Lani Mulgrave Blair

M, #3181, b. 1883, d. 16 Jan 1900
Lani Mulgrave BLAIR
Adoptive father*Dr John Blair1 b. 9 Mar 1834, d. 9 Mar 1887
Adoptive mother*Mary Hunter1 b. 1838, d. 2 Aug 1921
Birth*1883 QLD, Australia.1 
Death*16 Jan 1900 17 Crimea street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D3719 Age 18 [par unknown].1 
Death-Notice*18 Jan 1900BLAIR.—On the 16th January, at 17 Crimea street, St. Kilda, Lani Mulgrave Blair, dearly loved adopted Queensland aboriginal boy of the late Dr. Blair, of Collins-street and M. Blair. He heard the voice of Jesus say, "Come unto Me and rest." A peaceful and happy death.
BLAIR.—The Friends of Mrs. Dr. BLAIR and the schoolmates of the late LANI MULGRAVE BLAIR are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment in the Melbourne General Cemetery.
The funeral will leave 17 Crimea-street, St Kilda, THIS DAY (Thursday, the 18th inst ), at 2 p.m.2
 

Grave

  • Presbyterian Section N 404/405, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, John BLAIR MD died 9 Mar 1887; our Lani died 18 Jan 1900 age 17 yrs.3

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Dec 1889, " HOW should a ' Kindergarten ' celebrate its breaking-up for the holidays ?" is a question that has puzzled a good many teachers, for it is not the easiest thing in the world to carry out a programme when the performers are for the most part under eight years old.
    Miss Violet Neild, however, of the Kindergarten, Simpson-street, East Melbourne, managed to surmount all difficulties when she brought the half year to a close on Thursday evening, December 5, at the Independent Hall, Russell-street, Melbourne, amidst an attendance of between 70 aud 80 pupils, and a large number of friends. The first item on the programme was a festive tea, at which the Rev. Dr. Bevan said a few words of grace. The tables were beautifully decorated with flowers, an attraction only second to the piles of cake and other toothsome trifles.
    An adjournment was then made to the larger hall, where recitations, songs and piano duets were given by Misses Vyoyenne Goldie, Verna Goldie, Edith Baskerville, Emma Wynne, Annie Crawfurd, Masters Edward Boothman, Lani Mulgrave (Blair). Charlie Kirkby, Frank Harper, Tom Kerr and Willie Henderson. Miss Herz played some attractive piano selections to the enthusiastic admiration of the young people. The children acquitted themselves most creditably, and gave emphatic proof of the careful training to which Miss Neild had subjected them. The prizes were distributed by Dr. Neild, who aroused considerable amusement by his humorous remarks. The prize-takers included—Masters Russell McLean (history) ; Lani Mulgrave (Blair) (writing); Murray McLean (calisthenics) ; Charles Kirkby (music) ; Tom Kerr (drawing) ; Edward Boothman (singing) ; Archie King (good marks) ; Frank Harper (Scripture and good conduct) ; Misses Vyoyenne Goldie (singing) ; Yerna Goldie (good conduct) ; Alice McLean (good marks) ; Alice Rowe (highest marks) ; Mabel Long (marks). Mr. Thomas Long then gave an exhibition of magic lantern pictures, which were received with shrieks of delight, and finally everybody returned to the tea-room to partake of refreshments. The National Anthem concluded the entertainment, which passed off with every success.4
  • 26 Dec 1890, Miss Violet Neild, principal of the private school and kindergarten, George-street, East Melbourne brought the present-term to a conclusion on Thursday afternoon, December 18, when a large number of visitors were present. The occasion, was also intended to celebrate the opening of the new schoolroom, which was prettily decorated for the festivity with masses of foliage and flowers. At the end of the room stood a Christmas tree glittering with gifts for the small people, who were also treated to various toothsome delicacies, previous to the all important business of the afternoon. A number of songs, piano solo and recitations were pleasantly given by Misses Alice May, Mabel Brockhoff, Mercy May, Edith Baskerville, Beatrice Sargeant, Masters Clifford Anderson, Edward Stabb, Charley Kirkby, Frank Harper, Judy Herz, Tom Ker, Larry Herz, Alexander Herz and Lani Blair, all of whom bore testimony to Miss Neild's careful and intelligent training. The musical arrangements were under the direction of Miss Beaty Neild. A pretty juvenile comedietta, Mother Goose's Party, brought the programme to an end, after which Dr. Neild presented the prizes, with many kind little speeches to the children. A juvenile dance in the evening brought the festivity to an appropriate conclusion. The following is the list of prize-takers Senior class—Charles Kirkby, dux of school, first prize music and highest marks; Thomas Campbell Ker, good marks and first prize drawing : Mabel Brockoff, second prize drawing. Intermediate class—Frank Harper, highest marks; Lani Mulgrave Blair, first prize for writing, also special prize (writing desk), from Dr. Neild ; Alice M'Lean, first prize Scripture ; Larry Herz, first prize singing; Clifford Anderson, good marks. Junior class—Ettie Hunter, good conduct ; Alexander Herz, highest marks.5
  • 27 Jan 1900, THE LATE LANI MULGRAVE (BLAIR.) THE PATHETIC LIFE STORY OF A QUEENSLAND NATIVE.
    The hamlet of Goldsboro, situated on the Mulgrave River, North Queensland, is about 26 miles from the town of Cairns, near Trinity Bay, and close upon 2000 miles from Melbourne. It lies at the foot of a spur of the Main Divide, which runs from the far north down to the south, and from the coastal range separating the eastern and western waters. The height of the range varies from 3000 to 5000 feet, and the altitudes of the tablelands are regulated accordingly, falling off to the west. In the year 1884, Goldsboro was a very primitive mining camp, with one principal store, one or two huts of diminutive size, and scattered tents. To this place Mr F. J. Wimble (then of Cairns, now of Sydney) paid frequent visits; as he was greatly interested in and connected with one of the principal mines of that district, well known as "The Welcome."
    On the occasion of one of these periodical trips, when deciding to return to Cairns, his companion, Davidson, suggested that instead of climbing over the range where the claims were situated they could take a much easier track, by skirting round the foot of them. The lower track was accordingly taken, and certainly proved easier, and in every way more pleasant, even though slightly longer than the upper one.
    While walking along and leading the horses, Davidson, with the quick ear of an experienced bushman, discovered that there must be a camp of blacks in the neighborhood, as certain unmistakable sounds had reached him. The travellers carefully approached the spot, so as not to disturb the natives before they came within view of them. They beheld a large open space, surrounded by grand old trees, close to the banks of the Mulgrave River, and I am indebted for a picture of the place to the kindness of Mr A. C. Macdonald. In the space I have described was a gathering of over thirty or forty Myals (North Queensland natives), men, gins, and children. Of the latter, three little toddlers, all about the same age, were playing round a sand hole, close to the clump of trees, where Mr Wimble and his companion were standing concealed, watching the animated and interesting scene. Forgetful of where they had taken their stand, and anxious to approach closer to the spot occupied by the adults, who apparently were holding a kind of corroboree, the onlookers thoughtlessly stepped forward, thus suddenly exposing themselves to view. On the instant there was a general uproar, loud cries, and shrieks rose from the lips of the assembled natives, and before many moments the whole company had decamped, and entirely disappeared from sight.
    It is a recognised and remarkable fact, and has often been commented upon, how exceedingly well these people must be drilled among themselves, that each member of the company knows exactly what it is his special duty to do. Without some system or rule, inextricable confusion undoubtedly would be the result, when an entire encampment of Queenslanders, in the shortest time given clears out and utterly disappears, the Myals generally taking with them all belongings, and leaving not a stick behind to tell of their late presence there.
    On this occasion, however, the natives did leave something behind them, for after gazing with astonishment at the vanishing blacks, on turning round Mr Wimble observed the three baby pickaninnies, who had remained hidden behind him and Mr Davidson when they both
    stepped forward between the children and their elders. There were two boys and a girl, still playing as before, and far too young to be aware of what had taken place. Knowing perfectly well that the children would probably be lost or perhaps starved if left where they were (as it was hardly likely that the parents would return for them, for it would be against their rules to do so) the two travellers took charge of the three deserted children, taking them on horseback to Goldsboro, where they were well fed and kindly looked after. Mr Gordon, the storekeeper there, took charge of the girl, and decided to keep her. The two boys, however, were first taken to Alley's Hotel, at Riverstone, and then on to Cairns; one in the care of Mr Davidson, the other looked after by Mr Wimble, to whom I am much indebted for the greater part of the authentic particulars contained in this article.
    From the first, Mr Wimble was attracted by the smaller of the two, whom he noticed particularly on account of his remarkably fine curly hair and pretty little face. This boy later on became known as Lani Mulgrave Blair, though at the time of his being found Mr Wimble gave him another name, which the little fellow perfectly understood and acknowledged. It might perhaps appear cruel that no effort was made to return the children to their parents, but not only would it have been almost impossible to find them, but also it would have proved a most dangerous undertaking for the sake of the children, as it is well known that when once a black leaves his tribe in Queensland, whether by chance or from intent, he dares not go back to his people. If he did, certain death, it is stated, would be his fate.
    On reaching Cairns, Mr M'Kay, the butcher there, took Mr Davidson's boy, with the intention of teaching him the trade. The other little one was accommodated in Mr Wimble's house, and the youngster took very kindly to his surroundings. At Christmas time of 1884, having occasion to pay a visit to the capital of Victoria, Mr Wimble telegraphed to a friend in Melbourne, asking him if he would like to have a specially good-looking, curly-haired, handsome little native boy. He replied in these exact words, "Yes, if he has good teeth."
    Thereupon Mr Wimble took the child with him to Melbourne, and lodged him with his friend, Mr Goddard (who then resided in Hawthorn), much to the delight of his young children, who looked upon him as a sort of new toy, or a pet animal, intended specially for their amusement and entertainment, and having never seen one of his kind before, they innocently believed that, being black, he could not possibly be the same as themselves, nor, perhaps, even have the same feelings. They took him with them to Sunday school, treating him very much like a favorite doll, and his singular appearance created such a disturbance that the pupils refused to attend to their lessons, and the class had to be dismissed. Change of climate, and perhaps lack of the necessary precautions and care on that account, did not agree with the boy, and he took a severe cold on the chest, ending in pneumonia. It was then that Dr Blair come upon the scene. This gentleman, as may not be generally known, was one of the principal movers of the building of the Alfred Hospital,
    and was for years, up to the time of his death, senior surgeon, and also secretary of the Medical Society of Victoria. His genial, sympathetic disposition made him generally liked, and he was known never to have turned anyone from his door who needed help. As a friend, Dr Blair happened to be on a visit to Mr Goddard's house, and was asked to advise what should be done for the little Queenslander. The kind-hearted doctor immediately took an interest in the native child, a stranger amongst strangers in a strange land, and so far away from his own kind; and perceiving that he would want more care than could perhaps conveniently be given to him, he talked the matter over with Mr Wimble, and expressed his desire to take the boy home with him. Mr Wimble advised Mr Goddard to let the little fellow go, particularly as he had seven children of his own, and Dr Blair had none. Consequently, one day, when the latter called as usual to see his patient, he brought a large possum rug, and, wrapping the boy in it, took him home in his buggy to the Collins
    street house, where he lived.
    At that time, Mrs Blair was at Sorrento, and knew nothing of the little arrival, and when Dr Blair informed his wife of what had taken place, she was astonished and naturally uncertain as to what she could do with a black child, but on her return to Melbourne she saw him, and then decided to look upon him as her adopted son.
    A complete handsome outfit was bought, a special servant instructed to look after him, and as he grew he improved in every way, and developed refined tastes, which appeared to he born with him. The boy's christening fell upon a night when there was the firemen's torchlight procession, and a number of friends had congregated in the house to witness the demonstration. Among them was the Rev. Robert Scott, of Chalmers Church, who, after the procession was over, christened the little black boy Lani Mulgrave Blair, the second name being given in memory of the river near which he was found.
    For some years the boy attended Miss Neild's kindergarten school; then he was removed to All Saints' Grammar School; and there had a first-class record from the master, which proves that natives can be educated. Young Blair for some time attended the Working Men's College, specially giving his attention to free-hand drawing, carpentering, and plumbing; but his particular fancy was architecture or civil engineering. He received many prizes at school for good writing, and a gold medal for rifle shooting. As a bicyclist, he came in second in a race not long since; he could skate well, and was fond of all sports. Recently Lani entered an architect's office in Temple Court, where he was doing well when, sad to say, he was stricken down with illness, which terminated in death on the 16th inst., at St. Kilda.
    He had been a member of the Australian Church since his childhood, and the Rev. Dr Strong read the prayers over the grave, and alluded to him during service on the following Sunday evening, in a few well chosen words. The boy was a general favorite with his school friends, who came to see him during his illness. He was devotedly attended to by his adopted mother, and his last words prove how fondly he was attached to her. They were these: "Whisper into my ear, mother dear. I am satisfied. Say a little prayer for me, and let me go. Don't cry; it is for the best." He had not the slight est fear of death, having always been trained as a true Christian, and he passed away peacefully and happily. Every respect was shown from all sides, and the funeral was largely attended. Letters, telegrams, cards, and flowers came in abundance, proving that young Blair during his short life had made many friends. He was laid to rest in the Melbourne General Cemetery with his adopted father, the late Dr Blair.
    Probably Lani is the first aboriginal who has been able to fill such a position as he had achieved. It is undoubtedly a fact that the Australian natives are by nature gifted with some talent for drawing and modelling. I read lately the following interesting little paragraph, which may prove the justice of my remark. "The Age," 3/8/99: — "A blackfellow's water bottle of curious design has been found in a cave in the Maitland district. The bottle appears to have been fashioned of clay, on the end of a small round stick, and burnt until it assumed the consistency of rude pottery ware. The Watagan Caves are known to have been a favorite camping place for the blacks sixty years ago, and on the walls are seen many specimens of aboriginal rock paintings."
    As a fact the late Dr Blair and Mrs Blair are not the first who have undertaken to civilise a native child. It is well known that the late Princess Alice, while travelling, took home with her a little native boy, and made a great pet of him. She alludes to this child in one of her letters, which appear in the Biographical Sketch of Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Princess of Great Britain and Ireland, as follows;— "You will be amused to hear that I have got a little black (a Malay). He is a dear, good boy, was brought over two years ago by a gentleman to whom he was given away by his own parents, as a mark of gratitude for some service done. This man has had him here two years, but has never had him taught anything. I am going to have him taught, and later christened. He is very intelligent"
    In conclusion, it is interesting to notice that mention was lately made in one of the Melbourne papers of the intention of Lady Lamington to take home with her to the old country two little Queensland boys, whom she proposed to have educated in England. This proves how the idea is gaining ground that Australian natives can be trained and made useful members of society.6
  • 16 Jan 1901, IN MEMORIAM.
    BLAIR. —In loving memory of my darling Lani, who passed so peacefully away on January 16, 1900. Deeply regretted and mourned by Lily (Mrs. Wood) and family.
    BLAIR.- Passed to the higher life 16th January, 1900, after a short illness. Lani Mulgrave Blair, the dearly beloved adopted boy of the late John Blair, M. D., Collins-street, and M. Blair, aged 18 years. "In the beautiful valley of sometime. " M. B.
    BLAIR -In loving memory of Lani Blair, who departed this life January 16, 1900, at St. Kilda. (Inserted by the members of Armadale Baptist Cricket Club and Sunday-school, of which he was a member).7
  • 22 Feb 1930, When Trident Won The Derby. AN OLD PICTURE. By H. P. BRENNAN
    When Trident won the Derby Melbourne was slowly but surely working up to that delightful period which preceded the bursting of the boom in the early '90's. Trident won in 1886. It was not until about 1892 that Melbourne awoke to the fact that the great and glorious times which it had enjoyed had come to a more or less abrupt end. In the office of Mr Selwyn L Gerity, solicitor, of Queen street is an old picture showing the assemblage on the lawn, while Lady Loch, gowned in the mode of the period, slips the blue ribbon over Trident's head. Close behind her is the Governor (Sir Henry Brougham Loch), and near her Mr Byron Moore, who at that time had not long been appointed secretary to the Victoria Racing Club. To the picture someone has provided a key, so that those who are present may be identified by others than that diminishing army of veterans who probably still remember the faces.
    ...
    On the lawn, close to the winning horse, is a sturdy little figure marked on the key as "Mrs Blair's aborigine." Mrs. Blair was the wife of a Collins-street medical practitioner, and the aborigine in Eton uniform was a conspicuous figure at functions of the kind. It was said that a relative of Mrs Blair saved him just as he was about to be offered as a sacrifice in his native wilds. One wonders what became of him in after years. Did he grow tired of civilisation and "go bush," or did he rise to the rank of a butler in some distinguished house?8
  • 8 Mar 1930, "MRS. BLAIR'S ABORIGINE."
    Mr. C. T. Willis (Bendigo) writes-Regarding Dr and Mrs. Blair's aboriginal boy Lani Blair, mentioned by Mr. H. P. Brennan in '"When Indent Won the Derby" in the Camera Supplement on February 22, I think I have read that be died young. I remember seeing in earlier days a newspaper illustration of him, taken when aged about 12 years, in which he is shown standing with his bicycle beside Dr. and Mrs. Blair. The newspaper account stated that he was found alone by a party of whites by the bank of a creek or river in Queensland, having been for some reason or other deserted by his parents. A tribal fight was the supposed cause. He was wrapped in blankets, taken care of, and finally adopted by the Blairs. Whether Dr. Blair was himself a member of the party that found him I cannot now say. The report also stated that he was studying with a view to becoming an architect.
    Two other correspondents have written to say that the remains of the aborigine Lani Blair are interred in the Blair family grave in the Presbyterian section of the Melbourne General Cemetery with the inscription, "Our dearly beloved Lani, died January 18, 1900, aged 17 years." This indicates that in 1883, when Trident won the Derby, Lani was aged 3 years. In the picture referred to by Mr. Brennan, Lani is shown in an Eton uniform, a sturdy little fellow aged about 8 years, but that may be another error, like the discrepancy of the illustration of the Earl of Roseberry among the spectators at Trident's Derby, although the Earl was not in Australia in that year.9
  • 15 Mar 1930, MRS. BLAIR'S ABORIGINE
    Mr. L. A. Vail (South Yarra) writes: In his interesting article in the Camera Supplement on February 22, Mr. H. E. Brennan is incorrect when he suggests that Lani, Mrs. Blair's aborigine boy, was dressed in an Eton "uniform," and would no doubt become a butler. In the period which Mr. Brennan describes Lani would be attired in an Eton suit which was the gala dress of the period for all public and grammar school boys. Lani was never destined for domestic service. He was educated at All Saints' Grammar School, St Kilda, and I first met him there about 1892. He would have been born about 1879. This does not agree with the tomb stone inscription, but if the two people standing in the picture are Dr. and Mrs. Blair, then the little aborigine is Lani, for, as far as is known, this lad was the only aborigine adopted by them.
    Although the boy was not by any means energetic, he entered into his work and games with as much zest as most scholars. At cricket and football he adopted an air of listlessness, which quickly changed to that of speed and alertness when called upon to do his part. He was never robust - rather the reverse - and was usually seen outside of school horns with his bicycle. He started "hot favourite" for an old boys' bicycle race on the St. Kilda Cricket-ground. The trophy for this event is dated December, 1898. His fellow competitors had not seen him for about two years, and it was noticed that he was, if possible, thinner than ever.
    Mr. W. Murray McLean (West Wyalong) writes:-I was Lani Blair's greatest friend. He was found, I believe, at a deserted camp of aborigines in North Queensland. - Mrs. Blair had told friends of hers in that locality that she would like a "boy" for a butler, but Lani was sent to her as a child. Mrs. Blair adopted him and gave him the name of Lani Mulgrave Blair. At this time Mrs. Blair lived in Collins street, but shortly afterward she lived very near to St. Ives private hospital, East Melbourne, which was at that time my father's residence. Lani and I attended kindergarten together and he was far above the average, his work being particularly neat and his writing excellent. Mrs. Blair later moved to St. Kilda, and Lani attended All Saints' Grammar School, where he had a splendid record. On leaving that school he was employed by a Melbourne architect. I think this record proves that he suceeeded both as a scholar and an athlete. He was a cadet, and he gained a medal as ? shot, and was a good runner, ? and cyclist.
    Mr. Brennan mentions that Lani appeared in the old picture in ? I well remember that, and he remembered it.10
  • 22 Mar 1930, Mrs. Blair's Aborigine. Some More Memoirs
    Mr Sydney H. Wilson (Portsea. writes: -I was very much interested in learning about Lani Mulgrave, Mrs Blair's aborigine boy, who was mentioned by Mr H P Brennan in the Camera Supplement on February 22 as appearing in the old picture 'When Trident Won the Derby'. I well remember him from his childhood. He usually made weekend trips to Sorrento with Mrs Blair to Dr Blair's sanitorium Balgowie. Lani was usually dressed in a sailor suit. After he had completed his studies at All Saints Grammar School Mrs Blair articled him to the profession of an architect under my care. He showed considerable skill in drawing and took a great interest in his work. After he had served two years as a pupil, one Saturday afternoon he ventured after yabbies in Albert Park lake, with the result that he caught a chill and succumbed to pneumonia.
    Mr. L. Herz (Mordialloc) writes:- Lani was sent from Queensland by the late Dr. Blair, and, after about three months, was legally adopted by Mrs. Blair. Lani first went to Miss Violet Neild's kindergarten in George Street, East Melbourne. He became then one of my best friends, and was so until his death. The photograph mentioned by Mr. H. P. Brennan is undoubtedly that of Lani, as I drove to that Derby meeting with Dr. and Mrs. Blair and Lani in a drag and four. " Lani was a splendid cricketer, and he first played for the Sunbeams cricket team. East Melbourne, of which club the late Sir William Clarke was president. - Lani died at St. Kilda at the age of 18 years, and he was buried at St. Kilda.
    Miss M. T. James (Surrey Hills) writes: Mrs. Blair was in search of a boy for domestic work. She asked a friend staying at her house when he went to Queensland to send her a young aborigine. She was eventually told to meet a certain boat with the boy on board. When the vessel arrived and the cargo was being put ashore, she asked the captain where was the boy. To her surprise a bag was brought, pulled up at the top, and tied with rope, from which peeped a tiny black head with large, rolling eyes. The child had not been taken out of the bag from the time the boat left Queensland. Mrs. Blair hurried into a cab, and home to Collins street, where she cut the bag off and gave him a warm bath. He was only a baby, and she decided to adopt him. He was christened, and I had some of the cake. He was named Lani Mulgrave Blair. Mulgrave was the name of the river where his tribe lived, and where he was born. Mrs. Blair had him educated, and he became a remarkable French scholar and a clever dancer. He was indeed an engaging and attractive personality, and I always enjoyed his visits when he and his adopted mother came to stay with me at Blairgowrie.11
  • 5 Apr 1930, MRS. BLAIR'S ABORIGINE. AN EXPERIMENT IN ETHNOLOGY
    Mr. W. A. Larkins (Fitzroy) writes:- "My father and Dr. Blair were great friends, and every week-end they travelled together to Sorrento in the late '70's. I was nearly always there, and frequently I listened to discussions of Dr. Blair's theory that, given equal chances, the aboriginal brain would compare favourably with the 'white' brain. It was to test his theory that Dr. Blair arranged with a captain of one of the inter-colonial steamers to obtain a Queensland native for him. The first child died on the voyage down. A second attempt resulted in Lani being landed safely, but the dear old doctor did not live to complete his experiment."
    Miss L. T. James (North Fitzroy) writes:-"The late Dr. John Blair made a study of Australian aborigines, and intended that an infant aborigine trained and educated from birth would be equal to any British subject or scholar. Lani was quite a costly specimen before Mrs. Blair met him in the old sack with a pannikin tied to it with a hayband.
    "Lani came from his Queensland home to prove Dr. Blair's theory, but Mrs. Blair did not want a black boy, or any boy. The Blairs had had a staff of Indian servants, as was the custom then among people who lived in good style and could afford the luxury. One of them - the butler - remained a good and faithful servant until he died at Sorrento, where he lies buried. His name was Lani. ' When Mrs. Blair saw the sad little black baby a maternal instinct was aroused, and she was a mother to him, and he a loving son. She said, "I will call him Lani", as soon as he was dressed in conventional infant clothes. He had two playmates - Rose and Lily Fisher, the twin daughters of Dr. and Mrs. Fisher, of Collins street. They were in the next house, and they assisted greatly in Lani's happiness and culture. With their nurses they played in the gardens, always guarded by Donald Dinnie, Lani's Scotch terrier. Dr. Blair died while Lani was quite young, and Mrs. Blair then lived much more at Sorrento in Rinneel, her seaside home, near the beach and viillage, which none of your correspondents has mentioned. It was a later purchase than Blairgowrie, three miles distant. Lani's mother was shot dead, and he was taken from her breast while her body was yet warm. Dr. Blair told me this, but I do not know in which circumstances the shot was fired. The Mulgrave River tribe were murderers at one time, I was told, and there were raids upon them after trouble."12

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 18 Jan 1900, p1.
  3. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,
    "GSV Index."
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Fri 13 Dec 1889, p12.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Fri 26 Dec 1890, p9+10.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 27 Jan 1900, p9 ( BY THE BARON.).
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Jan 1901, p1.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Feb 1930, p2S.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Mar 1930, p8S.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Mar 1930, p.2S.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Mar 1930, p.10S.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Apr 1930, p.10S.
Last Edited24 Dec 2016

Archibald Dickson Hunter

M, #3182, b. Aug 1850, d. Sep 1922
Father*Archibald Hunter b. 1804, d. b 1876
Mother*Jane Butterworth Dickson b. 1820, d. 18 May 1855
Birth*Aug 1850 Bo'ness, Linlithgowshire, Scotland. 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelSep 1854 Sailing with Archibald Hunter, Jane Butterworth Hunter, David Hunter, Mary Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Cheviot
Age 3.1
Land-UBeac*1877Archibald Dickson Hunter selected land from the Crown. PAK-114. 19a 1r 13p - Land File 402/49
Selected by A. D. HUNTER (no date). Crown grant to M. H. BLAIR on 24 Oct 1889.2 
Land-UBeac13 Jan 1886 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Charles Swift to Archibald Dickson Hunter.3,4,5 
Land-UBeac*23 Jan 1886 GEM--42. Transfer from Euphemia Isabella Frances Nicol to Archibald Dickson Hunter. Transfer of Lease to A D Hunter. 99a 3r 38p - Land File 3794/19.20 Crown Grant issued to A. D. HUNTER on 4 Feb 1886.6 
Land-Note*4 Feb 1886 GEM--42: A D Hunter purchased the property for £100. Grant sent to office of titles 14 Apr 1886.7 
Land-UBeac*26 Mar 1886 PAK-115. Transfer from Dr John Blair to Archibald Dickson Hunter. Now tenants in common.8 
Land-UBeac26 Mar 1886 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Dr John Blair. Dr John BLAIR & Archibald Dickson HUNTER were tenants in common.3,9 
Land-Note*1 Dec 1886 Mortgagee: The Federal Bank of Australia Limited. The Federal Bank of Australia Ltd provided a mortgage over the land PAK-79.79A.111.112.113 and possibly PAK-114. It was discharged on 31 Oct 1890.. Mortgagor was Archibald Dickson Hunter Dr John Blair
Land-Note*6 Apr 1887 After the death of her husband, Mary BLAIR inherited all his assets, including the land at Beaconsfield, which she now jointly holds with her brother. Within a week, Archibald D HUNTER was declared insolvent, and Robert Elwall JACOMB was appointed Assignee in his estate. 
Land-UBeac*14 Apr 1887 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Robert Elwall Jacomb. Archibald Dickson HUNTER's insolvent estate was transferred to Robert Elwall JACOMB, his assignee.10 
Land-UBeac14 Apr 1887 GEM--42. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Robert Elwall Jacomb. Archibald Dickson HUNTER's insolvent estate was transferred to Robert Elwall JACOMB, his assignee.11 
Land-UBeac14 Apr 1887 PAK-115. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Robert Elwall Jacomb. Archibald Dickson HUNTER's insolvent estate was transferred to Robert Elwall JACOMB, his assignee.12 
Land-Note*c 1888 GEM--42: On a sketch in land file GEM--148 (Matthew LADD) the name D Smyth 42 is on the western boundary. Listed in rates 1888/9 Smyth D A Farmer N50 £2.10 unpaid - the following year as Hunter, but paid for by Fry & Co.13 
Land-UBeac*24 Oct 1889 PAK-114. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Mary Blair. 19a 1r 13p - Land File 402/49
Selected by A. D. HUNTER (no date). Crown grant to M. H. BLAIR on 24 Oct 1889.14,15 
Note6 Dec 1890 Victoria Court of Petty Sessions at Kyneton. Samuel John Jones against Archibald Dickson Hunter. 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel6 Oct 1892 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Waihora travelling in saloon from Bluff NZ
Age 41.16
Marriage*15 Dec 1898 Spouse: Mary Brown Clavering. Corio Street, Geelong, VIC, Australia, #M6765.17,18
(Migrant) Migration/Travel28 Feb 1899 Sailing with Mary Brown Hunter George Anderson to London, England. Ship S.S. Yarrawonga departing Melbourne Dec 1898. Presumably travelling in 1st class / saloon (steerage listing starts below them) no age given (Vic Outward shipping shows ages)
Mr Hunter traveller.19,20
(Migrant) Migration/Travel11 Jun 1914 To Southampton, England. Ship possible travel from Cape Town to Southampton on Grantully Castle. Mr A Hunter, age 64, merchant, usual residence Scotland.21
 
WidowerDec 1916Archibald Dickson Hunter became a widower upon the death of his wife Mary Brown Clavering.22 
Death*Sep 1922 Croydon, Surrey, England, Sep Q [Croydon] 2a 265.23 
Note*2006 From: "Susie Zada" Subject: Archibald Dickson HUNTER - big update (20 Jul 2006) — Hi Folks, For those who have shown an interest in this chap - the "infamous" deodorant manufacturer of Geelong in 1882, well here's a brief summary of what I've found out to this stage
And Alwyne it looks like your Bertie Archibald Dickson SILK possibly got his third name in "honour" of Archibald Dickson HUNTER!
Well I've got a lot of the "before" now just need to sort out where he went and died!
1850 August and September
Born and baptised Bo'ness (Borrowstounness), Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland. Youngest son (six children) of Archibald HUNTER, Cloth Merchant, and Jane Butterworth DICKSON
1851 March: Census - living in Borrowstounness, Scotland
1854 September: Archibald and Jane HUNTER and all six children arrived as unassisted immigrants in Victoria on "Cheviot"
1855 May: Jane Butterworth HUNTER nee DICKSON died at Collingwood, buried Melbourne General Cemetery
1855 - 1861: Archibald HUNTER with children Jane and Archibald Dickson (and possibly other children) returned to Scotland - haven't found but know they did. If daughter Mary returned with them she was back here by 1867
1861 April: Census - Archibald (Senr), and children Jane and Archibald Dickson living in Broxburn, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland
1867 April: Mary HUNTER (sister of Archibald Dickson HUNTER) married in Northcote, Victoria - may have stayed here since 1854. Husband died in 1887 - can't find any further trace of her. Interestingly her husband, John BLAIR was a surgeon and co-founder of the Alfred Hospital.
1876 January: Jane HUNTER (sister of Archibald Dickson HUNTER) married John Henry Talbot JOHNSTONE in Edinburgh - Archibald D HUNTER was witness (both their parents were both deceased at this stage)
1876: Geelong Advertiser reported that Archibald Dickson HUNTER started business in 1876 with no capital
1880 - 1886: Archibald Dickson HUNTER - various confirmations located in Geelong
1880 February - March: Patent applied for and granted for "improved combustible composition for rabbit and vermin destruction" - dynamite???
1880 April: Australasian Deodorising, Disinfecting & Fertilising Co, Mercer Street, Geelong. Henry JOHNSTONE (brother-in-law) one of the partners, Archibald Dickson HUNTER was patentee.
1884 January: A D HUNTER's compressed fuel project at Lal Lal said to start operations
1884 August (and back to c.1880): Archibald Dickson HUNTER of Geelong reported by Geelong Advertiser to have found Kerosene shale on the property of John BUNTINE JP of Toongabbie, Gippsland. HUNTER had purchased the freehold and 1200 acres adjoining; he had been prospecting the area for 4 years.
1885 July: Reference to a goldstrike at the Albion Quartz Goldmine at Steiglitz. Archibald D HUNTER said to be representative of the Melbourne Shareholders.
1886 July: Archibald D HUNTER's "Laurieston", Halstead Place, off Villamanta Street [Geelong] for auction - weatherboard, 10 rooms.
1887 March: John BLAIR, brother-in-law of Archibald D HUNTER, died. Did this trigger the Insolvency?? HUNTER was in partnership with his other brother-in-law and more than likely borrowed from this one - surgeon and co-founder of Alfred Hospital. Will need to check probate papers!
1887 June - September: Archibald Dickson HUNTER filed Insolvency Schedule and appeared in Insolvency Court in Melbourne (late of Geelong)
1891 June: Jane JOHNSTONE (sister of Archibald Dickson HUNTER died in Geelong, buried Melbourne General Cemetery with mother). Death notice in Geelong Advertiser said "youngest daughter of late Archibald HUNTER, Broxburn, Scotland (home and NZ papers to copy). Can only presume that NZ papers included because siblings in New Zealand (does this include Archibald Dickson HUNTER?)
Other odd references to A D HUNTER in the region up to 1895 which may or may not be him.
So did he go to New Zealand?
Did he marry in 1910 in New Zealand? or was this a son? Have ordered this marriage from NZ.
Did he die in New Zealand?
Can't find a death in Victoria - based on now knowing when he was born.
Can't find a death in Scotland at this stage.
This puzzle has been stimulating and amazing - considering how little I knew of this person when I started just over a week ago - will definitely be an article for the Pivot Tree (Geelong Family History Group) but might also warrant one for the Australian Family Tree Connection if NZ connections prove to be true.
Oh what fun .......... Susie Z.24 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
30 Mar 1851Branfield Cottage 26, Borrowstouness, West Lothian, Scotland(Head of Household) Archibald Hunter;
Age 7 months
Member(s) of Household: Jane Butterworth Hunter, Mary Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter25
7 Apr 1861Broxburn, Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland(Head of Household) Archibald Hunter;
Age 9
Member(s) of Household: Jane Dickson Hunter26
31 Mar 19019 Crown Crescent, Richmond Road, Twickenham, Middlesex, EnglandHead of Household: Archibald Dickson Hunter. Age 50 - Patent Agent own account
Member(s) of Household: Mary Brown Hunter.27
190869 Mayford Road, Wandsworth, London, England28
bt 1909 - 191155 Galveston Road, Wandsworth, London, England28
2 Apr 191197 Gosberton Road, Balham S W, London, EnglandHead of Household: Archibald Dickson Hunter. Age 60 - Manufacturer's Agent fibre and cotton manufacture
Member(s) of Household: Mary Brown Hunter.29
bt 1912 - 191597 Gosberton Road, Wandsworth, London, England28

Newspaper-Articles

  • 1878, PATENT FOR "HUNTER'S COMPRESSED FUEL."
    THIS is to notify that Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Melbourne, manufacturer, did, on the twenty-eighth day of August 1878, deposit at the office of the Registrar-General, in Melbourne, a specification, or instrument in writing, under his hand and seal, particularly describing and ascertaining the nature of the said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed; and that by reason of such deposit the said invention is protected and secured to him exclusively for the term of six calendar months thence next ensuing : And I do further notify that the said Achibald Dickson Hunter has given notice, in writing, at my chambers for patent cases, of his intention to proceed with his application for letters patent for the said invention, and that I have appointed Wednesday the second day of October next, at Twelve. o'clock noon, at my said chambers, to hear and consider the said application and all objections thereto ; and I do hereby require all persons having an interest in opposing the grant of such letters patent to leave, on or before the twenty-eighth day of September, at my said chambers for patent cases, in Melbourne, particulars in writing of their objections to the said application, otherwise they will be precluded from urging the same.
    Given under my hand this twenty-ninth day of August A.D. 1878.
    BRYAN O'LOGHLEN, Attorney-General.
    Attorney-General's Chambers for Patent Cases, Registrar-General's Department, Queen street (north), Melbourne.No. 226330
  • 1878, PATENT FOR "IMPROVEMENTS IN COMPOSITIONS FOR TREATING MATTERS HAVING AN OFFENSIVE SMELL."
    THIS is to notify that Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Collins street east, in the city of Melbourne , manufacturer, did, on the ighteenth day of October 1878, deposit at the office of the Registrar -General , in Melbourne , a specification, or instrument in writing, under his hand and seal, particularly describing and ascertaining the nature of the said invention, and in what manner the same is to be performed ; and that by reason of such deposit the said invention is protected and secured to him exclusively for the term of six calendar .month , thence next ensuing: And I do further notify that the said Archibald Dickson Hunter has given notice, in writing in my chambers for patent cases, of his intention to proceed with this application for letters patent for the said invention , and that I have appointed Friday the fifteenth day of November next, at Twelve o'clock noon, at my said chambers, to hear and consider the said application and all objections thereto ; And I do hereby require all persons hawing an interest in opposing the grant of such letters patent to leave, on or before the eleventh day of November, at my said chambers for patent cases, in Melbourne, partitulars in writing of their objections to the said application, otherwise they will be precluded from urging the same.
    Given under my hand this twenty- first day of October A.D. 1878.
    BRYAN O'LOGHLEN, Attorney-General.
    Attorney-General's Chambers for Patent Cases, Registrar-General's Department, Queen street (north), Melbourne.
    No. 271831
  • 1878, APPLICATIONS FOR PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS.
    SPECIFICATIONS have been deposited at this office by the undermentioned persons upon the dates stated, under the provisions of The Patents Statute 1865, No. 240, and under the Act to amend the same, No. 432 :-
    No. 2560. Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Melbourne, manufacturer, for " Hunter's compressed fuel " ; 28th August 1878.32
  • Oct 1878, Applications for Patents for inventions deposited: No. 2585. ARCHIBALD DICKSON HUNTER, Of Collins street east, in the city of Melbourne, manufacturer, for " Improvements in compositions for treating matters having an offensive smell"; 18th October 1878.33
  • 10 Dec 1879, A NEW DEODORISER. By incitation a number of the leading residents of Ballarat and others including Dr Holthouse (health officer), Dr Blair (Alfred Hospital, Melbourne), Dr Bunce, Sergeant Carden, and several of the city councillors, attended at Mr Roxburgh’s office, Mair street, on Tuesday morning to witness some experiments made by Mr A. D. Hunter of a new disinfecting, deodorising, and fertilising powder, which has received favorable notice in Melbourne and other towns in the colony. The first test made was with nightsoil, which was treated in various ways with Hunter's disinfectant, as also with Sullivan’s disinfectant. The second test was with some of the drainage from the Webster street drain, then some refuse from a soap factory, and last of all with some blood from one of the slaughteryards. Each experiment was performed by placing the material to be operated on in two buckets, and a small quantity of Hunter's compound being dusted over the contents of one bucket, while the same process was adopted by dusting the contents of the other bucket with Sullivan’s disinfectant. In every instance Hunter’s mixture gave the greatest satisfaction to those present, the general opinion being that the new deodoriser did its work more effectually, and left no smell behind. Several buckets of the material operated on were deposited away for the purpose of a further inspection to-day.
    Mr Hunter claims for his disinfectant that it absorbs the ammonia and retains it, while other deodorisers throw it off, thus rendering the material treated useless for purposes of manuring. Mr Hunter exhibited a block of manure, treated with his disinfectant and pressed in the form of a brick, while other portions were in a powdered state, and from the remarks made by several agricultural experts present, it will no doubt form a valuable assistant to the farmer and market gardener, the manure as treated, being quite free from the slightest smell, or in any way offensive. Mr Hunter also stated that when manure has been disinfected by means of his deodoriser it will have very beneficial effects both in promoting the growth and intensifying the colors of flowers, and as a valuable stimulant to fruit trees, especially the orange, during the long drought this country is subjected to.
    Dr Blair states that it is used in the Alfred Hospital, and proves a valuable assistant. We recommend the City Council to try its effect in a much more extensive form on the notorious Webster street drain, for if the stench arising from it, is anything like that from the sample tested on Monday, the sooner something is done the better. Mr Roxburgh, of Mair street, has been appointed the local agent, and will no doubt be pleased to give every information to persons interested in such matters.34
  • 1880, No. 2778. ARCHIBALD DICKSON HUNTER, of Mercer street, Geelong, manufacturer, for " An improved composition to be used in the destruction of rabbits and other vermin" ; 21st January 1880.35
  • Feb 1880, PATENT FOR "AN IMPROVED COMPOSITION TO BE USED IN THE DESTRUCTION OF RABBITS AND OTHER VERMIN."
    THIS is to notify that Archibald Dickson Hunter, of 1 Mercer street, Geelong, manufacturer, did, on the twentyfirst day of January 1880, deposit at the office of the Registrar-General, in Melbourne, a specification, or instrument in writing, under his hand and seal, particularly describing and ascertaining the nature of the said invention, and in what manner the same is to be performed ; and that by reason of such deposit the said invention is protected and secured to him exclusively for the term of six calendar months thence next ensuing : And I do further notify that the said Archibald Dickson Hunter has given notice, in writing, at my chambers for patent cases, of his intention to proceed with his application for letters patent for the said invention, and that I have appointed Friday the twenty-seventh day of February instant, at Twelve o'clock noon, at my said chambers, to hear and consider the said application and all objections thereto ; and I do hereby require all persons having an interest in opposing the grant of such letters patent to leave, on or before the twenty-third day of February, at my said chambers for patent cases, in Melbourne, particulars in writing of their objections to the said application, otherwise they will be precluded from urging the same.
    Given under my hand this third day of February A.D. 1880.
    BRYAN O'LOGHLEN, Attorney-General.
    Attorney-General's Chambers for Patent Cases, Patent Office, Registrar-General's Department, Queen street, Melbourne.
    No. 48936
  • 16 Nov 1881, MR A . D . HUNTER'S DEODORANT
    Yesterday afternoon, pursuant to arrangement, Mayor Wilson and Crs Hickman, Lewis, and Claxton, together with Mr G. Perry (city clerk), Mr Woods (clerk of works), and the representatives of the local press, in a couple of conveyances, visited the Botanical Gardens to see the result of Mr Hunter's deodorising process on a some what extensive scale. Arrived at the place, the party found Mr Hunter with his assistants ready to explain the nature of the operation, that is, so far as could be done without disclosing the secrets of the trade. The first thing that met the view was an excavation 25 feet long by 4 feet wide and 2 feet 6 inches deep, which had been filled with nightsoil, there being, as computed, about three tons in the pit. Over this Mr Hunter had spread a quantity of his deodorant, which certainly kept down all unpleasant stench. Underneath the deodorant layer, however, as was found on stirring the mass with a shovel, the smell existed ; but Mr Hunter explained that there would be no smell at all if the stuff were mixed by machinery, as he purposed doing, as the nightsoil would be completely deodorised in the tanks. He also explained that in his process the liquid would be separated from the solid matter in the pans, and that his primary object was utilising the nightsoil as a manure. He intended to offer his deodorant to the public at a cheap rate, and if they would purchase it and use it according to instructions he would purchase from them their nightsoil. Some of the night soil that had been mixed with the deodorant was lying on the bank of the excavation, where it had been placed on last Saturday, and it appeared to be very well deodorised. Mr Hunter stated it to be his intention to remain until he would thoroughly deodorise the nightsoil in the excavation. He next showed the party what may be called an earth-closet. It was made of zinc, and so constructed that by moving a receptacle in the rear a little of the deodorant could be showered down each time the closet was used, thereby keeping the place free from any unpleasant stench. The cost of the closet would only be a few shillings. Mr Hunter next showed another ingenious invention, as a sort of closet from which the urine overflowed, and was received into a deodorising pan, where it was subjected to chemical action in a simple and apparently effective way. Many samples of nightsoil which had undergone the deodor ising process were submitted, and they seemed to be free from unpleasant odours. A piece in the form of a brick was amongst the exhibits, and this elicited the remark that there would be houses of nightsoil built by and bye. The mayor and councillors seemed to take a great interest in the subject, and the mayor remarked that a great deal had been claimed for the process and a good deal said against it. He thought, how ever, that there was evidence that it had accomplished a considerable result. Cr Claxton spoke in favor of the deodorant from a practical knowledge of its properties, and Mr Longley, curator of the Botanical Gardens, bore strong testimony to the value of the manure as a fertiliser. There was then a start made for home. One of the Jehus brought his load of passengers into Drummond street, and Cr Hickman kindly invited the whole of the party to McDonald's Foundry hotel to freshen the olfactory nerves as well as the system with a goblet of “mountain dew.” After partaking of the friendly draught, and congratulating each other on the improved sani tary conditions of society in the present age, the party separated, believing that they had been witnessing useful though somewhat unpleasant experiments.37
  • 5 Dec 1884, Patent for "An improved composition for deodorizing wine and other liquids."
    THIS is to notify that Archibald Dickson Hunter, of the Exchange, Collins street west, Melbourne, manufacturer, did, on the eleventh day of July 1884, deposit at the office of the Registrar -General, in Melbourne, a specification , or instrument in writing under his hand and seal, particularly describing and ascertaining the nature of the said invention, and in what manner the same is to be performed ; and that by reason of such deposit the said invention is protected and secured to him exclusively for the term of six calendar months thence next ensuing : And I do further notify that the said Archibald Dickson Hunter has given notice, in writing, at my chambers for patent cases, of his intention to proceed with his application for letters patent for the said invention, and that I have appointed Monday the twenty-ninth day of December instant, at Eleven o'clock in the forenoon, at my said chambers, to hear and consider the said application and all objections thereto; and I do hereby require all persons having an interest in opposing the grant of such letters patent to leave, on or before the twenty-fifth day of December, at my said chambers for patent cases, in Melbourne, particulars in writing of their objections to the said application, otherwise they will be precluded from urging the same. Given under my hand this first day of December A.D. 1884.
    GEO. B. KERFERD, Attorney-General.
    Chambers of the Law Officer for Patent Cases, Patent Office, Lonsdale street, Registrar-General's Department, Melbourne. 657838
  • 9 Feb 1886, TO LET. BEACONSFIELD, Walnut grove, Eight rooms, comfortably furnished, 120 ACRES, Subdivided. Plentiful supply rain and wellwater. Stables, sheds, dairy, storerooms, horse and cow, buggy, and choice fowls large fruit and vegetable garden, 3½ miles station, 30 minutes walk from Post office and ladies' college. Invigorating mountain air.
    Apply to the proprietor, Mr A D Hunter (who is going to England). Robb's buildings, Collins-st west.39
  • 14 Jan 1887, NOTICE is hereby given that the partnership hitherto subsisting between James Davis, of the Clarence River, New South Wales, and Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Melbourne, Victoria, as sawn timber merchants and contractors, under the name or firm of " Davis & Hunter," has been this day dissolved by mutual consent. The business will in future be carried on by the said James Davis alone, who will receive and pay all debts due to or owing by the late partnership.
    Dated this thirtieth day of December One thousand eight hundred and eighty-six.
    ARCH. D. HUNTER.
    JAMES DAVIS.
    Witness--FRANK MADDEN, Solr., Melbourne. 18740
  • 11 Mar 1887, The funeral of the late Dr. Blair took place yesterday, and was attended by a very large number of representative citizens. The interment took place in the Melbourne General Cemetery. The pall bearers were:—Messrs. Archibald D. Hunter and H. J. Johnstone (brothers-in-law of the deceased), J. F. Anderson (secretary of the Alfred Hospital), N Wimble, J. Morris, W. Greenlaw, G Wragge, T Roxburgh, Thomas Loader, and Dr Figg. The Rev. Charles Strong officiated at the grave.41
  • 19 Mar 1887, Patent Office, NOTICE is hereby given, that I have accepted an application for a Patent, and the complete Specification annexed thereto, received from Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Collins street West, Melbourne, Victoria, for an invention described as "Improvements in Compositions for Treating Matters having an Offensive Smell."
    Notice is hereby further given, that unless within two months from the date of the first appearance of this advertisement in the Queensland Government Gazette it is proved to my satisfaction that the applicant is not entitled to a Patent for such invention , it is my intention to recommend that a Patent be granted for the said invention to the said Archibald Dickson Hunter, in accordance with the provisions of " The Patents, Designs, and Trade Marks Act, 1884."
    WILLIAM T. BLAKENEY, Registrar of Patents, &c.42
  • 5 Jul 1887, NEW INSOLVENTS. Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Collins street west, Melbourne, merchant, compulsory sequestration. Causes of insolvency— Having as a director of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Co. Limited became personally responsible, in connection with others of the directors of the said company, for the sum of £8,347 19s. 5d., and adverse judgment in an action brought against him by the Bank of Australasia to recover the amount of their claim against him as one of the directors of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Co. Limited. Liabilities, £16,153 14s. 7d; assets, £2,713 19s. 11d; deficiency, £13,039 14s. 8d. Mr. Jacomb, assignee.43
  • 6 Jul 1887, THE INSOLVENCY OF MR A. D. HUNTER. Mr A. D. Hunter, of Collins street, merchant, filed his schedule on Monday. This estate was compulsorily sequestrated on the 14th April. He gives as the cause of insolvency his becoming personally responsible, with other directors of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company, Limited, for £8,347. His debts are stated at £16,153 14d 7d (including two unsecured creditors £10,244 4s 7d, secured £5939 10s). Assets, £2713 19s 11d (real property, £2160; personal, £282 17s 4d; good debts due, £271 2s 7d); leaving a deficiency of £13,439 14s 8d. The largest secured creditors are Federal Bank, £2840; James Fry and Co., £3000 (contingent on guarantee to Federal Bank), and £999 10s on account; University Building Society, £500; Federal Bank, £1600 (guarantee for Dr Blair for advance on land at Beaconsfield). The principal unsecured creditors are Bank of Australasia, £1097 on overdraft of the above Mutual Company; Thomas Learmonth, £1080; and Thomas Learmonth and James Mirams, £650 (amounts paid to the bank on joint liability of the directors of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company); £5520 to holders of six promissory notes for £920 each; the estate of Dr Blair, £850 (money lent to firm of Davies and Hunter). His losses in mining are put down at £1316; in the partnership of Davies and Hunter, £4571; and in the Essendon Brick Company, £465. Mr Jacomb is the official assignee of the estate. — Telegraph.44
  • 1 Sep 1887, THE INSOLVENCY OF MR. A. D. HUNTER. In the Insolvent Court, on Wednesday, August 31, before his Honour Judge Worthington, an examination sitting was held in the estate of A. D. Hunter, of Melbourne, merchant, Mr Braham appearing for the assignee and Mr Hood for the insolvent.
    The schedule of the insolvent was filed on the 15th June, and it showed that his liabilities then were £16,158 14s. 7d, and his assets £2,713 19s. 11d., leaving a deficiency of £13,439 14s. 8d.
    A D Hunter, the insolvent, examined, said his unsecured assets amounted to £553 19s. 11d. He was a merchant and had carried on business in Melbourne since 1876. When he started in 1876 he had no capital, and he traded on borrowed moneys. He accounted for the deficiency in his estate through having incurred liabilities in connection with the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company, for which he became liable to the extent of £8,547. That sum was included in the recorded liabilities of his estate at sequestration. Besides the £8 547, he sustained losses in mining, £1,316; losses in the Gippsland Shale Company, £200; losses through lending money, £547; and losses in the Essendon Brickworks, £465. He had put down in his schedule a loss of £4,571 on account of his connection as a partner with Davis and Hunter, timber merchants, but he hardly thought the loss was so great as was set down. When he set down the amount he was not sure about it because he could not get access to the books of the firm. He could not give any idea of the loss he sustained in that partnership, and he put down £4,751 in his schedule because he was obliged to do so having got the figures from the accountant. His partner ship business of Davis and Hunter was carried on from March 1885 to December 1886 when the partnership was dissolved. Davis retained the business and the assets and was to pay the liabilities. He believed Davis was solvent now. Since the dissolution witness had to pay £800 of the partner ship liabilities. He had not paid the £800 yet, but was liable for it. When he went into the partnership business he put £2,000 into it which he borrowed from the Federal Bank and when he retired from the firm in December 1886, Davis paid the £2000 back to the bank. He believed it was part of the agreement of dissolution that Davis was to pay back the £2000. He (witness) must have lost very heavily in that partnership.
    Mr BRAHAM-How do you say you sus tained a loss by the business carried on by Davis and yourself as arising out of the partnership.
    The witness replied that it was a loss through losing his credit at the banks. He felt that he had made a loss but could not say what it was without re ference to the books of Davis and Hunter, which were now available, but were not available before. The losses which he felt that he had sustained were liabilities incurred on account of the partnership that were not taken into account at the dissolu tion. It was undoubtedly a fact that Davis wss to pay all the liabilities, but the liabilities to which he (witness) was referring were omitted from the agreement through an error. The agreement was that Davis was to pay all the liabilities appearing in the books, but the liabilities to which he was referring did not appear in the books because he had not had time to enter them before the dissolution. Those liabilities amounted to £800.
    There was only one liability that he was aware of omitted from the books. It was owing to the estate of the late Dr Blair. He had borrowed the £800 from Dr Blair and applied it to the proceeds of the partnership. The £800 had never been paid back, and he was liable for the amount to the representatives of Dr Blair. According to his evidence it would appear that the only loss he made in the Davis and Hunter business was £800, but he felt that was not so ; there were other losses that he could not explain. He could not say the £800 was the only loss until he had seen the books of the firm and his own books. When he transferred the partnership assets to Davis he was ruined. He was told that he was ruined but he could not say that he knew it and he thought then that he would be able to pull through. There had been an alteration for the worse in the state of his affairs since the date of dissolution. When the dissolution took place he owed all the debts that he owed at sequestration and he had no more assets then than at sequestration except his interest in the assets of the firm of Davis and Hunter. The reason why he dissolved with Davis was that his connection with the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Co was ruining the partnership business. The banks stopped his credit. Stock was taken before the dissolution but he did not take it or assist in making out the balance sheet. Davis did so, and he accepted Davis's figures as correct. He could not say whether the balance sheet showed a surplus or a deficiency. He believed it showed a deficiency, but had no idea as to the amount of the deficiency. The dissolution was effected out of consideration for Davis, because he (witness) was powerless and in making the arrangement he did not at all consider his creditors. In March, 1886, he had some property at Geelong which he sold in August 1886. He could not say that when he sold it he was involved with the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company, but he believed he was not then involved. In March, 1886, he had 3,000 shares in the Australian Deodorising Disinfecting, and Fertilising Company, and was agent for several firms in Great Britain and New York. He was also agent for James Davis timber merchant of Gratton New South Wales, his partner in the Victorian firm of Davis and Hunter ; the latter agency was worth £500 or £600 a year. He had also several Govern ment contracts in March, 1886, and one with the Alfred Hospital. All those agencies and contracts and the shares in the Deodorising Company were transferred by agreement to Fry and Co. on January 1, 1886. The agreement was made out in March 1886, but the arrangement for it was made before then and it was to date from the 1st January, 1886. The arrangement was made in January, and the properties taken over then, but the agreement was not signed until March. The suggestion that Fry and Co. should take over the agencies emulated from witness. He wanted to part with the properties because he had been struggling for years to establish his business especially the disinfectant business and he thought that Fry and Co., owing to their business connection, would be the most likely to help him. At that time he was embarrassed financially, and without the means neccesary to carry on his business and that was his sole reason for transferring the properties to Fry and Co. He had then a heavy overdraft at the Federal Bank, but he could not give any idea now of what his assets and liabilities were then. He had no other assets except what he sold Fry and Co., excepting some land held by the Federal Bank which was not worth anything like the amount owing to the bank. By the agreement with Fry and Co. he was to get from them for the properties transferred to them, £500 per annum for assisting to develop the disinfectant business and a number of shares in Fry and Co. not to exceed 6,000. The number of shares was to depend entirely on the success of the agencies and the disinfectant business. Fry and Co. were to determine how many shares he was to get. He got the £500 a year, but no shares. Altogether he got £1,000 from Fry and Co. of which £750 was salary and £250 advanced as loans. A document now produced was a statement of accounts between him and Fry and Co., and if it showed that he owed them £1,000 it was correct. The document debited him with £600 commission owing by James Davis, of Grafton which he never received, and which Fry and Co. were entitled to, under his agreement with them. He earned the commission for Fry and Co., who were the agents for James Davis, he did not receive the £600 in cash but he was not aware whether it might have been debited against him in Davis's books.
    On the application of Mr Hood the sitting was then adjourned until the 26th inst.45
  • 2 Sep 1887, INSOLVENCY COURT. Wednesday, 31st August. (Before Judge Worthington.) Re A. D. Hunter.— An examination sittings was held in the estate of Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Melbourne, merchant. Mr. Braham appeared for the assignee, and Mr. Hood for the insolvent. The insolvent stated that he filed his schedule on the 15th June, 1887. It showed a deficiency of £13,439 14s. 8d., the unsecured assets being £553 19s. 11d. He was a merchant by occupation, and carried on that business at sequestration. In 1879, when he started, he had no capital, but traded on borrowed moneys. His deficiency arose through having incurred liabilities on account of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company Limited. He became liable through that company for £8547, all of which he owed at sequestration. The remainder of his deficiency was made up by losses sustained in mining, £1316, £200 in the Gippsland Shale Company, £547 in moneys lent by him, and £465 on the Essendon Brick Works. He had £4571 down in his schedule for losses in connection with "Davis, Hunter and Co.," but as he had had no access to the hooks he could not be sure of the amount. He thought the loss was hardly so great. His partnership with James Davis was in a timber merchant's business. They carried it on from the 27th March, 1885, to December, 1886, when the partnership was dissolved. Davis returned the business and the assets, and was to pay the liabilities as well. Since the dissolution insolvent had had to pay £390? of the partnership liabilities. He had not yet paid it, but he was liable for it. He contributed £2000 to the partnership of Davis and Hunter. He borrowed £800 from Dr. Blair, and had applied the proceeds to the purposes of the partnership. This money had never been paid back to Dr. Blair or his representatives. At the time of the dissolution he owed £10,000. The reason he dissolved with Davis was be cause his connection with the Live Stock Com pany was ruining the partnership business. In 1886 he had property at Geelong, which he sold, but he believed he was not then involved with the company. He had also 3000 shares in the Australian Deodorising, Disinfecting and Fertilising Company Limited. He was also agent for James and John G. Scott, and Wylly and Lockhead, of Glasgow, Thomson, Bindford and Company Limited, of New York, and for other businesses. He likewise had Government contracts. These were all transferred, together with his shares in the Deodorising Company, to Fry and Co. on the 1st January, 1886. He was to receive £500 a year for developing the "disinfectant" business and working the agencies, together with a number of shares in Fry and Co. He got the money, but not the shares. In all, the company advanced him about £1000, including salary. The examination was then adjourned.46
  • 27 Sep 1887, INSOLVENT COURT. MONDAY, Sept. 26. (Before His Honour Judge Worthington.) RE ARCHIBALD D. HUNTER An adjourned examination sitting was held in the estate of A. D. Hunter, of Melbourne, merchant. Mr. Braham appeared for the assignee, and Mr. Bryant for the insolvent.
    A. D. Hunter, the insolvent, was further examined respecting his business transactions. He said that at sequestration he owed the Federal Bank £2,700 on account of an overdraft, which Fry and Co. had guaranteed ; that £2,700 was expended in the purchase of the properties at Gembrook, Geelong, und Ascotvale, in paying off an overdraft he had with the National Bank at Geelong, and in carrying on the Essendon brickworks. The Federal Bank held the properties he had mentioned as security at the time he become insolvent. He first became connected with the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Co in July, 1883, as a shareholder of 100 £1 shares, and paid £15 in cash for them altogether. That was all he had ever paid on the shares. He did not pay the calls that were made on the shares, because he was never asked. There were at least three calls made on the shares. He was elected a director of the company in August or September, 1885, soon after the company was incorporated. He had the means to pay the calls, but not without borrowing. When he first incurred obligations on behalf of the company he had an overdraft at the bank, but he was solvent then. The only assets he then had were the properties at Geelong, Ascot Vale, and Gembrook, and those were all under mortgage to the Federal Bank for more than their value. He could not say what his liabilities were at the time. He first incurred a liability for the company after he had transferred everything to Fry und Co. He joined with the other directors of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company, in giving a guarantee of £1,000 to the Bank of Australasia, at Geelong, on behalf of the company. The other directors told him it was necessary to give the guarantee, and said it would be cowardly if he did not give it. He next became liable for the company in August or September, 1886, and he believed he was solvent then. The second liability he incurred on behalf of the company was for a guarantee to the bank of Australasia, but he could not remember the amount of it. In August or September he incurred a third liability for the company. With the other directors he signed six promissory notes for £920 each. He got nothing for signing those notes, and received nothing on account of them. Tunmer, the manager of the company, told him when he signed the notes that they were intended to pay off the Bank of Australasia. He (witness) did not know how much was due to the bank then, and did not inquire. When he signed the notes he considered that he was solvent. He now knew that he was deficient to the extent of £13,000 when he had signed the promissory notes, and that, therefore, he could not have been solvent at the time he did so.
    The insolvent was ordered to file a debtor and creditor account with the Federal Bank, and an account of the manner in which he disposed of moneys that be received from the bank ; also an account of his dealings as agent for Davies, with whom he was formerly in partnership, showing how they stood at the dissolution of the partnership, an account of his liabilities when he entered into an agreement with Fry and Co ; an account of his dealings with the late Dr. Blair ; and an account of his liabilities and assets on each of the three occasions when he entered into obligations on behalf of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company.
    The examination was then adjourned to the 2nd November.47
  • 8 Jun 1888, The Insolvency Statute 1871.—In the Court of Insolvency at Melbourne.—In the matter of ARCHIBALD DICKSON HUNTER, of Melbourne, in the colony of Victoria, merchant, an insolvent. The above-named Archibald Dickson Hunter intends to apply to the Court of Insolvency at Melbourne, on the sixth day of July One thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight, at Half-past Ten o'clock in the forenoon, for a certificate of discharge, pursuant to the provisions of the Insolvency Statute 1871, and for an order dispensing with the condition mentioned in section 136 of the said Statute.
    Dated this seventh day of June One thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight.
    HUGH CALVERT NANKIVELL, Imperial Chambers, Bank place, solicitor for the above-named insolvent. 387048
  • 10 Aug 1888, ROSEDALE SHIRE COUNCIL. WEDNESDAY, AUG. 8TH. CORRESPONDENCE,
    From A. D. Hunter, Collins-street East, intimating that at the request of the president (Cr. Slater), and Cr Irwin, he had sent an exhilbit of Gippsland marble to the Centennial Exhibition. The slabs were highly finished and would no doubt attract considerable attention.-Received.49
  • 24 Jul 1893, No. 10576. By Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Tower House, City-road, South Melbourne, Victoria, manufacturer, and Jonathan Ranken Henderson, of 31 Queen-street, Melbourne, Victoria, agent, for "An improved fusee for pyrotechnic displays or signalling at sea." 3rd June. Provisional.50
  • 17 Aug 1893, PROVISIONAL SPECIFICATIONS ACCEPTED
    10576. July 18. Archibald Dickson Hunter and Jonathan Ranken Henderson. An improved fusee for pyrotechnic displays or signalling at sea51
  • 28 May 1894, APPLICATIONS ABANDONED.
    10576. March 4. Archibald Dickson Hunter and Jonathan Ranken Henderson. An improved fusee for pyrotechnic displays or signalling at sea52
  • 4 Apr 1895, Patent Applications. No. 12041. By Archibald Dickson Hunter, of Victoria Buildings, Swanston-street, Melbourne, Victoria, agent, for "An improved coffin." 22nd February. Provisional.53
  • 28 May 1898, Prospectus for Nugget Gold Dredging Co. Growlers' Flat, Upper Waikaia, with Capital of £4,200 has Archibald Dickson Hunter as one of its provisional directors.
    This Company is being formed to acquire and work mining areas by Dredging, and particularly the Special Claims of 80 acres (more or less), being Sections 6 and 8, Block VI, Waikaia District. These claims lie at the mouth of the gorge, which extends from them to the upper reaches of the Waikaia River, and they form a natural basin for the auriferous drift washed down from the well-known deposits of gold found above. The celebrated Canton, Anglo-Swiss, and other claims higher up this river have for many years past got fabulous returns of gold, and as the banks right along the gorge are exceedingly rich, and are being worked now, there is no doubt that in the river and banks comprised in these claims highly payable returns of gold will be dredged. The claims may be said to be virgin ground for dredging. Good returns of gold were got from the shallow workings in all places in the immediate neighborhood, where also many nuggets of gold-some of large size-have been found. Reliable and satisfactory reports as to the richness of the ground and river by experienced miners and others can be seen at the office of the Broker, 1 Bond Street, Dunedin. It is proposed to build a Dredge with all the latest appliances for saving gold at a cost of about £3,300 to work the claim, and as the Dredge will be able to work all the year, steady and handsome dividends may be expected by the Shareholders. Mr. Leslie H. Reynolds, M.I.C.E., has assured the Provisional Directors that the Dredge can be on the ground and at work within six months from the registration of the Company. Coal and timber can be supplied to the Dredge from the immediate neighborhood very cheaply.54
  • 18 Aug 1898, EXPRESS PASSENGER LIST. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17. For the South. including Mr. A.D. Hunter.55
  • 18 Aug 1898, OVERLAND PASSENGERS. Yesterday's Through Trains. From the North for Dunedin.-List including Mr. A. D. Hunter.56

Citations

  1. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B 076 003.
  2. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/1314     1165/40.4 MARY HUNTER BLAIR ARCHIBALD HUNTER PAKENHAM 114 19--1--3     1877 - 1889.
  3. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 SWIFT 1885, farmer 80 acres N30 - paid by A D Hunter 9 May 1886.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), V 1803 F 360447 issued on 26 March 1886 to John BLAIR of Collins Street East, Doctor of Medicine and Archibald Dickson HUNTER of Collins Street West, Merchant, both of Melbourne - Proprietors as tenants-in-common.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1565-912 - Archibald Dickson Hunter of Collins Street West Melbourne Merchant.
  6. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  7. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 626/P0/1597 3794/19.20 - viewed 1 Dec 2015.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-445 - Archibald Dickson Hunter of Collins Street West Melbourne Merchant and John Blair of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine - tenants in common.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1565-912 - Archibald Dickson Hunter to John BLAIR of Collins Street East, Doctor of Medicine and Archibald Dickson HUNTER of Collins Street West, Merchant, both of Melbourne - Proprietors as tenants-in-common - C/T 1803-447.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), V 1803 F 360447.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1809-603 - Memo No 148 On the 14th April 1887 Robert Elwall Jacomb of Bank Place Melbourne was appointed assignee of the Estate of Archibald Dickson Hunter of Collins Street West Melbourne Merchant. Dated 31 July 1888.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-445 - On the 14th April 1887 Robert Elwall Jacomb of Bank Place Melbourne Esquire was appointed Assignee of the Estate of Archibald Dickson Hunter of Collins Street Melbourne Merchant.
  13. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 Smyth D A Farmer N50 £2.10 unpaid 100 acres Lot 42.
  14. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/1314     
    1165/40.4. MARY HUNTER BLAIR. ARCHIBALD HUNTER. PAKENHAM 114. 19--1--3. 1877 - 1889.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2170-929 - Mary Hunter Blair of Melbourne.
  16. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Unassisted Passenger List.
  17. [S333] Michael STEWART, viewed 22 Dec 2016, Email received 22 Dec 2016.
  18. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  19. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  20. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), YARRAWONGA DEC 1898 LONDON VIA NATAL AND CAPE TOWN [DEC 1898-001]
    HUNTER ARCHD 50
    HUNTER —- MRS 35
    HUNTER —- MASTER 15.
  21. [S65] Ancestry - various indices.
  22. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Deaths Dec 1916 Hunter Mary B 55 Croydon 2a 530."
  23. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Deaths Sep 1922 Hunter Archibald D 72 Croydon 2a 265."
  24. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/…
  25. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Boness; ED: 2; Page: 13; Line: 7; Roll: CSSCT1851_173; Year: 1851."
  26. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Uphall; ED: 1; Page: 9; Line: 5; Roll: CSSCT1861_121."
  27. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG13; Piece: 1188; Folio: 60; Page: 1."
  28. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Electoral Registers. London, England: London Metropolitan Archives.
  29. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census - Class: RG14; Piece: 2299."
  30. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "1878, p2158 or 2207."
  31. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "1878, p2590."
  32. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "1878, p2254."
  33. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Oct 1878, p2910."
  34. [S235] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star "The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Wed 10 Dec 1879, p4."
  35. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "1880, p374."
  36. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Feb 1880, p336."
  37. [S235] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star "16 Nov 1881, p2."
  38. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "5 Dec 1884, p3273."
  39. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Feb 1886, p8.
  40. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "14 Jan 1887, p108."
  41. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Mar 1887, p5.
  42. [S14] Newspaper - Queensland Government Gazette Supplement 19 Mar 1887, p1059.
  43. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Jul 1887, p7.
  44. [S14] Newspaper - Ballarat Star, 6 Jul 1887, p4.
  45. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Sep 1887, p11.
  46. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 2 Sep 1887, p6.
  47. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1887, p7.
  48. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "8 Jun 1888, p1731."
  49. [S14] Newspaper - Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 10 Aug 1888, p3.
  50. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "24 Jul 1893, p3288."
  51. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "17 Aug 1893. p3556."
  52. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "28 May 1894, p2109."
  53. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "4 Apr 1895, p1331."
  54. [S14] Newspaper - Evening Star (NZ), 28 May 1898, p3.
  55. [S14] Newspaper - Press (NZ), 18 Aug 1898, p6.
  56. [S14] Newspaper - Otago Daily Times (NZ), 18 Aug 1898, p6.
Last Edited11 Sep 2017

Archibald Hunter

M, #3183, b. 1804, d. b 1876
Christening27 Dec 1803 Possible baptism Archbald Hunter [par David Hunter & Alison Thomson] bapt 27 Dec 1803.1 
Birth*1804 Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland. 
Marriage* Spouse: Jane Butterworth Dickson.
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelSep 1854 Sailing with Jane Butterworth Hunter, David Hunter, Mary Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter, Archibald Dickson Hunter to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Cheviot
Age 38.2
Death*b 1876 
Note*28 Jan 1876 Listed as late Railway Clerk on Jane Dickson Hunter's Marriage Certificate. 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
6 Jun 1841Broxburn, Uphall, West Lothian, ScotlandHead of Household: Archibald Hunter. Age 35 - Cloth Merchant
Also in household Elizabeth Ralston 25 and Jessie Arthur 15, both female servants
Member(s) of Household: Jane Butterworth Hunter, David Hunter, Mary Hunter, James Hunter.3
30 Mar 1851Branfield Cottage 26, Borrowstouness, West Lothian, ScotlandHead of Household: Archibald Hunter. Age 46 - Cloth Merchant
Member(s) of Household: Jane Butterworth Hunter, Mary Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter, Archibald Dickson Hunter.4
7 Apr 1861Broxburn, Uphall, West Lothian, ScotlandHead of Household: Archibald Hunter. Age 57 - Agent
Member(s) of Household: Jane Dickson Hunter Archibald Dickson Hunter.5
2 Apr 1871Broxburn, Uphall, West Lothian, ScotlandHead of Household: Archibald Hunter. Possible match: Age 64 - Fire Insurance Agent - Widower - born Broxburn, Linlithgowshire.6

Family

Jane Butterworth Dickson b. 1820, d. 18 May 1855
Children 1.David Hunter+ b. 1836, d. 12 Jul 1914
 2.Mary Hunter+ b. 1838, d. 2 Aug 1921
 3.James Hunter b. 1840
 4.John Hunter b. 1844
 5.Jane Dickson Hunter b. 12 Jan 1849, d. 2 Jun 1891
 6.Archibald Dickson Hunter b. Aug 1850, d. Sep 1922

Newspaper-Articles

  • 1 Mar 1860, BROXBURN. The Robin Redbreast.—During the severity of the snow-storm this winter, a robin redbreast hopped into the kitchen of Mr Hunter, draper, Broxburn, in search of crumbs. As he seemed in no hurry to retire, he was put into a cage, and supplied with ...7

Citations

  1. [S204] Find My Past, online unknown url, Scotland Births and Baptisms 1564-1950 Transcription (from family search).
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B 076 003.
  3. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Uphall; ED: 1; Page: 23; Line: 1390; Year: 1841."
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Boness; ED: 2; Page: 13; Line: 7; Roll: CSSCT1851_173; Year: 1851."
  5. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Uphall; ED: 1; Page: 9; Line: 5; Roll: CSSCT1861_121."
  6. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Uphall; ED: 1; Page: 8; Line: 15; Roll: CSSCT1871_153
    ancestry states that he lived at the Schoolmaster's House, but the image does not reflect this."
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Dunfermline Press (Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland ), 1 Mar 1860.
Last Edited27 Dec 2016

William Henry 'Bill' Russell

M, #3186, b. Mar 1902, d. 2 Aug 1989
Father*Thomas Henry Russell b. 1876
Mother*Celia Brown b. 7 Jul 1873, d. Apr 1971
Birth*Mar 1902 Easington, Durham, England, Mar Q [Easington] 10a 479.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel17 Mar 1927 Sailing with Celia Russell Elsie May Russell to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Baradine London
Age 25 - farmer. Previous address 6 Mill Street, Guisborough Yorkshire.3 
Marriage*1932 Spouse: Lily Louise Sizer. VIC, Australia, #M5901.4,5
 
Occupation*c 1933 Worked at Neerim East as bush carpenter and later as share farmer until Black Friday fires incinerated their home. Then moved to Berwick.1 
Residence*c 1940 "Rosemont", A'Beckett Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, lived there initially - then Windarra - then back to Rosemont, and finally to the back of the Berglund shop in Beaconsfield Emerald Road (where later Butcher shop was.)6 
Land-UBeac*20 Sep 1950 GEM-D-2 (part). Transfer from William Alexander Berglund to William Henry 'Bill' Russell. SW part of land.7 
Widower28 Feb 1962He became a widower upon the death of his wife Lily Louise Sizer.8,4 
(Mentioned) Village Bell2Jan 1980 WITH LOVERIDGE’S GOING, AN ERA PASSES
David Russell, whose untimely death is reported elsewhere, worked most of his life with the Berwick owned business of Loveridge's, and succeeded his father as Manager of the B. U. store on Bill’s retirement shortly after his 70th birthday.
Bill Russell recalls the scene at Charing Cross around the outbreak of World War 1:
The Milk Bar (presently leased by Tom Van der Dolder, previously by Allens and Cooks, and owned retrospectively by Beckwith, Stuckett, Pingo, Colles and Mrs G. Thompson) was a confectionery and fruitmongery conducted by Horner and Funnell. Immediately adjacent (now Mick O’Riley and Anne McKay's art/craft enterprise) was a grocery conducted by Bill Berglund, whose father created “The Towers” on the road after his own name.
Across Halford Road was Tom “Sport” Brady’s hire coach shed (now still exhibiting well-weathered petroleum advertisements). A former garage owner in Melbourne, Tom retired to B. U. and lived in a small in-built section of the building which was formerly the co-operative fruit packing shed at Beaconsfield railway station. Across the Emerald Road, now Jack Stephen’s butcher's shop, was “Boss” Shorthouse’s headquarters for a Royal Mail and passenger horse coach/bus service. (Later Bill Berglund’s grocery moved to this site).
Alongside it, now Loveridges, was John Nathan’s general store. (Nathan’s first store opposite the Cenotaph, now Cr Keith Ewenson’s, was burnt down. He set up next door to the Salisbury Road Hall, then moved to the Loveridge’s site in 1929. Here John Glissman had constructed the present building, employing some of the timber from the Village's first school.)
Bill Russell, who lived with his family in Berwick, came into Loveridge’s employment as counter hand and delivery man in the early 1930’s when Loveridges bought the business from Nathan.
Trading at that time continued to 10 pm. on Saturday nights to cater for the influx of weekend holiday-makers. Wednesdays were closed days. Bill slept in the store for a month then brought his family to rent "Rosemont" in A’Beckett Road (now Mrs Atkinson's).
When Bill Noblet managed Loveridge’s (succeeding Syd Dean), Bill Russell moved into the Berglund shop and cottage at the rear, and subsequently purchased it. When Mrs. Russell died about 18 years ago, the former grocery shop (then acting as a bed-sitting room) was leased to Jack Stephens. Prior to this Jack was a taxi cab operator in Emerald.
Among Bill Russell’s regular chores some 40 years ago was the delivery of 44 gallon drums of lime-sulphur to the many orchards, by horse and dray. Later it was in the comfort of a 13 model Ford motor truck.
Bill ultimately took over the management of Loveridge’s for 4 years, before son David was to give him a well earned rest. Like the publicity he received when phasing out of a long association with the store, Bill's mother Celia came very much into the limelight when she celebrated her 100th birthday at the Pine Grove Hotel.
These few lines have been penned to recall the family’s association with a district entity about to fade into the past.6 
Death*2 Aug 1989 VIC, Australia, (Age 87.)9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 191170 Essex Street, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, England(Head of Household) Thomas Henry Russell;
Age 9 - School
Member(s) of Household: Celia Russell Elsie May Russell10
1954"Windarra", Salisbury Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grocer. With Lily Louise Russell.11
1967Wondara, Salisbury Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grocer.12
1980Beaconsfield-Emerald Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grocer.11

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia9

Citations

  1. [S54] Rob Hansen, A Century Partnership, p97.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 [database on-line].
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  6. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "010-1980, p10 by Paul Easton."
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 5452-322 - William Henry Russell of Upper Beaconsfield Grocer's Assistant.
  8. [S352] St John's Church, St John's Memorial Book, Lillian Louise Russell born 14 Mar 1896, died 28 Feb 1962
    (her birth was registered in Jun 1895 - so I believe that the year in the memorial book is incorrect).
  9. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
  10. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG14; Piece: 29304."
  11. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  12. [S167] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1967.
Last Edited27 Dec 2018

Thomas Nelson

M, #3191, b. Dec 1894, d. 13 Jan 1968
Birth*Dec 1894 Whitehaven, Cumberland, England, Dec Q [Whitehaven] 10b 655.1 
Marriage*1933 Spouse: Vera Kimpton Watson. VIC, Australia, #M6994.2
 
Land-UBeac*3 Dec 1958 GEM-C-12.13. Transfer from Josephine Mary Stewart to Thomas Nelson Vera Kimpton Nelson. 19a 3r 12p + 19a 3r 28p.3 
Death*13 Jan 1968 Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D1083 (Age 72) [par John NELSON & Elizabeth BOUCH].4,5 
Land-Note*18 May 1970 GEM-C-12.13: Vera Kimpton Nelson is now the surviving proprietor.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1942Comport Street, Cheltenham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: sales. With Vera Kimpton Nelson.7
1963"Lo Yuang", Split Rock Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: engineer. With Vera Kimpton Nelson.8

Grave

  • St John's Church Memorial Garden, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia9,5

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mother's maiden name BOUCH."
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 + 4464-741 - Josephine Mary Howard-Smith to Thomas Nelson Engineer and Vera Kimpton Nelson Married Woman both of "Lo Yuan" Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S352] St John's Church, St John's Memorial Book, Thomas Nelson died 13 Jan 1968.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 + 4464-741 - Vera Kimpton Nelson is now the surviving proprietor.
  7. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  8. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  9. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
Last Edited24 May 2018

Vera Kimpton Watson

F, #3192, b. 1905, d. Nov 1978
Married NameNelson. 
Birth*1905 Carlton, VIC, Australia, #B8883.1 
Marriage*1933 Spouse: Thomas Nelson. VIC, Australia, #M6994.2
 
(Transfer to) Land-UBeac3 Dec 1958 GEM-C-12.13. Transfer from Josephine Mary Stewart to Thomas Nelson Vera Kimpton Nelson. 19a 3r 12p + 19a 3r 28p.3 
Widow13 Jan 1968She became a widow upon the death of her husband Thomas Nelson.4,5 
Land-Note*18 May 1970 GEM-C-12.13: Vera Kimpton Nelson is now the surviving proprietor.6 
Land-Note*3 Jan 1974 GEM-C-12.13: Boundaries changed.7 
Death*Nov 1978 Spot, VIC, Australia, #D26124 (Age 72) [par Gilbert WATSON & Martha Mary INCH].4 
Land-Note24 Apr 1979 GEM-C-12.13: Vera Kimpton Nelson died on 3 Nov 1978 - probate granted to Royale May Vautier of 14 Cobden Street Highton Married Woman.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1942Comport Street, Cheltenham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Thomas Nelson.9
1963"Lo Yuang", Split Rock Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Thomas Nelson.10
1968Lo Yuang, Split Rock Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.10

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia11

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 + 4464-741 - Josephine Mary Howard-Smith to Thomas Nelson Engineer and Vera Kimpton Nelson Married Woman both of "Lo Yuan" Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S352] St John's Church, St John's Memorial Book, Thomas Nelson died 13 Jan 1968.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 + 4464-741 - Vera Kimpton Nelson is now the surviving proprietor.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 + 4464-741 - Vera Kimpton Nelson changed the boundaries of the property - C/T 9006-418 + 419.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 - Vera Kimpton Nelson died on 3 Nov 1978 - probate granted to Royale May Vautier of 14 Cobden Street Highton Married Woman.
  9. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  10. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  11. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
Last Edited16 Mar 2016

Rev Edward Ince Gason

M, #3196, b. 1879, d. 7 Mar 1936
Birth*1879 Cranbourne, VIC, Australia, #B8431 [par John Boyle GASON & Annie Elizabeth DUFF].1 
Marriage*1907 Spouse: Phyllis Dorothy Vance. VIC, Australia, #M2867.2
 
Death*7 Mar 1936 Mornington, VIC, Australia, #D14090 (Age 56) [par John Boyle GASON & Annie Elizabeth DUFF].3 
Death-Notice*9 Mar 1936GASON.-On the 7th March (suddenly), at the vicarage, Mornington, Edwin Ince, dearly loved husband of Phyllis Dorothy, loving father of John, Harriett, Nancy, and Pat, aged 56 years.4 

Family

Phyllis Dorothy Vance b. 1880, d. 1967
Child 1.Rev Patrick Edward Duff Gason b. 3 Mar 1916, d. 7 Dec 1968

Newspaper-Articles

  • 9 Mar 1936, OBITUARY. Rev. E. I. Gason
    The death occurred suddenly from heart trouble on Saturday night of the Rev. E. I. Gason, who had been minister of St, Peter's Church of England, Mornington, since 1927. Mr. Gason entered the ministry in 1903, and from that period until 1927 had officiated at St. Stephen's Church, Richmond, Dean's Marsh, Broadmeadows, Mentone, St. John's, Malvern, Winchelsea, and St. Paul's, Ascotvale. He went from Ascotvale to Mornington.
    A service will be held in St. Peter's Church, Mornington, at 1.30 p.m. to-day before the funeral at Springvale.5

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Mar 1936, p1.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Mar 1936, p10.
Last Edited16 Aug 2018

Phyllis Dorothy Vance

F, #3197, b. 1880, d. 1967
Father*George Oakleigh Vance
Mother*Harriet Catherine Cresswell b. 1837, d. 1915
Married NameGason. 
Birth*1880 Kew, VIC, Australia, #B16775 [par George Oakley VANCE & Harriett Cath CRESWELL].1 
Marriage*1907 Spouse: Rev Edward Ince Gason. VIC, Australia, #M2867.2
 
Widow7 Mar 1936Phyllis Dorothy Vance became a widow upon the death of her husband Rev Edward Ince Gason.3 
Death*1967 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D1823 (age 86) [par George O VANCE & Harriett C CRESWELL].3 

Family

Rev Edward Ince Gason b. 1879, d. 7 Mar 1936
Child 1.Rev Patrick Edward Duff Gason b. 3 Mar 1916, d. 7 Dec 1968

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
Last Edited16 Aug 2018

Rev Patrick Edward Duff Gason

M, #3198, b. 3 Mar 1916, d. 7 Dec 1968
Father*Rev Edward Ince Gason b. 1879, d. 7 Mar 1936
Mother*Phyllis Dorothy Vance b. 1880, d. 1967
(Witness) History At St John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, Vicar Jan 1955-Apr 1961 (Parish of Berwick, Pakenham and Upper Beaconsfield.)1,2 
Birth*3 Mar 1916 Winchelsea, VIC, Australia, #B8160 [par Edward Ince GASON & Phyllis Dorothy VANCE].3 
Marriage*30 Dec 1939 Spouse: Viola Gertrude Lillias Garrett. Melbourne Grammar School Chapel, VIC, Australia, #M13525.4
 
Occupation*bt Jan 1955 - Apr 1961 Vicar at St John's Church Jan 1955-Apr 1961 (Parish of Berwick, Pakenham and Upper Beaconsfield.)2 
Death*7 Dec 1968 Strathmore, VIC, Australia, #D29231 (Age 52.)5 

Grave

  • St John's Church Memorial Garden, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia6,7

Newspaper-Articles

  • 30 Dec 1939, MANY NEW YEAR'S EVE MARRIAGES. Bride Wears Mother's Gown.
    Pink larkspurs and carnations were arranged with delphiniums in the Melbourne Grammar School Chapel, this afternoon, when the marriage was celebrated of Miss Viola Gertrude Lillias Garrett and Mr Patrick Edward Duff Gason, the bride wearing the gown which her mother wore on her wedding day.
    The Rev. P. St. J. Wilson officiated at the ceremony, and the bride was given away by her father. She is the only child of Mr and Mrs P. T. Garrett, Raleigh Street, Essendon, and the bridegroom the younger son of Mrs Gason, of Armadale, and the late Rev. E. I. Gason, formerly of Mornington.
    Of Edwardian Inspiration, the bridal gown was of cream satin and Brussels lace, and the long court
    train was embroidered with pearl horseshoes and lovers' knots and cream roses.
    A picture frock of delphinium blue marquisette was worn by the brides maid, Miss Jean Stewart.
    Two little trainbearers, Ann Garrett (cousin of the bride) and Jill Dynson, were in similar frocks, Mr David Staley was best man and Messrs. Mervyn Cook and Hugh Allnutt ushers.8
  • 1 Jan 1940, GASON-GARRETT
    Her mother's wedding gown of cream ? and ? ?with a ? train embroidered with flowers ? and horse shoes of pearls was worn by Miss Garrett at her marriage
    at the Melbourne Grammar School Chapel on Saturday.
    The bride who is the only child of Mr and Mrs P ? Garrett of ? ? Street Essendon was attended by Miss Jean Steward and Jill D? and Ann Garrett.
    The bridegroom who is the younger son of Mrs Ga? formerly of ? ...9
  • 1 Jan 1941, GASON (nee Viola Garrett).—On October 27, at Epworth Hospital, Richmond, to Mr. and Mrs. Pat Gason, of 3 Raleigh street, Essendon —a son.10

Citations

  1. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive ,"Ken Hudson's memories of his time as a vestryman."
  2. [S59] John Milligan, Book: The History of St. John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield.
  3. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  6. [S352] St John's Church, St John's Memorial Book, Patrick Edward Duff GASON Former Vicar of this parish born 3 Mar 1916 died 7 Dec 1968.
  7. [S352] St John's Church, St John's Memorial Book, Viola Getrude Lillias Gason
    wife of former Vicar of this Parish Patrick Gason
    born 11 Aug 1918 died 29 Feb 2012.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 30 Dec 1939, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article243346906
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 1 Jan 1940, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11277593
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 1 Nov 1941, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8213937
Last Edited25 May 2018

Rev William Percy Daunt

M, #3201, b. Dec 1883, d. 1976
(Witness) History At St John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, Vicar Jan 1944-Aug 1948 (Parish of Berwick, Pakenham and Upper Beaconsfield.)1,2 
Birth*Dec 1883 Rathdown, Wicklow, Ireland, Dec Q [Rathdown] 2 785.3 
Marriage*18 Jun 1912 Spouse: Alice Maria Webb. Christ Church, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M3280.4
 
Widower1965Rev William Percy Daunt became a widower upon the death of his wife Alice Maria Webb.5 
Death*1976 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D2239 (age 92) [par Edward Stephen DAUNT & Sarah Gertrude WHELAN].6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1942The Vicarage, Cranbourne, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clergyman. With Alice Maria Webb.7
1963The Vicarage, Berwick, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clergyman. With Alice Maria Webb.8

Grave

  • 4-275-B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia, Daunt Alice Maria 1965 81 wife/ William P., mother and grandmother ; Daunt William Percy 1976 92 hus/ Alice9

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 Jul 1912, MR. WILLIAM PERCY DAUNT TO MISS ALICE WEBB.
    The marriage of Mr. William Percy Daunt, second son of the Rev. E. S. Daunt, M.A., rector of Greystones, Ireland, and Miss Alice M Webb, eldest daughter of the late Mr. W. T. Webb and Mrs. Webb, late of Rochester, and now of St. Kilda, was celebrated at Christ Church, St. Kilda, on Tuesday, June 18, by the Rev. Canon Watson, of Eaglehawk, assisted by the Rev. J. E. Stannage, also of Eaglehawk, Bendigo. The church was artistically decorated and the service full choral.
    The bride, who was given away by Senator McColl, wore a beautiful gown of ivory crepe de chine, with a tunic skirt, embroidered with seed pearls and finished with a fan train, caught with a spray of orange blossom. The bodice was entirely composed of Limerick lace with pearl embroideries. Her veil was arranged with a spray of orange blossom, and she carried a shower bouquet of orchids and shell pink roses, which, together with a gold wristlet watch, were the bridegroom's gifts. The bridesmaids were the Misses Lillian and Ella Webb (sisters of the bride). They wore simple frocks of ivory ninon over silk, large picture hats of pale blue satin, lined with black panne velvet and trimmed with violets and pink fairy rosebuds. They carried shower bouquets of violets and roses, gifts from the bridegroom, together with a brooch and aquamarine and pearl necklet, respectively. Mr. Batten (Eaglehawk) acted as best man. After the ceremony a reception and wedding tea were held at "Hartpury," St. Kilda, over fifty guests being present. The bride's mother received in the hall, wearing a grey crepe de chine coat and skirt, and black velvet toque with grey mount. The bride and bridegroom received congratulations in the drawing-room, which was prettily decorated with golden chrysanthemums and autumn foliage.
    Mr. and Mrs. Daunt left by motor for Mentone, where they spent a few days prior to their departure for England by the R.M.S. Orvieto on June 26. The bride travelled in a grey tweed coat and skirt, with grey French toque trimmed with cerise, and a set of squirrel furs.10
  • 17 Nov 1948, THE SOCIAL EVENING arranged by the Vestry and Ladies’ Guild recently was much enjoyed, the occasion being to welcome Rev. and Mrs. Mountney and say farewell to Rev. and Mrs. W. P. Daunt. Mr. J. Royle, the chairman, in welcoming and farewelling them respectively, aptly described it as “the changing of the Guards.” Musical items from Mrs. Noblet, her daughter Irene and Mr. Royle were much enjoyed. Bouquets were presented to Mrs. Daunt and Mrs. Mountney by Margaret Royle and Valray Harris.11

Citations

  1. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive ,"Ken Hudson's memories of his time as a vestryman."
  2. [S59] John Milligan, Book: The History of St. John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ireland, Civil Registration Births Index, 1864-1958.
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D22353/1965 Place of birth Rochester."
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  7. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  8. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963.
  9. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-275-B Daunt Alice Maria F 81 12/10/1965 1528
    4-275-B Daunt William Percy M 92 8/01/1976 1714
    Daunt Alice Maria 1965 81 wife/ William P., mother and grandmother
    Daunt William Percy 1976 92 hus/ Alice - photo bw0741.
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thu 4 Jul 1912, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146181236
  11. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Wed 17 Nov 1948, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article214584224."
Last Edited23 Nov 2018

Rev Robert Griffith Mountney

M, #3202, b. 1912, d. 1986
(Witness) History At St John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, Vicar Sep 1948-Apr 1951 (Parish of Berwick, Pakenham and Upper Beaconsfield.)1,2 
Birth*1912 Adelaide, SA, Australia. 
Marriage*1939 Spouse: Eva May Keane. VIC, Australia, #M1429.3
 
Death*1986 Croydon, VIC, Australia, #D7971 (Age 74) [par William MOUNTNEY & Katie Priscilla GRIFFITH].4 
Widower1986Rev Robert Griffith Mountney became a widower upon the death of his wife Eva May Keane.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1949The Vicarage, Berwick, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: minister of religion. With Eva May Mountney.6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 21 Aug 1948, The Rev R. G. Mountney. of Warburton, has been appointed to the parish of Berwick. He will take up his duties at the end of September.7
  • 17 Nov 1948, THE SOCIAL EVENING arranged by the Vestry and Ladies’ Guild recently was much enjoyed, the occasion being to welcome Rev. and Mrs. Mountney and say farewell to Rev. and Mrs. W. P. Daunt. Mr. J. Royle, the chairman, in welcoming and farewelling them respectively, aptly described it as “the changing of the Guards.” Musical items from Mrs. Noblet, her daughter Irene and Mr. Royle were much enjoyed. Bouquets were presented to Mrs. Daunt and Mrs. Mountney by Margaret Royle and Valray Harris.8

Citations

  1. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive ,"Ken Hudson's memories of his time as a vestryman."
  2. [S59] John Milligan, Book: The History of St. John's Anglican Church, Upper Beaconsfield.
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D7971/1986 Place of birth Adelaide South Australia."
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D830/1986 Place of birth Lochwinnoch Glasgow Scotland."
  6. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Aug 1948, p20.
  8. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Wed 17 Nov 1948, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article214584224."
Last Edited23 Nov 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.