George Edgar Lorimer

M, #5706, b. 1863, d. 29 Apr 1916
Father*John Lorimer b. 1822, d. 2 Nov 1888
Mother*Jane Jamieson b. 11 Nov 1830, d. 12 Jan 1903
Birth*1863 Castlemaine, VIC, Australia, #B6764.1 
Land-UBeac*17 Sep 1903 GEM-C-36. Transfer from Jane Lorimer to George Edgar Lorimer. 19a 3r 17p - owner as executrix of Jane Lorimer's Will.2 
Land-UBeac*26 Jan 1906 GEM-C-36. Transfer from George Edgar Lorimer to The Union Trustee Company of Australia Ltd. 19a 3r 17p.3 
Death*29 Apr 1916 Gundagai, NSW, Australia, #D8184/1916.4 
Death-Notice*1 May 1916LORIMER.—On the 29th April at "Tarrabandra," Gundagai, NSW, George Edgar, son of the late John and Jane Lorimer, "Ermington," Kew.5 

Grave

  • IND A 0068/0068A/1001/1002, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, Stone 68: Sacred to the memory of John LORIMER d at Manly NSW 2 Nov 1888, aged 66 years, & his wife Jane LORIMER d at Kew 12 Jan 1903, aged 72 years, also their daughters Cecilia Jane d at Kew 4 Apr 1915, aged 54 years, Jessie Forrester d at Kew 13 Dec 1928, aged 74 years.
    In loving memory of Catherine Beatrice ROBERTS d 7 Aug 1933 in her 66th year.
    Erected by John & Jane LORIMER in loving memory of their children Frederick James d 16 Jun 1877, aged 3 years 11 months, Edwin Day d 3 Jul 1877, aged 6 years 11 months, text,
    In memory of John Alexander d 19 Jan 1859 aged 9 months, Mary Jane d 13 Oct 1859, aged 3 years 2 months, Henry d 3 Mar 1860 aged 2 months, John Arthur Henry d 1 June 1866 aged 17 months, children of John & Jane LORIMER who all died & are interred at Castlemaine.
    Stone 1002: George Edgar LORIMER d 29 Apr 19166,7

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-419 - Memo No 31158 - George Edgar Lorimer of St James Buildings Little Collins Street Melbourne Merchant is registered as proprietor of the within described land as Executor of Jane Lorimer late of "Ermington" Kew Widow who was Executrix of the within named John Lorimer, who died on the 2nd November 1888 and Probate of whose will was granted to the said Jane Lorimer on the 20th December 1888. The said Executrix Jane Lorimer died on the 12th January 1903 and Probate of her will and Codicils was granted to the said George Edgar Lorimer on the 17th September 1903. Dated the 29th October 1903.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-419 - George Edgar Lorimer to Union Trustee Company of Australia Limited of 335 Collins Street Melbourne.
  4. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 May 1916, p1.
  6. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    also Maie Jean, daughter of George LORIMER & Meg McMILLAN, aged 4 Months, 26 Feb 1893.
  7. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
Last Edited7 Jan 2016

Edward Charles Whitty

M, #5708, b. 1851, d. 7 Mar 1897
Father*John Whitty
Mother*Elizabeth Woolsey
Birth*1851 Dublin, Ireland.1 
Marriage*23 Oct 1884 Spouse: Isabella Sarah Warner. VIC, Australia, #M5419.2
 
Marriage-Notice*1 Nov 1884WHITTY - WARNER. -On the 23rd ult, by special licence, at Coburg, by the Rev R. Barlow, Edward Charles Whitty to Isabella, second eldest daughter of George Warner, and niece of J B Motherwell, MD.3 
Land-UBeac*b 1888Edward Charles Whitty selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-53. 19a 2r 23p - Crown Grant to E. C. WHITTY on 30 Apr 1888.4,5 
Land-UBeac*4 Apr 1889 GEM-C-53. Transfer from Edward Charles Whitty to Frederick Albert Lewis. 19a 2r 23p.6 
Widower13 Aug 1892Edward Charles Whitty became a widower upon the death of his wife Isabella Sarah Warner.1 
Death*7 Mar 1897 Hawthorn, VIC, Australia, #D1755 (Age 46) [par John WHITTY & Elizabeth WOOLSEY].1 
Death-Notice*8 Mar 1897WHITTY.--On the 7th March, at his brother's residence, Doonbrae, Robinson's road, Hawthorn, Edward Charles Whitty, in his 46th year.7 

Grave

  • Church of England Section X 646/647, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of our mother
    Elizabeth WHITTY
    died 14 Aug 1889, age 75 yrs
    also to the memory of her daughter
    Eleanor WHITTY
    who died 16 Nov 1899, age 65 yrs
    also
    to the memory of her son
    John Benjamin
    died 1 Dec 1914, age 78 yrs. Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella Sarah WHITTY
    who died 13 Mar 1892, age 26 yrs
    also her husband
    Edward Charles WHITTY
    died 7 Mar 1897, age 46 yrs.8

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Nov 1884, p1.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2113-451 - Edward Charles Whitty of Hawthorn Commercial Traveller.
  5. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 661/49.4.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2113-451 - Frederick Albert Lewis of Flinders Lane West Melbourne Merchant.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Mar 1897, p1.
  8. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,.
Last Edited18 Mar 2016

Isabella Sarah Warner

F, #5709, b. 1865, d. 13 Aug 1892
Married NameWhitty.1 
Birth*18651 
Marriage*23 Oct 1884 Spouse: Edward Charles Whitty. VIC, Australia, #M5419.2
 
Marriage-Notice*1 Nov 1884WHITTY - WARNER. -On the 23rd ult, by special licence, at Coburg, by the Rev R. Barlow, Edward Charles Whitty to Isabella, second eldest daughter of George Warner, and niece of J B Motherwell, MD.3 
Death*13 Aug 1892 Hawthorn, VIC, Australia, #D10497 (Age 27) [par George WARNER & Helen MOTHERWELL].1 
Death-Notice*15 Aug 1892WHITTY—On the 13th inst., at the residence of her brother-in-law, J B Whitty, Doonbrae, Robinson's road, Auburn, Belle, the dearly beloved wife of Edward Charles Whitty, in her 28th year.4 

Grave

  • Church of England Section X 646/647, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of our mother
    Elizabeth WHITTY
    died 14 Aug 1889, age 75 yrs
    also to the memory of her daughter
    Eleanor WHITTY
    who died 16 Nov 1899, age 65 yrs
    also
    to the memory of her son
    John Benjamin
    died 1 Dec 1914, age 78 yrs. Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella Sarah WHITTY
    who died 13 Mar 1892, age 26 yrs
    also her husband
    Edward Charles WHITTY
    died 7 Mar 1897, age 46 yrs.5

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Nov 1884, p1.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Aug 1892, p1.
  5. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,.
Last Edited18 Mar 2016

John Whitty

M, #5711
Marriage* Spouse: Elizabeth Woolsey. Ireland.
 

Family

Elizabeth Woolsey
Children 1.John Benjamin Whitty b. 1836, d. 1 Dec 1914
 2.Edward Charles Whitty+ b. 1851, d. 7 Mar 1897
Last Edited18 Mar 2016

Elizabeth Woolsey

F, #5712
Married NameWhitty. 
Marriage* Spouse: John Whitty. Ireland.
 

Grave

  • Church of England Section X 646/647, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of our mother
    Elizabeth WHITTY
    died 14 Aug 1889, age 75 yrs
    also to the memory of her daughter
    Eleanor WHITTY
    who died 16 Nov 1899, age 65 yrs
    also
    to the memory of her son
    John Benjamin
    died 1 Dec 1914, age 78 yrs. Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella Sarah WHITTY
    who died 13 Mar 1892, age 26 yrs
    also her husband
    Edward Charles WHITTY
    died 7 Mar 1897, age 46 yrs.1

Family

John Whitty
Children 1.John Benjamin Whitty b. 1836, d. 1 Dec 1914
 2.Edward Charles Whitty+ b. 1851, d. 7 Mar 1897

Citations

  1. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,.
Last Edited18 Mar 2016

John Benjamin Whitty

M, #5713, b. 1836, d. 1 Dec 1914
Father*John Whitty
Mother*Elizabeth Woolsey
Birth*1836 Dublin, Ireland.1 
Death*1 Dec 1914 Beechworth, VIC, Australia, #D12582 (Age 78.)1 
Death-Notice*3 Dec 1914WHITTY -On the 1st December John Benjamin Whitty of "Doon Brae" Robinson's road Hawthorn late of the firm of Lewis and Whitty, aged 78 years. A colonist of 62 years.2 

Grave

  • Church of England Section X 646/647, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of our mother
    Elizabeth WHITTY
    died 14 Aug 1889, age 75 yrs
    also to the memory of her daughter
    Eleanor WHITTY
    who died 16 Nov 1899, age 65 yrs
    also
    to the memory of her son
    John Benjamin
    died 1 Dec 1914, age 78 yrs. Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella Sarah WHITTY
    who died 13 Mar 1892, age 26 yrs
    also her husband
    Edward Charles WHITTY
    died 7 Mar 1897, age 46 yrs.3

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Jun 1885, THE INDUSTRIES OF THE COLONY. - XIII. - LEWIS AND WHITTY'S STARCH AND SOAP.
    The manufacture of rice starch is a monopoly in the colony. It is a monopoly, because no one but Messrs Lewis and Whitty have succeeded in making it of a quality that commends it to the household. A firm started business at Kensington in this line some years ago, but the work did not prosper, and the proprietors shut up shop leaving as Messrs Lewis and Whitty complain, a bad name behind. "It would have been better for us," they say, "if we had been the first in the field ; there would not have been so much prejudice as there is against colonial starch." Sometimes however, the grocer gets even with the pre judiced persons and turns the laugh in favour of colonial industry. A leading purveyor had a parcel sent back, to him, with a complaint that it was no use sending any colonial starch to a certain aristocratic laundry. Some of the "best" was substituted, as requested, and the housekeeper was soothed and satisfied without knowing that she had at last really got the despised colonial article in lieu of Colman's (English), which she had so contemptuously rejected. So strong, a lead has been taken by Messrs. Lewis and Whitty, aided by an im port duty of 2d. per lb. on starch, that English makers are hard pressed to maintain a market in Victoria. It is confidently asserted that imported starch is being sold at a loss of £10 per ton now, while the fight is keenest and yet the Melbourne firm, ever since they started their works on the banks ot the Yarra at Richmond three years ago, have been kept busy in making additions to their premises.
    The premises occupy by far too picturesque a site for a business which ranks as a noxious trade. True it took this rank when starch making was conducted upon the principle of fermentation, which is totally different to the modern methods Messrs Lewis and Whitty employ and which keep the place as sweet as a flour mill. But, pursuant to act of Parliament, the firm make their starch away from crowded neighbour hoods, on a hill overlooking the willow shaded banks of the Yarra, which became the site of a maizena making speculation long before eligible building sites were as much run after at Saturday afternoon auction sales as they are now. It did not pay to make maizena in Melbourne in those days, but Messrs. Lewis and Whitty, undeterred by the untoward fate of this kindred industry, required the place, and commenced with skilled labour and first class plant to make their starch in a bluestone store of two flats which now peeps out from the network of much larger buildings surrounding it on every side. The brick bonded store is the most pretentious of the additions, and it is watched by a studious Customs officer, who has little to do besides reading for eight hours a day and taking care that only the proper number of bags of rice are removed from his vigilant keeping. The firm pay £250 per annum for this and the literary entertainment of the Customs officer, who draws this salary to protect Her Majesty's revenue from any unfair diminution of the rice duty of £6 per ton which was imposed as a repressive and retaliatory measure against the influx of Chinese, who it will be remembered, were the objects of special aversion and legislation about four years ago. More fortunate than the maltsters, who are not allowed to malt in bond, even though they should provide a library and reading room for studious Customs officers as well as a comfortable stipend, Messrs Lewis and Whitty are permitted to carry on their operations duty free under proper supervision, because they convert rice into starch and entirely alter its constituent properties.
    The rice having been duly weighed and booked, is roughly ground and thrown into large troughs. A mixture of water and ingredients which are trade secrets sepa rates the starch and gluten of which rice is composed. All the gluten must be got rid of, or the starch would stick to the iron of the laundress. The starch has no nutrition—a person would starve on starch far more quickly than Clara Crosbie did upon the water of the Cockatoo Creek. The gluten becomes soluble in the water of the tank, and the starch remains in the crushed grain, which is thrown out into a dry box. An Archimedian screw makes it slowly travel from the top floor of the manufactory to a mill below, where it is ground afresh, and far more thoroughly than before, under a huge pair of French burr stones as hard as flint and as level as a die. The "teeth" of the stones must be level and fit as closely to one another as the cover of a watch, or grainy particles would get into the starch, which must be as fine and smooth as velvet. It is not easy to get the stones so true. First of all the "dresser" has a piece of specially-prepared flat steel—so flat that the most delicate instruments cannot detect the slightest inequality. Upon this is laid the wooden testing level, which is also brought up to the greatest nicety of balance. If it shows any declination as the result of wear it is pared down an infinitesimal piece at a time till it satisfies the critical eye of the expert. Now the level or "stock" is rubbed with red ochre, so that the tell-tale colour may reveal where the stone does not touch it when it is laid all round it. The hollow spots are worked down to until the red ochre marks evenly in every place. The stones themselves are hard as flint, and will last 40 or 50 years, but the dressing tool to sharpen the teeth has to be applied at regular in tervals in the same way that a mason uses his axe on a piece of kerbing. What we have called the teeth are therefore only fine lines unlike the fewer and larger ridges and furrows of a flour-mill stone. The rice in passing under these powerful pulverisers is mixed with water and forms a thin paste, in which state it is pumped back again to the top floor into vats. The paste is kept in constant motion like a batter pud ding stirred by the cook. The stirrer is an arm furnished with blades, which are turned by machinery. At length the fibre is allowed to settle and the starch is run off free from fibre through a syphon into large shallow troughs below stairs. The siphon acts as a kind of filter, and as soon as the operator notices any foreign matter passing away with the starch he remedies the fault. The handling of the syphon is a delicate process requiring a quick eye and hand and the closest attention.
    After the starcli has sunk to the bot tom in the BIIOIIOW vats to which wo have just seen it convejed, it will be drained of the water, which rises to tho top 1 he st ueh will then be dug out ui thick white slabs with wooden shovels, mid eirnetl in baskets to a pu"mill where in ire grinding fakes place and mole v atet is ui'ded Jt will theu percolate to the low est Moor of all, into a series ot loiu narrow troughs, lined with clean cloths und placed on a slope bo that euch will overllow into the other until they are ill lull A sieve is placed to Hitch the starch ns it comes down into the troughs so that no lumps or fo>cic,n mutter um "et through Hie stoieh now eon solidates into pure white tlusttc rikes of -ewt euch with i little water on the top ot each tiouji 1 he t tke Inn nt" become solid eiioue,h ilic tu u"hs UVA, tippped np and the watti thrown oil uni two min tiling the bocs-which are eactlj Ititi rutchers trajs -i n tin ir shouldet i 1 e ir them oh* to the liall ot the divmi, rooms white a number of c,irls are eiuplovetl in wrapping the d imp stirch into convenient si/ed pncl ets Hie bars of starch nie us Mi Ulntty °x plains, broken into these rackets by a chip with a Knife and i jolt, nnd after they are vv rapped up and libelled with the popular label ot the firm, thev ure pur, into the dnmc room, mid afterwards, when most of the moisture hasev ipoiuted, intotha "crusting chamber, in which thev nrostnckcd on rows of shelves for a further period o£ purgatorial purification anti improvement, 'lhe heat of the drun.? rooms is supplied by coko furn ices, from winch rudiate large fire» pipes, which become filled with dr> heated mr, and are kept at the same temperature night nnd day, in order to prevent the starch be- coming milder»ed, as it would if left m a damp state, and to break it up into those icicle shaped lengths which every laundress considers the criterion of good Hturch. "Wo go to a (rood deal of this expense m fuel,"snj3 Jír Whitti, "m order to idease the vv omen with the form in w Inch th starch is bent to niurket, as though it is not all the same when the starch is incited down " On the same strict rule of utiht/ icrstio elegance, a modest plum pudding would serve just as well as a florid bride t ike for nuptial festivities , but would the bride be satishcd? The starch, after being dried, is weighed into parcels ot öOlb, and Bent to tho wholesale merchants, with plenty of brinds in large typo to denote where it comes from. 'Iha weighing wants a clever knickit it is to bo dono quicMj. lhe parcel aro of different! sues-some 11 and some 12 to the box and the weigher, with an unerring eve, selects the 11 oi the VI with the quickness of a pedlar noting a likelv customer. Tho balance is alwajs right at the first cast, ami no time is lost On get tun,' the parcels tho grocer opens the paper and tumbles tba starch into a loose clrawr, from which it l8 sold in ounces or pounds in " lots to suit customers " The ftbie of the rice, after thai gluten and starch is extracted from it, ia sold to feed tuat useful consumer of many bye products-the pig-and it is saitl that the refuse rice is the nearest approach to " dairy ted pork ' that people ev er see.

    The men who make starch are taught their business bj Messrs Lewis and W lntty's foreman, who came from England, where ho bad long experience Those who are active and attcntivo soon beeomo useful, arid earn fair wages, but they aie spccitilly prohi- bited from telling anyone outside what they know, under pinn ot dismissal. The girls make fiom 7s to 2">s per vv cok, and tho urra regret that they c innot get enough of them for their Iltchmond mid fitzroy works, vvhero blacking, wushing powder, and other articles o£ household use aro made T hero is so much competition for fcniulo Iubour, wa leam, that the stall cannot be kept up to its full strength. And jet the work is light and cleanly m the starch works, at any rate, "lhere is no occasion for anyone to bo idle in Victoria," lemarked ono of the proprie- tors, "mid for girls least of all "

    The firm have another department for girls in the fancj soup room The fancy soaps include "eucalyptus, ' "carbolic," and last, but by no means least, Lewis and Wkitty's "borax soap" which has been a fruitful subject ot litigation both in New South Wiles nnd Victoria, where persons weie found infringing what the firm claim to bo a specialty of their own In Sidney they were successful in getting un injunction againat the defendant applying the tenu "borax" to his soap, but ni Melbourne the law is different, and a similar verdict could not be obtained when the question was tested recently before our Supreme Court The ltwjera, howevei, have not jet gleaned the last ot tbeir harvest, for, as the Loid Chancellor says in "Iolanthe," the subtleties of tho lentil mind nrc equal to any emergency, and thcro aro sundry appeals, or something of that kind, " before a higher com t" still in store to further tax the erudition of our judge« The boudan Contingent had au opportunity of testing tho manuold merits claimed lor the "boras soup," as Messrs Lewis and \ bitty sent a ton of their manufacture to swell the gilts o£ patriotic Australia to her soldiers upon their departure from Sydney. Hie stamping ot fancy soap is one of the most interesting ex- hibits of mechanical skill to be seen m the works It is noteworthy from the supiemo exactness ot the elie and itscover 'lhe visitor is asked to fit one into the other, mid hu finds that they go so closoly together that it takes some time and care o get one within the other, lhere is not the finest li urs breadth of a line between them when this bus at last been accomplished. Then the operator shows us how tho upper and lower dies have been so carefully adjusted on the stand th it they can be brought down on cadi other with a lightning swing, when each piece of soap is stamped, and close togethet in their proper place. The minutest deviation-an îotti ot miscalculation-would smash the die to pieces But the stand ia embedded in the foundations on solid stone, and once adjusted there is no fear of any jar causing an accident Tho fancy soap is made in a different building to tha household soup, of which large quantities are also turned out, und in a different way-but Lewis and Whitty contend that " borax " Bonp is not in the fancy class, which is sub- ject to a. higher duty in the other colonies, lor some time they were exporting " borax" soap to Tasmania and New Zealand ; but jealous rivals protested that it should pay tha superior tnnff of charges, and the authorities upheld this contention, which, pending tho passing ot tho reciprocity treaty with Tusmanin, has, to some extent, checked exportation to the southon» colonj The dillerent kinds of soap vv e seo the girls dexterously packing are of dilïeient colours, and are wrapped in dif- ferent colouicd paper to denote their kind. Thus "borax" soap is white, with u packaga to correspond, "euculjptus" is jellow, and "caibohc' ot u doliente pink. '1 here are soma new sorts still in process of preparation, and in couise of time the enterprising proprietors, who are alwajs making some new improve- ment and ventuie, expect to supply tha market with all the toilet sorts winch now come from England and the Continent In soap of all kinds silicate ot soda ia pretty largely cmplojed. This is really liquid glass. It is made from the sama matenal as glass, and comes out to the colony like lumps ot glass of a deep orange colour. If thrown into a furnace it docs not meit, buC it can bo fused in a liquiel known to soap makers 'I he manufacture of soda crjstals, or washing soda, is hugely carried on. Thesa arc made Horn sodi ash, a product of salt. By the the addition of chemicals to the ash, the crystals mc tunned in tanks. Looking into them, one is reminded of an ice cavern witbpendentieielesotcverj shape, faodacrys tals, ulterall the piocesses they go through.ara only worth twice us much ns salt Soda nsh, the first product, is not made in the colony.

    All the arrangements and appliances of tha firm are adapted lor economy und tha saving ot labour 'lho steam of tha engine is used twice over, 'lhere ara tramways, und trucks, and soap " lorma " on wheels to facilitate the transport of tha solid goods, and the lavis of gravitation and steam pumps are also emplojed to deal with the fluids and semi Hinds The pipes which heat the au chamber have screw plugs, so that brushes may be put in to clean tha cjlinders of smut, winch is a very bad con- ductor of he.it, and thereiore bas to bo got rid of to save fuel A mill expresses the water from the libre of the nee, and serves it up in hurd and portable cakes The labora- tory of the soapmnker is luted with all tim best models und specimens, which it is his business not to copy but to improve upon There appenrs to be good ordei and good management all over the establishment, and the constant enlargement ot its opera- tions would seem to be the best evidence that the public approve of the stnich mid tile soap, which is advertised on every raihvjj boarding in the colony.4
  • 2 Dec 1914, DEATH OF MR. J. B. WHITTY.
    Deep regret will be felt in manufacturing and business circles by the announcement of the death of Mr. John B. Whitty.
    Mr. Whitty, who was 78 years of age, enjoyed excellent health until a few weeks ago, when be suffered an attack of influenza. He remained at his home, Robinson road, Hawthorn, until he was fit to be moved, and his medical adviser suggested that a change of climate might be beneficial. Last week he visited Albury, where the trouble reappeared. On his return to Beechworth he entered St. Anne's private hospital. On Monday double pneumonia set in and he gradually sank and died. Dr. H. F. Walker, of Beechworth, and Dr. Merrillees, of Auburn, were in constant attendance. Mr. Whitty was born in Dublin, and in 1850 came to Melbourne with his parents. His father was specially commended by the British Government to the Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. La Trobe, and on the discovery of gold at the Ovens he was appointed postmaster at Beechworth. Mr. John B. Whitty lived there for several years, and subsequently came to Melbourne where he was employed (among other engagements) in a stock and station agent's office. A chance meeting with the late Mr. Fred. Lewis (they had been members of the Emerald Hill Artillery battery) led to his joining that gentleman in the manufacturing industry, then in its infancy, in connection with which their names afterwards became so well known. From a small beginning in North Melbourne, they built up the large business now carried on by the firm. Mr. Whitty retired a few vears ago. He never sought popularity but his sterling qualities of heart and mind attracted to him a great number of friends. He was extremely charitable, and it may now be mentioned without impropriety that there was scarcely an appeal made in these columns to which he did not cordially respond, though always anonymously. He had artistic tastes, and was particularly fond of music. For many years he was a singing member of the Melbourne Liedertafel, and in later life was always to be counted upon for support of movements to promote musical culture in Victoria. He was a bachelor. His only surviving brother is Mr. Herbert Whitty.5

Citations

  1. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Dec 1914, p1.
  3. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Jun 1885, p6.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 Dec 1914, p8.
Last Edited18 Mar 2016

Frederick Albert Lewis

M, #5714, b. 1842, d. 6 May 1914
Father*Robert Lewis b. 1808, d. 30 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Blackmore b. 1812, d. 10 Aug 1898
Birth*1842 
Marriage*1 Jan 1880 Spouse: Gertrude Mary Berghoff. St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M490.1
 
Marriage-Notice*12 Jan 1880LEWIS-BERGHOFF. -On the 1st inst., at St. Kilda, by the Rev. — Watkin, F A Lewis to Gertrude, eldest daughter of C Berghoff.2 
WidowerMay 1881Frederick Albert Lewis became a widower upon the death of his wife Gertrude Mary Berghoff.1 
Land-UBeac*b 30 Apr 1888Frederick Albert Lewis selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-54. 19a 2r 0p - Land File 521/49.4
Crown Grant to F. A. LEWIS on 30 Apr 1888.3,4 
Land-UBeac*4 Apr 1889 GEM-C-53. Transfer from Edward Charles Whitty to Frederick Albert Lewis. 19a 2r 23p.5 
Land-UBeac*12 Jun 1889 GEM-C-55. Transfer from Mary Elizabeth Lewis to Frederick Albert Lewis. 19a 2r 13p.6 
Marriage*1903 Spouse: Annie Catherine Johnes. VIC, Australia, #M262.7
 
Death*6 May 1914 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D4474 (Age 72) [par Robert LEWIS & Mary BLACKMORE].8 
Death-Notice*7 May 1914LEWIS. On the 6th May, at his late residence, "Leslie", Were street, Brighton Beach, Frederick Albert, loving husband of Annie Lewis... of the firm of Lewis and Whitty, aged 72 years. (No flowers by request.)
buried Brighton.9 
Probate (Will)*26 Jun 1914 134/687. Merchant. Brighton. property in UB: All those pieces of land being Allotments 53, 54, & 55 of Section C Parish of Gembrook and being land at Pakenham of an area of 58 acres 3 roods 36 perches, vacant, unimproved and uncleared.
Valued by Gemmell Tuckett & Co. Pty. Ltd at £73.10 
Land-Note*14 Sep 1914 Frederick Albert Lewis died the 6th day of May 1914. On the 26th day of June 1914 probate of the will and two codicils was granted to Alcon Ninus Ascot Bowman of 142 Canterbury Road South Melbourne Accountant.11,12,13,14 
Land-UBeac*3 Nov 1920 GEM-C-53.54.55. Transfer from Frederick Albert Lewis to Alcon Ninus Ascot Bowman. 19a 2r 23p.15 

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Brighton, VIC, Australia16

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 May 1915, LEWIS.-In loving memory of my dear husband, Frederick Albert Lewis, died May 6, 1914; also loving father of Eric and Beryl.
    Peace, perfect peace. -(Annie C. Lewis.)17

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Jan 1880, p1.
  3. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 521/49.4.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2110-993 - Frederick Albert Lewis of Melbourne Manufacturer.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2113-451 - Frederick Albert Lewis of Flinders Lane West Melbourne Merchant.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2143-553 - Frederick Albert Lewis of Melbourne Manufacturer.
  7. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  8. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 May 1914, p1.
  10. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2113-451 - Frederick Albert Lewis died the 6th day of May 1914. On the 26th day of June 1914 probate of the will and two codicils was granted to Alcon Ninus Ascot Bowman of 142 Canterbury Road South Melbourne Accountant.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2113-451 - cancelled certificate see C/T 4415-805 - R J No 2107267 This certificate is issued pursuant to Sec 79 Act 2740 The duplicate Crown Grant has as is alleged been lost.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2110-993 - cancelled certificate see C/T 4415-804 - R J No 2107267 This certificate is issued pursuant to Sec 79 Act 2740 The duplicate Crown Grant has as is alleged been lost.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2143-553 - cancelled certificate see C/T 4415-803 - R J No 2107267 This certificate is issued pursuant to Sec 79 Act 2740 The duplicate Crown Grant has as is alleged been lost.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4415-803 + 804 + 805 - Alcon Ninus Ascot Bowman of Rostrevor Parade Box Hill Accountant.
  16. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Brighton Cemetery Gravestone - Billion Graves,.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 May 1915, p1.
Last Edited14 Dec 2017

Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd

?, #5720
Name Variation Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd was also known as T. H. Grant and Company Pty Ltd. 
Land-UBeac24 Apr 1899 GEM-C-62.63.64 (part).65.66.67 PAK-248 (part). Transfer from Edward Keep to Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd. 807a 0r 17p.1 
Land-Note31 May 1899 GEM-C-62.63.64 (part).65.66.67 PAK-248 (part): Mortgagee: Edward Keep. Discharged 18 Jan 1906. Mortgagor was Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd.2 
Land-Note25 Jan 1904 GEM-C-62.63.64 (part).65.66.67 PAK-248 (part): Mortgagee: Caroline Eliza Kitchen. Discharged 18 Jan 1906. Mortgagor was Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd.3 
Land-UBeac*1 Jun 1904 GEM-C-65A. Transfer from Patrick Kinney McCaughan to T. H. Grant and Company Pty Ltd. 18a 2r 20p.4 
Land-UBeac7 Dec 1905 GEM-C-64 (part) PAK-248 (part). Transfer from Gertrude Kitchen to Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd.5 
Land-Note18 Jan 1906 GEM-C-62.63.64 (part).65.66.67 PAK-248 (part): Mortgagee: Edwin Currie and Wilfred Henry Johnston - discharged 13 Jun 1912. Mortgagor was Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd.6 
Land-UBeac*12 Sep 1906 GEM-C-46.47A. Transfer from The National Bank of Australasia Ltd to Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd.7 
Land-UBeac12 Sep 1906 GEM-C-48. Transfer from The National Bank of Australasia Ltd to T. H. Grant and Company Pty Ltd. 23a 0r 4p.8 
Land-UBeac*29 Jul 1908 GEM-C-48. Transfer from T. H. Grant and Company Pty Ltd to Charles Alexander Berglund. 23a 0r 4p.9 
Land-UBeac*19 Nov 1908 GEM-C-65A (part). Transfer from T. H. Grant and Company Pty Ltd to King George. Under an acre (pozi listed as GEM-C-65E.)10 
Land-UBeac*22 Aug 1910Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-65B. 0a 0r 24p.11 
Land-UBeac13 Jun 1912 GEM-C-67 (part). Transfer from Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd to Ashley Smart. 50 acres.12 
Land-UBeac11 Sep 1916 GEM-C-67 (part). Transfer from Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd to Nathan Woolf Isaac 'Dick' Woolf. 45a 2r 33p.13 
Land-UBeac*23 Aug 1920 GEM-C-56. Transfer from David Rule to Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd. 19a 2r 27p.14 
Land-UBeac*13 Apr 1921 GEM-C-53.54.55. Transfer from Alcon Ninus Ascot Bowman to Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd. 58a 3r 36p.15 
Land-UBeac*10 Jan 1933 GEM-C-46.47A.53.54.55.56. Transfer from Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd to Frederick William Kitchen.16,17,18,19 
Land-UBeac10 Jan 1933 GEM-C-62.63.64 (part).65.65A.65B.66.67 (part) PAK-248 (part). Transfer from Toomuc Valley Orchards Pty Ltd to Frederick William Kitchen.20 

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2527-293 - T. H. Grant and Company Proprietary Limited No 326 Little Flinders Street Melbourne - C/T 2725-898.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Mortgage No 191597 - discharged 18 Jan 1906.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Mortgage No 224899 - discharged 18 Jan 1906.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2067-209 - T.H. Grant + Company Proprietary Limited of 346 Flinders Stree Melbourne Orchardist.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-897 - T H Grant and Company Pty Ltd - C/T 3098-476.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Mortgage No 240168 - discharged 13 Jun 1912.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1160-944 + 1154-666 - T H Grant + Company Proprietary Limited of 346 Flinders Street Melbourne.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2079-606 - T. H. Grant + Company Pty Ltd of 346 Flinders Street Melbourne.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2079-606 - Charles Alexander Berglund of 120 Rupert Street Collingwood Civil Servant.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2067-209 - T.H. Grant + Company to His Majesty the King.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3457-263 - Toomuc Valley Orchards Proprietary Limited.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Ashley Smart of Gembrook Road Pakenham Orchardist - C/T 3591-112.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Nathan Woolf and Richard Woolf both of Western Market William Street Melbourne Fruit Merchants - tenants in common in equal shares - C/T 3998-495 - Richard's name changed to Isaac Woolf on a replacement title C/T 5539-709 dated 8 Mar 1929.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2550-900 - Toomuc Valley Orchards Proprietary Limited.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4415-805 - C/T 4439-645 - Toomuc Valley Orchards Proprietary Limited of 10 and 12 Queen Street Melbourne.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4439-645 - C/T 5845-978 - Frederick William Kitchen of 17 Sorrett Avenue Malvern Manufacturer.
  17. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2550-900 - C/T 5845-978 - Frederick William Kitchen of 17 Sorrett Avenue Malvern Manufacturer (GEM-C-56).
  18. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1160-944 - C/T 5845-978 - Frederick William Kitchen of 17 Sorrett Avenue Malvern Manufacturer (GEM-C-47A).
  19. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1154-666 - C/T 5845-978 - Frederick William Kitchen of 17 Sorrett Avenue Malvern Manufacturer (GEM-C-46).
  20. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2725-898 - Frederick William Kitchen of 17 Sorrett Avenue Malvern Manufacturer - C/T 5845-979 (only contains GEM-C-67 (balance) - other land contained in C/T 5845-978.
Last Edited17 Aug 2017

Mary Elizabeth Blackmore

F, #5721, b. 1812, d. 10 Aug 1898
Married NameLewis. 
Birth*1812 April 25 1815 • Devon England.1,2 
Marriage* Spouse: Robert Lewis.
 
Land-UBeac*b 30 Apr 1888 GEM-C-55. Transfer from Mary Elizabeth Lewis to an unknown person . 19a 2r 13p - Land File 520/49.4
Crown Grant to M. E. LEWIS on 30 Apr 1888.3,4 
Land-UBeac*12 Jun 1889 GEM-C-55. Transfer from Mary Elizabeth Lewis to Frederick Albert Lewis. 19a 2r 13p.5 
Death*10 Aug 1898 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D11034 (Age 86) [par Robert BLACKMORE & Elizabeth BUTCHER].1 
Death-Notice*12 Aug 1898LEWIS.-On the 10th August, at her late residence, Leslie Were-road Brighton Beach, Mary Elizabeth, relict of the late Robert Lewis of Melbourne, aged 86 years. Deeply regretted.6 

Family

Robert Lewis b. 1808, d. 30 Jan 1871
Child 1.Frederick Albert Lewis+ b. 1842, d. 6 May 1914

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ottieoswald.
  3. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 520/49.4.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2143-553 - Mary Elizabeth Lewis of Brighton Beach.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2143-553 - Frederick Albert Lewis of Melbourne Manufacturer.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Aug 1898, p1.
Last Edited23 Jul 2017

Robert Lewis

M, #5722, b. 1808, d. 30 Jan 1871
Birth*1808 Dublin, Ireland.1 
Marriage*17 Mar 1829 Spouse: Eliza Radcliffe. Kennington St Mark, England.2
 
Marriage Spouse: Mary Elizabeth Blackmore.
 
Death*30 Jan 1871 Hotham, VIC, Australia, #D1596 (Age 63) [par Robert & Kate].3 
Death-Notice*31 Jan 1871LEWIS. — On the 30th inst., at his residence, Curzon-street, Hotham, Mr. Robert Lewis, after protracted suffering, aged 63 years.4 
Probate (Will)*7 Aug 1897 LEWIS Robert of Melbourne colony of Victoria publican died 30 January 1871 Administration (Limited) London 7 August 1897 to Frederick Stanley Solicitor the attorney of Robert Edward Lewis Effects £441 12s 5d.5 

Family 1

Eliza Radcliffe b. 12 Sep 1812, d. 30 Mar 1897
Child 1.Robert Edward Lewis+ b. 14 May 1830, d. 3 Oct 1917

Family 2

Mary Elizabeth Blackmore b. 1812, d. 10 Aug 1898
Child 1.Frederick Albert Lewis+ b. 1842, d. 6 May 1914

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ottieoswald - born 8 Sept 1805 • Baltinglass County Wicklow Ireland.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ottieoswald.
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "Place of birth DUBL - Spouse BLACKMORE Mary."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 31 Jan 1871, p4.
  5. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
Last Edited23 Jul 2017
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.