William Calder Russell

M, #9544, b. 1887
Father*William Russell b. 1852, d. 11 Oct 1922
Mother*Mary Ann Ball b. 1850, d. 29 May 1927
Birth*1887 Gorbals, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, #B 644/12 692 [Gorbals].1 
Marriage*1911 Spouse: Mary McConnell. Shettleston, Scotland, #M 1911 622/2 31 [Shettleston].2
 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
5 Apr 189155 Victoria Street, Govan, Lanarkshire, Scotland(Head of Household) William Russell;
Age 3
Member(s) of Household: Mary Ann Russell, Nathaniel Corstorphine, Florence Corstorphine, Edith Ball Russell3
31 Mar 190118 Budhill Avenue, Shettleston, Lanarkshire, Scotland(Head of Household) William Russell;
Age 13 - Scholar
Member(s) of Household: Mary Ann Russell Edith Ball Russell4
2 Apr 191189 Reidhill Avenue, Shettleston, Lanarkshire, ScotlandHead of Household: William Calder Russell. Age 23 - Dairy Vanman
Member(s) of Household: Mary Russell.5

Citations

  1. [S250] General Register Office for Scotland Indexes "Statutory registers - Births."
  2. [S250] General Register Office for Scotland Indexes "Statutory registers - Marriages."
  3. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Govan; ED: 31; Page: 17; Line: 20; Roll: CSSCT1891_307."
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Shettleston; ED: 12; Page: 31; Line: 18; Roll: CSSCT1901_244."
  5. [S250] General Register Office for Scotland Indexes "1911 census image."
Last Edited2 Feb 2019

Nathaniel Corstorphine

M, #9545, b. 1849, d. 2 May 1884
Birth*1849 Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland. 
Marriage*26 Feb 1868 Spouse: Mary Ann Ball. 24 Lynedoch Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1
 
Death*2 May 1884 Hutchesontown, Lanarkshire, Scotland, Typhoid Fever.2

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 18819 Adelphi Street, Hutchesontown, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, ScotlandHead of Household: Nathaniel Corstorphine. Age 32 - Tailor & Clothier Master 1 Man
Member(s) of Household: Mary Ann Corstorphine, Mary Ball Corstorphine, Margaret Somerville Corstorphine, Annie Ferguson Corstorphine, Nathaniel Corstorphine, George Corstorphine.3

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Wakeham Family Tree - Owner: Trotter_Linda.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Wakeham Family Tree - Owner: Trotter_Linda (death certificate).
  3. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Glasgow Hutchesontown; ED: 4; Page: 23; Line: 14; Roll: cssct1881_242."
Last Edited25 Jun 2014

James Gibb

M, #9557, b. 1843, d. 22 Feb 1919
James GIBB
Father*Alexander Gibb
Mother*Elizabeth Cooper
Note* Matilda Wridgway Matilda WRIDGWAY may have worked for James GIBB.1 
Birth*1843 Campbellfield, VIC, Australia, #B948 [par Alexander & Elizabeth].2,3 
Land-Berwick15 Feb 1878 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to George Brown. 6a 1r 19p - 68798 (5 pieces) - see C/T 1016-156.4 
Land-Berwick15 Feb 1878 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Robert Bain. 3r 39p - 68793 - see C/T 1016-151 (acreage later amended.)5 
Land-Berwick15 Feb 1878 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Hector McKenzie Sutherland. 2r - 68795 - see C/T 1016-154.6 
Land-Berwick16 May 1878 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Thomas Henderson. 3r 9 1/4p - 70850 - see C/T 1036-060.7 
Land-Berwick16 May 1878 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Murdoch McDonald. 1r 28p - 70848 - see C/T 1036-058.8 
Land-Berwick14 Jan 1879 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Robert Officer. 1a 2r - 75880 - see C/T 1083-435.9 
Land-Berwick14 Jan 1879 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to James Richardson. 4a - 75878 - see C/T 1083-433.10 
Land-Berwick14 Jan 1879 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Henry Searle. 1a 1r 16 4/10p - 75879 - see C/T 1083-434.11 
Land-Berwick22 May 1879 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to William Atkins Dalton. 2r - 78570 - see C/T 1107-355.12 
Land-Berwick22 May 1879 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Joseph Clarke. 1r - 78571 - see C/T 1107-356.13 
Land-Note*bt 1884 - 1896 BER-18 (part): also some easements to
Grace Mary Poole - No 376435 - 13 Nov 1896 - C/T 2629-732
Alexander Bruce Bennie - No 373699 - 17 Aug 1896 - C/T 2620-984
Richard Skews - No 157590 - 13 Oct 1885 - C/T 1762-278
Her Majesty the Queen - No 126303 - 22 Jan 1884 - C/T 1530-808.14 
Land-Berwick20 May 1886 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to James Richardson. 5a - 169142 - see C/T 1822-313.15 
Land-Berwick1 Feb 1887 BER-18 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Margaret Ginty.16 
Land-UBeac*3 Sep 1888 PAK-223.224. Transfer from Frederick McCoy to James Gibb. 39a 3r 27p.17 
Land-UBeac*15 Oct 1895 PAK-223 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to Anne Elizabeth Robertson. 9a 0r 3p - Caveat lodged 27 Jul 1893.18 
Marriage*30 Jul 1898 Spouse: Mary Jane Paterson. Carlton, VIC, Australia, #M6463/1908.19
 
Marriage-Notice*13 Aug 1898GIBB-BROWN,-On the 30th July, at Cramond house, Queensberry-street, Carlton, by the Rev. D. S. M'Eachran, James Gibb, of Melville-park, Berwick, to Mary, relict of the late George Brown, of Inveresk, Berwick.20 
Land-Beac*9 Oct 1903 PAK-32.33 l/p 2963 (Lots 2.3). Transfer from Augustus Loriot Nott to James Gibb. 7a 2r 19p.21 
Land-Beac*31 Aug 1911 PAK-32.33 l/p 2963 (Lots 2.3). Transfer from James Gibb to Samuel Peter MacKay. 7a 2r 19p.22 
Land-UBeac*24 May 1913 PAK-223.224 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to George Hodges Knox. Total 30a 3r 1p (incl. PAK-224 and PAK-222.223 (part.)23 
Death*22 Feb 1919 Glenroy, VIC, Australia, #D672 (age 75) [par Alexander GIBB & Elizabeth COOPER].2,24 
Death-Notice*6 Mar 1919Mr. James Gibb died at Glenroy on the 22nd ult., at the age of 76 years. Deceased, who resided at Berwick for many years, was at one period a member of the Federal Parliament, and was one who took a keen and active interest in all public matters; the news of his demise was received in this district with many sincere expressions of regret. He was born at Campbellfield, where his father, the late Alexander Gibb, settled in 1840. Mr James Gibb left Scotch College at the age of seventeen, and settled in Berwick, where he built up one of the best farms in Victoria. He could claim the credit for tree planting, etc, which has made Berwick one of the most charming town ships in southern Victoria. He represented Mornington for many years in the State Parliament, and succeeded Mr Groom as representative for Flinders in the Federal Parliament. He left the Berwick district, and settled in Riverina (near Wagga), and was selected to oppose Sir William Lyne for Hume in the Federal Parliament. He was defeated - his only defeat in a long parliamentary career. He was a member of the Berwick Shire council for over 30 years, and one of the earliest members of the council of the Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria, of which he was a trustee until within a few years of his death. He was an enthusiastic breeder of live stock, and established a reputation for Clydesdale horses and Ayrshire cattle. He was one of the first breeders in Victoria to import pure-bred Lincoln sheep from England. Later on he imported Shropshire sheep from the same country. A brother, Mr Alex. Gibb, resides at Campbellfield.25 

Grave

  • Will Will Rook Pioneer Cemetery, Campbellfield, VIC, Australia, In Memory of James Gibb M.H.R. Late of Melville Park Berwick Died 22nd Feb 1919 Aged 76 years2

Newspaper-Articles

  • 25 Mar 1876, FARMING AT BERWICK. [FROM OUR TRAVELLING REPORTER.]
    The prosperous-looking little township of Berwick is situated twenty-eight miles eastward from Melbourne, and is passed through by the main Gippsland-road at the point where it crosses the southern extremity of the Dandonong range. The district by which the township is surrounded formed originally the squatting station of Captain Gardiner, who purchased the best of the run from the Crown by auction and cut it up in farms, and resold it about twenty years since. Most of the original purchasers are still in possession of their holdings. The farming country much resembles that of the Kangaroo Ground and the Lower Plenty, being hilly, heavily timbered, and composed of dark basaltic soil, which is for the most part richest and deepest on the tops of the rises. The district, in soil and general appearance, resembles also that of Drysdale, and judging from a sample exhibited at the show held during my visit it appears to possess a similar adaptability for onion growing, Its capabilities in this direction are however yet undeveloped, the sample being an isolated one. The opening of the Gippsland railway, one of whose stations is to be at Berwick, will probably have the effect of directing attention to this profitable crop, and in the way that the opening of the Creswick railway has developed potato-growing in the Bullarook district will likely produce a similar result here. The Berwick district used to produce potatoes largely during its earlier career, when the work of clearing the farms from timber was being carried on, and when the high prices ruling for potatoes handsomely repaid the carriage. During their career the settlers of the district have had their experiences of the unprofitableness of attempting cereal farming alone with harvests of wheat and other grain have been obtained, but these have been altercated with seasons of thin crops, and rust, which while diminishing the profits of the farmer pointed out to him the necessity for a rota tion of crops, combined with stock- and cul tivated grasses. The special feature of the district is, however the manufacture of cheese by what is known as the Cheddar process. So rapidly has this industry spread in the district that there are few farms which are not engaged in it. Amongst the few exceptions is the farm of Mr. Jas Gibbs, the president of the local agricultural society. This farm comprises Captain Gardi ner's original preemptive selection, with a half section afterwards added, making the total holding now 960 acres. Mr. Gibbs devotes his attention to draught stock breeding, his stud comprising a very superior selection of brood mares, and the recently imported stallion King of the Valley, purchased, by his pre sent proprietor at a cost of 1000 guineas. In addition to what he requires for his own stock, Mr. Gibbs grows a large quantity of oaten hay for the supply of Cobb and Co's. Gippsland line of mail horses. The cropped portion of the farm is worked in rotation, with cultivated pasture, on which some good long-woolled sheep are kept. The hay is stacked with the latest labor-saving derrick appliances and put into marketable form by means of handy chaff-cutting and bagging arrangements. Mr. Gibbs's barn and stabling accommodation is roomy and substantial, and the farm generally presents a most creditable air of trimness and order.
    To Messrs. Jas. and Robert Buchanan the district is chiefly indebted for the introduction of cheese-making, an industry that is spoken of by all who have tried it as the most remunerative branch of husbandry they have yet had experience of. The Messrs. Buchanan are among the earliest of the Berwick settlers, having settled upon a 640 acre section which they purchased and worked at first in partnership. They now occupy the section in two separate farms of 320 acres each, which have been cleared, subdivided, partially sown down, and furnished with all the buildings and appliances necessary for carrying on the business to the best advan tage. About 100 head of superior Ayrshire cattle are kept on each farm, and the number of cows in milk usually average about forty all the year round. The milking-house on both establishments is made with separate stalls and feeding places for each cow, and large sheds adjoining contain an abundant supply of hay for winter use ; while mangels, maize, and other green fodder crops receive due attention in the field. From the large area of roofing a full supply of water is ob tained, conserved in tanks, and conveyed to the cheese houses as required. The distinguishing feature in the new, or Cheddar, system of cheese making consists in the application of heat to separate the whey from the curd, by which such a uniformity of quality is ensured as could not be calculated upon under the old method. All the various details of the process being reduced to a system, and the labor connected with it being reduced to a minimum by means of the machinery and appliances used, the drudgery connected with the old method is obviated. The application of the necessary heat is obtained on each of the Messrs. Buchanan's establishments by means of steam apparatus and the processes as conducted on each farm are so similar that a description of one will do for both. Selecting Mr. Jas. Buchanan's the day's proceedings are briefly as follows : — The herd is milked twice a day, the evening's milk being kept over till the morning. Both milkings are then passed through the strainer into the milk tub, a large copper vessel of 200 gallons capacity, occupying the centre of the manufacturing room, this milk-tub has a double bottom and sides, into the space between which a jet of steam is introduced from the boiler sufficient to raise the milk to 84 deg., the temperature at which it is 'set' for coagulation. Cold water pipes also communicate with the milk vessel, so that the steam can be shut off and water turned on should the temperature be unduly raised. Annatto, for coloring, and rennet for coagulating, is now introduced, and the whole is completely mixed. Coagulation is completed from fifty to sixty minutes. As soon as the curd becomes moderately firm the process of breaking it up commences, which is done by implements made for the purpose, the temperature being raised meanwhile to 102 deg. This process, which is called "cooking" the curd, is carried on until a peculiar degree of firmness and consistency, known to the practical cheesemaker by handling, is attained, after which the whey is drawn off by a pipe communicating with the piggeries. The curd is then cooled, salted, packed into the cheese vats and placed under the presses, after which the cheeses are removed to the shelves of the store-room. The various processes, from the milking in the morning to the pressing, are got over generally not later than noon of the same day, and the cheeses remain on an average about two and a-half days in the press-room and three months in the store-room, at the end of which period they are sent to market. The portable nature of the commodity is not its least feature of merit, a considerable amount of value going into small bulk. The Messrs. Buchanan produce a superior article which always commands the top price, and they are known in the district as always having shown the utmost readiness to teach their neighbors how to attain similar excellence. They believe that the greater the quantity of cheese produced in the colony (providing it is of first-class quality), the better will be the price and the more steady the demand, this effect following as a direct result of our present export trade being largely increased. Mr. James Buchanan's books show the following wholesale prices per lb., received for each month's produce during 1875 :— January, 10d; February, 10¼d; March, 10d; April, 10d; May, 10d; June, 10d; July, 10d; August, 10d; September, 10d; October, 10½d; November, 11¾d; December, 10½d. The total quantity sold from the farm amounts to on average of ten tons per annum ; and there is a considerable return from pigs and other sources. The animal yield of milk has been reduced to some extent during the past year or two by the pastures being rather badly overrun with what is known as the yellow weed (Hypochæris radiata). Mr. Buchanan seldom employs more than two hands, who, together with his own personal superintendence, and occasional assist ance from one or two of his family, are found sufficicient to carry on all the operations.26
  • 26 Sep 1877, PRELIMINARY NOTICE. Township of New Berwick. EGAN CLARKE Are instructed by Robert Ker, 43 Bourke street west, as agent for James Gibb, Esq., of Berwick, to SELL by AUCTION on an early day, of which due notice will be given, 57 BUILDING ALLOTMENTS, in the Township of New Berwick, having frontages to streets one chain wide, abutting on the Railway reserve, close to the Berwick Station, also, to High street, Berwick, (Main Gippsland road), opposite Bain's Hotel, and to other important roads. From the advantages of the situation and suitability of the ground for building purposes, these allotments must command the attention of business men and others about to settle in this rising neighborhood. For plans and further particulars apply to Mr. Bain, Bain's Hotel, Berwick; to the auctioneers, Dandenong; or to Mr. Robert Ker, estate agent, 43 Bourke street west.27
  • 6 Mar 1919, The numerous friends of Mr James Gibb were grieved to hear of his death a few days ago. Mr Gibb was one of the pioneers of this district and, as a loyal citizen, did much to further its interests.28

Citations

  1. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), evidence at inquest that Matilda worked for Mr Gibb at Glenroy
    VPRS 24/ P0 unit 970, item 1918/946.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Yuille_Martin - Owner: JeffYuille69.
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "baptism Presbyterian Melbourne Fiche 1098
    siblings [par Alexander GIBB & Elizabeth COUPAR]."
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1016-156 - George Brown of Berwick County of Mornington Storekeeper.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1016-151 - Robert Bain of Berwick County of Mornington Hotelkeeper.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1016-154 - Hector Mackenzie Sutherland of Dandenong County of Bourke Bank Manager.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1036-060 - Thomas Henderson of Berwick Builder.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1036-058 - Murdoch McDonald of Berwick.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1083-435 - Robert Officer of Berwick Gentleman.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1083-433 - James Richardson of Berwick Carrier.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1083-434 - Henry Searle of Berwick.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1107-355 - William Atkins Walton of Berwick.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1107-356 - Joseph Clarke of Dandenong Auctioneer.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2629-732 ; C/T 2620-984 ; C/T 1762-278 ; C/T 1530-808.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1822-313 - James Richardson.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1000-992 - C/T 1891-089 - Margaret Ginty.
  17. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1822-398 - James Gibb of Berwick Gentleman.
  18. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1822-398 - Ann Elizabeth Robertson the wife of Alexander Sanderson Robertson of High Street Malvern Grain Merchant - C/T 2589-614.
  19. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "year is 1908 - newspaper writes about marriage in 1898."
  20. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 13 Aug 1898, p55.
  21. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2274-764 - James Gibb of Berwick Grazier.
  22. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2274-764 - Samuel Peter MacKay of Melville Park Berwick Esquire.
  23. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1822-398 - George Hodges Knox of Yuulong Beaconsfield Upper Gentleman - C/T 3695-806 (incl. PAK-224 and PAK-222.223 (part) total 30a 3r 1p.
  24. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  25. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 6 Mar 1919, p2.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne), 25 Mar 1876, p6+7.
  27. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 26 Sep 1877, p2.
  28. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1877 - 1920; 1926 - 1927), Thu 6 Mar 1919, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66195665
Last Edited10 Mar 2019

Henry Bell

M, #9561
Occupation*6 Jan 1879 Splitter and fencer of Beaconsfield.1 
Land-UBeac*6 Jan 1879Henry Bell selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-12. 19a 3r 12p - Crown grant to W. WILLIAMS on 22 Sep 1888.2 
Land-Note31 May 1879 GEM-C-12: Beaconsfield May 31/79. To Dr L. L. Smith, MLA
Dear Sir, About 4 months ago, Mr Wm. Williams of Melbourne (who at one time was a carriage manufacturer there) took up 20 acres at Beaconsfield - according to my directions he sent up his application to the Treasury with the usual fee of one pound. By some mistake the messenger who took up the money and application form after obtaining the registration certificate brought both away with him. Meantime a man who works in the neighbourhood discovered the mistake peg off the land. I soon discovered what had been done and on speaking with the latter was informed he would take £10 and give it up. Of course he only wanted it for a spec.
I refused and shortly afterwards finding it was no use trying it on, he said if he got his expenses he would throw it up. I told him I would hand over to him the £5 which I would receive for my commission, he agreed. I then asked him to call and sign the paper intimating to the Lands Department his intention of throwing it up. I then informed Mr Williams of the result of my negotiations with Bell, who authorised me to complete matters. Mr Jarram who adjoins the block referred to wishing his land fenced. I on the strength of getting paid from Mr Williams completed the whole line and did a few other improvements.
Now Mr Bell wishes to back out unless he gets something extra. In short he has no bona fide intentions as the block was simply taken up to make money out of it as he told me so and I have a number of witnesses who can testify to what I assert.
The ground is no use for cultivation, It will only do for people who can afford to lay out money in an ornamental sense and can therefore be no use to the person who has it. I wish you to lay the matter before Mr Longmore? It will be a pity if Mr Williams does not get the land as he was about to build a house on it. The whole ?dealing is an attempt to extort money and I am sure the Minister won't approve of such sharp practise.
Yours W. Brisbane

With reference to subject matter of this letter I am unable to give an opinion except that I saw the clearing and fencing mentioned therein done by Mr Brisbane for the applicant Mr Williams. It is for the department to decide if Brisbane's statement is correct if so did Bell obtain the license in a clandestine manner. John ?Jerram 6/6/79.3 
Land-Note*3 Jun 1879 GEM-C-12: W. Williams Esq. Dear Sir, The bearer is the party that has that block of land at Beaconsfield which Mr Brisbane was speaking to you about. He is a fencer by trade, and will let you have that block by paying him £8.5/-, the amount it has cost him in getting it; on the condition that you will allow him to do the fencing. He will put up a substantial two-railed fence and find the materials for 19/- per chain. Henry Bell.1 
Land-Note10 Jun 1879 GEM-C-12: The Australian and European Bank Limited, Melbourne 10 June 1879. Dear Sir, Enclosed please find copy of a letter received by me a day or two ago.
I would merely say in this connection that I have no wish to be mixed up in any dispute in this or any other block of land at Beaconsfield or elsewhere and would prefer to give it up if such were probable.
On this fence of England's I propose to build but shall do nothing if there are rival claims, Yours truly W Williams.
To Brisbane Esq.1 
Land-Note*24 Jun 1879 GEM-C-12: Beaconsfield June 24/79. The Honorable, The Minister of Lands. Sir, I beg to enclose correspondence in case of H. Bell who has selected 20 acres in the Parish of Pakenham under the 49th Clause, as he has not taken up the land for bona fide, but for speculative purposes. I now apply for the land referred to to be open for re-selection.
I have the honour to ... W. Brisbane
PS. Mr Williams first sent me a copy of the letter then the original. W.B.1 
Land-Note27 Jun 1879 GEM-C-12: Departmental Notes:
How does the rent stand? (Rent paid to 1 Apr 1880)
It appears that the holder of the license has not employed Mr Brisbane as his agent — hence, I presume, his action.
At the same time I think, some enquiry should be made into Bell's bona fides. (Request Bell to furnish an explanation of his letters to Mr Williams from Mr Brisbane.)4 
Land-Note15 Jul 1879 GEM-C-12: Beaconsfield, July 15th 1879
Sir, In answer to your letter of the 8th July I beg to inform you that I had no idea of selling the land. I have had several contract jobs of fencing for Mr Brisbane. He was constantly asking me to throw it up as he had got a gentleman that wanted it. What I said was if I was paid the expenses I have been put to and for throwing it up I should have the work of fencing it. I beg to state I am working on it and getting ready to live on it.
I remain yours truely Henry Bell.4 
Land-Note21 Jul 1879 GEM-C-12: Beaconsfield via Berwick July 21st 1879 Melbourne Corr 1078 No 49.
Sir, I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letters also that I answered your letter of the 8th on the 15th so that I think the letters crossed each other in the event of the last letter not having reached you I beg to state I was accustomed to taking contracts of fencing for Mr Brisbane, he several times asked me to throw it up as he knew a gentleman would like it so I said if I got the contract for fencing and what expense I had been put to they might have it otherwise I had no intention of parting with the land also wish to state I have been working on the land and am putting up a house and residing on it.
I remain Sir, yours truley Henry Bell. 
Land-Note26 Sep 1879 GEM-C-12: License revoked Gazette No 92 - Open for selection 10/10/1879.4 
Land-Note27 Nov 1879 GEM-C-12: Inspected by Mounted Constable James Gilfedder: No fencing, no land cleared or cultivated, not suitable for cultivation. A slab hut, bark roof 12x8x6 feet high some farming around the hut, valued at £3. Henry Bell resides on the land, resided on it since he took it up, he was a bona fide selector.5 
Land-UBeac26 Dec 1879 GEM-C-12. Transfer from Henry Bell to an unknown person . Beaconsfield December 26/79. Sir, In reference to your communication of the 23rd December requesting me to sign a paper for the sum of £3.0.0 three pounds. I will simply state the money that I have laid out on the land if I receive it in full I will sign a transfer to Mr Williams. I would have done all the omprovements required long ago only for the interference of Mr Brisbane. The sum total of what I laid out is £10.3.10.
When I receive this amount I will leave the land, until then I consider the land mine.
Yours truly Henry Bell
For time lost in pegging out the ground ... 7 .. 0
On or about the 6th of Jan/79 I went to Melbourne and put in an application which cost me ... £1.0.0
My expenses to Melbourne and my time I value at 13/- ... 13 .. 0
On the 20th of February I went to Cranbourne to attend the local land board which cost me 7/- ... 7 .. 0
On the 22nd of May I paid £ 3.5.10
in the land office and have receipt for same
On the 26th of August I had to attend at the local land board in Melbourne which cost me 13/- ... 13.0
For splitting and cutting timber preparing to fence ... 1.0.0
House valued at ... £3.0.0
Road board tax ... 5.0
Total £10.3.10.4 
Land-Note5 Jan 1880 GEM-C-12: Departmental Notes: Inform that he has no claim to anything more than the £3. Instruct Bailiff to take possession and then issue license to Williams.
I this day took possession of the above land John Yeoman 7/2/80.4 
Land-Note10 Jan 1880 GEM-C-12: Gembrook Jan 10/80. To the Secretary of Lands. Sir, I beg to enclose the account for £3.0.0. Signed by me you will please send the amount at once. Yours truly, Henry Bell.4 

Citations

  1. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2936/49.4.
  2. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2936/49.4. Originally selected by H. ENGLAND in 1877, but abandoned, then James A. DAVIS, then Henry BELL, but crown grant to W. WILLIAMS on 22 Sep 1888.
  3. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2936/49.4. VPRS 439/P0000/250 49/2936 GEMBROOK C -- 12 19--3--12
    Originally selected by H. ENGLAND in 1877, but abandoned, then James A. DAVIS, then Henry BELL, but crown grant to W. WILLIAMS on 22 Sep 1888.
  4. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2936/49.4.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2097-397 - William Williams of Armadale Contractor.
Last Edited16 Dec 2018

James Alfred Davis

M, #9562, b. 1836, d. 28 Oct 1919
Birth*1836 
Marriage*1858 Spouse: Honor Henwood. VIC, Australia, #M1484.1
 
Occupation*1878 Storekeeper in Berwick.2 
Land-UBeac*27 Apr 1878James Alfred Davis selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-12. 19a 3r 12p - Crown grant to W. WILLIAMS on 22 Sep 1888.3 
Land-Note*22 Aug 1878 GEM-C-12: Application refused for non-appearance - throw land open for selection.2 
Widower15 Dec 1916He became a widower upon the death of his wife Honor Henwood.4,5 
Death*28 Oct 1919 Perth, WA, Australia, #D1327.6,7 
Death-Notice*28 Oct 1919DAVIS. — The Friends of the late Mr. JAMES ALFRED DAVIS, relict of the late Honor Davis, and of 206 Brisbane street, Perth, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment the Anglican Cemetery, Karrakatta. The Funeral is appointed to leave his late residence, 206 Brisbane-street, Perth, at 10.15 o'clock TO-MORROW (Wednesday) MORNING, per road.
Friends wishing to attend the Funeral may proceed bv the 11 a.m. train leaving Perth.
C. H. SMITH and CO., Undertakers, 281 Newcastle-street, Perth. TeL A1231.8 
Death-Notice30 Oct 1919DAVIS.—On October 28, at his late residence, 206 Brisbane-street, Perth, James Alfred, relict of the late Honor Davis, fond father of Mrs. S. P. Hodder, Mrs. C. E. Stevens, Harry A., Charles W., William J., Walter G., Edgar A., and Francis W. Davis, aged 83 years. At rest. Victorian papers please copy.
DAVIS.—On October 28, at his daughter's residence, 206 Brisbane-street. Perth, James Alfred Davis, the dearly-loved father of Mrs. Hodder, Perth; Mrs. Ern. Stevens, Vic; also Harry Charles, Victoria; Will., Watty, Ted, Frank, W.A; in his 84th year. Deeply mourned.9 

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "as Nora Henwood."
  2. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  3. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2936/49.4. Originally selected by H. ENGLAND in 1877, but license revoked, then James A. DAVIS, then Henry BELL, but crown grant to W. WILLIAMS on 22 Sep 1888.
  4. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of KARRAKATTA CEMETERY ANGLICAN DA Section 0431 - as Honah,.
  5. [S62] Western Australian Government. BDM Index Western Australia "as Honah DAVIS."
  6. [S62] Western Australian Government. BDM Index Western Australia.
  7. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of KARRAKATTA CEMETERY ANGLICAN DA Section 0431,.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Tue 28 Oct 1919, p8.
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), Thu 30 Oct 1919, p26.
Last Edited2 Feb 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.