George Hodges Knox

M, #1445, b. 17 Dec 1885, d. 11 Jul 1960
Sir George Hodges KNOX
(1885-1960)
Father*William Knox b. 25 Apr 1850, d. 25 Aug 1913
Mother*Catherine McMurtrie
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS

World War I

George Hodges Knox enlisted with the 23rd Battalion Headquarters as a Captain. His unit embarked on 10 May 1915 from Melbourne on board HMAT A14 Euripides. He was mentioned in Despatches, was made a Lieutenant-Colonel and a Companion of the Order of St.Michael and St. George.
He returned to Australia on 2 May 1918.
His name is listed on the Honour Board at the Upper Beaconsfield RSL.1
AnecdoteThe City of Knox is named after Sir George Knox (1899), KBE, CMG. For its motto the city took his family motto ‘Move and Prosper’.
George Knox, born in 1885, worked briefly as an electrical engineer until settling as an orchardist at Beaconsfield. In World War I he commanded a battalion at Gallipoli and in France where he was blown up in 1916 and evacuated to England. In 1923 he was elected to the Ferntree Gully Shire Council and from 1927 until his death in 1960 he sat in Parliament, where he was an effective and impartial Speaker in 1942–47. He was knighted in 1945.2 
Birth*17 Dec 1885 Prahran, VIC, Australia, #B12943/1886.3 
Marriage*4 Feb 1909 Spouse: Kathleen Purves McPherson. Christ Church, South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #M376.4
 
Marriage-Notice*16 Feb 1909KNOX–MACPHERSON. —On the 4th February at Christ Church, South Yarra, by the Rev. Canon Tucker, George Hodges, eldest son of the Hon. William Knox M.H.R., to Kathleen Purves, only daughter of the late Robert MacPherson.5 
Land-UBeac4 Oct 1911 PAK-60 l/p 1137 (Lots 48.49). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to George Hodges Knox. 8a 3r 31p.6,7 
Land-UBeac4 Oct 1911 PAK-223 (part). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to George Hodges Knox. 9a 0r 3p.8 
Land-UBeac4 Oct 1911 PAK-222. Transfer from George Wilson Martin to George Hodges Knox. 19a 3r 4p.9 
Land-Note*4 Oct 1911 PAK-60 l/p 1137 (Lots 48.49): Mortgagee: Alexander Fraser, Thomas Robert Burrows, James Robert Thear and Jonathan Edward Pittock - discharged 11 Apr 1912 (G H Knox took over mortgage). Mortgagor was George Hodges Knox.7 
Land-UBeac*7 Oct 1912 PAK-219. Transfer from Charles Alexander Berglund to George Hodges Knox. 19a 2r 34p.10 
Land-UBeac7 Oct 1912 PAK-218.220. Transfer from Charles Alexander Berglund to George Hodges Knox. 19a 3r 38p + 19a 3r 38p.11 
Land-UBeac*31 Jan 1913 PAK-119. Transfer from George Wilson Martin to George Hodges Knox. 19a 3p 3r.12 
Land-UBeac*24 May 1913 PAK-223.224 (part). Transfer from James Gibb to George Hodges Knox. Total 30a 3r 1p (incl. PAK-224 and PAK-222.223 (part.)13 
Land-UBeac*26 Mar 1914 PAK-225. Transfer from William Nichol to George Hodges Knox. 20a 0r 0p.14 
Land-UBeac17 Feb 1915 PAK-218.220 (part). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Shire of Berwick. For Officer-Upper Beaconsfield Road - cutting through PAK-218+220.15 
Land-UBeac*22 Jun 1915 PAK-60 l/p 1137 (Lot 49 part). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Shire of Berwick. Small corner of land for road purposes.16 
Land-UBeac31 May 1916 Former government road. Transfer from Shire of Berwick to George Hodges Knox. 2a 0r 1p - former government road - gazetted 24 May 1916 No 112 p 1989.17 
Divorce*3 Jun 191918 
Residence*4 Jun 1919 "Yuulong", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, quoted as "Yarong" in newspaper.19 
Land-UBeac*5 Aug 1919 GEM-D-1 l/p 2461 (Lots 22.23). Transfer from Emma Shorthouse to George Hodges Knox.20 
Land-UBeac17 Jan 1921 Former government road. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Beatrice Starkey. Part of former government road.21 
Land-UBeac17 Jan 1921 PAK-219.222. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Beatrice Starkey. 19a 3r 4p + 19a 2r 34p.22 
Land-UBeac17 Jan 1921 PAK-223. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Beatrice Starkey.23 
Land-UBeac*17 Jan 1921 PAK-60 l/p 1137 (Lot 48 part). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Beatrice Starkey.24 
Land-UBeac*9 Feb 1921 GEM-D-1 l/p 2461 (Lots 22.23). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Victorian Orchardist's Co-operative Association Ltd.25 
Land-UBeac18 Mar 1921 PAK-225. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to King George. 20a 0r 0p.26 
Land-UBeac18 Mar 1921 PAK-224. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to King George.27 
Land-UBeac18 Mar 1921 Former government road. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to King George. Part of former government road.28 
Land-UBeac*18 Mar 1921 PAK-60 l/p 1137 (Lots 48.49 part). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to King George. Balance.29 
Marriage*19 Aug 1921 Spouse: Ada Victoria Harris. Malvern, VIC, Australia, #M8709.30
 
Land-UBeac*21 Aug 1939 PAK-119. Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Frank Douglas Barnes. 19a 3p 3r.31 
Land-UBeac*14 Nov 1939 PAK-218.220 (part). Transfer from George Hodges Knox to Alfred Philip Cruthers. 37a 3r 8p.32 
Death*11 Jul 1960 Ferntree Gully, VIC, Australia, #D24925 age 74 [par William KNOX & Catherine McMURTRIE].33 
AnecdoteKnox, Sir George Hodges
Born 17 December 1885 (Prahran, Victoria)
Died 11 July 1960. (Ferntree Gully. Springvale crematorium)
Parents: William, businessman, and Catherine Mary MacMurtie
Marriage: (1) 4 Feb 1909 Kathleen Purves MacPherson (dissolved 1919); 1s; (2) 19 Aug 1921 Ada Victoria Harris; 1s.
Occupation: Orchardist, farmer and soldier
Religion: Presbyterian
Education: Scotch College

Career: Electrical engineer Manchester, England; orchardist and farmer Beaconfield, Ferntree Gully from 1920, sold major portion 1947; Automobile Corps 1909, Vic. Scottish Regiment (later 52nd battalion) 1909-1915, major; Australian Imperial Force 1915-1918, Commanding Officer 23rd battalion, Gallipoli, Egypt and France, lieutenant-colonel, mentioned in dispatches twice, blown up 1916, Commanding Officer no. 1 Command Depot, England 1916-1918; CMG 1917; Aide-de-Camp to Vic. Governor and special service overseas 1918-1920; Commanding Officer 48 battalion 1921-1922, 52nd battalion Gippsland Regiment 1922-1927; Volunteer Officers Decoration 1926; WWII Commanding Officer Vic. Scottish Regiment and 2nd Infantry brigade Australian Military Forces, brigadier 1942, retired; director Mutual Store Ltd 1948; Kt 1945. Ferntree Gully Progress Association, Melbourne Hunt Polo Club; v-president Vic. Polo Association; honorary forest officer. Father was MLC South Eastern 1898-1901 and MHR 1901-1910. Ferntree Gully shire councillor 1922-1927, shire of Knox named after him 1963

Party: Nationalist; United Australia Party; Liberal Party; Liberal Country Party
Party Note: Secretary to cabinet 1929, Country Liberal group 1936-1937, Liberal, Liberal Country Party; refused to stand down from speakership 1947 and support no-confidence motion against Cain.
House      Electorate      Start *            End *      
MLA     Upper Yarra     April 1927     October 1945     
MLA     Scoresby     November 1945          July 1960     

Other seats contested: Corangamite (fed. b/e) 1918
Appointments: Minister without Portfolio Dec 1929, Mar-Apr 1935. Speaker Oct 1942-Oct 1947. Royal commission Dairying Industry 1928.
Publications: Co-author (with W. Brazenor) of 23rd battalion history. References: Australian Dictionary of Biography, 9; Jones, M., 'Prolific in God's Gifts: A Social History of Knox and the Dandenongs', Sydney, 1983.
Initial data source: Browne, G, 'Biographical Register of the Victorian Parliament 1900-84', 1985
Last update: 1985 (last date the record was checked and updated.)34 
Anecdote*KNOX, Sir GEORGE HODGES (1885-1960), orchardist, soldier and politician, was born on 17 December 1885 at Prahran, Melbourne, eldest son of William Knox and his wife Catherine Mary, née McMurtrie. (Sir) Robert Knox was a brother. Educated at Scotch College and the Working Men's College, George was employed as an electrical engineer and spent two years in Manchester, England. Returning to Victoria, he married Kathleen Purves MacPherson on 4 February 1909 at Christ Church, South Yarra, and became an orchardist at Beaconsfield.
In May 1909 Knox was commissioned lieutenant in the Australian Volunteer Automobile Corps; in November he transferred as second lieutenant to the 1st Battalion, Victorian Scottish Regiment, and after promotion to captain moved to the 52nd Infantry Regiment in 1912. Appointed captain in the 23rd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, on 29 March 1915 and major on 1 April, he commanded the battalion from August at Gallipoli and in Egypt and France with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In July 1916 he was blown up at Hardecourt and evacuated to England where in November he took charge of No.1 Command Depot. Twice mentioned in dispatches, he was appointed C.M.G. in 1917. He returned to Melbourne in April 1918 and his A.I.F. appointment was terminated.
Knox's brother William Johnstone, who served with the 3rd Field Artillery Brigade, A.I.F. and was awarded the Military Cross, died of wounds in 1917. Another brother in the A.I.F., MacGregor, who was also awarded the Military Cross, was permanently incapacitated.
In April 1918 Knox was appointed aide-de-camp to the governor of Victoria and in November was given temporary command of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, Australian Military Forces. He spent August 1919 to February 1920 overseas on special service as lieutenant-colonel, A.I.F., after which he settled on his new property Greenlaw at Ferntree Gully. He had been divorced in June 1919 and on 19 August 1921 at Malvern Presbyterian Church he married Ada Victoria Harris.
Knox continued his army career, his concern for his men making him a popular leader. He was lieutenant-colonel commanding the 48th Battalion from March 1921 and the 52nd Battalion in 1922-27. In 1939 he was appointed commander of the 5th Battalion and next year was temporary colonel commanding the 2nd Infantry Brigade. Promoted temporary brigadier in 1941, he had charge of the Queenscliff-Nepean Covering Force in March-August 1942 when he retired with the rank of honorary brigadier.
Late in 1918 Knox had been an unsuccessful Nationalist candidate at a by-election for the Federal seat of Corangamite. Five years later he was elected to the Ferntree Gully Shire Council and in 1927 he won the Legislative Assembly seat of Upper Yarra for the Nationalists. A diligent local member, he was unopposed in 1929-40; from 1945 until his death he represented Scoresby. In 1928 Knox carried a motion directing the assembly to open its sittings with the Lord's Prayer. (His father had persuaded the Federal parliament to adopt this procedure in 1901). Knox was secretary to cabinet in the McPherson ministry of 1929 and that year served on a royal commission into the dairying industry. In December 1929 and in March-April 1935 he was honorary minister in the McPherson and Argyle governments respectively, but in 1936-37 as one of the Liberal-Country Party faction in the United Australia Party he was critical of Argyle's leadership.
Knox was an effective and impartial Speaker in 1942-47 and was knighted in 1945. Throughout 1947 he was pressed by the Liberal Party to resign the Speakership and support a no confidence motion against the vulnerable Cain ministry. He refused, maintaining that the Speaker should be above party politics; he disapproved of the refusal of supply in October. In later years he persistently advocated the use of simple language in the drafting of legislation.
Described as 'tall, broad-shouldered with rugged features', Knox was admired for his integrity and kindness. He was president of the Melbourne Hunt Polo Club and a life member of the Polo Association of Victoria. He was an honorary forest officer and inspector of fisheries and native game in Victoria.
Lady Knox was an active philanthropist. Chief among her interests was the Australian Red Cross Society with which she was associated for over forty years. She was a life governor of the Eye and Ear Hospital and also worked for the St John Ambulance Association, the Royal Victorian Institute for the Blind, the Good Neighbour Council, the Girl Guides' Association and mental hospitals. She was appointed C.B.E. in 1961 for social welfare services in the Ferntree Gully area.
Sir George died of coronary vascular disease on 11 July 1960 at Ferntree Gully and was cremated after a state funeral. He was survived by his wife and by a son from both marriages, a daughter of his first marriage having predeceased him. His estate was valued for probate at £40,741. The city of Knox commemorates his name.35 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1914 - 1917Yuulong, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: engineer. With Kathleen Purves Knox.36,37,38,39
1918Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: engineer. With Kathleen Purves Knox.40
1919Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: engineer.41
bt 1921 - 1942Kent Park, Lower Ferntree Gully, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Ada Victoria Knox.42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49
bt 1949 - 1954Greenlaw, Scoresby Road, Fern Tree Gully, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Ada Victoria Knox.50,51

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 Feb 1909, A Pretty Wedding.
    A wedding that excited much interest was celebrated at Christ Church, South Yarra, on Thursday afternoon when Mr. George Hodges. Knox, eldest son of the Hon. W. Knox of 'Ranfurlie,' Malvern, was married to Miss Kathleen Purves Macpherson, of Palemica, New South Wales. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Canon Tucker. The service was fully choral, Mr. R. Shanks presiding at the organ. The bride was gowned in charmeuse satin of Princesse design, trimmed with Venetian guipure. The Hon. William Knox is at present an inmate of Dr. O'Hara's private hospital and was consequently unable to attend, but his good wishes to the young couple were conveyed by Canon Tucker at the reception which was subsequently held at Menzies. The bride was given away by Mr. G. W. Barton, her step-father, while Miss Margaret Barton was first bridesmaid and the Misses Mary and Jean Knox the other bridesmaids. Mr. W. Knox, brother of the bridegroom, was best man, and Mr. Mortimer Robb, groomsman.52
  • 13 Feb 1909, WEDDINGS. KNOX-MACPHERSON.
    A wedding which owed a good deal of its interest to the fact that both the contracing persons are youthful and well known in Melbourne society was celebrated on Thursday, February 4, when George Hodges Knox, eldest son of Mr. William Knox, M.H.R., Ranfurly, East Caulfield, was married to Kathleen Macpherson, stepdaughter of Mr. George Barton, Haldon, St. Kilda road. The ceremony took place at Christ Church, South Yarra, Canon Tucker, a relative of the bride, officiating. The church was beautifully decorated with white daisies and roses great bouquets of the flowers being placed at the entrance of each pew reserved for the guests. The chancel was lined with palms, and the altar, decorations were unusually fine. The bride, who was given away by her stepfather, wore an exquisite gown of white satin charmeuse, draped with costly lace, which fell on to the loop train most effectively. The bodice had a deep tucked chiffon yoke, with softly arranged lace falling from the shoulders and sleeves. The regulation bridal veil was worn, and sprays of orange-blossom were twined in a becoming manner in her ma.. of fair hair. She was attended by the young bridesmaids, who were Miss Margaret Barton, stepsister of the bride, and the Misses Mary and Jean Knox, sisters of the bridegroom. They wore fine white lawn frocks, with inlettings of fine Valenciennes lace, and the girlish hats were in pink chip and tulle. Pink posies and the bridegroom's gift of pearl ornaments were also worn. After the ceremony Mr and Mrs George Barton held a reception at Menzies', where elaborate preparations had been made for the occasion. Mr. and Mrs Barton received their guests in a beautifully-decorated room, and the bride and bridegroom received the congratulations of their friends as they stood under a large wedding-bell suspended from an arch mounted by a large white dove. The wedding tea was served in the winter garden where arches and bouquets of Romness roses, and ferns were placed, in addition some fine grouping of palms. Canon Tucker proposed the health of the bride and bride groom, and he read a message expressing good wishes from Mr. Knox, father of the bridegroom, who was unfortunately an in mate of Dr. O'Hara's hospital. After the bride and bridegroom had motored to the hospital in order to receive Mr. Knox' good wishes personally, they left by the express for Sydney. Mrs. Barton wore a beautiful gown of black figured ninon and white silk, inlet with fine lace. She wore a hat massed with autumn foliage, and the same shades were repeated in her bouqet. Mrs. W. Knox (mother of the bridegroom) wore a most becoming gown of chiffon taffetas in a new shade of faded violet. The bodice was trimmed with ivory lace and touches of velvet. She wore a black hat and carried a posy of orchids tied with purple streamers. Among the guests were the Speaker and Mrs. Frank Madden, Mr Justice Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Tucker, Canon Stephen and Mrs. Stephen, Mr Jamieson, Canon Tucker and Miss Tucker, Dr. M'Bryde and, Mrs M'Bryde. Mr. and Mrs. Hemy Butler. Mrs. Robert Chirnside and Mr. and Mrs. Percy De Grut.53
  • 18 Jun 1912, MYSTERIOUS DEATH. NUDE BODY FOUND.
    DANDENONG, Monday.—Mr. G. H. Knox, of Upper Beaconsfield and Toorak, while motoring on the road near Narre-warren this morning, discovered the naked body of a man on the roadside, and immediately notified Senior-constable Fitzgerald, who had the body conveyed to Dandenong.
    Deceased was about 65 years of age, 5ft. 8in. high, of medium build, and with grey hair. In the pocket of his clothing, lying near him, was a snuff-horn with silver rim, on it being inscribed the words—"Presented to Samuel Dow by his brother, Alex. Dow."
    There was not any money in the clothes, which consisted of a black serge sac coat, brown striped trousers, drab felt hat, black leather belt. There were no marks of violence on the body.
    The coroner has been communicated with.54,55
  • 7 Nov 1912, Berwick Council: Correspondence: From C. Berglund, Upper Beaconsfield, notifying the sale of three blocks of land to Mr Knox.--Received.56
  • 7 Jun 1913, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Knox have let their house, 'Ferndene,' Lansell-road, Toorak, and will reside for the next year at "Yuulong," Upper Beaconsfield.57
  • 7 Aug 1913, Upper Beaconsfield. At the invitation of Mr and Mrs George H. Knox, Yuulong, a party numbering about 80 ladies and gentle men were on Saturday evening last entertained to supper, etc., in the assembly rooms. The winds blew high, yet that did not deter the invited guests from gathering together in these cosy halls (said to be the most comfortable for miles round) in response to the request. The Dramatic club performed a piece, entitled "When the Wheels Run Down," which gave great satisfaction. Then came a purvey of good things for the inner man, followed by a dance, which was kept up with great vim till nigh the Sabbath morning. The wild winds wafted the melody of God Save the King as each made off to their separate homes after a hearty evening's amusement.58
  • 18 Dec 1913, From G. H. Knox, Upper Beaconsfield, again complaining of wandering cattle there. -Ranger to take action.59
  • 14 Mar 1914, BUSH FIRES. THE BEACONSFIELD HILLS. WOMEN FIRE-FIGHTERS.
    UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.—Two alarming fires occurred in the last two days. A fire burning in the gully near the township, on Wednesday, fanned by the northerly wind, broke away and threatened to cause serious damage. The fire swept up the hill, along the side of Mr. Kirkwood's orchard. It jumped the chain-wide lane dividing the properties, and tore up the rise. With difficulty it was checked before it reached the cottage on the crown of the hill.
    While the fire-fighters were busy at Fassifern another outbreak occurred two miles further east. This fire began in some dense forest country lying between the properties of Mr W G L Spowers, Mrs Anderson and Mr John Knox. The northerly wind took the fire along the range at a great pace. There were fears that it might run down into the Tumuc Valley, towards Pakenham, where there is one of the largest and most prosperous apple orchards in the State. However, with the setting sun the breeze dropned and, though the fire burned fiercely in the dry timber and undergrowth, it did not spread.
    During the onrush of the flames on Wednesday afternoon and evening, Mr and Mrs Austin, acting as caretakers for Mr J. Knox, who with his wife and family are in Tasmania, were deeply concerned for the safety of the homestead. On Thursday, while Mr Austin was down in the gully trying to turn back the flames the homestead was again threathened. The fire took a hedge of blackberry briars in its stride, and tore through the orchard as though nothing would stop it. Mr Austin checked it at one corner of the orchard with buckets of water, but it broke through at another point. Mrs Austin, single-handed, was fighting hard but seemed powerless. Just at this stage, however, Miss Christy, a lady gardener, who had arrived to do some pruning work came on the scene. By this time the fire was within 20ft of the house. It had already caught an outbuilding, over which were some dry honeysuckle and other creepers; but the two women got the hose to work, and the water beat the fire. Then other help arrived and, as if a reward for the plucky women who had done their work so well, the wind changed and the fire turning away up the gully, the homestead was saved.60
  • 22 Jul 1914, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. Last week Mr G. H Knox had the misfortune to lose one of his horses. It is surmised that, during the night, the horse was galloping about the paddock, and caught his front foot between some large stones, with the result that the hoof was wrenched off. As soon as the injury was discovered the horse was shot.61
  • 21 Jan 1915, From G. Knox, Beaconsfield Upper, calling attention to bad state of road between Upper and Lower Beaconsfield, particularly that portion between the post office and Upper Beaconsfield and Mr Luke's property, which was full of holes and dangerous to traffic-On motion of Crs Close and Barr, letter not received.62,63
  • 13 Mar 1915, Patriotic: Captain Knox, of Upper Beaconsfield, son of the late Hon Wm. Knox, M.H.R., has abdicated his throne at Upper Beaconsfield, and gone further to the front, having enlisted. He will be in "the smoke of battle," as the members of the various social insti tutions with which he had identified himself in Beaconsfield intended, when they presented him with pipes, tobacco and matches, on becoming aware that, with instinctive patriotism, the gallant captain had decided to "Jump the Rubicon," in response to the national call to arms in defence of his King and the Empire.64
  • 4 Feb 1916, According to the latest casualty list, Lieut-Colonel E. H. Knox, of Uper Beaconsfield, formerly attached to the 52nd (Hobson's Bay) Infantry Regiment of the Commonwealth Citizens' Forces, but now commanding officer of the 23rd Battalion of the Australian Imperial Forces, is seriously ill.65
  • 8 Jul 1918, OFFICER WELCOMED HOME. Members of 23rd Battalion Association assembled in huge numbers at Sargents Cafe on Saturday night to welcome home Lieutenant-Colonel G H Knox, CMG, who was the commanding officer of the battalion both at Gallipoli and in France, and was invalided home last month. In proposing the toast of "Our Guest," the chairman (Major Baird, MLA ), said that the manly qualities and genial nature of Lieutenant-Colonel Knox had endeared him to every member of the battalion. Lieutenant H C G Macindoe, in a brief speech, said that in order to remove a misapprehension it should be explained that the association had been formed for the purpose of bringing together and organising returned members so that they would be in a position to obtain direct representation on the returned Soldiers' Association. He urged every member to join that body. After responding to the toast, Lieutenant Colonel Knox proposed "Sister Battalions," and other toasts honored were "Fallen Comrades," proposed by Colonel Chaplain Macrae Stewart, and "The 6th Brigade Comforts Depot," proposed by Major R F Maberly Smith, M C.
    A cordial welcome home was given to Lieut.-Colonel Knox when he returned to Upper Beaconsfield on Friday. The residents gathered in front of the Assembly Hall, under an arch of flags. An address of welcome was given to Colonel Knox. When replying he directed attention to a private soldier, Private Stephen Gibb, an Anzac, who has been wounded seven times, and yet will return to the front after a short furlough in Australia. "These are the men," said Colonel Knox pointing to the soldier whom the country must honour, for no praise is too great, no compliment too high or generous for the rank and file of the Australian army," a sentiment which was received with great enthusiasm. In the public hall which bore many signs of cordial welcome the guests were entertained by the committee.66
  • 23 Apr 1919, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. - A hearty welcome home was given to Gunner Harry Ladd, M.M., of North Beaconsfield. Addresses were given by the Rev. James Wilson, Lieut.-Colonel G. H. Knox, and Mr. Harvey Smith.67
  • 4 Jun 1919, A HUSBAND'S CONFESSIONS SUFFICIENT FOR A DIVORCE.
    Melbourne. June 3. A divorce suit of considerable interest in society and military circles was heard before Mr. Justice Hood to-day. The petitioner was Kathleen Purves Knox (33). of "Ferndene," Lansell-road, Toorak and the respondent George Hodges Knox (33), orchardist, of Upper Beaconsfield, more widely known as Lieutenant-Colonel Knox, of the A.I.F. The ground of the petition was that the respondent had been guilty of repeated acts of misconduct while in London.
    The petitioner said she lived happily with her husband until the war broke out. He sailed for the front on May 8, 1915. She went abroad and met him in Egypt in January, 1916, after he had come from Gallipoli, following the evacuation. In March he left for France, and he went to London. He was then appointed second in command at the depot at Tidworth. One day he told her he had behaved stupidly with a woman known as "Mrs. Pat," that he had taken some drink and had pulled her about. He said, however, that no misconduct had taken place, and promiaed that nothing of the sort would happen again. She accepted his story and explanation. He told her of concert parties they had held at Tidworth, and said there was one girl a favorite of his among the company. She had been in his rooms, but he denied that any misconduct had occurred. In March 1917, when he was at home in London on two days leave, he told her he had gone with another officer to dinner with a girl, and afterwards had been guilty of misconduct with the girl. When next her husband came to London he admitted he had been to see the same girl again and misconduct had occurred. She said she would divorce him. He said, "Oh no you won't; I've only told you this. You cannot use it against me." On another occasion the respondent admitted misconduct with a woman who had rooms in Bond-street. The respondent reached Australia last June, but the petitioner stayed on in England until August. The husband met her when she came back. They ceased to live together as man and wife after he had admitted misconduct in England.
    After further evidence had been given a decree nisi with costs was granted, the petitioner to have the custody of the children, and the parties to agree as to the respondent's accees to them.68
  • 4 Jun 1919, SOLDIER IN DIVORCE SUIT. LIEUT.-COLONEL KNOX SUED. Wife Obtains Decree.
    A divorce suit of interest was heard in the Practice Court yesterday, before Mr Justice Hood, when Mrs Kathleen Purves Knox, 30 years of age, of Ferndene, Lansell road, Toorak, sought the dissolution of her marriage, with Lieutenant Colonel George Hodges Knox, CMG, 33 years of age, orchardist, of Yarong, Upper Beaconsfield. The parties were married on February 4, 1909, at Christ Church, South Yarra, and there are two children of the marriage, Katherine Mary Elizabeth Knox, aged nine years and William Macpherson Knox, six years of age.
    Mr Dethridge (instructed by Messrs. Weigall and Crowther appeared for the petitioner and Mr Schutt (instructed by Messrs Hedderwick, Fookes, and Alston), for the respondent.
    The dissolution of the marriage was sought on the ground of repeated acts of misconduct by respondent with a woman named Garrick, in London and with other women whose names are unknown.
    Kathleen Purves Knox said: -I lived happily with my husband from the time of our marriage up till the time that he enlisted for service abroad. He went away on May 8, 1915, and in January 1916, I went to Egypt and joined him after his return from Gallipoli. He left for France in the following March and I proceeded to London, where I took a flat. After my arrival in London my husband was granted two months sick leave, and we lived together during that time. I noticed a difference in his behaviour at that time, but as his nerves were very bad I attributed it to his illness. In September 1916, my husband was second in command at the depot at Tidworth, and I asked him to take a house three, as several of the officers' wives who were on home ser vice lived at Tidworth with their husbands. He placed obstacles in the way, however, and later told me that he had behaved stupidly with a woman named "Mrs Pat," but he denied having misconducted himself with her. Very often convcert parties came to Tidworth, and he told me that one of the girls belonging to a concert party had attracted him, and he was very friendly with her. This girl did not know that he was a married man, and respondent admitted that she had been alone in his roo but denied that anything had happened there. In March, 1917, my husband came up to London on two days' leave, and, after taking me for a drive to Hampton Court, we went for afternoon tea to the Automobile Club. While there he told me that he was not sure whether he would return to camp that night. However, he left me at the club, and later in the evening I heard that orders had been issued recalling all home service officers. My husband had not known of these orders when he left me, so I called at the club in case he was dining there in order to inform him. When I reached the Automobile Club I saw his bag in the vestibule, and learned that he had booked a room there for the night. Some days later he wrote to me and said that he had heard of the recall orders at 9 o'clock that evening and that he had spent the night trying to obtain a car to carry him back to camp. When I next saw respondent he took it for granted that I knew that something had gone wrong, and said to me, "Was I not a fool that night?" In reply to further questions he admitted that he had been unfaithful to me, that he had taken a girl to dinner at Romanos, and afterwards misconducted himself with her. I told him that I would not live with him again, and respondent replied, "Oh yes, you will! You will get over it." The next time when I saw my husband was when he had four days' leave. When I heard that he was coming up to London I wrote asking him whether I should take rooms at an hotel, but when respondent arrived he went to his club. I called at the club for him, and he was awfully nice to me, but left me later on saying that he had to meet his adjutant that evening. Afterwards I remembered that he and the adjutant could not be away from camp together, and when I taxed him with this he admitted having been unfaithful to me again. I then told him that I would divorce him, and he told me that as he had admitted it to me only, I could not use it against him. He often used to speak of the girl, and told me she was very attractive. In September, 1917, I was with my husband at Skindle's Hotel at Maidenhead, and after lunch we were sitting outside, when a young woman, accompanied by two officers, passed by. An officer whom I knew came up to speak to me, and my husband left me. When he came back he was frightfully excited, and said to the man who was speaking to me, "Do you know who that girl is?" He replied, "No, she is a pal of the other fellow's." My husband said that the girl was no good, and then he turned to me and told me that she was Miss Garrick, and that she was the girl with whom he had misconducted himself.
    On another occasion he told me that he had visited a place over a chocolate shop in Bond street, and had again been unfaithful to me. I asked him whether it was with the same woman, and he replied, "No." I returned from England in November, 1918, but my husband got back to Australia in April, 1918. he met me on my return, but I did not live with him as his wife. If a decree nisi be granted I ask for the custody of the children.
    Mr Schutt: Your husband has had a distinguished military career, has he not?
    Petitioner - Yes. He was always a good father to the children? - Yes.
    And has always appeared to be fond of them? Yes.
    Margaret Harper, who stated that she was a half-sister of the petitioner, said that two months after the return of respondent he asked her to see him in the Oriental Hotel. After some conversation, respondent said that he had not been getting on well with witness's sister, and that they had not lived together for some time. Witness asked him why, and respondent answered, "Oh, we had a fearful bust-up in London, because I went on the devil of a scoot." In reply to a question by witness as to how his wife had found him out, re spondent said taht on one occasion when he and his wife were at Skindle's a girl came into the room with two men. he told witness that he had lived with this girl, and that when the girl saw him she called him over and told him that one of the officers she was with intended to marry her, and implored respondent not to "give her away." Respondent then went back to witness's sister, who asked him who the girl was. He said that he then lost his head and told his wife the whole story. After telling witness of this incident, respondent said taht his wife desired to obtain a divorce, but that he wished to stop the case at all costs because he loved his wife. Witness said. "Surely you behaved in a dreadful fashion if you did love her and respondent answered that he did not think it mattered a scrap what a man did, and that his wife should not mind it. In January and February respondent saw witness again, and told her that his wife was determined to go on with the case. He wished to stop it, and expressed the opinion that he did not see why things should not go on as they were. If the case were proceeded with he would be an outcast from society, and no one in Beaconsfield would speak to him.
    Mr Justice Hood Said that a decree nisi would be granted, the parties to agree as to access to the children. If they could not agree the question would be settled by the Court.69
  • 5 Jul 1923, Dance at Upper Beaconsfield.
    At the invitation of Lt.-Col. and Mrs. G. H. Knox, a number of their friends from Upper Beaconsfield and the surrounding districts, and also Melbourne were present at the delightful dance held in the Assembly Hall, Upper Beaconsfield, on Friday evening, June 22. The guest of the evening was Miss K. Bird, cousin of the hostess, who is on a visit from England, and the dance was given in honor of her twenty-first birthday. The supper room of the hall was converted into a cosy lounge, with easy chairs, carpets, and a glowing fire. Bridge tables were provided for non-dancers. On a large table in the supper-room was arranged a buffet supper.
    The hall was gaily decked with cerise and violet streamers festooned from a centrepiece arranged with hoops of paper flowers of the same color and greenery. Tall oriental lamps and festoons of greenery, with cerise flowers, made a very effective screen round the dias, on which the musicians were seated. Mr. K. R. Pinkerton (of Berwick) was responsible for the artistic decorations of the hall. At 10 p.m. the guests retired to Salisbury House, opposite the hall, to partake of a sit-down supper.
    After midnight a large birthday cake, with twenty-one candles burning brightly on it, was carried into the hall, and cut by Miss Bird. The hostess (Mrs. G. H. Knox) wore a gracefully draped frock of apricot changeable taffeta, caught at the side with monkey fur: she carried an Early Victorian posy of autumn tints. Miss K. Bird was dressed in dainty mauve taffeta, with panels of Valenciennes lace, and a deep collar of georgette edged with similar lace.
    Among the guests present were.—Messrs. R. Knox (Melbourne), Dare (Melbourne), Lester, Beauchamp, Capt. Tate, Messrs. J. F. Sturken, Bunt, Day, K. R. Pinkerton, J. Swords, R. Glover, Berglund, Carsewell, Lorimer, Brown, McBride, E. Blain, Seely, Harvey Smith, Cant, Reed, Lester, Miss Margaret Clarke (Melbourne), flame-colored crepe de chine, with tulle pointed overskirt. Mrs. E. W. Harris, blue marocain, with flowing ninon sleeves, blue wreath. Miss Margaret Crossley, mauve crepe de chine, satin waist-line caught with cabachon of violets. Mrs. Beecham (Scoresby), blue shot taffeta, draped skirt, caught at sicie with handsome cabachon of feathers. Mrs. Lister (Scoresby), black crepe de chine, with jet trimmings. Mrs. R. P. Frances, black tulle, beaded with jet and iridescent beads, beads over crepe de chine. Mrs. John Sturken, brocaded crepe de chine, white waist-line finisher with pearl girdle, long ninon sleeves. Mrs Harvey Smith, black taffeta inlet with lace, finished at waist with gold and jet girdle. Mrs. Bunt, black charineuse, with silver trimmings.
    Mrs. James Wilson, black crepe de chene with steel trimmings. Mrs. P. C. Anderson, blue shot taffeta, with pink flowers at waist and in hair. Miss Campbell, black crepe de chine with black lace. Miss Towl (Melbourne), apricot charmeuse pointed skirt, finished at waist with same color. Miss Cunningham, powder blue georgette Miss Walker, slate grey silk, black tulle sash, deep collar Maltese lace. Miss Peterson, eau-de-nil cachemire de sole. Miss Shorthouse, shot taffeta, pink finished with flowers at waist. Miss King, shot pink, with tulle trimmings. Mrs Cyril Davey, pretty white georgette, with pointed skirt over crepe de chine.
    Miss Ashley, black cachemire de sole panels of radium lace, finished at waist with fuchsia flower trimmings. Miss D. Ashley, stamped mauve velvet, trimmings of silver and silver girdle. Miss Barker mauve taffeta silk, with pretty pointed skirt over trimmed underskirt. Miss R Gamble, fuchsia colored cachemire de sole. Miss Bunt, flame colored crepe de chine, Miss M. Bunt, turquoise blue crepe de chine. Miss Dayey, royal blue figured georgette, with side panel of steel color. Miss M. Davey, jade green georgette, Miss McLean, black cachery re de sole, kingfisher blue let in at side. Miss N. McLean, mole cachemire de sole, sleeves of gold georgette, skirt caught with blue and gold cabachon. Miss Stenhouse, pale blue crepe de chine, with bead trimmings. Mrs. Gamble, black crepe de chine. Mrs. Jack Ashley, black and gold figured georgette. Mrs. F. Griffin, black charmeuse, with radium lace trimmings. Mrs. Love, green and gold brocaded georgette. Mrs Hurditch, pink ninon, with pale blue finishings. Mrs. Kirkwood, black velvet draped frock caught at sides with jet or naments. Mrs. McBride, black crepe de chine, with jet girdle. Mrs. Fung, black crepe de chine. Miss Lockey, royal blue figured georgette.70
  • 27 Mar 1929, TOURIST ROAD WANTED.
    Members of a deputation from Upper Beaconsfield which waited on the Minister for Public Works (Mr. Chandler) yesterday to ask that a section of the Prince's Highway be taken over by the Country Roads Board. Left to right: Messrs. Alured Kelly, D. N. McBride. Councillor Bevan, Mr. Knox, M.L.A., Mr. Walter, M.L.A., Mr. George Keys (shire engineer), and Mr. Frank Griffin.71
  • 17 Jan 1935, Celebrations at Beaconsfield
    To popularise Beaconsfield Upper as a health and holiday resort, a series of reunion entertainments has been arranged for the Australia Day week-end, January 26 to 28. Beaconsfield Upper now has an excellent main road approach, an electricity supply from Yallourn, and a modern guest house. Former residents and visitors have been invited to attend, and the organisers and members of the organisations which will participate hope for a large attendance. Tennis tournaments will be held on the Saturday and Monday, and on Saturday night the local branch of the Country Women's Association will hold a social gathering, at which Lieut.-Colonel Knox, M.L.A., will officially open the celebrations. There will be special Church services on Sunday, and on Monday a burlesque cricket match on the recreation ground, followed by a ball in the evening. All arrangements are in the hands of a committee, of which Brigadier-General Foott is president and Mr. Thorogood secretary. Information may be obtained from them.72
  • 30 Oct 1939, Mrs. Catherine Mary Knox, mother of Colonel Knox, M.L.A., and Sir Robert Knox, died at her home, Ranfurlie, Albany road, Toorak, yesterday. She was aged 84 years, and was closely associated with many charitable and philanthropic movements. Mrs. Knox was an original member of the Australian Women's National League, and was life patroness of the league's club. Besides Colonel Knox and Sir Robert Knox, Mrs. Knox's surviving children are Major MacGregor Knox (England), Mr. J. U. Knox, and Mrs. Eric Murray, of South Australia.
    The funeral will leave Ranfurlie at 2.30 this afternoon for the Kew Cemetery. Arrangements are being made by A. A. Sleight Pty. Ltd.73
  • 14 Jun 1945, KNIGHTHOODS FOR THREE VICTORIANS
    The Victorian State Honours list, announced by Sir Winston Dugan last night, is as follows: KNIGHT BACHELOR: ... Brigadier GEORGE HODGES KNOX, CMG, VD, MLA.
    Sir George Knox, CMG, VD, MLA for Upper Yarra since 1927, and Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly since 1942, was born in Melbourne on December 17, 1885, a son of the late Mr William Knox, MP. He was educated at Scotch College and had a long and distinguished service with the AIF in the 1914-18 war, when he was twice mentioned in despatches. He commanded the 23rd Battalion at Gallipoli and in Egypt, Sinai, and France. He was ADC to the Governor of Victoria in 1918-19, and went on special service overseas in 1919-20. He has had a long service of command with the AMF since 1921.74

Citations

  1. [S29] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWI, http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=167850
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.scotch.vic.edu.au/gscot/09maygs/76b.htm
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B12943/1886."
  4. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#M376."
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Feb 1909, p1.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3381-123 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3381-123 - Knox took over Mortgage No 287686 - Alexander Fraser, Thomas Robert Burrows, James Robert Thear and Jonathan Edward Pittock - discharged 11 Apr 1912.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2589-614 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1127-265 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-557 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1110-754 + 1115-854 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman - C/T 3639-650+651.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3535-954 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1822-398 - George Hodges Knox of Yuulong Beaconsfield Upper Gentleman - C/T 3695-806 (incl. PAK-224 and PAK-222.223 (part) total 30a 3r 1p.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1136-190 - George Henry Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3639-650 + 651 - Shire of Berwick - C/T 3882-330.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3381-123 - Shire of Berwick - C/T 3895-817.
  17. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3977-351 - George Hodges Knox of 31 Queen Street Melbourne Gentleman.
  18. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A090631b.htm
  19. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 Jun 1919, p10.
  20. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2879-675 - George Hodges Knox of Yuulong Upper Beaconsfield Colonel in the Australian Military Forces.
  21. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3977-351 - Beatrice Starkey of Upper Beaconsfield Gentlewoman - C/T 4414-734.
  22. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-557 + C/T 1127-265 - Beatrice Starkey of Upper Beaconsfield Gentlewoman- C/T 4414-734.
  23. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3695-806 + 2589-614 - Beatrice Starkey of Upper Beaconsfield Gentlewoman - C/T 4414-734 64a 24p = PAK-219.222.223 and PAK-60 (part).
  24. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3381-123 - Beatrice Starkey of Upper Beaconsfield Gentlewoman - C/T 4414-734.
  25. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2879-675 - Victorian Orchardists Co-operative Association Limited of 456-458 Flinders Lane Melbourne.
  26. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1136-190 - His Majesty King George V.
  27. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3695-806 - His Majesty King George V.
  28. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3977-351 - His Majesty King George V.
  29. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3381-123 - His Majesty King George V - for soldier settlement purposes.
  30. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  31. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3535-954 - Frank Douglas Barnes of Railway Avenue Beaconsfield Carrier.
  32. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1110-989 + C/T 3639-650 - Alfred Philip Cruthers of Upper Beaconsfield Master Printer - C/T 6343-407.
  33. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D24925 age 74 [par William KNOX & Catherine McMURTRIE]."
  34. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/re-member/bioregfull.cfm
  35. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A090631b.htm Author: Geoff Browne
    Select Bibliography
    H. Coulson, Story of the Dandenongs, 1838-1958 (Melb, 1959); PD (Vic), 1960, p 17; Geelong Advertiser, 5 Apr 1929; Smith's Weekly (Sydney), 18 Oct 1947; Sun-News Pictorial (Melbourne), 12 July 1960, 10 June 1961; Age (Melbourne), 12 July 1960; Mountain District Free Press, 14 July 1960.

    Print Publication Details: Geoff Browne, 'Knox, Sir George Hodges (1885 - 1960)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 9, Melbourne University Press, 1983, pp 629-630.
  36. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  37. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  38. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  39. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  40. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  41. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  42. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  43. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  44. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  45. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  46. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  47. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  48. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  49. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  50. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  51. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  52. [S14] Newspaper - The Prahran Telegraph (Vic), 6 Feb 1909, p4.
  53. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 13 Feb 1909, p44.
  54. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 18 Jun 1912 p6.
  55. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), an inquest into the death of David Chrystie Dow 1912/551 (21 Jun 1912) states that he died of natural causes.
    #D5315 DOW David Chrystie (Age 69), [par Dow Alex & Unknown (Chrystie)], died Dandenong.
  56. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 7 Nov 1912, p3.
  57. [S14] Newspaper - Prahran Telegraph, 7 Jun 1913, p9.
  58. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 7 Aug 1913, p2.
  59. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 18 Dec 1913, p3.
  60. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 14 Mar 1914, p20.
  61. [S14] Newspaper - Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette, 22 Jul 1914, p3.
  62. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 21 Jan 1915, p3.
  63. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "21 Jan 1915, p2."
  64. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "13 Mar 1915, p2."
  65. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 Feb 1916 p6.
  66. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 July 1918, p6.
  67. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 23 Apr 1919, p5.
  68. [S14] Newspaper - Adelaide Advertiser: 4 Jun 1919 p6.
  69. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 June 1919 p10.
  70. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 5 Jul 1923, p36.
  71. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Mar 1929 p5.
  72. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jan 1935 p5.
  73. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Oct 1939, p5.
  74. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 14 Jun 1945, p3.
Last Edited18 Jan 2019

Ada Victoria Harris

F, #1450, b. 18 Aug 1900, d. 5 Jan 1988
Father*William Henry Harris b. 29 May 1859, d. 10 Jan 1901
Mother*Clara Margaret Cluff b. Dec 1869, d. 1 Sep 1904
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS
Married NameKnox. 
Note* Edward William Harris father died 1901, mother died 1904. 
Related* Christine Maybelle Harris Christine DRAKE was Ada Victoria KNOX' aunt. 
Birth*18 Aug 1900 Barnpark, Halwill, Devon, England, Sep Q [Holsworthy] 5b 455.1 
Birth-Notice*23 Aug 1900Harris.—August 18, at Barnpark, Halwill, Devon, the wife of William Henry Harris, daughter.2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel14 Jun 1919 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Ormonde leaving London 14 Jun 1919, arriving August 1919
Age 18.3
Marriage*19 Aug 1921 Spouse: George Hodges Knox. Malvern, VIC, Australia, #M8709.4
 
Widow11 Jul 1960Ada Victoria Harris became a widow upon the death of her husband George Hodges Knox.5 
Note*10 Jun 1961 CBE(C) for Social welfare services in Fern Tree Gully.6 
Village Bell*Apr 1984The article reads: The earliest personal recollections [about Amesfield Park] we have are from Victoria Knox, who revisited the site after the bushfires, and reminisced to Jane Holth.
“Dr and Mrs. Elliott Drake, my uncle and aunt, came to Australia from Devon about 1910, and built “Woonda Mia”, later known as “Amesfield Park”. The late Rodney Alsop (1881-1932) was the architect. It was a beautiful house, and with its garden and outhouses, was a source of pride and joy to its owners. It was built out of weatherboard which was oiled and had a wide verandah looking down the hill toward the sea.”
“I came to Australia to look after my only brother, who fought alongside Australians in World War One. I intended to be here for six months but I stayed for sixty years. On arrival on 1st August 1919 I was met at Beaconsfield Station on a cold wet winter’s evening by my aunt driving a buggy. The horses, Glitter and Silver, pulled us up the hilly bush road to her home. We went everywhere on horses in those days and the big occasion of the day was the meeting each morning at the Post Office. Everyone turned up on ponies to collect their mail, and to discuss yesterday’s happenings.”
“Our cooking was done on a big wood stove. A chip heater supplied water for baths. Tanks held rain water, and a bore was put down a year later. My aunt and I were water diviners and we found the water. The butcher called once a week in a covered wagon with the meat hanging from hooks inside. A large knife was handed to you, the back curtains pulled aside, and you dived in and cut off the piece of meat of your choice before the flies took over.”
“I remember an Aboriginal woman giving birth to a baby at the foot of a bush paddock opposite. No doctor being nearer than Berwick, my aunt and I ran down and helped to produce a healthy little baby. About two months later we were told by the Health Department that we were not certified midwives and would be prosecuted. So bureaucracy prevailed in those days too.”
“Anglican and Congregational Church services were held in the Hall, where my aunt played the harmonium for Anglican services. One Sunday she was shocked by the conduct of the Saturday night dancers, who had broken into the cupboard containing the vestments and Communion Cup. She decided that a Church should be built, and she grew flowers, raised fowls, kept bees for honey, and sold everything to raise money. I think she gave a tidy sum herself towards what eventuated as St. Johns. After it was built in 1923, she gave a window in memory of her husband; it bore the family crest of his ancestor Sir Francis Drake. Dr Drake took an active part in the raising of the War Memorial.”
“One day when walking around the garden at “Woonda Mia” with my aunt a swarm of bees alighted on her garden hat. I was horrified. My aunt said, ‘Stand still and do nothing.’ After what seemed an eternity the queen took off and all the swarm followed. My aunt was a woman used to facing emergencies of all kinds and was quite unperturbed. I would have shrieked and waved my arms frantically and probably been stung to death.”
“Saturdays during summer saw us all meeting for tennis–the courts being at the local Hall. Afternoon tea was always a feature and everyone brought a plate. That was a new expression to me but it didn’t take me long to learn. One Saturday someone said they thought the tea tasted funny. The water for the tea came from the tank at the side of the Hall so it was decided to clean it out and a pair of very grubby swaggy’s trousers was fished out from the bottom. There was horror all round.”
“We certainly had fires in those days and just everyone turned out
to fight them. There were of course comparatively few houses and when they were saved the fires raced away into the bush and finally burnt themselves out.”
“I left Upper Beaconsfield in 1921 to be married. When my uncle died, my aunt sold “Woonda Mia” and returned to England.”.7 
Death*5 Jan 1988 St Charles Gardner Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia, (Age 87.)8 
Death-Notice*11 Jan 1988KNOX. Lady Ada Victoria C.B.E. - Peacefully at St. Charles Gardner Hospital Perth on 5th January 1988. In her 88th year. Late of "Ludon" Mt. Martha Victoria. Dearly loved wife of the late Brigadier The Honourable Sir George Knox C. M. G., loved mother of John Elliott Knox, mother-in-law of Anne, Grandmother of Alexander and Serena, great Grandmother of Andrew, Sarah Jane, Kathryn and Christopher.
A faithful servant of God, Queen and Country. At Rest.9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
31 Mar 1901Barn Park, Halwill, Devon, England(Head of Household) Clara Margaret Harris;
Age 7 months
Member(s) of Household: Edward William Harris10
2 Apr 1911Belgrave West, Beachfield Road, Sandown, Isle of Wight, England(Head of Household) Walter Alvin Lamarque;
Age 10 - niece11
bt 1921 - 1942Kent Park, Lower Ferntree Gully, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With George Hodges Knox.12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19
bt 1949 - 1954Greenlaw, Scoresby Road, Fern Tree Gully, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With George Hodges Knox.20,21
bt 1963 - 1968Greenlaw, Scoresby Road, Fern Tree Gully, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.22,23
bt 1972 - 198011 Augusta Street, Mount Martha, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.24,25,26

Newspaper-Articles

  • 5 Jul 1923, Dance at Upper Beaconsfield.
    At the invitation of Lt.-Col. and Mrs. G. H. Knox, a number of their friends from Upper Beaconsfield and the surrounding districts, and also Melbourne were present at the delightful dance held in the Assembly Hall, Upper Beaconsfield, on Friday evening, June 22. The guest of the evening was Miss K. Bird, cousin of the hostess, who is on a visit from England, and the dance was given in honor of her twenty-first birthday. The supper room of the hall was converted into a cosy lounge, with easy chairs, carpets, and a glowing fire. Bridge tables were provided for non-dancers. On a large table in the supper-room was arranged a buffet supper.
    The hall was gaily decked with cerise and violet streamers festooned from a centrepiece arranged with hoops of paper flowers of the same color and greenery. Tall oriental lamps and festoons of greenery, with cerise flowers, made a very effective screen round the dias, on which the musicians were seated. Mr. K. R. Pinkerton (of Berwick) was responsible for the artistic decorations of the hall. At 10 p.m. the guests retired to Salisbury House, opposite the hall, to partake of a sit-down supper.
    After midnight a large birthday cake, with twenty-one candles burning brightly on it, was carried into the hall, and cut by Miss Bird. The hostess (Mrs. G. H. Knox) wore a gracefully draped frock of apricot changeable taffeta, caught at the side with monkey fur: she carried an Early Victorian posy of autumn tints. Miss K. Bird was dressed in dainty mauve taffeta, with panels of Valenciennes lace, and a deep collar of georgette edged with similar lace.
    Among the guests present were.—Messrs. R. Knox (Melbourne), Dare (Melbourne), Lester, Beauchamp, Capt. Tate, Messrs. J. F. Sturken, Bunt, Day, K. R. Pinkerton, J. Swords, R. Glover, Berglund, Carsewell, Lorimer, Brown, McBride, E. Blain, Seely, Harvey Smith, Cant, Reed, Lester, Miss Margaret Clarke (Melbourne), flame-colored crepe de chine, with tulle pointed overskirt. Mrs. E. W. Harris, blue marocain, with flowing ninon sleeves, blue wreath. Miss Margaret Crossley, mauve crepe de chine, satin waist-line caught with cabachon of violets. Mrs. Beecham (Scoresby), blue shot taffeta, draped skirt, caught at sicie with handsome cabachon of feathers. Mrs. Lister (Scoresby), black crepe de chine, with jet trimmings. Mrs. R. P. Frances, black tulle, beaded with jet and iridescent beads, beads over crepe de chine. Mrs. John Sturken, brocaded crepe de chine, white waist-line finisher with pearl girdle, long ninon sleeves. Mrs Harvey Smith, black taffeta inlet with lace, finished at waist with gold and jet girdle. Mrs. Bunt, black charineuse, with silver trimmings.
    Mrs. James Wilson, black crepe de chene with steel trimmings. Mrs. P. C. Anderson, blue shot taffeta, with pink flowers at waist and in hair. Miss Campbell, black crepe de chine with black lace. Miss Towl (Melbourne), apricot charmeuse pointed skirt, finished at waist with same color. Miss Cunningham, powder blue georgette Miss Walker, slate grey silk, black tulle sash, deep collar Maltese lace. Miss Peterson, eau-de-nil cachemire de sole. Miss Shorthouse, shot taffeta, pink finished with flowers at waist. Miss King, shot pink, with tulle trimmings. Mrs Cyril Davey, pretty white georgette, with pointed skirt over crepe de chine.
    Miss Ashley, black cachemire de sole panels of radium lace, finished at waist with fuchsia flower trimmings. Miss D. Ashley, stamped mauve velvet, trimmings of silver and silver girdle. Miss Barker mauve taffeta silk, with pretty pointed skirt over trimmed underskirt. Miss R Gamble, fuchsia colored cachemire de sole. Miss Bunt, flame colored crepe de chine, Miss M. Bunt, turquoise blue crepe de chine. Miss Dayey, royal blue figured georgette, with side panel of steel color. Miss M. Davey, jade green georgette, Miss McLean, black cachery re de sole, kingfisher blue let in at side. Miss N. McLean, mole cachemire de sole, sleeves of gold georgette, skirt caught with blue and gold cabachon. Miss Stenhouse, pale blue crepe de chine, with bead trimmings. Mrs. Gamble, black crepe de chine. Mrs. Jack Ashley, black and gold figured georgette. Mrs. F. Griffin, black charmeuse, with radium lace trimmings. Mrs. Love, green and gold brocaded georgette. Mrs Hurditch, pink ninon, with pale blue finishings. Mrs. Kirkwood, black velvet draped frock caught at sides with jet or naments. Mrs. McBride, black crepe de chine, with jet girdle. Mrs. Fung, black crepe de chine. Miss Lockey, royal blue figured georgette.27

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [Holsworthy] 5b 455."
  2. [S14] Newspaper - North Devon Journal, 23 Aug 1900, p8.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 for A V Harris.
  4. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D24925 age 74 [par William KNOX & Catherine McMURTRIE]."
  6. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au
    Award: The Order of the British Empire - Commander (Civil) CBE(C)
    Citation: Social welfare services in Fern Tree Gully.
  7. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "1984-037 p8+9."
  8. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, Karrakatta: Ashes removed.
  9. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age 11 Jan 1988, p21.
  10. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG13; Piece: 2170; Folio: 40; Page: 4."
  11. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Class: RG14; Piece: 5742; Schedule Number: 93.
  12. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  13. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  14. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  15. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  16. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  17. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  18. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  19. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  20. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  21. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  22. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963.
  23. [S168] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1968.
  24. [S172] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1972.
  25. [S177] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1977.
  26. [S180] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1980.
  27. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 5 Jul 1923, p36.
Last Edited18 Jan 2019

William James Harris

M, #1451, b. 1 Oct 1835, d. 29 Oct 1910
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS
Note*12 Oct 1814 William's parents Edward HARRIS [par Richard & Jane] and Isabella TINDALL [par John & Isabella] married at Quarterly Meeting of Yorkshire (Quaker Marriage.)1 
Birth*1 Oct 1835 Stoke Newington, London, England. [par Edward HARRIS, corn factor & Isabella TINDALL]2,3,4 
Marriage*11 Feb 1858 Spouse: Catherine Ann Thornhill. Hackney, London, England, Mar Q [Hackney] 1b 302.2,5
 
Death*29 Oct 1910 Halwill, Devon, England. 
Probate (Will)*3 Jan 1911 HARRIS William James of Halwill Manor Devonshire died 29 October 1910 Probate London 3 January to Robert Thornhill Harris esquire Katherine Ellen Harris spinster and George Vanhouse Burd surgeon. Effects £197,933 0s. 10d.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
6 Jun 1841Edward HARRIS, corn factor, Stoke Newington, London, EnglandHead of Household: William James Harris. Age 5.7
7 Apr 18616 Aden Terrace, Stoke Newington, London, EnglandHead of Household: William James Harris. Age 25 - Corn Factor. In the household was also a visitor Ellen Mary Thornhill and 4 servants
Member(s) of Household: Catherine Ann Harris William Henry Harris.8
2 Apr 1871Merlewood, Bromley, Kent, EnglandAge 35 - Cornfactor9
3 Apr 188175 Linden Gardens, Kensington, London, EnglandHead of Household: William James Harris. Age 45 - Corn Merchant
Member(s) of Household: Catherine Ann Harris, Katherine Ellen Harris, Robert Thornhill Harris, Marian Jessie Harris, Christine Maybelle Harris, Isabella Harris.10
5 Apr 1891Halwill Manor, Halwill, Devon, EnglandHead of Household: William James Harris. Age 55 - JP Devon, Cornfactor, Farmer
Member(s) of Household: Catherine Ann Harris, Christine Maybelle Harris, Katherine Ellen Harris, Marian Jessie Harris, Ada Forrest, Edmund Stewart Forrest.11
31 Mar 1901Halwill Manor, Halwill, Devon, EnglandHead of Household: William James Harris. Age 65 - Magistrate Landowner Farmer
Member(s) of Household: Catherine Ann Harris, Katherine Ellen Harris, Ada Forrest, Christine Maybelle Harris.12

Family

Catherine Ann Thornhill b. 1837, d. 28 Apr 1918
Children 1.William Henry Harris+ b. 29 May 1859, d. 10 Jan 1901
 2.Katherine Ellen Harris b. Jun 1861, d. 3 Jan 1949
 3.Ada Harris+ b. Dec 1863, d. 7 Jul 1917
 4.Robert Thornhill Harris+ b. Dec 1865, d. 4 Dec 1934
 5.Marian Jessie Harris+ b. Dec 1867, d. 28 Aug 1936
 6.Christine Maybelle Harris b. 8 May 1870, d. 20 Aug 1947
 7.Isabella Harris+ b. Sep 1872, d. Sep 1965

Newspaper-Articles

  • 26 Oct 1910, I regret to learn that Mr. W. J. Harris, lord of the manor of Halwill, is seriously ill. Mr. Harris had a paralytic stroke last January, since when his condition has varied. About a week ago Mr. Harris's illness took a serious turn. Yesterday, I am glad to say, a slight improvement was recorded.13
  • 31 Oct 1910, DEATH OF MR. W. J. HARRIS, J.P. AN INTERESTING CAREER.
    With much regret we record the death of Mr. W. J. Harris, J.P., of Halwill Manor. Mr. Harris's condition had caused his family considerable anxiety for some little time past, and it was felt that the end, which came on Saturday, could not be far off. Mr. Harris was possessed of a remarkably strong constitution, and this enabled him to withstand the original attack longer than would otherwise have been possible. He was constantly attended by Dr. Burd, of Okehampton, his son-in-law, and Dr. Chandler, of Black Torrington. Mr. Harris had a paralytic stroke in January last. But since then he has been able to enjoy occasional drives. Recently, however, his condition became critical. Mr. Harris was 75 on October 1st. He leaves a widow and the following sons and daughters:—Miss C. E. Harris, of Halwill; Mrs. Forrest, of Westcliffe; Mr. R. T. Harris, of Halwill Lodge; Mrs. Garratt, of Hertford; Mrs. Drake, of Australia; Mrs. Burd, of Okehampton. The deceased's eldest son, Mr. W. H. Harris, died in 1901, leaving two children.
    W. J. Harris was born in London and was the son of a member of the Society of Friends, and was educated at a Quaker school in London. He married, in 1858, Miss Thornhill, daughter of Mr. R. S. Thornhill, of London. Up to the age of 30, Mr. Harris continued a member of the Society of Friends, but since that time he has been a Churchman, and has taken special interest in the Church life of Halwill.
    Deceased was for years a member of the firm of Messrs. Harris Bros. and Co., of Mark Lane. He had a successful business career, his characteristic shrewdness, foresight. and perseverance being valuable business assets in the corn market. Mr. Harris closely studied the economic and social problems of our own and foreign countries. He was a much-travelled man. He gave others the benefit of his observations and the opinions he had formed in a number of speeches and essays, for he was a voluminous writer.
    When Mr. Harris came to Halwill Manor, and intimated that he hoped to bring the estate into a state of profitable cultivation, a good deal of doubt was expressed as to whether he would succeed. Indeed, Mr. Harris was regarded, in some quarters, as a good-natured man who had made money in London, and certain theories, the application of which would get rid of some of that money, and bring little return. Mr. Harris, however, while having his theories applied to them his business instincts. He started a system of small holdings, letting them at a very low rental. The labourers of the district had no objection to a piece of land at almost a nominal rent. They set to and worked upon it with the view of getting what they could in return. The result was satisfactory to both parties. The cottagers found that the land was suitable for certain crops, while the owner benefited by his property—which had been previously regarded as practically useless being brought into a satisfactory state of cultivation.
    Mr. Harris, on the portion of the estate he kept in hand, farmed on scientific principles. He raised crops better than any previously produced and, he said, on terms satisfactory to himself. Being in a position to wait for a return upon his investment, the probability is that he was able to farm on conditions somewhat different to those in which the ordinary farmer would find himself. Mr. Harris bred good horses and good cattle.
    The experiment that, for a time, attracted the greatest attention was the making of ensilage. One season was extremely wet in the neighbourhood. it was impossible to make hay. Mr. Harris decided to make ensilage. In due course a very large party of agriculturists were invited to see the result of the experiment. The experiment was a satisfactory one. The grass had an aromatic odour which was agreeable to the cattle, and they fed upon it freely. A good many people followed the example set by Mr. Harris in thus dealing with grass. But the making of ensilage does not seem to have become general, hay being regarded, on the whole, as preferable, and the seasons usually permitting of a fair quantity of grass, at all events, being turned into hay.
    Mr. Harris was an avowed Protectionist. He very strongly advocated a duty upon wheat, partly with the view of a greater area of British land being devoted to the cultivation of corn, partly with the view to large stores of wheat being kept in the country, and partly with the hope of giving a fillip to farming, so attaching a greater number of people to the land. He desired, in the interests not simply of the farmer, but of the community generally, to make agriculture a more profitable industry. Mr. Harris five and twenty years ago, represented Poole in Parliament; he subsequently fought Mid-Devon, on which occasion he plainly proclaimed himself to be a Protectionist, and fought the Division as such, making the fiscal policy he advocated the feature of the campaign. The result of the election was not encouraging, but Mr. Harris professed to be quite satisfied.
    Among the pamphlets or re-printed addresses which emanated from Mr. Harris may be mentioned "The best farm in the world," and interesting narrative of agriculture in New Zealand; "Butter versus Home Rule, or the economic condition of Ireland." "Letters of a one-sided Free Trader," "Estimates of the realisable wealth of the United Kingdom, based mostly on the estate duty returns (prepared in conjunction with the Rev. K. A. Lake), read at a meeting of the Royal Statistical Society in 1906," "In defence of Protection"—a speech delivered at Holsworthy, "Three papers on Agriculture" read before members of the Devon and Cornwall Chamber of Agriculture in 1899. During the present year Mr Harris wrote a paper entitled "The Balance-sheet of Socialism." This was the last he penned.
    The deceased was the senior member of the Holsworthy Bench ol Magistrates, but had not attended the sittings for some years. He was at one time an active member of the Holsworthy Board of Guardians. Mr. Harris had occupied the important position of President of the Devon and Cornwall Chamber of Agriculture, and was up to his death, a Fellow of the Statistical Society. Wide as was the circle of Mr. Harris's friends and acquaintances there are few who will regret his demise more than his neighbours, tenants, and employes in Devonshire and Cornwall.
    Mr. Harris was the lord of the manors of Halwill and of Crackington, St. Genny's. With his family he spent the greater part of his time, of late years, at one or the other of his residences in these places. Mr Harris ever evinced the utmost interest in the welfare of those among whom he lived.
    Perhaps nothing will give a better idea of Mr. Harris' views of the value of small holdings than extracts from a speech made two years ago at Halwill. He said:
    It in the year 1870 that I bought this estate and took my first lessons as a landowner, and as the leases of the tenants were mostly on old lives I soon had an opportunity of studying the English land question in a very practical manner. My first idea was to build one good large farmhouse where two or three previously existed, and to unite the farms under three or four large tenants. But I had not lived here for many months before I noticed in the immediate neighbourhood two or three cottages, standing on land of small value where the landowner, or more often the farming tenant, had given consent to its being used by one of his labourers at a very small rent, where great improvements had been made. I could not help being struck by the bright appearance which had been given to the few acres immediately surrounding these cottages by the unaided efforts of the labouring tenants. These men had more than doubled the value of the land immediately contiguous, even without any guarantee of permanent residence.
    It was these instances of industrial success on land neither better nor worse than much of my own which converted me, and I quickly made up my mind to keep the labourers on the estate at any cost, and to give them every reasonable inducement to stay. Some of the larger farms fell in hand soon after, and I tried to persuade myself that I could farm as profitably (with bailiffs) as my tenants had previously farmed for themselves. A good many other people who have purchased land in England have thought as I did, and although there are exceptions, yes, in the greater number of cases, it is a mistake. These new-fledged landowners are apt to consider that farming is a business which any townsman can learn in a few months.
    "I believe that, after nearly 36 years of practical experience, I have learnt something of agriculture, but not so much as I should have known if the first five years of my life after boyhood had been spent as a farm labourer. it thus followed that in the management of this estate I decided to assist the tenants who were already there to live through the bad times, and where small acreages existed which could, without much loss to those tenants, be taken away, to establish small cottage holdings. I came to the conclusion that a man who has been brought up to farm labour, when he marries and has children, is very much benefited by being able to keep a cow or two, and that a small dairy gives to the family a large part of their support, while a moderate extent of gardening ground pays in food a good deal more than it costs in rental, and that if the man be sober and industrious, with a good wife, he will probably succeed in any pastoral neighbourhood where there is outside employment by which he can earn wages, while his wife and daughters attend to the poultry, the dairy, and the pigs. Let it not be supposed that these Halwill small holdings, which have sprung up since I bought this property, would have succeeded in the way they have had there not been some means of earning wages besides. That I believe to be a necessity. (Applause.)
    "Well, what has been the result of this policy? The population of the parish has increased by more than 50 per cent., while that of most parishes in Devonshire has decreased. We call on the Poor-rate for next to nothing, drunkenness is almost unknown, and I have received a fair rent for land which, perhaps, might have been thrown on my hands had I not pursued this policy. I don't wish to convey the impression that small holdings would succeed everywhere. I think not under present circumstances. But in a pastoral district, where land can easily be laid down to grass, and where the Devonshire system of dairying is understood. I believe they are almost certain to succeed if the rent is quite moderate. My system of letting those small farms has been that the rental shall never be raised on the tenants' own improvements a moderate rate of interest, shall be charged as extra rent, that the tenant may leave by giving short notice, but that if he acts honourably and pays the rent he shall remain for his whole life. This is practically equivalent to a freehold for life. I wish to say as plainly as I can that I have no belief in bringing wastrels from the overcrowded towns and trying to turn them into farmers. All we can do is to offer an inducement for those who have lived in the rural districts to remain there. There are about 500 acres on this estate in small holdings. (Applause.)"
    The occasion of the assemblage referred to was the celebration by Mr. and Mrs. Harris of their golden wedding. On the anniversary there was a family party, and in the evening a deputation waited upon Mr. and Mrs. Harris, when Mr. Jollow, the oldest tenant on the estate, presented them with a handsome silver-gilt rose bowl, subscribed for by the parishioners of Halwill and neighbours. A bridal bouquet, comprised of Mrs. Harris' favourite flowers—white carnations, freesias, and lilies of the valley, with trails of asparagus fern and lilies, tied with broad gold ribbons—was presented to Mrs. Harris by her children on her golden wedding morning. The next day considerably over 200 parishioners, neighbours, and tenantry, with their wives, were entertained in the Church Room.
    There were similar festivities later at Crackington, where as at Halwill, Mr. and Mrs. Harris endeared themselves to all with whom they came into contact. Evidence of the goodwill felt towards them was forthcoming in the handsome gifts presented—a clock, with Westminster chimes, from the tenantry and a few neighbours, and an excellent barometer from the employes at Crackington. The proceedings occupied two days. On the first Mr. and Mrs. Harris received their tenants and neighbours, and on the second they entertained their employes. Mr. Harris presided at a dinner, and, in the course of his remarks, said: When I came among you I was anxious to push the system of small holdings as I had done at Halwill Manor, but my larger tenants did not wish to spare the land, and I thought I had better tread cautiously and keep on and encourage them in their farming as they had been accustomed to do until any of them desired to give up, when the opportunity would arrive for my favourite hobby. I did, however, divide a farm or two into smaller ones, and I allowed land to be held by some of the cottagers which I had improved. Shall I tell you something about the results of my own farming? There was one of the largest farms in a terribly poor state when I came into possession. I took that in hand, and I have now farmed it for several years. It cost me a good deal to bring it round—but now that I have brought it round I am beginning to find out how land gains in heart by farming. At first I used almost to be afraid to look at the yearly account, but now I have the satisfaction of knowing that the manager there (once an ordinary labourer), and a very competent man, has discovered the right way to make it pay a very moderate profit, besides the rental and interest of money at 4 per cent, per annum. I believe I am producing more than double what the last tenant produced. As for the other farms, they are all tenanted and none of their tenants are behind hand.
    Mr. Harris' life has been of more than ordinary interest, and the records we have quoted indicate how useful and considerable a part he has played in the affairs of those among whom he lived, while his literary work is of national importance.14
  • 1 Nov 1910, Kindly references to the late Mr. W. J. Harris, of Halwill, were made in the obituary notice of the "Times" yesterday, it says he came of a Quaker family, but many years ago became a member of the Church of England. In parties he was a Conservative and long before Mr. Chamberlain advocated Tariff Reform Mr. Harris contended with much energy and ability for an alteration in our fiscal system. On this subject he made many speeches and wrote many letterd, and though much that he then said seemed to fall on deaf ears, he had the satisfaction of finding his views ultimately adopted by one of the two great parties in the State.15
  • 1 Nov 1910, SPLENDID RECORD. Death of fVlr. Wm, J. Harris, J.P., of It with much regret that we record the death of Mr. W. J. Harris, which took place early on Saturday morning his residence, the Manor House. The deceased gentleman had been in indifferent health for the last two three years, hut until recently was able to go to and from Halwill and his residence at Crackington Haven, the North Cornwall coast. For about' a couple months he has been at Halwill, and although able to have a drive occasionally in his donkey chaise, it was evident that the end was approaching. On Friday Mr. Harris had relapse, and it appeared likely that he would not live for many hours, the action the heart 'being very feeble. Members of the family were telegraphed for, but after a time he rallied, and lingered until Saturday morning, when passed peacefully away, in the presence several members of his family. Mr. Harris was head of the great corn firm of Harris Bros., of Liverpool and 'London. About 35 years ago purchased Halwill Manor, and built a residence (since enlarged) near the Parish Church. He took keen interest in agriculture and everything pertaining to the prosperity the parish. He was the pioneer of small holdings in the district, and many years ago made a number of them in his own parish. looked with pride on the success of his- venture, and at meetings of Parish Council Conferences, tenants' dinners and 'other places, referred to the prosperous condition of Halwill due principally to the system small holdings • I which he established. Before Tariff Reform came on the political platform, Mr. Harris was a keen Protestiomst. His views were expressed in the clearest of terms in the Press, and he was to hold his own with the cleverest of his opponents. His great desire was to see the land producing more food, and suggested that the Government should give a bounty tor the growing wheat. His manipulation of Ugures was truly wonderful. Descended from a Quaker family Mr. Harris was a member of the Established Church, and worshipped in the Parish Church, which he restored, and where for many years held the position of churchwarden, a short time Member of ParteS? ' - Harris contested the Mid-Devon Division against the late Mr. J m ' and was defea ted, and although offers were received, did not become a Parliamentary candidate On°the oimation County Councils he contested £ °a, but his absence oa elected. He took keen nterest local affairs, and until recently A °, Parish After S Manor, few years that'J r J m f time at whereWWi?K* ? Pterins place, where also W "ft?" nic and holdings mtlodu '-' d the system of small allowed opinion, StWk?* eir OWn never allowed a aS tormist appeai , from any Noncon! kindness and nheede d. His acts the district. various bodies one son and son, arH IOSS - only surviving' son sed him, his |J P-, LtSS? "ft " T - 1 that in the " Squire" H," Parishi oners feel and benefact[or and lost a goes out to the eartfelt sympathy |ment. Mr. golden his family were a T ' When * whole of whole* of be Parisilntn-er One daughter (Mrs 7- tained. tralia. ' now Aus-16
  • 2 Nov 1910, The Late Mr. W. J. Harris. J.P.17
  • 4 Nov 1910, Squire of Halwill.
    SQUIRE OF HALWILL. DEATH OF MR. We I. HARRIS. LARGELY-ATTENDED FUNERAL. Much regret has be«n occasioned by the d«vcu Mr. W. J. Hams, J.l'., Halwill L.r.. Hi* condjtitrn had caused the faon.! considerable anxiety for some litUe time i»u*t, and was felt that the "-rui Utution, aud this enabled him to withstand the original attack longer than would otherwise have been He was con- Stantlv atten ted Dr. Burd, Okehampton, his *.u-iu-law, and Lr. (.handler, Black Mr. Harris had uaralvtic in January last. But since Uen "h* !..» hern te eujoy occasional drives Kecently. however, h.s coud.tion became critical. Ha.n. was OctolK-r Ist. He leaves a widow and the following s>>iis and .laushteis. M.ss (.. E. Harris. <»! Mrs. Forrest, of Westcliffe Mr. T. Harris, Halwill Lodge: Mrs uarratt. Hertford; Mrs. Drake, Australia: Mi< Hurd, of Okehampion. The deceased - eldt>st son. Mr. W. H. Hams, ui«-.l 1901. leaving two children. Mr. Harr was boru in London. was the -«'Tit member the Society Fnends. and was educated at a Quaker school la London. He married, in 1858, M s> ornhill, daughter of Mr. R. S. ThornkiU. London. I p to the age 30 Mr. Harr continued member the Society o> F-. -nds, but since that time has been a ircbmaa. has taken special interest in the Church life Halwill. Deceased tat for years a member the firm M»-ssrs. Harris Bros, and Co.. Mark Lane. had successful business career, his cliaracteristic shrewdne-e, foresight. and perseverance b.mg valuable busings the corn market. Mr. Harris closely the economic and social problems our own and foreign countries. was a much-travelled man. gave others the benefit of his observations »nd the opinions he had formed in number of speeches and essays, for was a voluminous writer. „ . ... „ When Mr. Harris came Halwill Manor, intimated that he to bring the ee'ate into a state of profitable cultivation, a good dnal doubt was expressed as to wh would succeed. Indeed, Mr. Harr was regarded, in some quarters, as a good-natured man who had made money London, had certain theories, the application which would get rid some of that monev. and bring little return. Mr. Harris, however, while having his theories, applied them his business instincts. He started a system of small holdings, letting th-mi very low rental. Th» the district had no objection piece iaml almost a nominal rent. They set to. and worked upon it with the view at getting what could in return. The was satisfactory parties. The found that the land was suitabb for certain crop*, while the owner 'benefits! his property —which had been previously regarded practically useless- - berng brought into a satisfactory state cultivation. Mr Hams, the portion of the estate kept in haad. farmed on scientific princplss. H® raised crops better than any pre*.ou*ly produced and, he said. on terms satisfactory him*?lf. Being in position for rwturn upon his investment. the probability that was able 'arm an conditions somewhat different those in the ordinary farmer would find himself. Mr. Harris bred good and good cattle. The experiment that, for time, attaote i rh» greatest attention was the making enwlage. One season it was extremely wet the neighbourhood was impossible to make hay. Mr Harris decided to make ensilage. due course a very large party agriculturists were invited see the result the experiment. The experiment was a satisfactory one. The grass had aromatic odour which was agitable to tie cattle, and they upon it freely. A good many people followed the example bv Mr. Harris in thus dealing with grass But th* making ensilage e..nted Poole in Parliament: •n.Meqnently fought Mid-Devon, on which h:> pi.i nl.v proclaimed hiirs»lf to *» Protection and fought the Division such, making the fiscal policy caied the feature the campaign. The reeult the ele<-tion was not encouraging, Harris l>e quite ?at. Among the p.imphlets re-printed ad•resse, which emanated from Mr Harrif ?Uy mentioned "The best farm in the worm. an interesting narrative of a?ritr f>,v Zealand; " Butter versns , ® p K'Jle. or the economic condition of -tsT j "I, f !'" v ?" "««kW Free " a ®* > Estimates the realisable *'?? I'h the I'niteri Kingdom. based niost- "n the estate dutv return* prepared junction with the Rev. K. A. lake). a meeting of she Royal Statistical in 1906." "In defence Holsworthy, Thr*» Agriculture" read befot* ?embers i.f the Devon and Cornwall Chamber f Agriculture in 1899. During the pre«?rn T,l,r r Harris wrote a neper entitled The Balance-sheet Socialism." This ' ' as ' he penned. »i deceased vat the senior member '«* uolswnrthy Bench of Magistrates, but •»<, nor attended the sittings for soma ars was at one time an active memy 'j! Holswnrthv Beard Guardians, Harris had occupierP * , death. a Fellow the Statistical 7. :i* was the circle of Mr. Harris friends and acquaintances re are few who will regret his more than his neighbours, tenants, ' ii ' '' t" n-i <'«ti*ali , W£ " ! 'he lord the manors of 'l Crackington, St. Genny's. family he spent the greater part ' m e, f late years, at one the of hi* residences these places. Mr. rr ' ,r ,T *' Vlr '*d the utmost interest welfare of »bose among whom lived. In" v. sympathy and regret <> ild have hsd no nior» strA ,r - •' titan and ?' .fi.e , f the a*»einblage h's Hal will Parish Church. Jietg-h--•ottna? lujidowneifc, professional men. r.ute. tenants, employes, and 1 - ' 1,1 *'""<* represented among those atteml' ' 'v i tribute respect his _ stiiry. flag on the tower the J®,' 1 ' 'tt''"h was at half-mast, ami many r v the sympathy felt »er« < ' nt - weather could Imve oeen inclement, for. U sides br.t-rlv told. l.oavy shower* rain fell. fnneral pro, left Hal will Manor 3.15 p.m., and pre**««fed the church .yam g»t»H, where the mourner* 2ft* h* the Rev. K A Lake (Hector of /uTT" 1 ' til Rev Melhuish, R.D. Keotor of Ashwalor who oftiiiated, and the J "orthiivgton of Northlew). £ A Donaldson (Rector and T. H"*oombe (Rector Black Torrington), woo were also robed. The opening sentences were said by the Rector the parish. The church was filled. The hymn The Saints (iod, their conflict past," was feelingly n .. e Lesson was read the Re*. G. D. Melhuish. The service wty. choral, and organist (Mr. C. Cooper) impressively n i a f 1 P ro P '* t< music. The Rector of . pronounced the committal, and the concluding prayers were said by the Rural Dean. The following were the immediate i mourner*:—Mr. Robert Thornton Harris, S*, lwi <"° n >» Mi * K - E. Harris, |Halwill Manor (daughter). Mr. and Mr* j iHewart Forrest, of Southend-on-.sea (son-inlaw itod daughter), Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Garratt, Hertford (son-in-law and daughter), Dr. and Mrs. G. V. Burd. of Okehainp, ton (son-in-law a .id daughter), Miss hill (secretary late Mr. Harris), Mr. 3. V. B. Asser, Windleshuin; Mr. Vomers Jamee, of Ohislehurst; Mr. aad Mrs. Thorn- hill, of A«hwater; Mr. Edmund Burd, Mr. E. P. Northey, and Mr. Thomas McLennan (Mr. Harris's nurse).' Among general assemblage and Mr A H Scott Browne, Mr and Mrs Ash water). Meters E Ad«uns (Barn Park), T L Ash J.P.. H Higss, J.P., J H StratHj*, J.P.. A P Peter (Cl>rk to the Holswoithy Mag »t ratos). A K Peter (Deputy-Clerk to tho L Cook-Hurle P K Ktqiyon-Slanev (Hratton Gkwelly), O Kmgdon. W C P-t«r.-on to 1, Hoi.-*worthy), W T Kivoll, J Mc Dickson, W A Rudland. T Uees. T Sanders Bray, the Kendall (Bootor), M««rs W Wiffen. G Cartbew, C H Cooper. Coles vHolswortty), Messrs D Prickman. Davidson (Okehampton), I>r M widows Dr Candler and Mr J (Black Messrs T E Bttt.son, and Hutch," i«rs Harry (Rnwoithyl, E J Day, H A Meredith Craig Winsford Tower), P H hough, J H White, F AlUn, T Wonnacott, Hatch. J Jimen, W Wooldridga, H Snell, (representing the London and South -West*- rn Railway Company), J E E Tu-rrc»r, M Knight, Wivell, Dart, E Baker. J White, J B Brown. C Lazenfcv. C Jamie, and the Rov E V Thuredav (Halwill), Frank James (representing the h-Eaat Cornwall Association). J Trelea»?n. jun., C H Hayman. C Hayman, C Vospcr, senr., J Vickenr (Launceston). W Mariaton E Smeeth, R and D Spry, C Jewell, J Ward, H .•»" "ion, T Cole, W Smale, A Farrington, Woolridge, and J J Smeeth. The servants at Halwill Manor, Crackington Manor, and ITalwill I/odg" who were Me*rrs. H Mills (butler). C Newrrun (head gardener), Parsons (coachman), E Parsfins, Rutley. E Norther, S Hunkin, Esser (lady's-maid), M Hill (coo*), L J a mew (parlourmaid), E H«ter. Maunder, M Hortop, and Martin CHalwill Manor); W Jenkins (coachman), (Vomlje (head gardener), Paddon, Mrs Stacey man). Ix'arws —Messrs. J. Jollow.1. Knight, If. Knight, J. Martin, H. Dark, R. Northey. J Box, Ke«d. if. Uiibert. V. Gilbert, T. lioldicliff-, and W. Soby— from okwat tenants and employes the Halwill estate. The many choice floral tributes included beautiful from the widow, and another inscribed " From all his sons aud daughters, with fond lave" (these being upon the coffin), together with the following:—"For our loving grandfather, from all his grandchildren ; With loving thoughts, from Harriet, Mouse, and Daisy"; , "In loving remembrance, from Mary. Frank, and Mabel " ; Mr S V r. Mr-, and Miss Wood Mrs S (Harrow-onth«—HiM>. Fred and Annie Mrs G W Medley (Wins-ford Tower. Beaworthv). Meadows (Saltnsh), Mr T H ?pry (Wither Maidstone!, the Mis-es Brav (Rude). Mrs Walter (Paignton). Mr <' Wade. Mr James " From E18
  • 7 Nov 1910, Halwill's late Squire. Impressive Memorial Service. The Rector's Tribute.19

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013. Piece 0786: Quarterly Meeting of Yorkshire: Marriages (1813-1837).
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
    Cornelia.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, baptised 3 Jul 1857 St Peter's Stepney London.
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837
    Description: Piece 0415: Monthly Meeting of Gracechurch Street, City of London: Births (1793-1837).
  5. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  6. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  7. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: HO107; Piece: 669; Book: 7; Civil Parish: Stoke Newington; County: Middlesex; Enumeration District: 5; Folio: 15; Page: 22; Line: 3; GSU roll: 438784."
  8. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 152; Folio: 123; Page: 30; GSU roll: 542582."
  9. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Class: RG10; Piece: 874; Folio: 65; Page: 21; GSU roll: 827771.
  10. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 28; Folio: 107; Page: 41; GSU roll: 1341006."
  11. [S83] Online index to the UK census "The National Archives of the UK (TNA); Kew, Surrey, England; Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891; Class: RG12; Piece: 1793; Folio: 45; Page: 12; GSU roll: 6096903."
  12. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG13; Piece: 2170; Folio: 39; Page: 2."
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 26 Oct 1910, p2.
  14. [S14] Newspaper - The Devon and Exeter Gazette, 31 Oct 1910, p6.
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Devon and Exeter Daily Gazette (Exeter, England), Tuesday, November 01, 1910; pg. 5;.
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Western Times (Devon), 1 Nov 1910, p6.
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Devon and Exeter Daily Gazette (Exeter, England), Wednesday, November 02, 1910; pg. 4.
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Devon and Exeter Daily Gazette (Exeter, England), Friday, November 04, 1910; pg. 7;.
  19. [S14] Newspaper - Devon and Exeter Daily Gazette (Exeter, England), Monday, November 07, 1910; pg. 3.
Last Edited13 Jan 2019

Catherine Ann Thornhill

F, #1452, b. 1837, d. 28 Apr 1918
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS
Married NameHarris. 
Birth*1837 Essex, England.1 
Marriage*11 Feb 1858 Spouse: William James Harris. Hackney, London, England, Mar Q [Hackney] 1b 302.1,2
 
Widow29 Oct 1910Catherine Ann Thornhill became a widow upon the death of her husband William James Harris
Death*28 Apr 1918 Newton Abbott, Devon, England, Jun Q [Newton Abbott] 5b 124 (Age 80.)2 
Probate (Will)*7 Aug 1918 HARRIS Catherine Ann of Glenside Teignmouth Devonshire widow died 28 April 1918 Probate London 7 August to Hugh Somers James barrister-at-law and the reverend Kenneth Alexander Lake clerk. Eitects £8455 18s. 8d.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 18616 Aden Terrace, Stoke Newington, London, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 23
Member(s) of Household: William Henry Harris4
2 Apr 1871Merlewood, Bromley, Kent, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 33
Member(s) of Household: Katherine Ellen Harris, Ada Harris, Robert Thornhill Harris, Marian Jessie Harris, Christine Maybelle Harris5
3 Apr 188175 Linden Gardens, Kensington, London, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 43
Member(s) of Household: Katherine Ellen Harris, Robert Thornhill Harris, Marian Jessie Harris, Christine Maybelle Harris, Isabella Harris6
5 Apr 1891Halwill Manor, Halwill, Devon, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 53
Member(s) of Household: Christine Maybelle Harris, Katherine Ellen Harris, Marian Jessie Harris, Ada Forrest, Edmund Stewart Forrest7
31 Mar 1901Halwill Manor, Halwill, Devon, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 63
Member(s) of Household: Katherine Ellen Harris, Ada Forrest, Christine Maybelle Harris8
2 Apr 1911Halwill Manor, Halwill, Devon, EnglandHead of Household: Catherine Ann Harris. Age 73 - Widow
Member(s) of Household: Katherine Ellen Harris.9

Family

William James Harris b. 1 Oct 1835, d. 29 Oct 1910
Children 1.William Henry Harris+ b. 29 May 1859, d. 10 Jan 1901
 2.Katherine Ellen Harris b. Jun 1861, d. 3 Jan 1949
 3.Ada Harris+ b. Dec 1863, d. 7 Jul 1917
 4.Robert Thornhill Harris+ b. Dec 1865, d. 4 Dec 1934
 5.Marian Jessie Harris+ b. Dec 1867, d. 28 Aug 1936
 6.Christine Maybelle Harris b. 8 May 1870, d. 20 Aug 1947
 7.Isabella Harris+ b. Sep 1872, d. Sep 1965

Citations

  1. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
    Cornelia.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 152; Folio: 123; Page: 30; GSU roll: 542582."
  5. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Class: RG10; Piece: 874; Folio: 65; Page: 21; GSU roll: 827771.
  6. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 28; Folio: 107; Page: 41; GSU roll: 1341006."
  7. [S83] Online index to the UK census "The National Archives of the UK (TNA); Kew, Surrey, England; Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891; Class: RG12; Piece: 1793; Folio: 45; Page: 12; GSU roll: 6096903."
  8. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG13; Piece: 2170; Folio: 39; Page: 2."
  9. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG14; Piece: 13495; Schedule Number: 9."
Last Edited3 Jun 2018

William Henry Harris

M, #1453, b. 29 May 1859, d. 10 Jan 1901
Father*William James Harris b. 1 Oct 1835, d. 29 Oct 1910
Mother*Catherine Ann Thornhill b. 1837, d. 28 Apr 1918
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS
Birth*29 May 1859 Stoke Newington, Middlesex, England, Jun Q [Hackney] 1b 292.1 
Marriage*Jun 1890 Spouse: Katherine Jones. St Giles, London, England, Jun Q [St Giles] 1b 956.2
 
Widower20 Dec 1891William Henry Harris became a widower upon the death of his wife Katherine Jones.2 
Marriage*Jun 1894 Spouse: Clara Margaret Cluff. Hastings, Sussex, England, Jun Q [Hastings] 2b 61.2
 
Death*10 Jan 1901 Holsworthy, Devon, England, Mar Q [Holsworthy] 5b 409 (Age 41.)2 
Probate (Will)*25 Mar 1901 HARRIS William Henry of "Barnpark" Halwill Devonshire esquire died 10 January 1901 Probate Exeter 25 March to Clara Margaret Harris widow und Robert Thornhill Harris esquire. Effects £2002 10s. 3d. Resworn November 1901 £1706 6s. 2d. and £2577 11s. 2d.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 18616 Aden Terrace, Stoke Newington, London, England(Head of Household) William James Harris;
Age 1
Member(s) of Household: Catherine Ann Harris4
2 Apr 1871Catherine ATKINSON - Pricipal, Montpelier Cresent, Brighton, Sussex, EnglandAge 11 - Scholar5

Family

Clara Margaret Cluff b. Dec 1869, d. 1 Sep 1904
Children 1.Edward William Harris+ b. 19 Jul 1895, d. 8 Feb 1961
 2.Ada Victoria Harris+ b. 18 Aug 1900, d. 5 Jan 1988

Newspaper-Articles

  • Harris.—At Liverpool, Dec. 20, Katherine, wife of William Henry Harris (eldest son of W. J. Harris, ef Halwill Manor), aged 30.
  • 11 Jan 1901, Harris.—On Jan. 10, at Barnpark. Halwill, North Devon, William Henry Harris, elder son of W. J. Harris, aged 41 years Funeral, Saturday, Jan. 12, at Halwill Church, at 3 p.m.6
  • 18 Jan 1901, HALWILL. THEK FUNERAL OF MR. W. H. HARRIS.
    Tht remains of the late Mr W H Harris, of Barn Park, Halwill, were interred in the parish churchyard on Saturday afternoon amid tokens of deep sympathy from a very large attendance of friends aud parishioners. The following eighteen bearers, Messrs J Knight, Wm Soby, S Parsons, R Jordan, E Cutler, J B Brown, J H Durant, R Gilbert, J Jollow, T H Baker, G Baker, H Darke, J Martio, W Knight, R Knight, T Cole, W Gilbert, R Spry, conveyed the body from the residence to the church. The funeral service was conducted by the Rector (Rev K Lake) assisted by Revs G D Melhuish and J Downie.
    The chief mourners were Mrs W H Harris (widow), Mr and Mrs W J Harris (father and mother), Mr and Mrs R T Harris (brother and sister-in-law), the Misses Harris (sisters), Mrs Burd and Mrs Forrest (sisters), Mr and Miss Thornhill, Rev William Clough, Mrs Puttock (sister-in-law), Mr Hoare, Mr and Mrs F Harris, Mr R Thornhill, and the medical attendants (Drs Ash, Kingdon and Burd). Others present were Revs Gardiner, Squires and Brown, Mr and Mrs Scott Browne (Buckland), Col Prendergast, Major Bearne, Lieut. Bearne, Rev. Gregory Bateman, Messrs C M Saunders, J.P, C B Woollcombe, J.P, J Oag, J.P, Perterson, W. Kivell and W. S. Bray (Helsworthy), W R Lemarque, S Asser, J H Mullins, J Risdon (Exeter), Russell, Prickman (Okehampton), Craig, D Hutchings (Beaworthy), C Bearne, W Cole, Spry (Ashwater), S W Adams, J Durrant, W Boundy and S Soby. There was a choice collection of wreaths sent by Walter A Lemarque and family, late partners, Mr and Mrs Mullins, Kathleen and Madge, Mr and Mrs K Barnard, Father and Mother, Mr M White and family, Mr and Mrs Corney, Christine and Neville, stationmaster staff and guards. Mr and Mrs Forrest, manor servants, Mr and Mrs McConnell, Mrs E H Puttock, Mr and Mrs E Costin, Mr Jones, Mr and Mrs Ball, Mr and Mrs P Garratt, Mr and Mrs Hore, Mr Thornhill, Mrs and Mrs Tylor, R T Harris, Misses Harris, Dr and Mrs Burd, Rev W Clough. The coffin was of polished oak, with solid brass fittings and a large brass cross on the lid, at the bottom of which was a brass plate with the following inscription:— "William Henry Harris, born May 29, 1859; died January 10, 1901." The coffin was supplied and the funeral arrangements made by Mr M White, of Halwill Station.7
  • 19 Jan 1901, HALWILL ... inscription: “William Henry Harris, born May 29, 1859, died January 10th, 1901.” The principal mourners were Mrs. Harris (widow), Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Harris (father and mother), Mr. R.T. Harris (brother), Mrs. Forrest, Mrs. Hurd, and the ...8

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mothers maiden name THORNHILL."
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 152; Folio: 123; Page: 30; GSU roll: 542582."
  5. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 1088; Folio: 117; Page: 37; GSU roll: 827502."
  6. [S14] Newspaper - The Western Times (Exeter, England), Friday, January 11, 1901; pg. 5;.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - The Western Times (Exeter, England), Friday, January 18, 1901; pg. 6.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Cornish & Devon Post, England, Saturday 19 Jan 1901, p2.
Last Edited3 Jun 2018

Clara Margaret Cluff

F, #1454, b. Dec 1869, d. 1 Sep 1904
Father*Charles John Cluff b. 1833
Mother*Harriet Hall Hall b. 1836
ChartsDescendants of William James HARRIS
Married NameHarris. 
Birth*Dec 1869 Hackney, London, England, Dec Q [Hackney] 1b 445.1 
Marriage*Jun 1894 Spouse: William Henry Harris. Hastings, Sussex, England, Jun Q [Hastings] 2b 61.1
 
Widow10 Jan 1901Clara Margaret Cluff became a widow upon the death of her husband William Henry Harris.1 
Death*1 Sep 1904 Holsworthy, Devon, England, Sep Q [Holsworthy] 5b 325 (Age 34.)1 
Death-Notice*8 Sep 1904HARRIS.-September 1. at Barn Park. Halwill, Clara Margaret, wife of the late William Harris, 34.
HARRIS.—Sept. 1, at Barn Park, Halwill, Clara Margaret Harris, aged 34.2,3 
Probate (Will)*5 Jul 1905 HARRIS Clara Margaret of Barn-park Halwill Devonshire widow died 1 September 1904 Administration (with Will) (Limited) London 5 July to Robert Thornhill Harris esquire Katherine Ellen Harris spinster and Edith Harriet Lamarque (wife of Walter Lamarque). Effects £737 7s. 7d.4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
31 Mar 1901Barn Park, Halwill, Devon, EnglandHead of Household: Clara Margaret Harris. Age 31 - Widow - living on own means
Member(s) of Household: Edward William Harris Ada Victoria Harris.5

Family

William Henry Harris b. 29 May 1859, d. 10 Jan 1901
Children 1.Edward William Harris+ b. 19 Jul 1895, d. 8 Feb 1961
 2.Ada Victoria Harris+ b. 18 Aug 1900, d. 5 Jan 1988

Newspaper-Articles

  • 2 Sep 1904, HARRIS.—On Sept. 1st, Barn Park, Halwill, Clara Margaret, wife the late William Henry Harris, and daughter of the late Charles John Cluff, aged ... Funeral o'clock Monday, Sept. sth, at Church ...6
  • 6 Sep 1904, FUNERAL OF MRS W. H. HARRIS, HALWILL
    ... W. J. Harris, Miss Harris, Mother and Cis, Papa and Mamma, Willie and Tibboo, Will and Arthur, Mr and Mrs Lamarque, Mrs. Pullock, Mr and Mrs Forrest Mrs E. and Miss Thornhill, Mr and Mrs H. Thornhill, Mr and Mrs R. Harris, Dr and ...7
  • 7 Sep 1904... FUNERAL MRS W. H. HARRIS, HALWILL. Very great was the regret when the public learnt the death of Mrs Harris (widow of Mr W. H. Harris, son of the lord Halwill Manor). The deceased had been in ill-health for some time, but the death was not generally ...8

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Cornishman, Cornwall, England, 8 Sep 1904, p8.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - Western Times, Devon, England, 3 Sep 1904, p1.
  4. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  5. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG13; Piece: 2170; Folio: 40; Page: 4."
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Devon, England, 2 Sep 1904, p10.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Western Times, Devon England, 6 Sep 1904, p7.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Devon, England, 7 Sep 1904, p3.
Last Edited3 Feb 2019

Upper Beaconsfield

?, #1455

Newspaper-Articles

  • 17 Sep 1870, ACCLIMATISATION.
    A meeting of the Council of the Acclimatisation Society was held on the 9th inst, at the office, 30 Swanston-street ; present, Dr. Black, (president); Mr. Brodribb, Mr. Venables, Mr. Moule, Dr. Joseph Black, Mr. Allport, Mr. Sprigg, and Mr. Hammond.
    The hon. secretary informed the meeting that the hatching out of the trout ova was proceeding very satisfactorily. The ova appear to be very healthy, and the council confidently expect to have a quantity of young fry to distribute in suitable streams ; in; about two months' time. Mr. Allport brought before the council a scheme for forming parent piscicultural establishments in suitable parts of the colony, which was highly approved of by the members present. In addition to the large number of English skylarks already liberated the society have lately purchased another lot recently imported. It is hoped, as the birds were caught in England when full, grown and have now been placed in very favourable situations, in the neighborhood of Melbourne, that they will soon increase and multiply. For a considerable time past the council have been anxious to remove the herd of fallow deer now numbering about 200, from Phillip Island. Many difficulties have, however, presented themselves in accomplishing that object. They yesterday passed a resolution, "That the Government be written to and informed that the council have no power under the act to give the inhabitants of Phillip Island permission to destroy the deer, but that they are at perfect liberty to drive them over to the mainland.1
  • 12 Dec 1877, PROPOSED TRAMWAY AT BERWICK.
    A meeting of gentlemen interested in the construction of a tramway from the Gembrook ranges, near Berwick, to the Gippsland railway line was held, on Monday last, at 4.30 p.m., at Scott's Hotel, Collins-street West, Melbourne. There were twenty-six persons present, and Mr Gibb, of Berwick, was called to occupy the chair.
    The Chairman said that Mr. Brisbane had been acting in this matter for some time past, and he had applied to the Shire Council, of which he (Mr. Gibb) was a member, to give every facility it could to the undertaking. The Shire Council would give every encouragement to the scheme, but it was found that that body had not power by the law to confer a title to the land required, and Mr. Brisbane had arranged to carry the tramway partly, through, private land and partly through Government land. He supposed that Mr. Brisbane would presently be prepared to give some information about the matter. There could be no doubt that the tramway would be a very desirable work. Those who had selected land in the neighborhood should all take shares in the proposed company ; he had done so himself, and he felt convinced that they would confer great benefits on the district.
    Mr Brisbane said that about two months ago there was a meeting held at Scott's Hotel, at which it was agreed to construct this tramway, and the meeting was then adjourned to see if the ground could be obtained. The Shire Council was applied to, but that body had not power to give a title to the ground that would be required; it was understood, however, that it would do everything it could to forward the scheme, and recommend it favorably to the Government. He then went to several of the selectors; and got their consent, in writing, to the construction of the tramway. A great portion of the route was on a Government reserve, and the use of it would be allowed ; other parts would be excised, by the district surveyor from the licenses. It now devolved on the meeting to appoint directors, and, form the company. All the required facilities had been pro mised and the object now in view was to form the company, and determine the number of shares. He supposed a thousand shares of 25s. each would be sufficient, and some had already been promised. Plans of the tramway had been drawn, showing the gradients, &c., but they were in the pos session of the minister of railways. The minister had promised to grant a siding. The exact length of the tramway, as at present proposed, would be four miles and three quarters, and it would cost about £1000, including £200 for rolling stock. The rails would be of wood, but they might be partly covered with metal plates. His own tramway, which he had constructed, did not cost more than £200 a-mile, and after the work had been done, the charges for freight and passengers could be fixed and regulated so as to make the scheme a payable one. There would be plenty of wood brought down, and it would be bene ficial to the selectors to get rid of it.
    Mr. Hornby said that the best way would be, to form a company with 1500 shares of 25s. each, and float a thousand of them at first. The directors could be ap pointed, and the minister could give them a title to the land, and, after that, contractors could be invited to construct the tramway. He would propose that company be formed, to be called the Berwick Tramway Company limited to consist of 1500 shares of 25s. each, 1000 to be issued, and the rest kept in trust for the Company.
    Mr. Goff seconded the motion.
    The Chairman said he was, to some extent, in the dark ; he should have liked the committee to bring up a written report. He believed that the scheme would pay, and thought every selector in the locality should take up shares.
    Mr. Ford suggested that the tramway should eventually be taken round by Pakenham station. He hardy thought 1500 shares would be sufficient. He would test the opinion of the meeting by moving, as an amendment, that the capital be raised by means of 2000 shares of 30s. each. It might not be necessary to call it up, but there would be plenty of money available for rolling stock.
    The original motion was then withdrawn, and the amendment was agreed to unanimously.
    Mr. Brisbane was appointed Secretry, to register the Company, and take the preli minary steps for its formation, and Mr Hornby was appointed Solicitor to the Company. It was understood that the Secretary should call a meeting, as soon as possible, to draw up rules. It was stated that about 220 selectors would immediately be benefitted by the tramway.
    The meeting then closed.2
  • 1 Jun 1878, THE NEW PROVINCE. (BY OSHEA)
    About Dandenong the embankments are rather "dicky," but they will soon get properly set. There are numerous cuttings and heavy bridges on this route, which added considerably to the cost of the line, but for them no engineering difficulties of any consequence had to be overcome in its construction. The station accommodation is, wretched, and it is with extreme difficulty that refreshments are procured on the journey, and when it is possible to get them, thye are, as a rule, not worth taking the trouble to obtain. There are two trains per day—the first starting from Oakleigh at 8a.m., and arriving at Sale at 2 p.m; the second leaving at. 5 p.m., and reaching its destination at 10.15 p.m. Passing Dandenong and Berwick, two dead-and-alive villages, the traveller reaches Packenham, about 40 miles from Melbourne. Here a branch of the pioneer family of Henty is settled on a large freehold, and seven miles away is the Gembrook district, where numerous areas are being pegged out. principally by opulent Melbourne citizens. The country is very rangy and thickly tim bered, but the soil is magnificent. Its chief attraction, however, in the eyes of those who are taking up the land is the picturesque scenery and salubrious atmosphere. The settlers intend to erect country residences here in order to escape the stifling heat and dust of the metropolis during the summer months. I may here mention that under previous Commissiouers of Lands facilities were afforded to selectors, who took up heavily timbered land, by dispensing with either residence or cultivation, at the settler's option. This had a very good effect as it led to the utilisation of much land that would otherwise have remained unoccupied. Mr. Longmore appears to be playing fast and loose with this subject—he will not tell the selectors whether he will follow in the footsteps of his prede cessors or not, the consequence being that much uneasiness is felt in many cases. Packenham itself is a city containing two antediluvian public houses and a modern mud-hole. Bunyip is the next station. There is some good land in the vicinity, but it is nearly all occupied. Brandy Creek — the alcoholic locality which tween Mr. J. J. Casey, Professor Strong, and the late G. P. Smith—is the next stage. The station known as Drouin is 46 miles from Melbourne, and four miles from the township which is called Drouin East, and is situated on the main road. Conveyance over a fright ful track is afforded by Cobb and Co.'s coach. The business is however forsaking Drouin East, and taking up its abode at a newly-sur veyed township near the railway station. The old township is picturesquely situated on the rise of a hill, beside purling brook. It con-tains four hotels, three stores, a bank, butcher, baker, shoemaker, etc. An immense area of land is taken up, in most instances by Melbourne tradesmen desiring to establish their sons in the country. The country is hilly and heavily timbered, but the underscrub is not heavy. Ferns from the delicate maidenhair to the gigantic tree variety flourish in luxuriant profusion. The operations of a selector consist in first cutting down the scrub and gathering it into a heap. Then he intermixes with that heap the trunks of all the fallen trees he can conveniently convey thereto. This is set fire to, and when thoroughly consumed English grass is sown on the spot. The standing trees are then rung. Immense numbers of rung trees denuded of their foliage, looking for all the world like phantom forests form a prominent feature in the landscape.
    (Extract of long article)3
  • 4 Dec 1878, EXCURSION TO BEACONSFIELD. A large party of excursionists, numbering about 120 ladies and gentlemen, among whom were the Commissioner of Railways, and Dr. L. L. Smith and Mr. Bosisto, M's. L. A., took a trip, on Saturday last, to Beaconsfield, a place about four miles and a-half from Berwick on the Gippsland line. The Argus, which gives a very correct account of the outing, states that the excursionists were conveyed to Oakleigh in omnibuses provided by the Melbourne Omnibus Company and thence by a special train which left Oakleig at half-past 10. At Berwick station about 30 vehicles were in readiness to convey the party to Beaconsfield, where arrangements had been made for holding a picnic on a large scale. Beaconsfield is a settlement which has been formed within the last two years by se lectors of 20-acre blocks under the 49th section of the Land Act. Three hundred blocks have been taken up, chiefly by residents in Melbourne. Very few of them have as yet been built upon, but there are substantial evidences of settlement. The allotments are all fenced, and a very large amount of money bas been expended in clearing. The excursion was organised for the purpose of drawing the attention of the Commissioner to the requirements of the selectors in the matter of railway accommodation. Some months ago, a company was formed for the purpose of constructing a tramway to take the timber, stone, and firewood from the hills to the railway line. The shares in the proposed undertaking were readily taken up; but the operations of the company were stopped by a hitherto unforeseen difficulty. They could not take the line across a road without the sanction of an act of Parliament. The Government have promised to introduce a bill dealing with the tramway question generally, but till this is done the company can proceed no further, and in the meantime the selectors are desirous of having a station erected near the Kardinia Creek. The settlement is at no great distance from Berwick station, but the nature of the country is such as to render it very difficult of access. At present the selectors have to travel by a very circuitous route, and even then they cannot avoid a steep hill, over, which it would be almost an impossibility to convey a heavy load of produce. The spot at which the selectors desire to have a station was pointed out by Mr. Brisbane to the Commissioner of Railways, who admitted that a good case had been made out, and promised that it should receive early attention. The party then proceeded to the residence of Mr. Brisbane, which is situate on the top of a hill about 1,200ft. above the level of the sea. Driving up the steep ranges was a work of some difficulty, and many of the travellers found themselves compelled to alight, and make the rest of the journey on foot. They were, however, amply rewarded for their toil. The weather was pleasantly cool, and the top of the hill. on which Mr. Brisbane's handsome residence is perched commands a view of an extensive sweep of country, comprising the Baw Baw ranges, Mount Macedon, Western Port, Phillip Island, and Port Phillip Bay. Luncheon was laid in the dining room, at which Professor Halford presided: "The Queen" having been honoured in the customary manner, the health, of "The Commissioner of Railways", was proposed by Mr. Brind. Mr Woods, in responding, said if there was one thing he valued more than another it was the good opinion of his neighbours. Allusion had been made to the administration of his department, but when he reminded them that there were no less than 4,000 persons employed in his department, and £2,000 had to be found every day to pay them, they would be able to form some idea of the difficulties he had to contend with. He had departed somewhat from the beaten track, and in doing so had risked fame and reputation; but the day would made when the public would be fully satisfied with the results. With regard to the particular object which had brought them together that day, he remarked that railways were constructed for the convenience of the public, and if they could not accommodate the public, they did not fulfil one of the primary purposes for which they were constructed. He saw no reason why these grand hills should not in the course of a very few months be made accessible onto the young and feeble, who wanted to escape from the impure air of Melbourne. When the station was open on the spot he had been shown that morning, he would put on a morning train if the traffic was sufficient to justify it—(cheers)—and when the connexion with Melbourne was finished, it would be quite possible for a resident of these hills to leave home at 8 o'clock in the morning, reach Melbourne in an hour and after his day's business return again to his residence in the hills by six o'clock. (Applause. He concluded by proposing the health of Mr. Brisbane, who responded. "The prosperity of Beaconsfield" was proposed by Mr. L. L. Smith, and responded to by Mr. Bosisto. "The Chairman" was then proposed by Mr. McKean, and responded by Professor Halford. The party then broke up, and dipersed themselves among the many beautiful hills and gullies in the neighbourhood till half-past five o'clock, when a start was made for Berwick station, which was reached without accident, and the excursionists got to town a little before 10 o'clock.4
  • 28 Oct 1880, Councillor Gibb said he had received a petition from residents of Beaconsfield as to the expenditure of a sum of £500 on Bowman's track instead of on road to Beaconsfield as originally intended, as it would be making part of a road to Gembrook.— Councillor Souter also handed in a petition on the subject which he had received, by which he was requested to use his influence to have Beaconsfield road made. He explained that he was one of a a deputation to Government to ask for this road through to Gembrook ; and, when it was explained that the track was an old one, the Commissioner said it should be opened. A good deal of work had been done to keep the road good, and he did not see how the Council could interfere; as the amount was on the estimates for Bowman's track.—Councillor Gibb understood it was for a road through Beacons- field to Gembroook.—Councillor Souter knew that a deputation had waited on the Minister on the subject.—Councillor Gibb reminded the Council that the letter was a private one. He told the Minister that an error had been made, and if the Berwick Council would not step in and decide which road the money was to be expended on, it would be difficult for the Department to do so. It would be time enough to quarrel about the money when they got it.—Councillor Gibb said he intended to reply to the letter to the effect that the Council would expend the money where it was considered most beneficial to the ratepayers of the Shire.5
  • 5 Feb 1881, EASY TRIPS FROM MELBOURNE. - BEACONSFIELD.
    The view before you as you sit in the front verandah of Beaconsfield-house is one of which I have not seen the equal in Victoria. I have seen many of the "show" views, but none that can compare with this for extent, and diversity, and interest. As you sit here you can, without moving, look over those wooded rolling hills close around, over the wide stretch of lowland, mottled with grassy plain and light forest and you see far away to the south the broad blue waters of Western Port, with its great islands, French Island and Phillip Island, which spread over so much of its surface. Slightly turning your head to the right or the westward, you see the afternoon sun flashing on the waters of Port Phillip Bay, and can with the naked eye trace many of its high head lands, such as Portarlington, Mount Martha, and Arthur's Seat. Close at hand you are surrounded by dark, wooded hills, and the one on which you are is the highest of all. They have not the straight, rigid, backbone-and-rib formation of our greater mountain ranges, but are rounded and undulating, pleasantly divided by gently-sloping gullies. Down many of these trickles a clear, cold stream of spring water, over which graceful fern-trees here and there cast a tracery-like shade. On almost every hilltop is a little clearing, in which stands a little cottage with its roof of galvanised iron gleaming like diamond in the sun. Behind us the bulges grow darker and higher, and run back into thelofty mass of the Dandenong. More to the east are seen the blue distant summits of the Juliet and Mount Monda Ranges. Of all this great mass of ranges connected one with the other, or only divided by high passes, Beaconsfield occupies a lofty, prominent outwork, dominating the plains below, and nothing but lowland lies between us and these two great inland seas. And the result of it all is that nowhere else can you find a position commanding such a view as this—a view at once of land and sea, of mountain and plain, presenting close at hand aspects of picturesque nature, dotted with the signs of growing civilisation, and in the dis tance spreading out into limitless expanse, over which the sight ranges till it reaches and becomes lost in the misty margin where earth melts into sky and sky hardens into earth.
    Of the cottages which sprinkle the hills around the greater number are inhabited and owned by Melbourne people, who have taken up theae pieces of land for the purpose of forming easily-accessible country retreats in these cool, shady hills. They are found here in great numbers, and are scattered from far up towards the Dandenong in one way, and down to Gembrook in another. By settling here they manage to secure an altitude of from 1,000 feet and upwards, freely open to the south sea breezes, and within about 30 miles or so from their offices in Melbourne. Some have perched their cottage on the crown of a hill overlooking half a county, some from their front door lookout over ridge after ridge of dark hills, some are on the edge of deep fern tree gullies, along the bottom of which a clear stream steals silently, and some are in proximity to a creek which flashes musically along between huge granite boulders. Each has consulted his preference, and chosen the site most in accordance with his tastes and his convenience. And thus it is that unassuming citizens, who, as you meet them in Collins-street, suggest to your mind nothing at all geographical, up here give their names to hilltops and mountain-gullies. They give them selves bucolic airs, affect leather gaiters, talk of swine and cows, and crops of maize, and forget, or appear to forget, that there are such places as Flinders-lane or Temple-court in the world.
    We left Melbourne, Mrs. X. and I, on Saturday morning by the early train for Gipps Land, and reached Beaconsfield station soon after 9 o'clock. Well, that is very early, and you have the day still before you. Mr. Butler, who is to be our host for a day or two, is waiting at the station, and drives us up the winding, rapidly-rising road to Beaconsfield house, which stands about six miles from the railway line. On the line you are, I should think, not very much above sea level, but by the time you get to the hill-top you are 1,200ft. high. The road is pretty and picturesque, and by looking back now and then you get to see far and farther over the low country. Beaconsfield-house was founded, as I understand, some two or three years ago by Mr. Brisbane, who intended it for the purpose of a sanitarium of easy access to the heat-oppressed citizens of Melbourne. This purpose the railway has helped to foster, and many people, it seems, are now getting into the way of seeking an outlet to pure fresh air and breezes at once of the sea and the mountain in the hills of Beaconsfield. We get to our destination about half-past 10 in the morning, and at once utilise the time between then and dinner in taking a walk. To take a walk is, in fact, your one occupation and resource here. Fortunately, walks are plenti ful. There are close at hand a large number of gullies to explore, and you soon get to see that they all possess different characteristics and different vegetation, and, more especially, different ferns. Then there are numberless tracks leading off in all directions into the forest, most of them conducting along ridge and saddle-back to some or other cottage in the hills, in using the term cottage, I have no intention of speaking disrespectfully, although I must admit that many of these residences are properly entitled to some more imposing ap pellation. In this way would the interval between one meal time and another be filled up by easy strolling in the pure light mountain air, and under the pleasant shade of the forest trees. As the time for the next meal approached the visitors at the hotel would gather together out of the gullies and forest impatience for the sound of the dinner bell. After tea there was nothing pleasanter than to sit and watch the sun descend among the gorgeously-tinted clouds in the west, to see the notched summit-line of the You Yangs fuse and melt in rosy mist, and blood-red gleam quiver on the broad surface of the distant Port Phillip Bay. Gradually the deep rich colours die out of the sky, the vast landscape slowly, imperceptibly fades into shadow, and then into darkness, the stars come out in the sky, still all lucent with the afterglow, till at length night comes down and draws the horizon in close around us, and only the dim outline of a neighbouring hill can be discerned through the darkness.
    But you cannot live altogether on mountain air or diversified hill scenery. Indeed, the more of these you get, the more imperative, as I have before hinted, becomes the call of meal time. I am happy to say that, in that respect, nothing was wanting on our side or on that of our host and hostess. We were very well treated, and we did good justice to our opportunities. Whether it was the walking up and down these hills, of the altitude—a thousand feet of dense atmosphere shaken, off your shoulders—or the breezes coming up fresh and cool from the sea and beating freely on the seaward face of this block of mountain ranges, I do not attempt to explain, but the result was that we sat down to our meals uncommonly hungry. The thermometer indicated a very low temperature, which was shown, too, by the stinging cold air on our faces on the last morning of our stay in Beaconsfield-house. We had to get up very early to take breakfast before starting on the pleasant drive down to the station. It had taken us an hour and a half to ascend, but we ran down easily in an hour. I was amused as we returned to town by the suburban train—not the Gipps Land train, that does not stoop to each undignified pro ceedings—to see how we stopped at almost every cross-road to pick up passengers for Melbourne. And so on through the pretty park-like lands of Berwick and Dandenong, and the sandy heaths of Oakleigh and Caulfield, till we reach the wonderful series of palatial stations, one of which, under the liberal and generous régimé of Mr. Woods, was built at almost every level crossing in the aristocratic districts of Malvern and Toorak.
    X.6
  • 20 Jun 1883, ENLARGEMENT OF THE SUBURBAN RAIL WAY SYSTEM.
    A large and influential meeting was held in the mechanics' institute, Dandenong, on Monday evening, to take the necessary steps to secure the re-establishment of the suburban system between Melbourne and Dandenong, Berwick, and Beaconsfield.
    Mr H M Sutherland JP, occupied the chair, and Mr Rodd, Mr Jos Clark, Mr. Macpherson, Mr Hyde, Dr Moore, and several other of the leading residents spoke at some length on the subject, urging that the recent arbitrary action of the Government in removing the suburban trains was a direct breach of faith with the residents, as, on the supposition that the suburban system would be still further developed, many persons had been induced to purchase property, and build thereon, in what is, without exception, the finest and most salubrious district near Melbourne, trusting to those trains enabling them to get into town and back with something like certainty. The Dandenong meeting was considerably strengthened by a large contingent of Berwick and Beaconsfield gentlemen, who, having been appointed a committee of management by a meeting held in Berwick on Saturday evening last, came down to Dandenong to enlist the sympathy and aid of the Dandenong people, and to heartily co-operate with them in securing this boon for the residents of these districts. Statements were made and statistics produced, showing that close on £100,000 has been spent in Berwick and Beaconsfield during the last three or four years, of which £37,750 has been spent on buildings, the rest being for the purchase of land from Government, and for fencing and improving the same. It was also pointed out that the Government had sold large areas of the Beaconsfield ranges in 20 acre allotments for building sites, and had obtained large prices for them, the land being valueless for any other purpose. It was complained that now that some 300 of these allotments have been sold, and people induced to build and settle up there, entirely on the strength of the suburban trains, a new Ministry comes into office, and with a stroke of the pen the system is, discontinued. Several other reasons were adduced why the suburban system should be recontinued to Dandenong, Berwick, and Beaconsfield, and after the matter had been fully ventilated and discussed, the following resolution, proposed by Dr. Moore, and seconded by Mr. Hyde, was unanimously carried.
    "That this meeting considers the recent action of the Government in discontinuing the suburban trains to Dandenong, Berwick, and Beaconsfield a direct breach of faith with the residents of those districts, and that a committee be formed to appoint the strongest possible deputation to wait upon the Commissioner of Railways, and endeavour to secure the re-establishment of the suburban system." A very strong committee of local gentlemen was then formed to co operate with the Berwick committee in appointing a deputation to wait on the Minister, and, after a vote of thanks to the chairman had been passed, the proceedings terminated.7
  • 28 Jun 1883, LIGHT RAILWAY LINES. Mr. Gibb, M.L.A, introduced a deputation from Beaconsfield and Gembrook to the Minister of Railways yesterday. He explained that the last Government had proposed to construct a line from Beaconsfield to Beaconsfield House, a distance of 4½ miles, at a cost of £17,000. He felt sure that Mr. Gillies would see that the construction of a light line would do away with such an expenditure. A member of the deputation remarked that if Captain Rowan's system of light lines and steam carriages were employed, the line could be constructed for less than £17,000, About 400 gentlemen from Melbourne had takon up residence areas and erected buildings on the hills near Berwick, being induced to do so by the salubrity of the climate. The deputation considered that the present afforded an excellent opportunity to try Captain Rowan's system of light lines in hilly country. The line would pass through Gembrook, which was equally as populous as Beaconsfield. Besides that there was a large area of good agricultural and timber lands. The distance between Beaconsfield and Gembrook was about 15 miles. Dr. Dobson, M.L.C., supported the request of the deputation. Captain Rowan, who also spoke, referred to the utility of his system of railway extension by means of light lines and steam carriages, and explained that a surface line could be constructed from Penshurst to Coleraine at a cost of £1200 to £1250 per mile. That amount would include £600 per mile for rails and fastenings. Mr. Gillies remarked that the light rails employed by Captain Rowan's system were passing out of use all over the world. Captain Rowan explained that the light rails could be laid down on horizontal sleepers instead of the usual transverse sleepers, and showed a plan on that system. Mr. L. L. Smith also spoke in support of the extension, Mr Gillies said that no doubt many places in the mountainous districts would be left without railway communication unless a system of light lines were introduced. He would cause inquiries to be made as to the character of the gradients up to Gembrook. He had asked the Engineer-in-Chief certain questions in regard to more cheaply constructed lines in hilly country. From what he had seen of Gippsland, it would be practically impossible, for want of capital, to carry out the present system of railway. Something would have to be done in the shape of steam tramways, other wise many places must be left out in the cold. He expected in a few days to be furnished with important information on the subject of light lines. He would also be glad if Captain Rowan would furnish information on the point, which would laid before the Engineer-in-Chief. The difficulty with regard to Captain Rowan's steam carriage was that on a line where there was a large traffic the passengers would have to be shunted with the goods, but for passengers travelling through to a terminal station it would be very useful. He would take the view of the deputation into close consideration.8
  • 21 May 1884, The following is a list of the names of the deputation on Wednesday last in reference to the Berwick Shire under the heading of the interest in which each attended: -Brown's petition, for re-sub division of Shire: Messrs. J. S. White, Trail, Buckley, Barry, Berwick Shire Councillors, and Mr. G. Brown and Mr. Buchanan, M. L. C.
    Beaconsfield petition, for riding in opposition to Gembrook riding: Messrs. Brisbane, Brind, Butler, Bullen, Vail, W. Elms, Goff, Walford, E. A. A'Beckett and Professor Halford.
    Gembrook riding petition: Messrs. Souter, Bourke, Dote, Pakenham riding Councillors, Dr. Bromby, Messrs. Cameron, M.L.A., A. Crichton and H. Miller.
    Glaums petition, to have portion of Gembrook annexed to Scoresby: Messrs. Bosisto, M.L.A., and C. Glaum.
    Neutral: Dr. Dobson, M.L.C.
    Gembrook petition won hands down; Glaumn came in a good second; the others ran off the course and were nowhere in the race.9
  • 24 Dec 1884, A RIFLE COMPETITION Will be held on BOXING DAY
    at the BEACONSFIELD RIFLE RANGE (Pine Grove Hotel).
    The Committee have offered the following prizes:—
    1st prize, MARTINI HENRY RIFLE
    2nd do. 500 ENFIELD CARTRIDGES
    3rd do. 250 Do. Do.
    Distance, 200 yards; Rifle, Enfield only; Seven rounds each. Firing to commence at 1 p.m. sharp. Entrance fee, 5s. Open to all comers from Dandenong, Berwick, Cranbourne, Pakenham, Gembrook and Beaconsfield. Competitors' tickets to be had from Mr. Dobson, Albion hotel, Dandenong; Mr. G. Brown, Berwick; Mr. D. Bourke, Pakenham; Mr. Wade, Gembrook; Pine Grove hotel and Gippsland hotel, Beaconsfield; the Secretary, and on the ground before 12 o'clock. Signed, J. HALFORD, Hon. Sec.10
  • 2 Nov 1887, SHIRE OF BERWICK. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO BORROW FIVE THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED and FIFTY POUNDS for the Construction of Public Works and Undertakings within the Shire of Berwick. NOTICE is hereby given that the Council of the Shire of Berwick propose to borrow Five Thousand Two Hundred and Fifty Pounds on the credit of the President, Councillors and Ratepayers of the said Shire, by Fifty-two Debentures of £100 each, and One of £50, bearing interest at the rate of five per cent per annum ; that such Debentures be payable on the 1st day of January, 1914, and the interest thereon by half-yearly instalments on the 1st day of January and the 1st day of July in each year, at the Commercial Bank of Australia, at Berwick ; that four per cent of the principal sum be invested in the purchase of Victorian Government Stock towards the formation of a Sinking Fund for the liquidation of the said loan; that the Permanent Works and Undertakings on which such loan is to be expended are as follows:—
    BEACONSFIELD RIDING.
    7 chains Metalling and Forming near Craik's (Telegraph Line) ... £48
    6 chains of Forming and 10 of Draining at Culvert near Lambert's ... 7
    2 Culverts and Draining (Telegraph Line) near Hunter's ... 8
    6 chains of Clearing to Croft's gate (Telegraph Line).. ... .. 4
    36 chains Grubbing and Clearing on road from Telegraph Line to Haunted Gully ... 18
    42 chains of Side Cutting on Haunted Gully road ... 12
    Pipe Culvert on same road ... 4
    100 chains Clearing, Haunted Gully rd. 40
    Culvert and Drains at Barnes' road ... 12
    Metalling No. 1 Cutting round Brisbane's hill .... ... .. 100
    Metalling Cutting round Cummings' hill and 8 chains of Metalling near Einsiedel's ... ... ... 250
    6 chains Side Cutting road towards Flannagan's hill ... ... ... 6
    10 chains Side Cutting on Rocky hill 10
    80 chains Grubbing and Clearing from Beaconsfield House to Cavalier's corner .. 40
    10 chains Grubbing and Clearing on Flannagan's hill ... ... 28
    55 chains Grubbing and Clearing south of Flannagan's hill ... .. 28
    Culverts, Draining and Clearing between Harris' and main Gippsland road... ... ... . 40
    Expenditure on road to Officers' Siding 100
    Metalling, Forming and Making Culverts on Kitchen's road .. ... 100
    Clearing, Draining and Culverts from Lewis' hill, Pakenham and Gembrook road ... ... 55
    Cutting on Lewis' hill ... . 15
    Clearing, Draining, Culverts and 8 chains of Forming between Gembrook road and W. Brown's ... 20
    Clearing road from Knight's to Stony Creek .. .... ... 25
    2 Culverts and Draining, Walford's rd. 18
    8 chains Forming and Culverts, Wilford's road ... ... ... ... 12
    5 chains Forming and Culvert, Wilford's road, near Brind's... ... 10
    5 chains Forming and Culvert, Wilford's road, near Stewart's ... 10
    4 chains Forming and Culvert at Walford's gate ... . .... ..... . 8
    4 chains Forming and Culvert at gully, Walford's road, and 3 chains from Walford's orchard... ...... 7
    47 chains Grubbing and Clearing, Walford's road, and 47 chains Draining, &c., between Nicholson's and Stewart's and Gembrook road... 30
    44 chains Grubbing and Clearing, Cattanach's road ... 22
    30 chains Grubbing and Clearing between Fenwick's and Aron's 16
    200 chains Clearing between Wade's Store and McKenzie's ... ... 70
    8 Culverts and Draining on same road 20
    Clearing road north end of Paternoster's cutting 12
    30 chains Draining, Paternoster's cutting ... £7
    10 3 Culverts, &c., Paternoster's road ... £25
    5 chains Corduroy, Mackenzie's road ... 20
    Culvert, Draining and Clearing, Mackenzie's road 12
    Clearing, Forming, Draining and Culverts, Naree Warren road ... 100
    Clear Drain and Culverts, between Deally's new road... 50
    Clearing, Draining and Culverts, Nelson road ... ... 40
    Clearing, Draining and Culverts between Nar-nar-goon station and Gembrook . .. 40
    Culvert, Clearing and Side Cutting, 30 chains, between Crichton's and Simmonds'... 150
    Improvements on road between Agcl. Society's grounds and Bell's ... 30
    Clearing, &c., from Gembrook church to Crichton's .. .. . 50
    Clearing timber from rd. near Bromby's 20
    Draining and Clearing Gembrook road (Clarke's hill) .. 25
    Grubbing and Clearing and 5 chains Side Cutting to Burke's creek .. 25
    Draining, Clearing and Forming, with & Culverts, &c., between Burke's creek and Mount's.. .. 100
    Widening road between the 2 culverts near Le Soeuf's gate 7
    Clearing on Le Soeuf's road, Gembrook 5
    Main Gippsland road, near Kelly's ... 100
    [Total] £2000
    That plans, specifications and estimated cost of such works and undertakings with statement of intended expenditure of moneys proposed to be borrowed are open for inspection at the Shire Office, Berwick, where the Council will meet on the 26th day of November next, at Two p.m., to agree to, the provisions of the above notice. By order of the Council, G. W. ROBINSON, Shire Secretary. Shire Hall, October 10, 1887.11
  • 10 Dec 1890, AT Beaconsfield, lovely views, 20 ACRES planted, new house, sacrifice, Baylee, 325 Collins-st.12
  • 25 Feb 1891, PARENTS and GUARDIANS.—Lady resident, Upper Beaconsfield, 1100ft. above sea level, desires CHARGE of refined gentlemanly LAD, not under 10 years to educate with her son, terms no object, liberal comfortable home. Mother, P.O., Upper Beaconsfield.13
  • 25 May 1891, MESSRS FLANNAGAN and FOY, Architects and Surveyors, 450 Chancery-lane Melbourne,
    Invite TENDERS — ALTERATIONS and ADDITIONS BEACONSFIELD HALL (Wood), Plans, &c. at M'Lean's Store, Upper Beaconsfield ; Gower's Store, Lower Beaconfield ; Kelly's Store, Berwick ; and at the offices of the architects. Deposit £8 required.14
  • 22 Oct 1891, BEACONSFIELD-Twenty ACRES Villa furnished, use of cow, 50s. Brown, Hair, and Co. 325 Collins-street.15
  • 2 Apr 1892, ABOUT BERWICK. [BY WANDERER.] I have been to Berwick for a few days this week. It is refreshing to get away occasionally from the rush and drive that goes on in Melbourne and suburbs continuously, from Monday morning till Saturday night. In the city especially the high pressure is very great, and the wear and tear on the human machine is at times more than can be borne long. I have a few hours to spare, and ever having in my mind the couplet— 'T was doing nothing was his curse—Is there a vice can plague us worse ? The wretch who digs the mine for bread, Or ploughs that others might be fed, Feels less fatigue than that decreed To him that cannot think or read. Sit down to knock off my usual column for the Chronicle. It is just 15 years since I was in Berwick last, and on that occasion I travelled from Back Creek, Talbot, to where I am now writing from, viz., High street, Berwick, 160 miles to attend the last moments of a dying friend. I left Talbot at 5 p.m., arrived in Melbourne at 11, got a mouthful of supper at Garton's and was again on the road for my destination half an hour afterwards, sitting behind a celebrated old horse named Fireworks. Fireworks had seen better days like a good many more of us, and I frequently since thought it was a cruel occupation (cab dragging) to put such a game, well-bred animal to. But the game old bird took me to Berwick that night in four hours, and taking into consideration the state of the roads and the weight of the cab, I think he did marvelously well. There was no iron horse up this road then, and those that have travelled through the "glue pot" a few miles up will remember how the coaches carrying Her Majesty's mails, and other vehicles used to have occasionally to be dug out, whilst the passengers did the Blondin business on the fences. "Full little knowest them that hast not tried, What a hell it is along such roads to ride." But after all, give me back the good old days. Fifteen years in Aus tralia is comparatively speaking, a long term, as measured with other country towns ; yet Berwick and its people were then better off than now. This seems strange, but such is the case. I dropped into Searl's, the blacksmith and shoeing forge. When there is no barber's shop in the town, the next best place to look for news is the smithy. Mr Searl is an old and respected resident. He came here 30 years ago, has raised a large family, fears God, drinks no whiskey, and is loyal to his Queen. What better character can I give a man ? Well, what does the honest fellow tell me? Simply that the place is going to the dogs since the railway was run through. I drop into some of the old storekeepers, such as Cameron and Lewis, to buy the Argus, and they confirm what I have already been informed, but in more striking words, that the place is dead. Then I masquerade round and invest a shilling in some good cigars with Mr Kelly, the largest storekeeper, and what does Mr Kelly say ? Well, Mr Kelly is about one of the most sensible Irishmen ever I come across, he says very little; almost "houlds his gab" do you mind me, and looks on me with suspicion—putting me down as a broken-down land jobber or pester ing bagman from Flinders lane. But after a while I assure him that I am neither, and he becomes more communicative, invites me to his house and we fraternise. I then question my newly made friend about the owners of land around, and putting this and that to gether, come to the conclusion that the curse of Berwick is the large holdings. I am not one that ever advocated the bursting up of large estates, or yet putting your foot on the throat of capital, but when large exhorbitant prices are demanded by the holders of these big estates from people that are prepared to settle on the land, I do think that the owners act as a brake on the progress of the place, and, to put it mildly, possess very little if any patriotism. I find the Wilsons, the Buchanans, the Gibbs, the Hamiltons, the Levines, the Clarks, the Struttles and Browns own pretty well all the country—barring the five churches and Mrs Bain's one clean, well-conducted pub. -I call on a few people here who own land, and I am staggered when they ask me L100 an acre for land outside the township and L25 an acre for bush land, not cleared, two to three miles out. I ques tion them as to whether they are aware that the boom has collapsed ; they stare at me, are inclined to call me impudent, and laugh at my apparent expense. Tnus my readers will see that it is very improbable Berwick will ever advance much until the present generation of the big landowners have passed away.Berwick itself is one of the prettiest and healthiest townships in Victoria. It has all the advantages that nature can shower on it ; is within an hour and a half's run from Melbourne, and the population of the whole shire is only 1200 souls. If the big landholders ever intend to do anything for the people and the future yet unborn Berwickians, let them come down from their lofty pedestal, cut up the runs in 10, 20, and 50 acre blocks, give easy terms, with no pound of flesh interest, and Berwick will become one of the most prosperous and happy spots on the map of Australia. Round about Berwrick there are some good vineyards, although small in extent. Mr Longmore shows me round his, and explains the different sorts of wine grapes. He tells me that this is an excellent year and that the crop will "run out" something like 450 gallons to the acre. I next visit Mr Lewis Smith's plantation. Mr Smith is the finest specimen of an Australian that I have ever met. He stands 6 feet 2 inches, weighs 16 stone, is 30 years of age and would make a grand life-guardsman. "Loui," as my guide, Mr Searl, calls him, is loughing when we arrive ; I am introduced as a vagabond press-man. "Loui" stops the plough, es corts me round and explains the character and capabilities of his vineyard. Amongst other things, he says, to make farming pay it is well to have a little of everything—as far as you can consiSstently go. " Loui" is a bachelor, and if I were a member of the weaker sex, or softer sex if you will, I should throw "sheep's eyes" at Loui. Amongst other curiosities in Berwick is to be found a haunted house. This house I am told was the parsonage attached to the Church of England. Two, if not three died in it and eventually the Rev. Hill was built new brick premises, and the old wooden place let. The tenants cleared out after a short time, both asserting that the house was haunted. I laughed at the story, but Miss S. an esteemed friend, challenged me to sleep in it, and I agreed provided a bed was found for me. I mean to win the wager—gloves, and at the same time arm myself with a little instrument known as a bulldog revol ver. The ghost that comes floating round the night I am in the haunted house will be pierced enough to act as a cigar holder, and my friend Dr. Helms will have the pleasure of pocketting a couple of guineas for the post mortem. Speaking about Dr. Helms reminds me of our 15 years ago ac quaintance. The Dr. was then " Cock of the Walk," had no opposition, and was Robinson Crusoe of the position. He is an old army surgeon, and has fought and bled for his country. At the side of my sick friend Mac. we have had many a long chat; I found him extremely attentive, a scholar, gentleman and a judge of wvhiskey. The Dr. holds several govern ment appointments such as vaccinator, health officer, and doctor of the Inebriate Asylum. I met him the other day on his black charger and saluted him, but he did not recognise me. I mean to make myself known to this countryman of mine who is a "Dublin Jackeen."16
  • 9 Apr 1892, AROUND BERWICK. [BY WANDERER.] No. 2. A few of the chronicles of last issue, containing my jottings about Berwick arrived here on Saturday. Both complimentary and uncomplimentary comments were passed on the writer. The big landowners said "Its like the fellow's impudence, coming up here on a flying vist, attempting to grasp all the causes and effects of the backwardness or dullness of the place, attributing the cause to us landowners not cutting up our property in small lots to benefit the paupers." The other side compliment me, and say—"The fellow has hit the nail on the right head, we ought to start a newspaper here and ask him to edit it." So you perceive opinions differ. It is ever thus, you cannot please everyone. To-day, one is the idol of the people, to- morrow, they shout "'crucify him" I don't intend stopping long enough in Berwick to be crucified. It is Tuesday night, I have nothing particular to do, and drop into the Rechabite Hall to hear Mr W. H. Elington Bailey-a high-falutin'long-sounding title for a little man, but if Mr Bailey is little in stature he is big in intellect and oratory. Most of our great men in past ages were small fellows. The Alexander the Greats, the Napoleons, the Nelsons, and a host of others to wit, so Mr Bailey can "crow." Well, I heard a rattling good speech. The candidate spoke for an hour and a quarter, and was good for another hour and a quarter if he was required. Mr Bailey is a liberal of the first water, is no Trades' Hall puppet, and, amongst other measures, advocates one vote for manhood sufferage, and anotlher for property. This is as it should be. I was sorry to find that Berwick possesses some old larrikins. Mr O'Connor, a big "hairy toothed" gentlemen from Tipperary, who claimed to be a relation of the great liberator, Dan O'Connell, persisted during the first part of Mr Bailey's speech in interruptions and calling out "you liar." This conduct should not be tolerated at any meeting, and it appeared strange to me that the police, who have little or notlhing to do, did not put in an appearance till they were sent for to remove the blackguard O'Connor. Previous to the police arriving, a smart young fellow named Dumelow volunteered and put the obstructor out and was warmly applauded for his pluck. I have no vote for Berwick, but if I had Bailey is the man that would receive it. You have enouglh politics in the Chronicle just now as uttered by the Styles, the Carters, the Clarks, the Stewarts and Streets, without troubling your readers about other districts, so shoot off to my rambles round Berwrick. The longer I stay in this place the better I like it. I am naturally (don't laugh) a bashful retiring in dividual, and when Miss S—— calls on me and proposes to drive me round the beauty spots of Berwick and Beaconsfield, I am at a loss for words to express myself. I inform her that I am a married man—very much married—and ask her what will my wife and other crities say about us "meandering" through the country together? She blushes and says " Well, Wanderer, if you do not object, I certainly do not, I like gentlemen's company and you can repay me some day with interest by driving me round the fishing village." On those conditions we start for Beaconsfield. It is 17 years since I last visited the place. It was then little better than a "one horse" roadside bush place, now it can boast of possessing the fashionable country residences of the wool kings, merchant princes, bankers, stock jobbers, large practice lawyers, and elite of Toorak. Yes there are the Armytages, the Mackays, the McCutcheons, the Smiths, and the Croker here with handsome man- sions, after the good old English country gentleman's style, with-well laid out exten sive grounds, carriage drives and ornamuental approaches which create admiration and at times awe in the breasts of broken down pressmen like poor Wanderer. Your Williamstown boy, Mr W. H. Croker, has 80 acres of what may be termed fairy land there. It joins Mr Smith's, the stock broker, and in my opinion Fern Tree Gully is not a patch on it. Two lady friends show me round. We make our way down the gully amongst the ferns, and boil the billy in "Croker's castle." The castle is a log hut measuring 10 x 12 feet, with a chimney big enough to lay down in. Miss S—— makes the tea, provides some excellent sandwiches, a plum cake bearing Swallow and Ariell's label, and we feast on the good things as only bush people can do after a journey. The castle was furnished with table and chairs of a rustic character last summer, but some ruffian or ruffians committed a piece of of gross vandalism not long ago in throwing the lot down the gully thereby smashing them up. I hope Mr Croker will offer a reward for information that will lead to the prosecution of the miscreants. The boarding houses in Beaconsfield are the largest and best conducted in Victoria. Hundreds of people are here accommodated during the spring and summer months. It is a favorite resort for some of our judges and their families. The sights are second to none. With the naked eye you can see ships going down the bay, Western Port, You Yang mountains, Dandenong, Cranborne, Harkaway, and other towns quite easily, and a large hall where concerts, balls, and parties are held, is attached; also a Mechanics' Institute and library. The land about Beaconsfield is not good, but will grow fruit in abundance and would prove profitable if laid out in vineyards. After doing Beaconsfield, I am driven round next day by Mr Searl to Nareewarren. We pull up at "Oatlands," the property of Mr Kent. Oatlands is the pick of Nareewarren, and within half a mile of the railway station. It is on the top of a hill, sur rounded by grand views, easily approached by good roads and contains all the comfort of a well-to-do farmers dwelling. Mr Kent, I find, is an old resident of Berwick, is the son of a Church of England clergyman and the grandson of a rear admiral of the "Blues." He wanted once, like a good many more gay youths to go to sea and fight for "hearts and honors," but his parents would not hear of it, so he bolted to Australia in the latter end of the fifties to try his fortune on the diggings. Mr Kent and I chat of those days when we carried our swags, and both of us compare notes, and arrive at the same conclusion, that money can be easier made than "humping a swag." My new acquain tance is suffering from the effects of a broken leg, and his good lady, who I find is of German nationality, shows me round the grounds and well appointed surroundings of Oatlands. Captain Wauchope, one of your oldest pilots, is also here. The captain is King of Nareewarren. He came here some years ago with his family, bought land, laid out a township and settled down close by. His two sons run stores—in opposition to each other—not a very brotherly affair, and the usual bakers, butcher shops, and smithy have since followed. The captain is a favorite in Nareewarren, respected by his neighbours and looked on as an authority in most topics. They want a magistrate or two in Nareewarren, and the Government cannot do better than appoint Mr Kent or Captain Wauchope. There are no less than five churches in Berwick, and one pub. The churches represent pretty well all classes, including a sect called the "dippers." I divide my patronage in the morning I attend the Presbyterian Church, and in the evening the Church of England. The former is the wealthiest body in Berwick. The Church of England minister, Rev. Hill, is said to be rather "high church" for most of the people here. I must admit that I could not detect anything in the shape of high church business, unless it be the singing of the "Story of the Cross" which Mr Hill directed was to be sung kneeling; personally, I objected and did not kneel. Kneeling is no doubt the proper attitude for prayer, but not for singing God's praises or any other praises. It is absurd and heavy tax on people in small country bush towns, running five, six, and seven churches where there is but a handful of people. There is some talk of starting a newspaper in Berwick, and my opinion is asked. If Dandenong supports three, Berwick, Nareewarren, Beaconsfield and Packenham should be able to support one.17
  • 14 Dec 1892, A VISIT TO UPPER BEACONSFIELD. A few years ago a friend and I were discussing the relative merits of several holiday resorts, with a view to spending a fortnight holiday at the most suitable. The Beaconsfield district was at that time becoming popular in this respect, so I suggested that we should sojourn there. "Beaconsfield," exclaimed my friend, disgustedly ; "why, I would'nt go there if you offered to pay all ex's. I've been there before, and, 'once bitten, twice shy.' There are only about three houses there, and a similar crowd of inhabitants. "I remember," my friend continued, "that after our party had been in Upper Beaconsfield for three weeks without seeing other human being, we decided to lay wait for a stray tramp, or whoever passed. A few days after the watch was set we nabbed a 'sky-pilot' riding to a neighbouring parish. We caged him for a few days, to look at ; he threatened us with illegal detention, but as soon as we let him go we got out of the district, and I, for one, never want to visit it again." I listened patiently to my friend's outburst, and, being a new-chum at the time, ergo, gullible I conceived a holy horror of the Beaconsfield country, which did not abate as the years rolled on.
    However, my time was to come, and, when I received and invitation a fortnight ago from a gentleman residing at Upper Beaconsfield, to visit that locality, the traditions of my new-chumship came to my mind. Finally, I came to the con- clusion that "'twas better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all," so I decided to chance the horrors of the expedition, and to take a long and searching look at every human being I saw during the week previous to my visit, in case I should see no others in that Ultima thule of civilisation.
    My invitation came from Mr. W. H. Goff, principal of All Saints' Gramnmar School, St. Kilda, who is a leading member of the Berwick Shire Council, and has a country residence in Upper Beaconsfield. During the school term Mr. Goff makes frequent visits to Beaconsfield, and it was on one of these visits that I accompanied him.
    A great many people are not aware that there are two distinct Beaconsfield townships-Upper and Lower, but such is the case, and the first thing that strikes the visitor on an acquaintance with the Upper township after sojourning for a while in the Lower, is the vast difference in the class of people, and the methods of existence.
    With this explanations I will proceed. Meeting my host at the 4.30 train, we journeyed to Lower Beaconsfield station (there is not a station at Upper Beaconsfield yet, but the energetic inhabitants hope to have one ere long), where a strong, serviceable waggonette was waiting for us. The road to our destination lay in a north-easterley direction, and for about two miles was about as level and smooth as Bourke street. As we proceeded, the road began to ascend, and wound round steep hills innumerable. Splendid views can be obtained from various portions of this mountain road, the high, rugged hills, towering above, and the dim, solemn glens and gullies below, making a beautiful picture in the soft, warm glow of the setting sun. Jim, our driver, was not impressed with the beautiful scenery, familiarity evidently breeding contempt, so he urged his horses to greater effort, and, after about 40 minutes drive, we arrived at our destination. After dinner my host showed me round his orchard, which, for uniformity in laying out, size and excellence of all kinds of fruit—in short, a multum in parvo—cannot be equalled by many orchards of much greatet pretensions. Mr. Goff has a most invaluable manager in James Woolff, whose strawberries, gooseherries and raspberries are the finest in the district, whilst the vitality and superb appearance of the crops of oats, etc., grown under his care are the envy of the adjoining growers. Altogether, Mr. Goff has one of the finest country residences that a man could wish for, with every appliance of civilization as handy as in a town residence.
    As time was an object with me, I had to make a tour of the district on Sunday, and must confess that my pessimistic views received a severe shock at the sight of the numerous prosperous-looking residences to be seen scattered in all kinds of picturesque localities. There was no sign of the prevailing depression here, and every person we met had a cheerful, well-to-do appearance about him or her, as the case might be. Some really pretty and flourishing orchards, such as those of Messrs. Mackly, Noble, Glissmann and othere, give promise of return- ing fourfold the capital and energy bestowed on them by their proprietors.
    Another place of interest is the "Big House," an amalgamation of a private boarding house and a genteel hotel. The "Big House" has lately changed hands, and is now under the capable manage- ment of Mr. J. R. Wakeham, a gentleman who has evidently had a deal of experience in that line, and who is rapidly bringing back the good name enjoyed by the establishment years ago.
    The principal attractions for pleasure seekers in this locality are the wonderfully beautiful fern gullies that exist within half-a-mile of the township. The much-raved-about splendors of Ferntree Gully pale into utter worthlessness beside the glorious abundance and beauty of the ferns to be found in those gullies. One of the ravines goes by the name of "Bain's Gully," owing to the late Mr. Bain, of the Border Hotel, having at one time been the owner of the land. Mr. Bain was passionately fond of' the beautiful spot, and went to a':deal of expense in making a pathway from the top of the hill to the depths of the gully. The land has since been sold, but the proprietor has allowed the place to go to decay, and a neighbor, who evidently objects to picnic parties going down the gully, has maliciously caused a number of'trees to be felled across the path, thus partially obstructing access to the ferns. If a good old English curse could do that neighbor any good, my maledictions on his confounded impertinence ought to make an angel of him.
    Visitors to Upper Beaconsfield are never allowed to depart without being shown "our Assembly Hall," and well might they be proud of such a cosy, compact and convenient building. To Mr. Goff is largely due the credit of the erection of this handsome edifice, which is an everlasting testimonial of what can be effected by the judicious application of "blarney." The building consists of a large hall (which is used on Sundays for church purposes), a circulating library, with nearly 700 volumes, a commodious supper room, and ladies dressing room, all fitted up with the most modern appliances. In fact, it struck me as being something marvellous that such a small township should possess such a handsome edifice, and when I asked Mr. Goff how it was, he simply "winked the other eye." A courteous and obliging librarian is Mr McLean, who showed me over the building, and supplied me with all necessary information.
    In conclusion, I cannot well help thinking that a grand future is before this little colony of energetic people. True, most of them are only weekly visitors to the place, but during their short visits a deal of work is planned for their employees, and, not only that, they are mostly men of considerable wealth; who do not begrudge spending a few hundred pounds in improvements. A government fruit expert who recently visited the district gave his opinion that there was not a better place in the colon for growing all kinds of berries, and also several of the larger fruits. In view of this, a number of the leading residents have taken the subject up heartily, and it will not be their fault if, before long, Upper Beaconsfield is not a large exporter of dried fruits of all descriptions. The soil is there, and also the men and capital, so it may be looked upon as one of the '"certainties."
    I must confess that my ideas regarding the fertility of the soil, etc., at Upper Beaconsfield have undergone a great change, and I am fully determined that at the first opportunity, I will take a couple of week's leave, and spend them in this Victorian Eden.18
  • 25 Feb 1893, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1. At Half-post One O'clock. IMMENSE SALE.
    W. BRISBANE will OFFER by AUCTION, on the above date, at the rooms of Munro and Baillieu the following PROPERTIES, most of which will be sold without reserve,
    BEACONSFIELD.-Ten Acres, fenced wire netting, four acres cleared, two acres orchard ; House, outhouses, &c, good roads.
    BEACONSFIELD.-Property known as Cavesham, 363 acres, magnificent house; land laid out with orchard, shrubbery, and flowers; beautiful views; abundance of water.
    BEACONSFIELD.-Eight allotments of Land, 12 acres in each, partly cleared and fenced; creek.
    BEACONSFIELD.-Large brick House, 10 rooms, with tower, magnificent shrubbery and flower garden, orchard, 57 acres of land, all cleared, beautiful views.
    BEACONSFIELD.-Lot 130, 19 Acres, all fenced, creek, well adapted for fruit-growing, good road.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-Six Acres, all cleared and cultivated, brick villa, five large rooms, bathroom, &c., tanks, stabling, &c, orchard and flower garden.
    Plans, particulars, and complete lists on application to W. Brisbane, auctioneer, 60 Queen street.19
  • 20 Mar 1897, BEACONSFIELD UPPER, March 15.
    Since my last we have had splendid weather for this time of the year—abundance of rain, with the result that, instead of the grass being dry and parched up, it is wonderfully green. Feed and water have been plentiful, and stock of all kinds look well. Farmers who made a sowing for green feed early in the year have promise of cutting a good crop during the winter months. To show what kind of a season we have had, I may mention that I saw some maize from Mr Paternoster's farm that measured thirteen feet in length.
    The company that has leased Blair's property have commenced operations at last. The men who obtained the contract for sinking the shaft have begun. I believe this shaft has to be sunk to a depth of seventy feet, when they will commence to drive onu the lead. The operations of this company will be watched with interest.
    Our local Fruit-growers' Association intend holding their annual show on Easter Monday, and it promises to be a successful one. Fruit has been very abundant here this year, and prices ruinously low. I have seen some splendid apples forwarded from here to Melbourne, bringing the low price of 1s 3d per case. After cost of case, cartage, and commission has been taken off this, there is not much left for the grower. Evidently combination is required amongst the fruit-growers, and, until such exists, prices will continue to remain low. They also want a better system of distributing the fruit in the metropolis.20
  • 28 Aug 1897, BEACONSFIELD UPPER, 16th Aug.
    We have had our share of the general rainfall which has occurred all over the colony. It rained here very heavily on Friday afternoon, and all day on Saturday, and again this afternoon. Every waterhole is full to overflowing, and the creeks are running bank high.
    The cold weather which we have had for the past few weeks has somewhat retarded the growth of the early sown crops, but taking everything into consideration they are looking fairly well.
    Fruit tree planting has during the past six weeks absorbed a good deal of time and at tention. There has been a large number planted. It is estimated that within a radius of five miles from the Post Office there have been fully five thousand trees planted this season. If planting increases at this rate in a few years this district should become famed for its orchards. Mr G. Neilson, who gave a practical illustration in orchard work here six weeks ago, states that it is one of the finest districts in the colony for fruit-growing, and his opinion ought to be worthy of attention.
    Matters in the municipal world are beginning to attract attention. In the Beaconsfield Riding of the Shire of Berwick, Councillor Goff does not seek re-election. Ex-councillor Sykes and Mr James have been nominated, and should run each other pretty close for the coveted seat. In the Pakenham Riding Councillor A'Beckett enjoys a walkover, and in the Berwick Riding Councillor Barr is opposed by Mr Curtois.
    Foxes are becoming pretty numerous, and poultry owners are beginning to complain of their too frequent visits. When once firmly established it will be almost impossible to clear them out, the gullies and scrub affording such excellent cover.
    Mining news is rather scarce at present. In Walker's and The Haunted Gullies a few men are still at work and manage to eke out a livelihood. The company in Blair's property have been busy lately fixing up poppet heads and getting the winding engine into position. They expect to start driving shortly.21
  • 16 Jan 1900, BEACONSFIELD RANGES, health resort, highly recommended medical faculty. See illustrated guide. 6d., obtainable Mullen's and Bookstall, Prince's-bridge. Information regarding ACCOMMODATION, Chairman Progressive League, Beaconsfield.22
  • 15 Mar 1900, MRS. ALFRED LEVI and family, of St. Kilda, have taken " Fassiferne," Upper Beaconsfield where they will remain until Easter.23
  • 10 Dec 1902, District news. Beaconsfield Upper We have had a delightful change in the weather during the past few days. It has been nice and cool. Rain is badly wanted, and although we have had some nice showers the fall has not been sufficient to benefit the crops to any great extent. Harvesting operations are nearly finished, the yield of hay, with one or two exceptions, being the best for some years, in some cases exceptionally good crops have been obtained. The crop of cherries in this district has been fairly good this season. The early varieties have already been picked and marketed, and prices on so average have been fairly good. A meeting in connexion with the Drought Relief Fund was held in the hall on Wednesday evening. Unfortunately the attendance was not as good as might have been expeted considering the object, but those who were present were very enthusiastic, and a good sum was collected in the room. A petition to the Berwick Shire Council asking them to throw open the portion of the Cardinia Park that is in the Beaconsfleld riding for the benefit of starving stock was signed by all present. There is a large number of starving stock in the district just now and more are arriving every day. There is such an area of unfenced land here that some are getting the stock and travelling them over it. The annual picnic in connexion with the local State School was held on the Recreation ground last Thursday, and was a de cided success. The committee and their energetic secretary, Mr. H. Glismann, worked hard, and they had the satisfaction of knowing that their efforts were appre ciated by the large number of residents and visitors that were present. At the conclusion of the sports Councillor G. W. Martin distributed the prizes won by the successful competitors during the day, and congratulated them upon the fact that by having such an energetic and hard work ing committee they were the recipients of such valuable prizes. At the conclusion of the prize distribution Mr. A. S. Robertson proposed a vote of thanks to those who had made the affair such a success, which was seconded by Mr. Kerwin and carried by acclamation, after which Mr. Glismann suitably responded for his co workes and himself. Tea was then partaken of, and the children wended their way home thoroughly tired out after hav ing a good day, and the members of the committee and their friends adjourned to the hall where they spent a few hours' dancing.24
  • 29 Jul 1903, Beaconsfield.
    Mr. W. H. Goff, late of All Saint's Grammar School, St. Kilda, was taken seriously ill last week, but we are glad to say he is now progressing favorably under the care of Dr. Bennie and a trained nurse.
    Mrs. Unwin, who is also very ill, is in a very serious condition.
    There is a greet deal of sickness in the district, and the death of Mr. Little is reported.
    That "the way of the transgressor is hard," was verified locally last week. A young fellow who has been working here for some weeks past tried to get away without paying his debts. One creditor was seen (much to the amusement of a football team in the railway train who cheered him on), chasing at break-neck speed, whip in hand. He soon overtook the culprit, who was crouching in a hollow tree. Enforcing his remarks with sundry cuts with the whip, the Beaconsfielder made him empty his pockets leaving him a sadder though, it is to be hoped, a wiser man. Soon after this another creditor was noticed galloping furiously on horse back in the same direction overtaking the offender on the Narre Warren hill. After punching him, he saw the futility of trying to get blood out of a stone, and turned disconsolately homewards.
    The Eumemmerring Hotel has been robbed of some valuables by two swagmen and a woman. Their descriptions are well known to the public, and it is thought they will soon be captured. Dozens of suspicious looking characters are camped along the creek.
    There are some interesting cases to be heard at the Berwick Police Court this week.25
  • 2 Sep 1903, Two new houses have been built here recently, one a handsome brick house for Dr. Bevan, one what is known as the Big House Hill; and the other a neat wooden villa for Mr. Bunt, near the Tower. It is rumored that a well known local resident has purchased a block of land close to the Post Office, where he purposes erecting a villa in the near future. The alteration of the time of running our early morning train is meeting with a good deal of opposition here, as it is con sidered if the alteration is made that our district as a summer resort will suffer. At present the train allows the business man to reach town in time for business, but if it is altered from 7.15 to 8.15 it will mean that be will just reach town an hour too late. I believe that a petition has already been forwarded to the traffic manager asking him to allow the time to remain as at present. I am pleased to record that Mr. W. H. Goff head teacher at the local Grammar School has completely recovered from his recent indisposition, and is now able to take charge of his school again. The proposed euchre tournament which is to take place on Friday, 4th September, promises to be great success. We have had a great quantity of rain lately, and fine weather is needed now, as our orchardists are beginning to talk about spraying, and that is a job that cannot be done in wet weather.26
  • 28 Oct 1903, Beaconsfield -+- The is now little doubt in the public mind that Dr. L L. Smith will get in. Two ywo young lady equestrians (Miss Louise Smith and Miss Sleight) have been for the last week canvassing the district from house to house. Thoroughly understanding their business, and having a good command of language, they would make good parlimentarians themselves. They even boldly entered the enemy's camp and made no small stir in the place. Having done Berwick and the surrnounding district, they started down south, through Beaconsfield, Pakenham, on to Warragul, and are expected to return to headquarters (Beaconsfield) about the middle of next week. Last Saturday Mr. Somers, of "The Towers," Beaconsfield, had the staff of the" Argus" on a visit to his residence. The party after travelling by rail were met at the station by a four-in-hand drag, which was driven from town to meet and convey them up the hills. The rather light horses, which were driven at a great pace through the heavy roads, knocked up on reaching the post office. Most of the party alighted, and after several delays were driven to their destination in local vehicles, the tired horses following. They had much time to rest, the whole party starting away again to catch the 4.30 train to town. The "staff" were rather disappointed, but will be wiser next time and provide suitable drivers and vehicles. One the same day two ponies belonging to Dr. L. L. Smith, whilst standing out side the post office, took fright and bolted in a homeward direction, the drivers and others running after them. Mr. Payne, of the Pine Grove Hotel, promptly stopped them on their reaching his residence, thus averting serious results. On Saturday night at the Assembly Hall Mr. Noble's farewell passed off pleasantly, a good number of people being present. He was presented with an illuminated address from the residents, and a handsome bible from the children of the Sunday school, of which he had been superintendent for many years. During that time his energies have not lagged. During the heavy thunderstorm last Wednesday, Mr. Shorthouse, a resident of Beaconsfield, was struck by lightning. For a time he was completely prostrated, but we are glad to hear he has almost recovered. Since the storm there has been continuous rain, and the farmers are complaining bitterly. Mr. Galsworthy, of Upper Beaconsfield, has sold his place to Mr. Gear, of St Kilda. Fortunately Mr. and Mrs. Galsworthy will not be leaving the district for some time.27
  • 16 Mar 1904, Clearing Sale "BRAESIDE," UPPER BEACONSFIELD. MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1904.
    JOSEPH CLARKE & CO. have received instructions from E. M. Irvine, to sell by auction, on the above date, all their cattle, horses, household furniture, and effects, etc., as under— 2 horses, 1 cow, waggon and harness, plough and harrows, chafcutter, lot of hay, lot of poultry, double and single bedsteads, wire and horsehair mattress, washstands and ware, tables, chairs lampstands, and a host of sundries. Sale at 2 olock. No reserve.
    Joseph Clarke and Co., Auctioneers Dandenong, Poowong, Korumburra and Bass28
  • 20 Jul 1904, Amid climatic conditions which interfered considerably with the attendance of many from the district a mid-winter fair was held here on Saturday, in aid of the fonds of the Anglican Church. The Assembly-Hall was prettily decorated, and the secretary, Miss Jean Robertson, of the organising committee, worked to such good effect that a net sum of over £40 will accrue as a result. Vocal and instrumental elections, recitations and tableaux vivants enlivened the proceed ings. Numbers of distinguished visitors from town were present, some of whom gave valuable help in making the fair a success. The stallholders were Mesdames Nichols, Drake, Goff, Francis, Robertson, McNab and others. In the same hall on Friday evening July 8th, a very brilliant affair was held in the shape of a "Mock Banquet." Numbers of ladies were present, and splendid speeches were made. Mr David Bevan appeared as Governor-General; Mr. W. H Goff, as Lord Mayor, presided; Mr. C Wheeler, as Sir Kyabram Cranbourne; and others too numerous to mention. The dainty viands, etc., provided were much appreciated; and would have done credit to the Lord Mayor of Melblurne's banquet.29
  • 24 Aug 1904, Petition signed by 32 residents and ratepayers of Upper Beaconsfield, asking permission to enclose 10 square chains of land at the junction of the four roads known as Charing Cross to plant trees and shrubs ; also asking for donation.-Referred to Beaconsfield members, to take whatever steps it might be deemed desirable to assist the movement.30
  • 7 Sep 1904, Upper Beaconsfield. The large paddock known as "Walkers" has just changed hands, Mr Harkins, of South Melbourne, being the purchaser. He has already made a start to improve it, having let a contract for grubbing to Messrs Shorthouse and Cameron, and the other day McLellan Bros' team of horses brought a house up from Melbourne, and deposited it on its new site. I have been informed that it is Mr Harkin's intention to clear the greater portion of the six hundred and forty acres which the paddock contains.
    The Misses Corder, of "Salisbury House," have also been making some additions to their alrealy extensive establishment. Amongst others they have built a large billiard room which has been fitted up with one of Fallshaw Bros. best tables, so that in the future visitors to this well known house will be able to indulge in a game of billiards.
    The trustees of the local Hall have also made a start to paint the building, which badly needed renovating, and I believe it is their intention to thoroughly do it up and make it look a little better before the influx of summer visitors sets in. Another decided innovation has been the clearing of the small piece of ground between the cross roads at Charing Cross. This was the work of our esteemed storekeeper and postmaster, Mr Marsh, who paid for the whole of the work himself. He says that he is not going to let it stop at this but intends going on until is has been fenced, ploughed and planted with onamental trees. He has already got the promise of several good donations, and now only waits for the Shire Council to obtain control of the land from the Lands Department ; when they do this he will make a start again with the fencing and ploughing.
    The residents of North Beaconsfield opened their newly erected Mission Hall on Sunday. There was a good congregation present. The service was conducted by the Rev. James Wilson and Mr. Hewison. Mr Wilson preached the sermon, taking for his text—Levit 19 part of the 30th verse— "Reverence my sanctuary;" he gave a most eloquent address and impressed upon his congregation, especially the younger portion, the necessity of due reverence to God's sanctuary, and particularly the building they were opening for divine worshlip that day. Mr Hewison gave a short address after Mr. Wilson's sermon. The building, which has been erected by the residents on a piece of land donated by Mr. Shanks, is practically free from debt; the committee worked matters in such a way that when the building was, ready for opening everything had been paid for. It still requires some little internal fitting, and the committee are hopeful of being able to have it completely finished in a few months at most. Like other portions of the colony we have had a good deal of rain ; some of the roads are almost impassable, especially the "Inebriate Hill," as it is called, between here and the station. Just at the beginning of the winter the council put ablout eight inches of gravel and mud on it, since then it has never had a chance to get set and the result can be better imagined than described.31
  • 23 Sep 1909, BEACONSFIELD TENNIS DANCE.
    A most enjoyable dance was given on Saturday evening. 11th September, by the Beaconsfield Upper Tennis Club. The Assembly Hall was prettily decoratcd with peach blossom, poppies, and ivy by the ladies of the club.
    Among the visitors were—Mr. and Mrs. Felstead. the latter in an exquisite lace dress.
    Mrs. Francis—black chiffon.
    Miss Francis—cream filet net.
    Miss Towl—pale blue French muslin.
    Miss Overend—black ninon, with cream lace.
    Miss Montgomerie—white satin, with overdress of floral mauve net and silver trimmings.
    Mrs. Bobardt—black sequin dress.
    Miss Young—black net, with black and gold trimming.
    Miss Bruche—mauve satin Empire gown.
    Mrs. Harvey Smith—white embroidered chifion Empire gown in pastel shades.
    Mrs. C. Fisher—-black spotted chiffon.
    Miss Iris Tyler—white embroidered muslin de soie Empire.
    Miss Knipton—cream taffeta voile.
    Miss Campbell—pale green voile.
    Miss Ivy Campbell—cream taffeta.
    Miss Thomson—white muslin, with pink and blue trimmings.
    Mrs. Kirkwood—mauve muslin de soie.
    Miss M'Lean—mauve ninon.
    Miss Marie M'Lean—pale blue silk voile.
    Miss Halinbourg—a very becoming gown of pale apricot.
    Miss V. Halinbourg—pale blue floral beaded net.
    Miss Robertson—turquoise blue striped voile.
    Misses Corder, in heliotrope and black.
    Miss E. L. Henderson—ivory silk and net sleeves.
    Miss A. S. Laing—cream silk.
    Miss Maggie Laing—cream silk and gold tassels.
    Mrs. von Ranstan—black silk, trimmed with Mechlin lace.
    Miss N. Bell—cream satin, with mauve flowers.
    Miss a'Beckett—blue silk.
    Miss Margery a'Beckett—pale pink and blue flowered silk.
    Miss K. a'Beckett—cream, silk and net.
    Mrs. Warren Kerr—cream silk.
    Miss V. Kerr—cream silk Empire, spangled net.
    Messrs. W. H. Felstead, Harvey Smith, W. M'Lean, Dr. Beattie Smith, Cr. Geo. Martin, Messrs. D. Bevan, H. Smith, R. Francis, A. Strachan, Anderson, Clement Fisher, Robertson, R. J. Tyler, Knapton, Friedman, Stevens, Lynch, Hopkins, Campbell, a'Beckett, L. Rankin, and many others.
    At the close the members of the club accorded a vote of thanks to the president and Mrs. Harvey Smith for their untiring efforts to make it a success.32
  • 24 Aug 1910, Berwick Council: Correspondence: From eight ratepayers of Upper Beaconsfield, complaining of the bad state of road and side-tracks leading to their pro perties from the store at Upper Beaconsfield to the Stony Creek bridge.-To be informed the road is now being repaired, on the motion of Crs. Martin and Henty.33
  • 6 Oct 1910, UPPER BEACONSFIELD TENNIS DANCE.
    The members of the Upper Beaconsfield Tennis Club gave their annual dance on Saturday evening, 17th September. The Assembly Hall was beautifully and artistically decorated by Mrs. Harvey Smith, assisted by the lady members of the club, with garlands of shaded yellow poppies, interspersed with ivy and ferns. The supper tables were done in masses of peach blossom and maidenhair fern, with festoons of pink ribbons. The excellent supper provided by the lady members was partaken of after the company had unmasked with great merriment at 10 o'clock. The dance, which took the form of a Masque and Fancy Dress Ball, proved the most enjoyable and successful the club has yet given. The president (Mr. W. Harvey Smith) gave two handsome prizes for the best sustained characters. These were won by Miss D. Thomson (Folly) and Mr. Roy Tyler (Simplicitas).
    Those present were—Mrs. Harvey Smith, who looked well as a Sportswoman.
    Mrs. Drake—The Mystery.
    Mrs. Kirkwood—handsomely gowned as a Watteau Lady.
    Miss Campbell—a charming Lady Teazle.
    Miss M'Lean—a Nurse (Ambulance Corps).
    Miss Nessie M'Lean—Queen of Hearts, with a beautiful jewelled crown, red velvet train bordered with ermine.
    Miss a'Beckett—a dainty Miss Hook of Holland.
    Miss Marjorie a'Beckett represented Bensdorp's Cocoa.
    Miss Ivy Campbell—a charming Kate Hardcastle.
    Miss Fowler—a Puritan Maid.
    Miss Miriam Fowler—Gretchen.
    Miss Iris Tyler—an Irish Colleen, in emerald green.
    Miss Vera Knapton looked beautiful as a Greek Maiden.
    Miss Viola Halinbourg and Miss Berger were two picturesque Swedish Peasant Girls.
    Miss Thomson—a Violet.
    Miss Stenhouse—a splendid representation of a Pack of Cards.
    Miss N. a'Beckett—The Dairymaid.
    Amongst the visitors were:—
    Mrs. Francis—Powder and Patches.
    Mrs. a'Beckett (Narre Warren)—a dainty Pierrette.
    Mrs. Ryan (Berwick)—Night.
    Miss Dorothy Towl—Mistress Dorothy Marvyn.
    Miss Francis—a Greek Maiden.
    Miss Du Moulin— Australian Bush Girl.
    Miss Corder—Night.
    Miss M. Corder—Grey Domino.
    Miss Shorthouse—Nurse.
    Miss Malcomson—"Berwick Shire News."
    Miss D. Thomson (Melbourne)—Folly.
    Miss B. Berger—Powder Puff.
    Mr. Harvey Smith (president)—John Bull.
    Mr. Roy Tyler—Simplicitas.
    Mr. Ulick a'Beckett—Rouge et Noir.
    Mr. W. G. a'Beckett (Narre Warren)—a Barrister.
    Mr. Stenhouse—Pierrot.
    Dr. Cookinham—an American Gentleman.
    Mr. David Bevan—Jack Johnson, senior.
    Mr. W. Knapton—Knight of the Bath.
    Mr. Monty Bruce (Melbourne)—a Cricketer.
    Mr. Gilbert a'Beckett—Plenipotentiary to Charles V.
    Mr. Frank a'Beckett —Mr. Hook of Holland.
    Mr. Bert Anderson—a Postman.
    Mr. Sam M'Gregor (Melbourne)—a Dutchman.
    Mr. Percy Anderson—Black and White.
    Mr. George Anderson—Our English Visitor.
    Mr. Arthur Anderson—a Tennis Player.
    Mr. Hans Glismann—a Cricketer.
    Mr. R. P. Francis, and others.34
  • 27 Oct 1911, Australian Picture Films. BUSH WORK AT BEACONSFIELD. UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.
    The cinematographic artist and his suite of actors have invaded this district, and several mysterious happenings on the road and in the bush have taken place during the last few days, to the wonderment of local residents. The piece being enacted is a powerful mining drama, and a portion of the Cardinia Creek looks like a scene of the early days, with the tents and mining paraphernalia incident to the various scenes.35
  • 2 Nov 1911, A new film-producing concern has been privately formed in Melbourne, styled "The Photo-Vista Co.," and their first effort is now being put through its final processes by Pathe Freres. "A Miner's Luck" is the name of the drama, which is full of original and startling effects peculiar to the real Australian bush-life. A capable company of actors have had the piece in hand for some time, and Beaconsfield has supplied some splendid scenery for the various scenes. The Photo-Vista Co. intend devoting themselves entirely to Australian subjects, and have already acquired some very fine pieces for production in moving picture form.36
  • 9 Nov 1911, The new Photo-vista Co. have just completed an exciting mining drama, entitled "A Miner's Luck," acted by a capable team of actors amid the natural scenery at Beaconsfield. The piece is entirely original and has some very novel scenes of Australian bush and mining life as a setting for a most interesting story. Pathe Freres have the preparation of the posi tive in hand, which will be ready for inspec tion very shortly. A good deal of interest is being shown in the production, as it is the first, of a series of original Australian films under taken by the Photo-vista, Co., and every effort has been made to ensure success.37
  • 14 Mar 1914, BUSH FIRES. THE BEACONSFIELD HILLS. WOMEN FIRE-FIGHTERS.
    UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.—Two alarming fires occurred in the last two days. A fire burning in the gully near the township, on Wednesday, fanned by the northerly wind, broke away and threatened to cause serious damage. The fire swept up the hill, along the side of Mr. Kirkwood's orchard. It jumped the chain-wide lane dividing the properties, and tore up the rise. With difficulty it was checked before it reached the cottage on the crown of the hill.
    While the fire-fighters were busy at Fassifern another outbreak occurred two miles further east. This fire began in some dense forest country lying between the properties of Mr W G L Spowers, Mrs Anderson and Mr John Knox. The northerly wind took the fire along the range at a great pace. There were fears that it might run down into the Tumuc Valley, towards Pakenham, where there is one of the largest and most prosperous apple orchards in the State. However, with the setting sun the breeze dropped and, though the fire burned fiercely in the dry timber and undergrowth, it did not spread.
    During the onrush of the flames on Wednesday afternoon and evening, Mr and Mrs Austin, acting as caretakers for Mr J. Knox, who with his wife and family are in Tasmania, were deeply concerned for the safety of the homestead. On Thursday, while Mr Austin was down in the gully trying to turn back the flames the home-stead was again threatened. The fire took a hedge of blackberry briars in its stride, and tore through the orchard as though nothing would stop it. Mr Austin checked it at one corner of the orchard with buckets of water, but it broke through at another point. Mrs Austin, single-handed, was fighting hard but seemed powerless. Just at this stage, however, Miss Christy, a lady gardener, who had arrived to do some pruning work came on the scene. By this time the fire was within 20ft of the house. It had already caught an outbuilding, over which were some dry honeysuckle and other creepers; but the two women got the hose to work, and the water beat the fire. Then other help arrived and, as if a reward for the plucky women who had done their work so well, the wind changed and the fire turning away up the gully, the homestead was saved.38
  • 16 Apr 1914, Concert at Upper Beaconsfield.
    On Saturday night, in the local hall, a grand entertainment was given by local and Melbourne talent. There was a good attendance, and those pre sent were given a musical treat and some dramatic action by budding ama teurs actors and others. In a one act farce, entitled A Silent Woman, the characters were taken as follows: Alice Eltham, in love with her cousin Jack, Miss I. Campbell; Josephine Kendall, (Alice's friend), Miss Una Wilson; Mrs.Wallace (Alice's Aunt), Miss N. McLean; Jack King (Alice's cousin, Mr Bergland; Mary, Mrs Wallace's maid, Miss Hay. A commedietta in one act was also given, entitled, My Lady's, Maid, Characters: Madame Pendennis, Miss Campbell; Peggy (her maid) Miss I. Campbell. On Easter Monday night a grand ball took place in the hall. It was largely attended, and splendid music and a recherche supper was provided for a company that contained a preponderance of ladies.39
  • 25 Jun 1914, Berwick. A most successful entertainment by the local Dramatic Club, in aid of the funds of the Library, was given to an overflowing house on Saturday night. The first piece, A Romance of 1750, was portrayed by the following caste, viz :-Mr. E. W. Poynter, Toddeo Ferrari (a master violin maker); Mr. E. Loveridge, Filappo, (apprentice to Ferrari); Mr. R. Brocklebank, Sandro (apprentice to Ferrari); and Miss M. Miller, Giannina (Ferrari's daughter). It was an ambitious effort but the players were equal to the demand, and scored an instant, success. They were deservedly congratulated on all asides. The second part consisted of a humorous farce entitled That Rascal Pat, played by the following: —Pat McNoggerty, Mr. Allan Jones; Major Puffjacket, Mr. H. Avard; Charles Livingston, Mr. F. Fritzlaff; Laura, Mr. E. Brown; Nancy, Miss D. Moore. Mr. Jones made a distinct hit, and showed himself a clever comedian, while the other parts were well subtained.
    A party of eight ladies from Upper Beaconsfield met with an accident while being driven to the above dramatic entertainment. The driver missed the road and the horses, getting up on the bank of a cutting, upset the cab. One of the party had her face cut, but the others escaped with a shaking and a fright. Messrs. a'Beckett Bros., who were driving immediately behind the cab in a jinker, were also capsised but luckily escaped injury.40
  • 9 Jul 1914, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. — The new road from Officer to Beaconsfield Upper is now well in hand. For about two and a half miles at the Officer end the road has been fully formed, and the upper portion, as far as Flanagan's Track is being rapidly completed by means of a steam plough, worked by a team of horses. Blasting operations at the Beaconsfield end are in full swing all along the granite range.—The Rev Dr and Mrs Adeney have been spending a few days, with Mr and Mrs P. R. Hurditch, at "Pen Bryn," The visitors were much interested in observing the Australian birds, and in watching clearing operations by means of blasting, and the ploughing of virgin soil with a team of 14 oxen.41
  • 31 Dec 1914, Late Advertisements. Postmaster General's Department, Melbourne, 29th December, 1914.
    WRITTEN OFFERS will be received at the Post Offices, Beaconsfield, Upper Beaconsfield, Narre Warren and Berwick, until 3 p.m. on they 5th January, 1915, for the supply and delivery of 20 Round Wooden Poles between Upper Beaconsfield P.O. and residence of Misses M. E. and L. Connor, Dr. Drake, and E. Shorthouse, snr.
    Full particulars at the Post Offices named.
    W. G. SPENCE, Postmaster-General42
  • 24 Jun 1915, BERWICK SIRE AFFAIRS. Mr J. J. Ahern, clerk of works, reported at last Saturday's meeting of Berwick shire council as follows:—I would recommend that the council object to the removal of the tree known as the 'Rotunda Tree,' Beaconsfield Upper, and that it be preserved as long as it is sound and attractive.43
  • 24 Jun 1915, BERWICK SHIRE AFFAIRS. Mr J. J. Ahern, clerk of works, reported at last Saturday's meeting of Berwick shire council as follows:--I would recommend that the council object to the removal of the tree known as the 'Rotunda Tree,' Beaconsfield Upper, and that it be preserved as long as it is sound and attractive.44
  • 5 Jan 1916, SCHOOL CONCERT. The concert held at Beaconsfield Upper on Boxing Night to raise funds to build a shelter shed at the new school, which will probably be opened this month, was a great success. There was a large attendance, and after all expenses are paid there will be a credit balance of about £11. The hall was attractively decorated, the work being carried out by Miss Glismann and Messrs Crook, Homes, Hopkins and D. McLean. Dr Bevan acted as chairman for the evening, and the programme given by the children was a most interesting one, reflecting much credit on the children and their teacher (Mr Homes) who spent much time in training them. All the items were well given and were greatly appreciated and loudly applauded by the audience. Miss Stenhouse acted as accompaniste and carried out her duties very satisfactorily. Mrs Thompson and Mrs A. Shorthouse also rendered good service in attending to the dressing of the children for the stage.
    At the close of the entertainment Mr Hurditch proposed a vote of thanks to the chairman, the teacher, and the secretary, and congratulated the children on the success of their concert. The motion was seconded by Mr Harvey Smith and carried with hearty applause. The entertainment was one of the most successful ever held in the hall, a fact due in a great measure to the energetic work of the secretary (Mr R Crook) and his committee.
    This programme was as follows :-Overture, God bless our noble men, Miss G. Hopkins ; songs, Unfurl the Flag and Bay of Bismay, Children ; recitation, When the flag goes by, Master J. Gilpin ; song, The old Rustic Bridge, Misses D. Thompson, E. Merritt, Masters D. Pittard and A. Shorthouse ; recitation, There's a knowing little proverb, Miss Gladys Shorthouse ; duet. Russian Peasants, Misses A. and N. Glismann ; recitation. The Boy and the Baker, Master D. Pittard ; action song, Fancy, just Fancy, Misses D. Thompson. Merritt, D. and N. Glismann, Masters Gilpin and Shorthouse ; First Aid Display of Bandaging, Scholars : club swinging, Master F. Lee ; duet, Selection from Maritana, Misses B. Shorthouse and D. Glismann ; recitation, Looking on, Miss Nellie Glismann ; song, Australia will be there, Master J. Lee, J. Gilpin and chorus ; recitation, The Honest Jew, Miss D. Glismann ; humorous recitation, Was you there ? Mr Lindsay Kerr ; recitation, Six times nine, Miss N. Glismann ; action song, Old Soldiers, Masters A. Hopkins, D. Pittard, A. Shorthouse, E. Merritt, J. and L. Gilpin ; songs, Toll for the Brave and When the Empire Calls, Scholars ; trio, Hunting March, Misses A., N. and D. Glismann ; recitation, The Fairies, Master Frank Lee ; comic song, Nursery Rhyme, Masters Hopkins, Pittard and J. Gilpin ; reci tation, Twenty Froggies, Lower School Scholars ; action song, Old Age, Misses Thompson, Merritt, Glismann and Shorthouse ; recitation, Poor Thomas, Master W. Lang ; song, We'll never let the old flag fall, Master F. Lee and chorus ; dialogue, Johnnie's Arithmetic, Miss Thompson and Master J. Lee ; recitation, How to Cure a Cough, Miss D. Glismann ; action song. Coach and Four, 4 Girls and 6 Boys ; song. The Sea is Britain's Glory, Scholars. God Save the King.45
  • 19 Jul 1916, Beaconsfield Upper Progress Association.
    SEPARATE Tenders are invited, and will be received by the Secretary up to Wednesday, 9th August, for the following work
    (1). Erection of a new Rotunda at Upper Beaconsfield, on the ground known as Charing Cross Reserve.
    Plans and specifications can be seen at the Post Office, Upper Beaconsfield, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily.
    (2). Repairing Seats on the roads in the district.
    The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
    M. J. REGAN. Hon. Sec. Beaconsfield Upper.46
  • 26 Jul 1916, Beaconsfield Upper Progress Association.
    SEPARATE Tenders are invited, and will be received by the Secretary up to Wednesday, 9th August, for the following work :
    (1). Erection of a new Rotunda at Upper Beaconsfield, on the ground known as Charing Cross Reserve.
    Plans and specifications can be seen at the Post Office, Upper Beaconsfield between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily.
    (2). Repairing Seats on the roads in the district.
    The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
    M. J. REGAN. Hon. Sec. Beaconsfield Upper.47
  • 6 Dec 1916, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. The anniversary of the Congregational Church took place last Sunday. Special services, which were well attended, were held in the morning and evening, and were conducted by the Rev. S. Bryant, ex-chairman of the Congregational Union, whose addresses were much appreciated. A social took place on Monday evening, the officiating gentlemen being the Rev. Dr Bevan, Rev. S. Bryant and Warren Kerr, Esq. A tableau, "England and her Dominions," was presented, which gave great satisfaction to a crowded hall. Firstly, Wales was presented, the leading char actors in which were Dr Bevan, chairman, and Mrs C. P. R. Hurditch, as the spirit of Wales. Misses K. Bunt and B. Shorthous and Mrs L. Kerr appeared in Welsh costume, while Mr Lewis appeared as a Druid, with his enblem—mistletoe and scythe. Ireland.--Mr Warren Kerr caused great laughter by his witty way of describing the characteristics of an Irishman. Mrs R. Wilson posed as leading lady, whilst the Misses Hopkins and Ricaby appeared in facinating attire, as peasant girls. Mr M. J. Regan and Mr L. Kerr sang some Irish National songs with great effect, while Miss Brierley sang "Killarney" in good style. Scotland —Mr McDougall acted as chairman, and after a few remarks introduced Mrs Percy C. Anderson as leading lady, while her husband appeared in a full Highland (Stuart) outfit. Miss Russell posed as a Newhaven fish-wife and sang " Caller Herrin' " in appreciative style. Mr William Russell was clad as a shepherd, and was accompanied by his Collie dog. He recited Scott's "Caledonia." Little Miss Jean Martin, in Rob Roy tartan and Miss Thomson in Gordon tartan concluded the picture. Here Mr G. R. Grieve sang with great effect "Jessie's Dream" and the "Bonnets of Bonnie Dundee". Then came England and her Colonies. Miss Stone, on an elevation, as "Britannia," Miss McLean, as Australia, with sceptre of Southern Cross; Miss Wilson as Canada; and Miss Campbell representing "New Zealand". Mr C. P. R. Hurditch, as an Indian chief, in real attire, and Mr Hopkins, as a Boer (S. Africa), coupled with the lending artists of the evening made up an imposing picture. Rule Brittania was sung in hearty loyal style, and votes of thanks brought an enjoyable night to a close. The refreshments were in the hands of Mesdames Hopkins and Kirkwood, and were grandly served. Mr A. V. Kirkwood operated with the limelights. Great credit is due Mrs Wilson, wife of the Pastor, who so ably organised the successful proceed ings. In connection with the Upper Beaconsfield State school bazaar, which was held on the 18th Nov., a meeting of stallholders and others interested was held in the library at the Assembly Hall, on 28th Nov. The balance sheet was read, and showed a profit of £35 10s. Votes of thanks were accorded to the ladies who so ably assisted in making the bazaar a success ; to the members of the Men's Social Club, who gave the proceeds of an evening's enter tainment to the bazaar fund; to the trustees of the Assembly Hall for kindly giving the use of the hall free of charge ; and to the chairman. Mr T. Gilpin. The proceeds will be handed to the Education Department for the Returned Wounded Soldiers' Fund.
    Cr. Geo. W. Martin met with a painful accident last Saturday night. He was driving with Mr A. Shorthouse, when the wheel of the vehicle struck a stump, and both were thrown out. Mr Martin had his arm broken, and his companion received some painful bruises.
    The programmes for the sports to be held on New Year's Day are now being distributed. The secretary—Mr W. Russell—will be pleased to supply any information in regard to the day's proceedings.48
  • 11 Jan 1917, The Shire Council on Saturday decided to strike a rate of 1s 6d in the £1 on all rateable property in the shire. The rate will be struck in the existing valuation as the valuer, Mr G. W. Martin, who met with a serious accident at Upper Beaconsfield during the holidays, through the overturning of a coach, was unable to complete his arduous work in time to prepare estimates and strike the rate in the newer and higher valuation. It is understood that the valuation of the Cranbourne and Tooradin ridings is completed but that of Yallock is not completed. It is felt by a large body of the struggling settlers, that it was a blessing the valuation was not completed as owing to the ruination by rains and floods they would be unable to pay the higher rate, as it is said the valuation of many properties has been considerably increased. In some cases I believe there are not any valuation of some of the subdivisional blocks. It is possible a special rate of three pence in the £1 will have to be struck to meet the overdraft which is pretty well up to the limit, and no works will be undertaken until the rates are got in.49
  • 31 Jan 1917, The choir and friend's of Christ Church, Berwick, held their annual picnic, on Monday last, at Bateman's Falls, Upper Beaconsfield. The party spent a most enjoyable day.50
  • 31 May 1917, UPPER BEACONSFIELD ENTERTAINMENT.
    On the evening of Empire Day, a Samlagundi organized by Mrs A. Kirkwood of "The Steyne," Upper Beaconsfield, assisted by the parents, friends, ladies of the local Red Cross, and the head teacher, of School No. 2560, Upper Beaconsfield, was held in the Assembly hall. Notwithstanding, the inclement weather, the entertainment proved a great success, and a very enjoyable evening was spent. The programme consisted mostly of games, some of which were very amusing. Prizes were awarded to the winners of the games. Mrs A. Anderson secured the lady's prize, Mr A. Hopkins the gent's, Miss Nellie Glismann the schoolgirl's, and Master Norton Shorthouse the shoolboy's. Mr Regan won the guessing competition. Mrs Arthur Shorthouse, Mrs Kirkwood, and Mrs Tulloch dontated the prizes. After the games, the Hoopla-table attracted a great many to it, and the ladies at the refreshment table were kept very busy. Mrs Kirkwood, Miss C. a'Beckett, Miss N. McLean, Mrs Shorthouse, Mrs Glismann, and Mrs Tulloch superintended the games. Mrs Arthur Shorthouse, Mrs Hopkins and Miss N. Fowler had charge of the refreshments and Mr Gilpin of the school commitee rendered valuable assistance. The proceeds, which amounted to £6 10s 2d will be sent to the Education Department for the War Relief fund, to which is added, for the present month, a fund for the British Red Cross.51
  • 20 Sep 1917, Mrs. Dunbar, ex-Mayoress of Caulfield, is taking a holiday at Upper Beaconsfield. She had a very busy time last year with Red Cross work at Caulfield, having headed the list of municipalities in raising funds for war work, the sum of £15,000 being raised in the racing suburb. But though Mrs. Dunbar is supposed to be "resting." it is quite evident her interest in Red Cross work has not abated. There was a progressive euchre party last Saturday night at "Salisbury House." A very fine cake was raffled in aid of Red Cross funds, when Mr. Dunbar was the lucky winner. He handed the cake to Mrs. Dunbar, when she announced her intention to raffle it again, which she did. All in the house, kitchen staff included, went in for it. This time the "cook was the winner. Mrs. Dunbar handed the proceeds to Mrs. Harvey-Smith, the hon. treasurer of the local Red Cross.52
  • 27 Sep 1917, "Under the Red Cross" BEACONSFIELD BRANCH.
    A garden fete was held at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Kirkwood, " The Steyne," Beaconsfield Upper, in aid of the local Red Cross, when the excellent sum of £86/10/- was realised, clear of expenses. Not a little of the success of the fete was due to the energetic efforts of the stallholders, including:—Jumble, Mesdames Harvey Smith, Crowther, Anderson, and Miss Bunt; boudoir, Mrs. E. a'Beckett (Auburn), Misses a'Beckett and M. Bunt; refreshments, Mesdames Bunt, Hopkins, Hurditch, Misses Fowler and Anderson ; sweets. Misses Thomson, K. Bunt, and K. a'Beckett; children's stall, Mrs. and Miss Hay, assisted by Misses Mavis Kirkwood, Janette Walker, Beverley, Hetherington, and Gwyr. Gowan; croquet events, Miss M. Corder, Miss W. Wilson, Miss A. Anderson ; hoop-la, Messrs. Hurditch, Bunt, Lindsay, Kerr; novelty shot, Scouts of Beaconsfield Upper.53
  • 20 Dec 1917, The proposed fruit packing shed:-This project is taking favor and prospectuses are being issued to form a co-operative company to erect a shed at Beaconsfield alongside railway.54
  • 6 Mar 1919, We are glad to report that Berwick is still regarded as "clean," though there are a few cases of influenza in the shire. Three cases were removed to Warragul this week.
    At a meeting of the Berwick and District Agricultural society, it was decided to abandon the annual horticultural show, which was to have been held at the Berwick show grounds this month. This action was taken on account of the influenza epidemic.55
  • 27 May 1920, Items of Interest. On Saturday Major General Elliott unveiled a handsome granite obelisk, at Upper Beaconsfield, to the memory of local volunteers who served in the war. There were 28 men who enlisted from the district, 14 of whom paid the supreme sacrifice.56
  • 18 Nov 1920, Ratcliff Bridge -I have inspected what is known as Ratcliff bridge, over the Cardinia Creek, also Stoney Creek bridge.
    Both bridges are in an advanced state of decay and only capable of carrying light loads. It appears inexpedient, however, to carry out any reconstruction or extensive repairs to either of these bridges till the fate of the Cardinia Creek scheme of road construction is decided. In the meantime I have ordered some full length planks to be put in the deck to distribute the load, and I would recommend that notices be posted, under section 496 of the Local Government Act, limiting the load to be carried on the bridges to 1 ton. -Recommendation adopted.57
  • 19 Apr 1921, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. — The soldiers' memorial at Upper Beaconsfield is now completed. The ground has been levelled and a fence has been erected, consisting of solid basaltic pillars with bars of steel tubing between. -A good soaking rain fell on Saturday evening. In about an hour 58 points were registered So far this has been a dry month, and the fall was very acceptable.58
  • 24 Sep 1921, BEAUTIFUL Beaconsfield (Upper). - Clovelly House, in centre Clovelly orchards; tennis, shooting, fishing; excellent table. tel. Beaconsfield Upper (11).
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-An ideal locality for your holidays; tennis, croquet; liberal table. Particulars "Runnymede." L. Cadby. Tel. 7
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-Ideal Home for rest, comfort, mountain air, glorious views, cuisine; week-ends. Mrs. Hudson, The Steyne.
    BEACONSFIELD (Upper), Salisbury House.-Billiards, tennis, croquet; superior catering, every home comfort. R. L. Blaikie.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-Mountain Home, 35/ week; tennis, piano. Miss A'Beckett.59
  • 10 Jan 1922, Beaconsfield Upper. Whilst there has been a lull in Beaconsfield since the New Year, a good many visitors are still here, and more are arriving daily. The young people's dance, which is an annual function arranged for the visitors, was held in the public hall on Thursday. There was a good attendance, including several guests from Berwick. Fishing parties have obtained some good catches of blackfish in Cardinia Creek, some fish weighing about 1lb. Salisbury House is fully booked, and picnics and billiard tournaments are in full swing. A very successful tennis tournament (American mixed doubles) was held on January 2. There were 22 entries, and great interest was taken in the games by the visitors. Mr. Wiseman and Miss Mcculloch were the winners, and Judge Bevan and Miss D. Stenhouse runners-up: Prizes were handed to the winners by the Rev. G. Raws, of Adelaide. The Pine Grove Hotel has been full for the Holidays.60
  • 27 Jan 1922, 27 Jan 1922 - Berwick County Times p1
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER.
    An effort is being made to resurrect the local Recreation Ground, which has been lying in an uncared-for condition for some years. The reserve comprises nearly twenty acres, and was once used as a sports ground, but, owing to the apathy and lack of interest shown, it has become covered with scrub and rubbish. A well-attended meeting of residents was held at the Assembly Hall on Wednesday evening, 18th inst., and it was unanimously agreed that a live committee of management should take charge of th Reserve and thus give the residents of this district a recreation ground where they could indulge in various sports, which in the past have been denied them. The following office-bearers and committee were elected: Messrs. J. H. Ashley, president; A. Kirkwood, vice-president; W. Harris, hon. secretary and treasurer; committee, F. Love, F. Keeble, C. Harris, Hayball and J. Kirk. Several donations have already been received, and the hon. treasurer will be pleased to receive any further donations from residents who desire to show their interest in the project in a practical way.
    The accommodation is well booked up for next week-end. A tennis tournament will be held on the local courts on Monday. A cricket match has also been arranged, to be played on the recreation ground during the week-end. Croquet seems to be the favorite pastime here this summer. Games have been arranged at the local court, and also at Salisbury and Sherwood, resulting in some interesting and well contested contests.
  • 7 Dec 1922, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-Hay harvesting is in full swing in this district. On the whole crops are light; indeed one has to travel to see a good crop this year.-Trees have been planted in the recreation reserve in place of those which failed, and plates with the names of soldiers have been affixed.-Cricket, which has been in abeyance since the war, has been resumed under favourable auspices. With the veteran, Hayball, of Brighton, as captain, enthusiasm in the game is assured. — There was plenty of blossom in the orchards this year, but the very wet and cold weather at the critical time means that the yield of several varieties will be light.61
  • 12 Dec 1922, Beaconsfield Upper is noted for many things, but one of its chief virtues is the fresh, bracing, and healthful air. The beautiful drives and walks are a feature of the locality. Tennis and croquet are always available to tourists, and drives can be arranged to Emerald, The Reservoir, Berwick, and other resorts. Salisbury House is already booked up to its full capacity. The proprietor is not disturbed by the new boarding-house regulations, as the rooms are large, there are no sleeping-
    out places, and bathrooms are adequate. The croquet lawn has been top-dressed and the tennis court is in good order. Runnymede reports good bookings, there being only a few vacancies for adults. The proposed golf links in Runnymede paddocks will prove an acquisition, and it is hoped that they will be completed by the Christmas season. Tennis and croquet players are well provided for. Ttekceba expects to be full over the new year. The building of new dining and bath rooms will be complete for the holidays. The Steyne also reports a full house for the new year. Miss McNamara, who has had a boarding-house for the last few years, is retiring. There will be a gymkhana at Beaconsfield on New Year's Day. The Pom Poms are giving a concert and entertainment on December 29 in order to help the Starving Children of Europe Fund. Cricket enthusiasts will be catered for by a day's match between an Upper Beaconsfield team and visitors. The store and Cormore tea rooms and billiard table are ready for any demands which, visitors may make on them.62
  • 13 Feb 1923, MOTORING. OVER BEACONSFIELD HILLS. BERWICK TO EMERALD. A Cross-country Drive. By G. R. BROADBENT.
    Perhaps the worst feature of home touring is that so many miles of familiar country must first be traversed before comparatively new ground is broken, and in the trip under notice this was no exception. To reach Berwick the Prince's Highway is followed through Caulfield to Oakleigh, between which there is much broken roadway, but thence to Dandenong and for some distance beyond the surface is excellent, but is poorer over the last five miles to Berwick, 28 miles from Melbourne. Turning to the left at the foot of the hill on which the town is built, and taking the right branch at two junctions met with in the next mile, the road from Beaconsfield is reached at right angles at a wayside hostelry, where another turn to the left is made.
    From this point the hills are entered upon, and there is a long rise, in parts much waterworn, until Beaconsfield Upper is gained. Hereabouts the surroundings are very attractive, the country being a series of wooded hills and dales, with numerous homesteads and other residences built in picked places, revealing that the district is well settled and prosperous. Continuing through this popular resort, and passing Pine Grove Hotel in less than two miles on a fine elevation, Beaconsfield North was reached at about nine miles from Berwick, over a fairly good roadway, not all metalled, however.
    At this point a finger-post indicates the road to Emerald, leading to the left first into a deep valley, and later over a second valley and ridge, followed by a long and steepening grade—about 1 in 6 at the top—into Emerald. The conditions on the hill were the worse because a grader had recently been used upon it, leaving the surface soft and broken. From Berwick to Emerald the distance is about 13 miles, the last four, from Beaconsfield North, being not much better than a bush track; but as the weather was fine and dry there was no difficulty in negotiating it.
    Looking back from the heights of Emerald over the country just traversed, the aspect is particularly pleasing, while from the other side of the town the prospect is just as inviting—an expanse of timbered ridges and valleys extending to the higher ranges in the distance. Picking up the graded and metalled road in the town and turning towards the drooping sun, there followed a fine run down to Clematis at a junction of roads, where the left branch was taken, leading downhill, off and on, for many miles, to Cardinia Creek, from which however, there is a very stiff pull for half a mile on the other side.
    At no great distance beyond are two junctions, where the righthand road is the direct route to the city, and is known as Wellington road, but at a mile or more past Lysterfield Post-office this thoroughfare was left in order that the Ferntree Gully road be tapped at Scoresby. It was a poor track, however, broken and dusty until nearing Scoresby. Following the main highway and scaling Wheeler's Hill, the run to town was made through Notting Hill and Oakleigh, the round trip aggregating about 75 miles over all conditions of road and country.63
  • 21 Sep 1923, NATURE NOTES AND QUERIES. By DONALD MACDONALD.
    IN WATTLE TIME
    "To see the wattle blooming to perfection," writes "Wattle Blossom" (Camberwell) "the place to visit is the wild country around Upper Beaconsfield. It is not so much travelled and plundered as some other places, like Warrandyte and Hurst's Bridge (I can remember when a boy, I used to get plenty in Studley Park, Kew).

    There is a plantation on a hill near Quambi road, where all kinds are grown-a splendid collection. The paddocks are also now gay with the native heaths-white, pink, and red-and the orchids are beginning to push up their curious blooms.

    'Down by the Cardinia Creek the bell- birds seem to be answering the cow bells, making a pleasant melody. Down one of the valleys a wallaby was disporting, and the laughing jacks and magpies were always about. On the highest point of Upper Beaconsfield a view may be obtained of hills ranging from Mounts Riddel, Juliet, and Donna Buang, to Woolamai, Frankston, Mount Martha, Arthur's Seat, Flinders, Portarlington, You Yangs, and Macedon. The only drawback to this place is the unsatisfactory coach and railway service.64
  • 8 Dec 1924, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. The anniversary of the opening of St. John's Church of England was commemorated on November 23, when Archdeacon Hindley preached. Mr. Amery, choirmaster of St. John's, Northcote; presided at the organ.65
  • 17 Dec 1924, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-This new section of the Gembrook road (about two miles long), which cuts off the very steep hill approaching Stony Creek bridge, and which was impassable last winter, is now to be metalled. The granite will be quarried at the Sugar Loaf hill, and conveyed in spalls to the crusher near the road. The contractor has a gang of men laying down the new tram track. When completed it will open up a large area of bush land on either side of the road.
    -The Rev. Mr. Crotty has purchased Lang's property on the Gembrook road. On behalf of Mr. Frederick Martin, Alston has been sold to Mr. Collie.66
  • 18 Sep 1925, At the annual meeting of the North Beaconsfield Progress Association the following officers were elected:-Mr. J. G. Lewis, president (re-elected); Messrs. Holman and Matthews, vice-presidents; Mr. D. Kerr, treasurer; Mr. S. Smith, secretary; Messrs. G. Harris, U. Harris, Brain, Logan, and Cowper, committee. The report showed 28 members, an increase of 12 in the year. Mr. R. Bell (secretary) resigned on leaving the district, and for his ser vices to the association he was elected a life member.
    There is now a continuous telephone service at the Beaconsfield Upper exchange and a mail service. Four lectures had been given during the year on pruning, pigs, cows, and manures.67
  • 24 Nov 1925, WHERE TO SPEND A HOLIDAY. BEACONSFIELD HEIGHTS. No. 5.
    To many holiday makers, whose number yearly increases, Beaconsfield Heights present ideal surroundings and conditions for their annual vacation. Only 28 miles from Melbourne, on the main Gippsland line, Beaconsfield has one great advantage over more distant holiday centres, and that is its accessibility to the city and frequent train service. At the same time, its fine panoramic views, wealth of native flora, and sporting facilities make it worthy to rank with the more remote mountain resorts as one of the ideal tourist districts of Victoria.
    One of the features of Beaconsfield is the Cardinia Park, within easy walking distance of the township. This reserve, which remains practically in its virgin state, is a happy hunting ground for such true naturalists as those who delight to hunt wild birds—with a camera. Among the rare species which thrive in the protected haunts is the bellbird. To lovers of forestry, the wealth of acacias and eucalypts in the park is a constant source of delight.
    Upper Beaconsfield is situated on the hills, about 700ft. above sea level, and about five miles from the railway station. A service of motor-cars waits to convey the tourist to this delightful mountain resort. The road runs from Beaconsfield up the valley of the Cardinia Creek, the park lying on the left. Of especial interest on the route is the line of steel towers conveying high tension electricity at 120,000 volts from Yallourn to Yarraville. Two and a half miles from Beaconsfield the road takes the ascent to the hills, and passes, at three miles, the Quamby settlement, in which are many charming week-end residences. All along the upper road may be seen magnificent panoramic views, while the increasing
    rarity and the exhilarating air sweeps the "cobwebs" from the brain of the jaded city worker. At Upper Beaconsfield comfortable boarding establishments provide accommodation for the tourist, while tennis-courts and croquet-greens are available for visitors.
    Delightful walks may be taken in the picturesque hill country. One of the finest prospects in Upper Beaconsfield may be viewed from that portion of the Gembrook road which leads from the post-office to the recreation park. Berwick and the plains below, stretching to Mordialloc and Port Phillip Bay, lie on the one hand, with the blue foothills of the Baw Baw ranges on the other. The water supply system serving Berwick, Cranbourne, Frankston, and Mornington, and extending as far as the naval base at Westernport, is derived from the Toomuc Creek and the Bunyip River. Along the line of the aqueduct are views of surpassing scenic beauty. Other points of charm and interest include Salisbury Gully, Bain's and Walker's gullies, Haunted Gully, and Welcome Gully.
    To all lovers of wildflowers Beaconsfield Heights are a source of endless delight.
    Here may be found many varieties of erica (heath), sarsaparilla, native clematis ("travellers' joy"), and other fragrant growths of bushland. For the sportsman game is plentiful and fishing enthusiasts need rarely return with empty creels from the mountain streams, where blackfish and trout abound.68
  • 2 Mar 1926, There is great activity here now in the packing sheds. The orchardists have been hit hard. First came the bush fires and scarcely an orchard escaped. Whole rows of trees were so badly scorched that the fruit is unmarketable, and in some cases replanting will be necessary. Then came the strong gales which have made mad havoc. Owing to the very dry season augmented by the heat of the bush fires, fruit was easily dislodged, so that here will be a severe loss on the output.
    Motorists will greatly appreciate the fine roads in Upper Beaconsfield now the contract for metalling and rolling is nearly completed.69
  • 22 Jul 1926, Bridge, Chadwick’s Gully, Harkaway.—l have inspected and taken levels at the site of the bridge that was burnt out near Chadwick’s. To replace this bridge with a new timber bridge would cost at least £200. I consider, however, that the position would better be met by the construction of a 4ft. 6in. pipe culvert and filling. The catchment area is under 200 acres, and a 4ft. 6in. pipe would carry the water in any ordinary flood.
    It would not only be cheaper than timber, but would have the advantage of standing up against fire and decay.
    The report was received and adopted.70
  • 19 Feb 1927, A further section of the Upper Beaconsfield-Emerald road is being metalled, and when completed the metal will be to the Upper Beaconsfield Orchardists' Pty. Ltd. packing-shed. The shed is not opening this year owing to the scarcity of apples, which were further reduced by the high winds recently.
    At the meeting of the Beaconsfield Upper branch of the Apple and Pear Growers' Association, the secretary (Mr Colles) and Mr R Coventry were appointed to attend the meeting of the central body in Melbourne, and to bring forward the matters of the marketing of the 1928 crop, and the more careful handling of fruit on rail and steamers.71
  • 8 Nov 1927, An entertainment in aid of the new playground adjoining the Assembly Hall was given on Saturday evening by members of the Old Grammarians' Society. The playground funds benefited to the amount of £8.72
  • 20 Jan 1928, A volunteer bush fire brigade has been formed. Mr. J. M. Reed, chairman of the Tourist Committee, who convened the meeting, announced that he had been in communication with the Forests Commission, and, as a result, had received an issue from it of beaters, water bags, and rakes.73
  • 3 Feb 1928, The Foundation Day holiday proved as popular a holiday as New Year and Christmas. The guest houses were all well patronised and the fine week end enabled outside attractions to be fully availed of. The Rugby Car Co held a picnic on the recreation ground. The visitors, about 400 in number arrived in 75 to 100 motor-cars. Meals were partaken of on the ground, and a good programme of sports was held during the day.
    The contract for the purchase of the block of land adjoining the Assembly Hall has been signed. The vendor is Mrs Pringle who sold the land on most reasonable terms for the purpose of a children's playground and general recreation purposes. The erection of swings slides, see-saws, &c., is already in hand and the new playground will be a great attraction to the district on a holiday resort.
    The recent rains have been of great benefit to the district. The apple crops, which were in serious danger of failing owing to the dry and hot weather, have revived, and there is every hope of a record crop. Already the packing shed is busy getting off the earlier kinds of apple.
    The volunteer Bush Fire Brigade held a meeting for the election of officers. These were:—D N McBride captain, C D Colles vice captain, E W Harris transport officer, and C P R Hurditch secretary. Mr J M Reed, chairman of the tourist committee who initiated the movement, was elected the permanent chairman of the brigade.74
  • 13 Mar 1928, The packing sheds at North Beaconsfield are now in full swing with a weekly output of about 1200 cases of apples for export. Some of the growers are packing and shipping their own to the extent of nearly 2000 cases weekly, and it in estimated that over 60,000 cases will be the total for the season.75
  • 11 May 1928, A meeting was held in connection with a new guest house, to be called The Lakes. The house will accommodate 300 guests, and will have its own golf course, tennis courts, bowling greens, croquet lawns, and lake for boating. A company has been registered to carry out the scheme, and 50,000 £1 shares are offered to the public. "Work has already been commenced on the site chosen.
    The property occupied by the Shorthouse family for at least 30 years has been sold to Mr. Nathan, of the store, Beaconsfield Upper.76
  • 19 May 1928, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Big Guest House Mooted.
    Melbourne will have a new holiday resort if plans prepared by The Lakes (Upper Beaconslield) Limited come to fruition.
    A prospectus has been issued for a company with a nominal capital of £75,000 to provide an up-to-date guest-house for 300 people, golf links, inland lake for boating and yachting, bowling greens, tennis courts, swimming pool, croquet lawns, social and dance halls, and every possible holiday convenience at Upper Beaconsfield.
    The architect and engineer (Mr P. J. O'Connor) has already advanced the work of creating a lake half a mile long and 400 feet wide. Nature has formed a natural basin for the purpose. Mr O'Connor is now completing plans and specifications for the calling of tenders for the guest-house, estimated to cost £30,000, including incidentals. This will be laid out on the lines of the modern guest house of South America. It will be a single story building of 150 rooms. Mr Rowley Banks has reported that the property is admirably suited for a golf course. The swimming pool, 100 yards from the main building, will be fed by a large spring, and the overflow will run down a natural waterfall to the lake..ft. below.
    The directors are: W. C. Willmott, Punt road, Prahran; J. J. Cohen, Maitland street, East Malvern; J. F. Trevethan, Tooringa road, East Malvern; Charles Ford, The Palms, Alexandra avenue, Melbourne, and E. J. Lynch, Manning road, East Malvern. The secretary (pro. ten.) is Mr P. F. Thomas, A. F. P. A., The Palms,
    Alexandra avenue.77
  • 24 Aug 1929, Gum boughs and maiden-hair fern, with baskets of flowers, decorated the Assembly Hall, Upper Beaconsfield, for the annual at home of the Lawn Tennis Club on the evening of August 16. Those present included:
    The president (Mr. W. K. Lorrimer) and Mrs. Lorrimer, Mesdames J. A. Reid, Bunt, Love, Bevan, McBride, King, Francis, Griffin, Harvey-Smith, Walker, Lane, Anderson, Stevens, Macartney, and Charley, Misses Loloh King, McLean, Kellaway, McBride, Stenhouse, Joshua, Blaikie, Elder, Chenery, Sharp, McKay, Henderson, Good, McLeod, Stevens, Macartney, Walker, Lockey, and Greenwood, Judge Bevan, Dr. Lane, and Messrs. Hurditch, Reid, Griffin, Kellaway, Bunt, Love, Reid, Serle, McBride, Harvey-Smith, Francis, Anderson, Lyon, McKinnon, Sturken, Macartney, Frost, Charley, McGregor, Adam, Bevan, Walker, Kelly, Yuncken, and Casey.78
  • 2 Nov 1929, A few nights ago the petrol bowser at the garage was forced and 100 gallons of petrol stolen from the tank. No trace of the offender has been found.
    The tender for crushing 2,000 yards of metal at the Sugarloaf quarry has been accepted and it is expected that work will commence within a very short period. This work is for resheeting some of the roads which is being carried out under the loan recently raised by the shire.
    To cope with the extensive road works about to be carried out under the loan, Mr Chambers has been appointed supervisor for the shire.79
  • 15 Jul 1930, UPPER BEACONSFIELD HOUSE BURNT
    UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Tuesday. — Fire last night destroyed a house and stables belonging to Mrs C. Brown. This is the third fire in Upper Beaconsfield within three weeks.80
  • 11 Oct 1930, SPORTING CRICKET. Clubs desirous of day's outing, week-ends, all material provided. Ring or write Pine Grove Hotel. Upper Beaconsfield. Phone 24.81
  • 6 Jun 1931, CONFIDENCE NEEDED. Young Nationalist Rally.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER. Thursday. - There was a large attendance at the meeting of the National federation last night, when an address on current politics was given by Mr Spicer, vice president of the Young Nationalist organisation. Speaking on the question of the conversion loan Mr Spicer emphasised the necessity for such a conversion being dependent on the bona-fides of the proposals to make the suggested cuts in Government expenditure. He did not think that the present Government would carry it through. If a Ministry which had the confidence of the people was in power bondholders would of their own free will offer their holdings for conversion. The great need of the country was a Government which possessed the confidence of the people.82
  • 24 Oct 1931, BEACONSFIELD UPPER TRADERS.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER, Friday.- At a meeting of the Beaconsfield Upper Traders' Association it was agreed that every effort should be made to avoid the formation of different associations representing individual interests, and that there should be one general association guarding and forwarding the interests of all. One of the difficulties with which the association is faced is the apparent unsympathetic policy of the railways. There are two service coaches plying to the station, one of which has the contract for the combined rail and coach tickets. There is more work than one service can carry out, yet the railways have refused to stand to the service that has not the railway tickets at the station, thus to a huge extent inconveniencing a number of the travelling public. If a service car caters for through passenger traffic to the city then that car is automatically shut off from earning passengers to and from the station. It is hoped that the association will be able to overcome these anomalies. Special attention is to be paid to putting the footpaths in good order, and opening up the fern gullies with suitable tourist tracks. A picturesque swimming pool is another object in view, and the renovation of signposts and the erection of new ones where required.83
  • 19 Jan 1932, BEACONSFIELD UPPER -In the absence of the owner a fire reached the property of Mr Appleby and burnt a shed in which a cart was kept.
    At a meeting of the Fruitgrowers' Association it was stated that compared with other districts the crop would not be a bad one, although it would be less than 50 per cent of an ordinary crop.
    Under the leadership of scoutmaster Begg and Cub master Kellaway, the Scouts and Cubs camped for a week at Balnarring.
    Several small fires are burning in the gullies, but there has been no serious outbreak.84
  • 27 Jun 1932, —A public meeting was held, at which General Foott presided, to consider the best way to rehabilitate the soldiers' memorial avenue, which has fallen into a condition of neglect. it was decided to appoint a committee representative of the varios organisations of the district to carry out whatever should be considered the best method of preserving and improving the avenue.—Cold winds with heavy rain squalls have swept the district. More than three and a half inches of rain have fallen since June 1.85
  • 6 Mar 1933, BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Fruitgrowers are busy picking and packing apples for export. As there will be a shortage of shipping space during March they are trying to get away as much as possible.86
  • 11 Apr 1933, HOUSE OF TREASURES MENACED.
    Antiques, oil paintings and historical relics, worth thousands of pounds, narrowly escaped destruction in the bush fire which swept through the hills near Berwick early today and burnt a six-roomed week-end home belonging to Mr J. Ackroyd, a city dentist.
    The fire approached within 100 yards of Miss Ada Armytage's homestead, "Holm Park," at Upper Bcaconsfield. But for a sudden change of wind Miss Armytage's home, a weatherboard house where Mr J. Binks and five children live, and other houses would most likely have been destroyed.
    Miss Armytage's house contains antiques dating back hundreds of years. They include a mirror used by Marie Antoinette, which was taken from the Tuilleries in the French Revolution; a Bible printed in 1602 (claimed to be the oldest in Australia); one of the first pianos ever built, and hundreds of pounds worth of old silver and other ornaments.
    Many of the oil paintings in the house are by famous artists of last century, and have never left the Armytage family.
    BRIGADES RUSH TO SCENE
    In the garden are trees transplanted from Mount Lebanon (Palestine), Japan and England, which would have been killed but for the quick change of wind.
    The fire was first noticed about 12.15 a.m. The Upper Bcaconsfield and Berwick Brigades were rushed up into the hills, but the strong north wind made it impossible to control the flames. Just when the position was desperate, the wind veered to the west, and soon afterwards heavy rain fell.
    Mr Ackroyd's house was furnished. It was insured.
    FIREBREAKS IN FORESTS
    In denying today that the methods of the Forests Commission in burning fire breaks were wasteful, Commissioner W. W. Gay said that the breaks were now being made only 16 feet wide, whereas formerly they were from one to three chains wide.
    Mr Gay was referring to a motion agreed to at the annual conference of the Western District Bush Fire Brigades' Association condemning the alleged present wasteful methods of burning firebreaks and recommending that breaks be burnt in early spring or late autumn as the accumulation of debris was considered by the conference to be a menace to the forest and also the landowners.
    Mr Gay said that it was now the practice of the Commission to burn back a chain or two from the fire breaks in the early spring or autumn, so that the breaks could be kept free of rubbish or debris.
    MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
    "The question of the width of fire breaks was considered at a State-wide conference of the Bush Fire Brigades Association two years ago," said Mr Gay, "and it was then agreed that the policy of the Commission was satisfactory.
    "Many people have the idea that fire breaks are made solely to stop fires. This is incorrect, as they are also made to provide a rapid means of transit to the heart of the forests and as a general means of communication. Our only regret is that we have not got sufficient money to make more so that the forests can be made more accessible."87
  • 7 Jun 1933, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-The beautiful weather over the King's Birthday holiday attracted a large number of visitors to the district. The tennis club held its King's Birthday tournament. A number of visitors from town and the surrounding district came to play, and a closely contested set of games resulted in a win for Miss Audrey Walker and Mr. Hurditch. In the evening the club held a dance.88
  • 8 Feb 1934, Efforts are being made to the electric light main to Beaconsfield Upper, but unfortunately the guarantee required (about £500 for five years) seems to be the stumbling block, as residents consider it is too much; this, added to the cost of installation, would make it a very costly undertaking.89
  • 9 Jun 1934, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27. At Three O'clock. In the Orient Line Auction-rooms, 358 Collins Street.
    THE OLD-ESTABLISHED AND WELL-KNOWN GUEST HOUSE FREEHOLD.
    SALISBURY HOUSE, UPPER BEACONSFIELD.
    Fully Furnished and Equipped.
    To be Sold as a Going Concern In One Lot.
    LAND APPROX. 20 ACRES.
    Title, Certificate.
    Solicitors, Messrs. F. J. Corder ond Redmond, 450 Little Collins Street.
    Easy Terms. Full Particulars From 171 M, PURDY AND CO, PTY. LTD., J-J. Auctioneers and Real Estate Agents, 20 Queen street. Cent. 141-143.90
  • 13 Dec 1934, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. The floods, fortunately, did not do much damage, with the exception of roads and bridges, which suffered. For some days we were isolated, as the road from here to the railway station was covered with water in parts, to a depth of four or, five feet, and all the bridges over the Cardinia Creek were either damaged or washed away. The one on the back road to Berwick was lifted clean off its foundation, carried for about a hundred yards down the creek, and hung up a tree. On the Princes Highway about twelve feet of the approach on our side was washed away, and also some of the decking. On the Soldiers’ road the bridge was slewed round. A temporary crossing was fixed up on the Highway on Sunday afternoon, so communication with outlying districts was restored, but it will be some time before the others will be ready for use.
    On Sunday the anniversary services in connection with St. John’s Church of England were held. There were good congregations at each of the three services, and the vicar. (Rev. Mr. Rowell) gave a fine address at the evening service.
    The annual meeting of members of the recreation ground was held on Thursday night, and there was a good number present. The secretary’s report showed that a fair amount of work had been done during the year; the plantations had been well looked after, and the playing arena and surroundings had been cleaned up, and all the trees (needing it) had been trimmed. The treasurer reported that there was a balance of some £6 in hand, which was considered very satisfactory. The following were elected office-bearers for the ensuing year: President, Mr. J. Baxter; vice presidents, General Foott and Mr. E. W. Harris; treasurer, Mr. H. Edwards; secretary, Mr. J. Glismann; committee, Messrs. P. McArthur, L. Knapton, C. Horner, C. Begg and J. Hudson. The wet weather has made all the orchardists very busy, as “black spot” has made its appearance, and needs constant spraying to keep it in check; added to this, the heavy hailstorm that we had at the beginning of the big downpour has knocked the fruit about a lot.
    The haymakers are having a bad time, as the continued showery conditions prevent them getting their crops dry; they had to cut them, on the green side, as the heavy wind had knocked them down.
    An exchange of parishes of the Congregational Church has been arranged between the local minister, Rev. T. Greenwood and the Rev. H. Forbes Ewan, of Stawell. The new minister will take up his duties after the New Year.
    The annual meeting, of the local branch of the Country Women’s Association was held in the Hall on
    Wednesday afternoon. There was a large attendance, including visitors from Melbourne and surrounding districts, and a very pleasant afternoon was spent; Mrs. Sewell (group president) occupied the chair. The secretary’s report showed that a number of demonstrations and lectures bad been given by visitors and members during the year, which were much appreciated. The treasurer reported that
    after meeting all expenses a credit balance remained: It was reported that a case of groceries had been sent to “Somers House,” and arrangements, were made to provide the usual
    Christmas treat for the district children. The election of office-bearers for the ensuing year resulted as follows: President, Mrs. Bevan; vice-presidents, Mrs. Thorogood and Miss McLean; treasurer, Mrs. Dowling; secretary, Mrs. Osborn; committee, Mesdames Marsh, W. Holmes, Chauncery, Homer and, Griffin. After the business of the meeting had closed, a very interesting lecture was given by
    Mrs. Welch, on “Some interesting sidelights of the Victorian International Congress,” which she attended as one of the Victorian delegates. This was most enjoyable, and gave her listeners some idea of the vast amount of work that was done. A dainty afternoon tea was served, and the “stall competition” was then judged. The judge found her task a hard one, as the exhibits were so even that she could not separate them, and finally decided that a tie was the only decision she could agree upon.91
  • 2 Feb 1935, AUCTION. WEDNESDAY, 6th FEBRUARY, at 3 O'clock. On Property, Halford St., Upper Beaconsfield. Executor's Realising Sale. -NEAT COTTAGE, three rooms, k'ette. G.I. tanks. Land 132ft. x 132ft. W. E. WELLS and SON. Auctioneers. South Melb.92
  • 19 Sep 1935, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. The annual school vacation brought a large number of visitors to the district, and the fine spell of weather enabled them to spend a very enjoyable time. Through the courtesy of Mr. Heep, the proprietor of “Salisbury House,” who placed his large dining-room at their disposal, the ladies of St. John’s Church of England Guild held a flag bridge and whist evening last Friday week, and it was an unqualified success, as the attendance was good, and everyone present thoroughly enjoyed themselves. The bridge prizes were won by visitors, and whist was won by two locals, Miss Murphett and Mr. H. Holmes. A dainty supper brought a most pleasant evening to a close.
    On Wednesday afternoon and evening the members of the Congregational Church held their annual fete, in aid of the church funds. The hall was nicely decorated, and various stalls were well stocked ; with the usual goods found at these functions. The attendance, both afternoon and evening, was very good, and the stall holders appeared to do a good business. It is expected that the funds of the church will benefit to the extent
    of about £25.
    The Cormore Tennis Club has just finished levelling and top dressing their court in preparation for the coming season. Their membership list is steadily growing.
    Mr. Walter Brown has just had a nice little villa erected on his property. Mr. Brown is one of those
    young men who believe it's not a good thing to run in single harness, so we are looking forward to a mistress occupying the new house in the very near future—“good luck to both of them.”
    The orchardists are busy spraying and ploughing their orchards, and all are very optimistic about having a good crop next season.
    A party of Girl Guides from one of the suburbs have been camping on Mr. Kellaway’s property during the week-end, and are having a good time. As they are under good covering, the few showers of rain that we had did not interfere with their enjoyment.
    A storm, accompanied by heavy thunder and lightning, passed over the district on (Monday) afternoon, and at the time of writing is is raining steadily, and looks as if it may continue.93
  • 13 Feb 1936, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Until the thunderstorm, which passed over the district, came on Saturday evening, the water shortage question was becoming a serious one, as already some residents had to cart water, and, in a large number of cases, tanks and wells were getting very low. However, the timely rain relieved the situation.
    On Thursday evening a public meeting was held in the hall, to arrange about a fete, to be held during the Easter holidays, in aid of the Hall funds.
    The first serious bushfire of the season occurred on Friday and Saturday. A fire, which started on the Cardinia Creek, in Borchardt’s property some few days before, assumed alarming proportions, and the bush fire brigade were called out; by this time the fire had reached Messrs. C. Wright’s and J. Binding’s property, and only by hard work were they saved. In the meantime the fire had leaped the road and destroyed a number of fruit trees, the whole of the passion fruit plantation and a splendid row of pine trees belonging to Mr. Walter Brown. Mr. A. J. Brown’s lemon orchard was only saved by the super-human efforts of the fire fighters. When night came it was thought the danger was over, but unfortunately on Saturday morning the wind came up and the fire broke out afresh, and soon the residences of Major C. Campbell, Miss Elliot, Mr. J. Campbell and Mr. F Robinson were in danger, and a call went out for more helpers, which was soon forthcoming. The cricket match, between Beaconsfield Upper and Clyde, was abandoned, and the players helped to keep the flames in check; to save the township it was decided to burn a break about three-quarters a mile long, and here the captain of the local bush fire brigade (Mr. U. a’Beckett) had a force of over 200 men under his control. The break was safely burned, and the township made safe. About six p.m. a thunderstorm came, and put the grass fires out, but it still needs watching, as a number of trees and logs are still smouldering. On Saturday, whilst the bulk of the fire fighters were concentrated near the township, a fire broke out near Mr. Begg’s fine orchard, and caused anxiety for some time. However, it was eventually got out before much damage was done. Before finishing, I must mention the large part the women played during the two days that the men were employed beating out the fires. They banded together and saw to it that every man had abundance of both solid and liquid refreshments, and carried them right up to where the men were working, through the smoke and heat.
    Through the courtesy of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hayball, who placed their residence at their disposal, the members of the Beaconsfield Upper Recreation Club held a very enjoyable house party on Wednesday evening, when a large number attended, and a very pleasant time was spent. Dancing and cards were freely indulged in; the winners of the card games were Miss and Mr. Binding.
    After a dainty supper, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr. and Mrs. Hayball for their kindness in allowing the club to have the use of their home.
    On Friday evening the members of St. John’s Church, of England held their annual meeting in the Assembly Hall. There was an attendance of over 80 present, and a great amount of interest was shown in the proceedings by all present. The vicar (Rev. R. J. Rowell) occupied the chair. The treasurer (Mr. Geo. Marsh) produced the balance sheet, which showed that they were starting the new financial year with a credit balance of £16/11/9. The election of officers for the ensuing year resulted in the following being returned: Church wardens, Messrs. Thorogood, Marsh and Edwards; vestrymen, Messrs. Binding, E. W. Harris, Ken Hudson and F. Sulman; auditors, Messrs. Kuring and Glismann. At the conclusion of business a social was held, when a programme of instrumental and vocal items, interspersed with several recitations, was given, after which the ladies belonging to the Guild handed around a dainty supper, after which the Benediction brought a most successful meeting to a close.94
  • 5 Jan 1939, COUNTRY HOLIDAYS. At Beaconsfield & Berwick.
    PICTURESQUE Upper Beaconsfield is undoubtedly feeling the effect of the dry season, and its usually attractive scenery has, like the rest of the countryside, changed from green to brown, while very few of the private gardens are flourishing. Even the few lucky people who still have spring water are using it sparingly, and water is being carted to Upper Beaconsfield. The difficulties created by the water shortage are reflected in the fact that there are fewer holiday makers in the district than in other years, but those who are there—and their number is not inconsiderable—are enjoying the rest and change, which this popular resort offers. Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Colles, "Mundra," their daughter Gwynne, and a young guest, Neil Walker, who is staying with them, have just returned from a camp ing holiday at Waratah Bay, South Gippsland. Yesterday their visitors in cluded: — Misses N., G. and B. Campbell, of Brisbane, and Mrs. Colles's brother, Canon W. P. F. Morris, who is head master of the Church of England Grammar School, Brisbane; he is staying with his brother, Lieut.-Colonel B. M. Morris, at "Leintwardine," Upper Beaconsfield.
    Holiday Home for Years
    At "Strathearn," which has been the holiday home of Mrs. J. C. Campbell, of Meadow-street, East St, Kilda, and her family for the past 23 years, a family party of 16 was held during the holidays, and included Mrs. Campbell, her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Eric Ferguson; another son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Campbell, Miss Anne Campbell, Mr. Bill Campbell and Mr. Fred Rowlands. Usually the swimming pool at "Strathearn" is a centre of great attraction in the holidays, but this year it is dry. Mr. and Mrs. John Ogden, of Amesfield Park, have Mr. Ogden's mother, Mrs. J. E. Ogden, from Mountainville, New Jersey, staying with them for three months; she arrived last week. The attractive ballroom at Amesfield Park has been much appreciated during the holidays, and many young people from the district and from Melbourne have enjoyed dancing there. Another ballroom which has been a centre of attraction, also a swimming pool, are those at "Fassifern," the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Walker, whose guests over the holidays have included their daughter, Mrs B. Barraclough, and her husband, and Miss Lillias Sinclair, of Melbourne, while Miss June Fanthorpe, of Melbourne, will arrive on Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buckley's home at "Quiamong" is a half-way house for visitors at any time, and those who have called in during the holidays have received the usual warm welcome. Mrs. Buckley has two polo ponies, Dinah and Lena (a half Arab), and two Irish Terriers, Pilot and Whiskers, to say nothing of the emu, who claims much of her attention when she is not enter taining visitors.
    At "Bryn Gwyn" during the holidays were Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hudson, Miss Barbara Hudson and her fiancee, Mr. Duff Gordon, also Miss Sheila Broadhead.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Griffin, at "Kamarooka," have had Miss K. Inglis and Mr. Gordon Balmaine staying the holidays where Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bevan, at "Pen-Bryn," have had a number of callers during the holidays. Mr. and Mrs. Monte Luke and their son, Peter, from New South Wales, are visiting Mrs. E. T. Luke at "Montuna," Upper Beaconsfield.
    Tennis, Croquet and Bridge Holiday makers at the guest houses have enjoyed the festivities and made their own fun, as various tennis tournaments in the district have been arranged, and visitors have entered enthusiastically into everything despite the heat. At "Runnymede" Miss J. Vardie and Mr. L. Byers carried off the silver cups for a mixed doubles. Here the visitors include Mr. W. M. Crougey and Mrs. Crougey, Miss Olive Rogers, Miss E. Findlow, Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Wyatt, Mr. and Mrs. A. Aitken and Mr. Keith Aitken, Miss Marjorie Knowling, Miss J. Vardie, Mr. L. Byers and Mr. R. An derson. Salisbury House has also had its tennis enthusiasts, and a mixed doubles tournament arranged by the Upper Beaconsfield Tennis Club was won by Mr. Lloyd Davis and Miss Audrey Rice. Croquet champions of the house proved to be Miss M. M. McPhail and Mr. Roy Davies, Mr. N. Harris and Mrs. Marsh, and Mr. G. Wilson and Miss Gwen Hughes, while Mrs. S. Hope and her daughter, Miss Nancye Hope, and Mr. J. Davies carried off the prizes for flag bridge. A crazy whist party resulted in prizes being won by Mrs. Hope and Miss Audrey Cole, and by Mr. Clarke and Miss Nancy Hope. Guests at Salisbury House over the holiday included a family from Geelong, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Herd and their daughter, Miss V. Herd; Mrs. S. M. Herd and Miss D. O. Herd, and Mr. Roy Goodwin. Other guests were Mr P. Drew and Miss T. Drew, Miss Swan, Miss A. Cole, Mr. G. Lawson, Miss M. M. McPhail, Mr. and Mrs. B. Satchell, Mr. and Mrs. R. Baker, Mrs. An gus, Mr. Geoff Drew, Miss Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. J. Davies, Mr. Lloyd Davies, Master Roy Davies and Miss Irene Davies, Mr. V. Moorhouse, Miss Audrey Rice, Miss Doris Henry, Mr. and Mrs. Clarke and their boys, Peter and Colin; Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Fox and their boys. Graham and Malcolm; Miss B. Perrier, Mr. and Mrs. Smith and Miss Love, while Mr. and Mrs. Norman Harris, who have a cot tage near by have stayed for part of the time at Salisbury House.
    Staying at Berwick Literally, a flying visit was paid to Berwick over the new year, when the Federal Treasurer (Mr. Casey) and Mrs. Casey flew from Canberra on Saturday afternoon to visit Lieut.-Colonel R. S. Ryan, at "Edrington." They left again on Sunday morning. Dr. and Mrs. S. V. Sewell have Miss Hermione Pott and Miss Marie Louise Carse as their guests at "'Road's End"; Mrs. Edward Stevens spent Christmas with them as usual, and other guests included Mr. J. T. Tweddle and Dr. and Mrs. Jim Sewell.95
  • 15 Jun 1940, BEACONSFIELD UPPER BARGAINS
    1 Large Allot in township 690 ft to Halford st 512 ft Fern st. few yards Gembrook rd rear Assembly Hall; only £50.
    2 20 Acs exceptionally fine block near Recreation Ground, bitumen rd frontage only £160
    3 89 Acs divided by Gembrook rd (CRB) handy township more than half of this block is good dry land bal rather low laying; could be drained. An absolute gift at £270. The owner is particularly anxious to sell; will accept small dep bal 4 pc. In such a progressive area any of this land should prove a good investment.
    JOHN F STURKEN Sole Agent Berwick. Tel 3896
  • 25 Mar 1944, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. A Bargain.-12 Rooms, beautifully furnished, plenty of water, electric light, on 20 acres of land, make an ideal after-care home or guest house. Price. £1600 the lot. Apply G. Thomson, local agent. Phone U.B. 34.97
  • 1946, Pakenham Gazette 25 Jan 1946. Decisions at Berwick Shire Council. Engineer's Report.
    The engineer (Mr. H. L. Keys) reported as follows:—
    Beaconsfield U. Swimming Pool.—The State Rivers and Water Supply Commission has approved of the construction of swimming pool on Stoney Creek in principle but required an increase in size of concrete culvert and spillway. I will take this matter up with them first opportunity. Application has been made to the Lands Department to reserve the portion of Crown lands required for swimming pool and park.

    22 Mar 1946
    Stoney Creek.—An officer of the Lands Department has inspected the site for swiming pool on Stoney Creek, Upper Beaconsfield, and is recommending an additional area on the east and west of that site to be included in the reservation.

    28 Jun 1946
    Relative to swimming pool at Upper Beaconsfield, the Department of Lands and Survey asked when work would be sufficiently advanced to permit of survey being made. The matter was referred to the engineer.98
  • 27 Feb 1946, IT IS RUMORED that several of the wives of Upper Beaconsfield are thinking seriously of starting a grass widows club, as their husbands are out three or four nights a week at committee meetings.99
  • 27 Feb 1946, A VERY ENJOYABLE afternoon was had by everyone present at the Sunday cricket match, played on the Cormore Park ground, between the married men and single. The married men were much too good for the single. The final scores were: Married, 146 (H. Holmes 59. Tonti 23, Bourke 16, Appleby 12). Single, 71 (M. Hamilton 15, N. Holmes 9). A return match has been asked for, and this will take place in a week’s time.99
  • 8 May 1946, Over Easter At Upper Beaconsfield BY A RAMBLING REPORTER
    May I bring before the public a little of what goes on in that lovely old town of Beaconsfield Upper, of which we hear so little.
    The Easter holidays passed off with every one well pleased with results and glorious weather made out-door sports hugh successes. Guest and private homes were filled to capacity with young and old alike all ready to enjoy their holiday. The M.G.S. and the scout camps were both over-flowing with boys and they all had a great time. ... The cricketers’ dance, on the Saturday night was a huge success and showed a pleasing result. Easter Sunday service was held in St. John’s Church of England and was conducted by the Rev. Eustace Wade. Taking as his text, John 11: 25, 26, his congregation were thrilled with his inspiring address. The church, filled to overflowing, was beautifully decorated for the occasion credit for which goes to Mrs. Claud Harris. Many old residents were present among the congregation, as were the boys from Melbourne Grammar camp. . . . The boys from M.G.S. camp held high tea at night at which a few local lads were guests and afterwards a large bon fire was lit and all enjoyed a fireside concert. The dark night made the scene a very beautiful one. ... A bumper day was Easter Monday, and the gymkhana, held by the Recreation Committee in aid of funds excelled all hopes both socially and financially. Introduced by President Perc Hamilton. Col. Ryan, M.H.R., opened the function. Ring events were judged by those two well-known sportsmen, Bob Cooper and Claud Harris, and they did a good job. Saw old-timber Roy Hayball there among the crowd. Wonder what became of the “leg” Mabel was raffling? . . . Tom O’Keefe and “Blue” Harris did a good trade on the soft-drink stall. Where did Tom get that brand of raspberry vinegar so popular with the boys? The ladies excelled themselves in providing a scrumptious afternoon tea. What a lovely hot-cup of tea it was, too. Well done, ladies and great credit to president Hamilton and his committee. You did a good job boys. The ball at night ended a great day with the hall filled to overflowing with merrymakers. They tripped the light fantastic till the “wee sma’ hours” and no wonder Ted was late for work and Bob couldn’t even work—only have a walk-about. . . . Anzac Day was quietly celebrated at the State School on Wednesday. An impressive service was given by Mr. Burke, at" the conclusion of which Valerie Harris placed a lovely sheath of flowers on the School Honor Roll. ... At the Memorial Stone, Sunday the 28th, in the presence of a large gathering, Padre Blake, of the 6th Div., introduced by Mr. Claud Harris, President of Berwick R.S.S.A.I.L.A., unveiled the names (recently inscribed on the stone) of those who paid the supreme sacrifice in the last war. Floral tributes were many and beautiful. Popular President Harris had a large squad of “boys” from Berwick Branch with him to pay their homage. Among them ex-Secretary Albert. Glad to see him about again after his illness. . . Throughout the holidays the tennis club held their tournaments and all were well patronised. To make my holiday complete “Don” had plenty at the “Pines” and I have made up my mind next holiday to return to this quiet holiday resort and look forward to enjoying myself as I did this time.”100
  • 5 Oct 1946, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. VACANT POSSESSION; £4500. GENTLEMAN'S COUNTRY HOME, TIMBER RESIDENCE, 9 rms., 2 bath rms., septic sewerage, electricity, ample water supply, spacious verandahs, double garage, and outbuildings; land 120 acres. MAGNIFICENT VIEWS. Price includes Furniture. Plant, and Stock.
    COGHILL & SON, 79 Swanston St. C, 2793.101
  • 14 May 1949, DEWHURST. 4 MILES UPPER BEACONSFIELD, and Only 32 Miles Melbourne. TO BE SOLD AT AUCTION TUESDAY. MAY 31, AT 11 A.M. Property known as Greenacres. Glorious situation, unequalled views, comprising practically new fibro villa, cont. 5 good rooms, mod. bathroom, sep. shower recess, septic sewerage, and approx. 20 acres land. 8 acres cleared, remainder firewood. Numerous outbuildings include brooder-house, 24ft. x 16ft.
    ERIC WEBER & CO. PTY. LTD., 325 Collins st. Melbourne. MU8971.102
  • 1 Jun 1949, DEWHURST. THIS DAY. At Eleven O'clock. AT GREENACRES. DEWHURST (4 Miles from Upper Beaconsfield).
    ATTRACTIVE FIBRO VILLA.
    Cont. 5 Rms.. Mod. Bathroom. Sep. Shower Recess, Septic Sewerage, lighting Plant. Numerous Outbuildings. Approx. 20 Acres, of Which 8 Acres Cleared. Remainder Firewood.
    IMMEDIATELY AFTER IN SEPARATE LOTS, FURNITURE AND OTHER CONTENTS OF THE HOME. Including Lounge, Bedroom, and Dining room Suites, Carpets, Lino., Standard Lamp. Practically New 5-valve Astor Mantel Wireless, Ice-chest, China Cabinet, and Many Miscellaneous Items.
    ERIC WEBER & CO. PTY. LTD. 325 COLLINS ST. MELB. MU8971.103
  • 17 Feb 1951, Several private garages and sheds and farm and Crown properties were destroyed when a smouldering fire revived at 10.10 last night at Upper Beaconsfield.
    Late last night about 100 volunteer firemen, hastily summoned, and district brigades were co-operating in efforts to quell the blaze.104
  • 25 Mar 1953, EDUCATION Department regretted that no hope could be held out for providing a teacher at Dewhurst School at present.105
  • 18 Jul 1953, WEDNESDAY JULY 22, At 3 pm KYOGLE MAIN ROAD, Upper Beaconsfield SPLENDID WEATHERBOARD VILLA
    VACANT POSSESSION
    Spacious Lounge-rm., Large Dining-rm., 7 Bedrms, Sleepout, Kitchen, AGA Stove, H.W.S. Bathrm., Land Approx. 12 Acres. Views of Surrounding Countryside Extending to Sea.
    Known as Kyogle Guest House, with Unlimited Possibilities.
    TERMS: £2000 Dep., Bal. £4 P.W. Incl. lnt. at 4%, 3 Years
    INSPECT THIS WEEKEND
    WILLIAMS & CO. PTY. LTD.106
  • 28 Apr 1954, BERWICK. “SCOUTER.” EASTER CAMP.—Our Easter camp held, at Burnt Bridge on the Cardinia Creek at Beaconsfield Upper, was a great success. I think it has been our best camp to date.
    20 boys in four patrols attended and we were fortunate to have two from 1st Narre Warren Nth., Assi. Scouter Max Thompson and his brother Senior Scout Lloyd Thompson, and Jim Watkinson, from Yallourn as well as our own two Scouters. The weather was very favourable and the general camping standards were well maintained.
    Friday was spent in erecting the camp and settling in, and by nightfall all was under shelter and the mess tent was a popular place after a heavy day’s work.
    Saturday was spent in improving the Camp area and erecting gateways and gadgets. Each patrol used a different theme and the results were very good particularly that of the Wolves Patrol.
    Saturday afternoon saw the start of the Thompson Bridge and much cutting and sawing of logs was evident. Under the guidance of Spr. Watkinson a shelter was erected over the kitchen and entrance to H.Q. and the Mess Tent was completed. The Terrible Twins added three fine black fish to the larder and the day finished with a small camp fire —and on the Scouters return a Cream Cake supper at midnight for those who were awake or rudely wakened. Thanks Mrs. McKay.
    Sunday was a big day with full dress parade, inspection, and at 11 a.m. we held a “Scouts Own.” Sunday’s dinner, the big event of the Camp was a great success.
    We had two visiting Scouters from the East St. Kilda Troop who camped nearby and all enjoyed the meal of Roast Beef, potatoes, pumpkin and green peas, followed by steamed sultana pudding which the seniors so ably prepared and served. After lunch the Thompson bridge was completed and formally opened just in time to allow our first visitors to cross the creek. We were proud to have as the first lady to cross the bridge our president’s wife, Mrs. Woods.
    Altogether we had about 70 visitors and it was pleasing to see them, and to be able to show them around. Afternoon tea was served to all and once again the boys rose to the occasion admirably. The Cubs and parents expressed appreciation of the Committee idea of running a bus to the camp on visitors day and we hope this practice is continued. Sunday night’s Camp-fire was a great success. The boys from East St. Kilda troop joined us and the items were many and even though “The Lion et our Albert ’at an all.” Supper of Cocoa (?) and biscuits brought an enjoyable day to a close. Monday was spent in varied activities and during the afternoon the camp was dismantled and we left for home about 5 p.m. after a very enjoyable Easter
    Camp.
    A candid observer in the camp would have noticed: The cooking and meals were particularly good; The Patrol sites well set out, with the Lions setting the standard; A general dislike of washing dishes; A general liking for tree falling; The strong-arm discipline after lights out in the Wolves tent; That Buff’s stretcher was not just an ornament, and also that “Camp Fire Hat;” The nocturnal activities of the Big Fishermen and their absence from breakfast after their nightly expeditions; Brian’s reluctance to the use of water for purposes other than running in creeks; “Wing Ling Ching” Smith always setting the example good or otherwise. Welly Solly, Franky; 2 I.C. with the distinct Scottish attire; The visitors’ obvious appreciation of the day’s outing and the Camp Site; The influence of a recent Wood Badge Course on a very able and welcome “Ring-in.” Summing up: a wonderful Easter Week-end with special thanks to Max and Bill Killer, Ling Ching and Pash for the way they carried out their duties, and Buff, the Troop Leader, without whom the camp would not have functioned (so he says!). Also to Ellis, who transported his as sorted cargo with cheerful cooperation.107
  • 17 Nov 1954, Re-building of Chadwick's Bridge Would Open Land-locked Area At Upper Beaconsfieid
    BERWICK COUNCIL on Monday received two requests the re-building of Chadwick's bridge over the Cardinia Creek burnt out many years ago, and never replaced.
    During the discussion, it was pointed out that it would cut 10 miles off the distance to Melbourne and the Dandenong Market for local residents, and would open up to settlement a land-locked area.
    The first request was from the Beaconsfield Upper Progress Association, which pointed out the many advantages of opening up this route by re-building the bridge, and urging that the work be given a high priority.
    Beaconhills Country Golf Club also advocated the replacement of the bridge, pointing out that its members could then come up this way, cutting 10 miles off the trip, and relieving the busy highway of quite a considerable amount of traffic.
    Cr. C. Harris stated that the Golf Club planned to put in another 18 holes and increase its membership. The Chadwick’s Creek bridge route would take a lot of this traffic off the highway, and would be a boon to local residents. He had told them that the best council could do at present would be to give it a high priority for next year.
    Cr. Greaves: It would be a great thing if the bridge was replaced. I’ve been trying for years to get that done. There’s a big slice of land-locked territory in there that would be opened up. It would be a tremendous asset in rates to this council if we put a road through there and opened it up. We should have a deputation to the C.R.B. on this.
    Cr. Rae: It would take a lot to do it, but it could be done.
    The engineer: It is very desirable, but it is a question of priority on grants. We would have to give it an early priority on our list when applying to the C.R.B., and we may find we have more urgent works when we get around to preparing our application. Before we apply, we would want to investigate and plan the work to make sure just what is involved.
    Cr. Robinson: At present there is no road between Berwick and Emerald tapping that area, but there would be a big sum involved. It would mean the realignment of the road on the Berwick side of the creek.
    The engineer: A mile of road at least would have to be reconstructed on the Berwick side. I haven’t looked at the Beaconsfield side to see what is involved there.
    Council authorised the engineer to go ahead and make a preliminary investigation.108
  • 27 May 1955, Beaconsfield Upper and Dewhurst Halls. Applications have been forwarded to the Public Works Department for grants to assist in carrying out extensions to both these buildings.109
  • 5 Nov 1956, UPPER BEACONSFIELD: Emerald rd., Durants Estate. 19 lots offered, three sold. £150, £200, and £200 each. (E. Weber & Co.)110
  • 17 Nov 1956, AUCTION TODAY: SAME DAY at 3 P.M. 28 1-ACRE LOTS. ST. GEORGE'S RD. UPPER BEACONSFIELD Only 12 mis. G.M.H., S.E.C. avail. Terms . £50 dep. lot, Bal. £2 weekly (Int. 5%). Full details
    WILLMORE & RANDELL, 357 Lt. Collins St.. MU9715, Aft. Hrs., XW1367.111
  • 5 Oct 1981, Captain Phillips charges
    MELBOURNE: Captain Mark Phillips, due in Australia next week for an unofficial visit, will give lessons on horse sense to anyone willing to pay $200.
    The three-day tutorial, billed by organisers as "a regal occasion", will be held under the auspices of the Victorian Equestrian Centre at Upper Beaconsfield.
    In addition, four "exclusive" champagne lunches have been arranged - at $25 each. Then for the night owls, Captain Phillips will be guest of honour at an $80-a-double Mardi Gras party at a city hotel. Captain Phillips, husband of Princess Anne, has also made his services available to the Press for a $10,000 fee, set by his business manager, Mr Mark McCormack, the globe-trotting American superstar promoter. Profit from the lucrative deals, his managers say, will go the the British Equestrian Federation.112
  • 3 Nov 1983, Tanker 'spluttering' before five died
    Five firefighters who died when they were caught in the Ash Wednesday fire at Beaconsfield were earlier seen driving a tanker which was coughing and spluttering as it tried to climb a hill, the Pakenham Magistrates Court was told yesterday. Two eye witnesses told the inquest into the deaths of 27 people in the Beaconsfield and Cockatoo fires that they saw the troubled tanker in Ringwood at about 7.30 m on Ash Wednesday, 16 February. Mr Rodney Blundell, of Mitcham, said the Panton Hill tanker had stopped twice as he watched, and the crew had poured water over the engine. A young crew member had told him: "She's vaporising." -Mr John Joseph Clarke, of Heathmont, said he was worried that the tanker would roll back on his car as it tried to move from stop lights. He said the tanker was turning roughly, and the crew looked concerned. The inquest was told earlier that the Panton Hill tanker and truck from Narre Warren were the tanker had fuel vaporisation problems about 12 months before Ash Wednesday. This had been solved by switching from super to standard petrol. Mr Motschall said there was no record at the Panton Hill general store of what petrol was last put in the tanker, but he said all the crew members had known of the need to use standard fuel. He admitted the tanker "could have vaporised, depending on how hard the truck was driven". He also said the crew had left with only a Melways street directory, which did not show the dirt roads around Upper Beaconsfield.
    Mr Motschall said he had heard a recording on the ABC's 'Four Corners' program of the last radio message sent from the tanker. He had recognised the voice of the brigade's communications officer, Mr Peter Singleton, calling out: "May Day, Panton Hill tanker." Mr Motschall said he had taken two men off the tanker before sending it out One had been too inexperienced to go, while the other was needed back at the station because of his good local knowledge. The men who died were all experienced firefighters, he said. In the same situation, "I'd send them again."
    Killed were Mr Maurice Atkinson, 39, Mr Stuart Robert Duff, 24, Mr Neville Lewis Jeffrey. 18. Mr William John Marsden. 39, and Mr Peter John Singleton, 41.
    Mr Barry Kingsley Medwin, said he had been fighting the Beaconsfield fire with his son. He went back to his home in Carpenter Road, Upper Beaconsfield at about midnight. It was not until the morning that he found the bodies of his wife, Allison, and daughter, Kerry, "cuddled up" about six feet outside the front door. He said his wife had been deaf in one ear, and his daughter had been studying. They would probably not have heard anyone knocking on the front door. A State Emergency Service volunteer said he had gone to all the houses in Carpenter Road, including the Medwin's but could not remember having spoken to Mrs Medwin.
    A police senior sergeant told the inquest he had been "stunned" at finding the bodies of his neighbors, a man and his wife, who had been his close friends. Senior Sergeant Charles Hunt said he had returned to his property in Upper Beaconsfield at about 10.30 pm and had put out fires around his house. About an hour later he went to the home of Mr Lionel Stephens, 62, and Mrs Margaret Stephens, 56. At the back of the house he found the bodies of his neighbors, untouched by fire. He said the couple seemed to have been knocked down and killed by an explosion, probably that of their house. Their horse and five-month-old puppy were found dead in the driveway.
    The inquest continues today.113
  • 1995, A HERON'S HAVEN
    The origins of the HERON primary glider are somewhat obscure. It was discovered as a partially constructed airframe in a fruit packing shed in Upper Beaconsfield in 1943 by four young employees of the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation; Jim Fullerton, Des Lynch, Don Bowd and Alan Patching.
    The foursome had ambitions to build a glider and this partially-completed project offered an irresistible opportunity. After acquiring the aircraft, the four became affiliated with the Victorian Motorless Flight Group and arranged to rebuild the Heron Glider using the facilities of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. The former owners knew nothing of the Heron's history, but its appearance suggested that it was originally constructed in the late 1920s. As rebuilt, it appeared in a somewhat modified form when compared to its original configuration.
    The Heron made its first flight from the Governor's Road Field in Mordialloc in July 1945. It flew for several years before the Victorian Motorless Flight Group moved to Belwick in 1948; whereupon the Heron was stored. In 1955, the Heron was given to the Geelong Gliding Club which flew it for a short period before allowing it to become derelict at Belmont Common.
    The Heron was then re-acquired by the Victorian Motorless Flight Group and stored at Bacchus Marsh Airfield for many years until it was completely restored to display standards. The Heron was presented to the MOORABBIN AIR MUSEUM on April 8th 1995.
    There was a ceremony which included drinks and an informal inspection of the museum where museum personnel were on hand to answer questions and elaborate on points of interest.
    An official welcome to the Moorabbin Air Museum was conducted by President Mr Keith Gaff and Mr Michael Parkinson, President of the Victorian Motorless Flight Group formally presented the Heron Primary Glider to the museum.
    A short address by Mr Jim Fullerton relating to the discovery and operation of the Heron Glider was then given.114

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Last Edited3 Apr 2019

John Woods

M, #1460, b. 5 Nov 1822, d. 2 Apr 1892
John WOODS
(1822-1892)
Birth*5 Nov 1822 Liverpool, Lancashire, England. 
Marriage*c 1843 Spouse: Sarah Gibbons. Liverpool, Lancashire, England.1
 
Land-UBeac*c 1877John Woods selected land from the Crown. PAK-130. 19a 0r 15p - Land File 976/49 (1880 map). Govt Land Sale 5019 21 Feb 1879. Upset price £1/ac, valued £65. Crown Grant to J. WOODS.2,3 
Residence*1878 Off Hughendon Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, selected Lot 130 Parish of Pakenham.4 
Land-UBeac*18 Oct 1887 PAK-130. Transfer from John Woods to The Real Estate Bank Ltd. 19a 0r 15p.5 
Widower12 Jan 1888John Woods became a widower upon the death of his wife Sarah Gibbons.1 
Marriage*23 Sep 1891 Spouse: Jessica Whitley. VIC, Australia, #M6233/6233R.6
 
Death*2 Apr 1892 Brighton, VIC, Australia. 
Death-Notice*5 Apr 1892WOODS -On the 2nd inst, at his residence, Ebley, Male street, North Brighton, the Hon. John Woods MLA, in his 70th year Stawell papers please copy.7 
AnecdoteWoods, John
Born 5 November 1822 (Liverpool)
Died 2 April 1892. (Brighton)
Parents: Richard, railwayman, and Mary, nee Cave
Marriage: (1) Moonee Ponds, Sarah Gibbons; 2s. 4d; (2) 1891 Kensington, Mrs Jessica Muir, nee Whitley.
Occupation: Engineer
Religion: Church of England?
Education: Locally and trained as locomotive engineer; further training in Germany where his father was employed with Leipzig & Dresden Railway Co.
Career: Had various engagements in USA, Canada and England; took part in anti-Corn Law agitation; arrived Melbourne 1852; mining in various districts, and prominent in 1854 movement; briefly in Ararat where he was member first local mining court; went to Mount Pleasant (Stawell), then built machinery for mining company at Stawell; settled Melbourne 1859; appointed engineer for the Malmsbury reservoir 1864, dismissed by McCulloch c1870; inventor of a railway brake.
House      Electorate      Start *            End *
MLA     Crowlands     October 1859          August 1864     
MLA     Crowlands     April 1871          April 1877     
MLA     Stawell     May 1877          April 1892     
Other seats contested: Crowlands 1864
Appointments: Commissioner Railways & Roads 7 Aug-20 Oct 1875, 22 May 1877-5 Mar 1880; vice-president Board land & Works 23 Aug 1875-20 Oct 1875, 11 June 1877-5 Mar 1880; royal commission tariff 1881, shop employees 1883, coal industry of Vic. 1889; Railways Standing Commission 1890.8 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 Dec 1878, EXCURSION TO BEACONSFIELD. A large party of excursionists, numbering about 120 ladies and gentlemen, among whom were the Commissioner of Railways, and Dr. L. L. Smith and Mr. Bosisto, M's. L. A., took a trip, on Saturday last, to Beaconsfield, a place about four miles and a-half from Berwick on the Gippsland line. The Argus, which gives a very correct account of the outing, states that the excursionists were conveyed to Oakleigh in omnibuses provided by the Melbourne Omnibus Company and thence by a special train which left Oakleigh at half-past 10. At Berwick station about 30 vehicles were in readiness to convey the party to Beacons- field, where arrangements had been made for holding a picnic on a large scale. Beaconsfield is a settlement which has been formed within the last two years by se lectors of 20-acre blocks under the 49th section of the Land Act. Three hundred blocks have been taken up, chiefly by residents in Melbourne. Very few of them have as yet been built upon, but there are substantial evidences of settlement. The allotments are all fenced, and a very large amount of money bas been expended in clearing. The excursion was organised for the purpose of drawing the attention of the Commissioner to the requirements of the selectors in the matter of railway accommodation. Some months ago, a company was formed for the purpose of constructing a tramway to take the timber, stone, and firewood from the hills to the railway line. The shares in the proposed undertaking were readily taken up; but the operations of the company were stopped by a hitherto unforeseen difficulty. They could not take the line across a road without the sanction of an act of Parliament. The Government have promised to introduce a bill dealing with the tramway question generally, but till this is done the company can proceed no further, and in the meantime the selectors are desirous of having a station erected near the Kardinia Creek. The settlement is at no great distance from Berwick station, but the nature of the country is such as to render it very difficult of access. At present the selectors have to travel by a very circuitous route, and even then they cannot avoid a steep hill, over which it would be almost an impossibility to convey a heavy load of produce. The spot at which the selectors desire to have a station was pointed out by Mr. Brisbane to the Commissioner of Railways, who admitted that a good case had been made out, and promised that it should receive early attention.
    The party then proceeded to the residence of Mr. Brisbane, which is situate on the top of a hill about 1,200ft. above the level of the sea. Driving up the steep ranges was a work of some difficulty, and many of the travellers found themselves compelled to alight, and make the rest of the journey on foot. They were, however, amply rewarded for their toil. The weather was pleasantly cool, and the top of the hill on which Mr. Brisbane's handsome residence is perched commands a view of an extensive sweep of country, comprising the Baw Baw ranges, Mount Macedon, Western Port, Phillip Island, and Port Phillip Bay. Luncheon was laid in the dining room, at which Professor Halford presided: "The Queen" having been honoured in the customary manner, the health, of "The Commissioner of Railways", was proposed by Mr. Brind. Mr Woods, in responding, said if there was one thing he valued more than another it was the good opinion of his neighbours. Allusion had been made to the administra tion of his department, but when he reminded them that there were no less than 4,000 persons employed in his department, and £2,000 had to be found every day to pay them, they would be able to form some idea of the difficulties he had to contend with. He had departed somewhat from the beaten track, and in doing so had risked fame and reputation; but the day would made when the public would be fully satisfied with the results. With regard to the particular object which had brought them together that day, he remarked that railways were constructed for the conve nience of the public, and if they could not accommodate the public, they did not fulfil one of the primary purposes for which they were constructed. He saw no reason why these grand hills should not in the course of a very few months be made accessible onto the young and feeble, who wanted to escape from the impure air of Melbourne. When the station was open on the spot he had been shown that morning, he would put on a morning train if the traffic was sufficient to justify it—(cheers)—and when the connexion with Melbourne was finished, it would be quite possible for a resident of these hills to leave home at 8 o'clock in the morning, reach Melbourne in an hour and after his day's business return again to his residence in the hills by six o'clock. (Applause). He concluded by proposing the health of Mr. Brisbane, who responded. "The prosperity of Beaconsfield" was pro posed by Mr. L. L. Smith, and responded to by Mr. Bosisto. "The Chairman" was then proposed by Mr. McKean, and res- ponded by Professor Halford.
    The party then broke up, and dipersed themselves among the many beautiful hills and gullies in the neighbourhood till half-past five o'clock, when a start was made for Berwick station, which was reached without accident, and the excursionists got to town a little before 10 o'clock.9

Australian Dictionary of Biography

WOODS, JOHN (1822-1892), engineer, politician and inventor, was born on 5 November 1822 at Liverpool, England, son of Richard Woods, railwayman, and his wife Mary, née Cave. Educated locally, he trained as a locomotive engineer in Liverpool and then on the Leipzig and Dresden railway. He worked in North America and held positions in railway and iron works in Staffordshire and Lancashire, where he was active in anti-corn-law agitation. He won first prize for railway axles at the 1851 Great Exhibition. At Liverpool, aged 21, he married Sarah Gibbons.
With his wife Woods arrived in Victoria in 1852 and went to the goldfields. He first 'mounted the stump' at the Goulburn diggings to lead passive resistance to the licence fee. He became president of the Ararat branch of the Land Convention and was active in the registration of electors and in obtaining sufficient ballot papers for the 1858 election. At Ararat he was elected to the local court and then to the Mining Board and was a delegate to the 1859 Mining Board Conference. Partnership in a deep wet claim left him penniless; he took employment at Stawell, building the St George's crushing plant.
From October 1859 until his defeat in 1864 Woods was member for the Legislative Assembly seat of Crowlands. On 30 October 1865 he was appointed engineer and surveyor for the Victorian Water Supply at a salary of £300. He worked on the Malmesbury reservoir until summarily dismissed by (Sir) James McCulloch's government on a charge of knowingly accepting faulty pipes and tarring over the cracks. The accusation and dismissal were later privately acknowledged as unfair. Woods represented Crowlands again in 1871-77 and in 1877-92 the new electorate of Stawell. He was commissioner of railways and roads and vice-president of the Board of Lands and Works in (Sir) Graham Berry's governments of 1875 and 1877-80. He sat on many select committees, mainly about railways, and was also a member of several royal commissions including those on the tariff (1881-83), employees in shops (1882-84) and coal (1889-91). He was a commissioner for the 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition and an honorary commissioner to the 1883-84 Calcutta Exhibition; from 1890 he was a member of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Railways.
A consistent, active proponent of democratic and radical principles and a staunch local member, Woods worked hard for the interests of miners and small settlers. He advocated a non-legalistic approach to mining on private property and a sliding scale of gold royalties to replace rents for mining land. He steadfastly put forward the Land Convention programme, always opposing permanent alienation of crown land and sale by auction, and proposing, in 1859, 1864 and 1873, a progressive land tax to 'burst up the great estates'; he published pamphlets on the subject in 1873 and 1880. As minister, his overriding interest was to reduce costs to small farmers, a political priority opposed by senior officials. He initiated great railway activity: a major branch line along the Goulburn Valley, the Melbourne-Oakleigh connexion and two north-western extensions into the Wimmera. He reformed the goods tariff to reduce freight charges and levelled and reorganized the Spencer Street yards; but his plans to build a block of grain and wool sheds and a new dock to reduce farmers' storage and cartage costs were cancelled by the next government.
A strong protectionist, Woods championed local industry, thereby opposing T. Higinbotham, on the use of Victorian-built locomotives. Among his several inventions were a fast stone-breaking machine (patented 1860) and an important and successful hydraulic railway brake (1882) which was used on many Victorian lines. He had set up a company in December 1877 to register the patent and manufacture his invention but air-powered brakes dominated eventually.
Although a member of the Chamber of Manufactures, Woods was always proud of his artisan background and claimed to be a representative of labour: 'I graduated in a hard school … I had to work my ten hours a day in England for very little money, and I know exactly what it means; and I know the advantages which have been obtained in this colony by labour in combination'. However he opposed political representation of trade unionists as such. He fought for the eight-hour principle and argued for unemployment relief and old-age pensions. In a major article, 'Wages', in the Victorian Review (1880), he raised the problem of ensuring for a worker a fair share in the profits of industry, not merely a day's pay. After 1880 he became a liberal oppositionist to the James Service-Berry coalition and subsequent ministries.
Deakin first met Woods in 1879, 'his rotund form, snub nose, glistening eyes and spiky hair rendering him a rather Socrates-Silenus appearance'; he described him as a serious reader and a man of original mind and initiative. However Woods never attained high parliamentary stature. His radical ideas, heterodox opinions and abrasive approach offended the community's respectable conformism. Impetuous and unconventional in his actions, he sometimes had to apologize for 'taking intoxicants too freely' and wrote amorous doggerel which Punch would not publish. He was a vigorous speaker with a gift for phrase-making. Deakin, however, claimed that he lacked industry and self-control. He lent his name to some of James Munro's more questionable promotions and with L. L. Smith 'puffed' a tin mine on the London market. Attacked by the conservative press, the nickname 'Tarbrush' followed him everywhere.
Woods's first wife died, aged 74, on 12 January 1888 and on 23 September 1891 he married a divorcee, Jessica Muir, née Whitley. He died of heart disease, dropsy and gangrene on 2 April 1892 at Brighton. Survived by his second wife and two of his four daughters, and predeceased by his two sons, he was buried in the Boroondara cemetery according to the rites of the Anglican Church.10

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#D1397 age 74 [par Peter GIBBONS & Hannah]."
  2. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/3916
    976/49 JOHN WOODS PAKENHAM 21 19--0--15. 1877 - 1879.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1114-682 - John Woods of Melbourne.
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://caseycardinialinkstoourpast.blogspot.com/
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1114-682 - The Real Estate Bank Limited of 52 Collins Street East, Melbourne.
  6. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#M6233/6233R as Jessica Muir & Whitley."
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Apr 1892 p1.
  8. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/re-member/bioregfull.cfm

    References: Australian Dictionary of Biography, 6
    Initial data source: Thomson, K & Serle, G, 'A Biographical Register of the Victorian Legislature 1851-1900', ANU Press, 1972.
  9. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 4 Dec 1878, p3.
  10. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A060466b.htm
    Select Bibliography: A. Sutherland et al, Victoria and its Metropolis, vol 2 (Melb, 1888); A. Deakin, The Crisis in Victorian Politics, 1879-1881, J. A. La Nauze and R. M. Crawford eds (Melb, 1957); C. E. Sayers, Shanty at the Bridge (Donald, 1963), and Shepherd's Gold (Melb, 1966); M. Cannon, The Land Boomers (Melb, 1966); Parliamentary Debates (Victoria), 1873, 1883, 1886, 1887; Argus (Melbourne), 2 Dec 1859, 2 Oct, 23 Oct 1883, 24 Mar 1887, 4 Apr 1892; Australasian, 31 Aug 1878; Table Talk, 11 Nov 1886; Pleasant Creek News, 5 Apr 1892; Leader (Melbourne), 9 Apr 1892; S. M. Ingham, Some Aspects of Victorian Liberalism 1880-1900 (M.A. thesis, University of Melbourne, 1950); J. E. Parnaby, The Economic and Political Development of Victoria, 1877-1881 (Ph.D. thesis, University of Melbourne, 1951).
    Print Publication Details: Jill Eastwood, 'Woods, John (1822 - 1892)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 6, Melbourne University Press, 1976, pp 434-435.
Last Edited14 Sep 2017

Joseph Bosisto

M, #1464, b. 21 Mar 1824, d. 8 Nov 1898
Joseph BOSISTO
(1824-1898)
Birth*21 Mar 1824 Leeds, Yorkshire, England.1 
Marriage*17 Feb 1852 Spouse: Eliza Stirling. Adelaide, SA, Australia, #M12/381.2
 
Marriage-Notice*27 Feb 1852Married on Tuesday, February 17th, 1852, by special license, at the residence of Mr. Thos. Padman, Stephens-place, Adelaide, by the Rev. D. J. Draper, Mr. Joseph Bosisto to Eliza, relict of the late Mr. Andrew Johnston.3 
Land-Note*20 Oct 1875 Application for renewal of License 4832: License to distil essential oils from the Eucalyptus and other vegetation at the Kardinia Creek near Narree Warren under 47th section Land Act 1869 for the year 1876.4 
Land-UBeac*15 Sep 1877Joseph Bosisto selected land from the Crown. PAK-156. 19a 2r 15p - Land File 92/49 (1880 map)
Crown grant to J. BOSISTO on 7 Jan 1879. Govt Land Sale 4983, upset £1/ac, value £199 10s. This includes 60 chains of fencing (£79.10) and sowing, clearing & tree planting valued at £120.5,6 
Widower7 Jan 1885He became a widower upon the death of his wife Eliza Stirling.7 
Death*8 Nov 1898 Richmond, VIC, Australia, #D18094 (Age 74) [par William BOSISTO & Maria LAZENBY].1 
Death-Notice*9 Nov 1898BOSISTO.-On the 8th November, at his residence, Richmond, Joseph Bosisto, C.M.G., aged 75 years. No flowers.
THE Friends of the late JOSEPH BOSISTO, Esq., C.M.G., are informed that his remains will be interred in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew.
The funeral to move from St. Stephen's Church, Richmond, THIS DAY (Wednesday, the 9th inst.), at 3 o'clock p.m.8 
Probate (Will)*19 Jan 1899 69/911. CMG Richmond. Owned Allot 156 Parish of Pakenham, 19 acres, unoccupied, no house. Value £100.9 
Land-Note2 Aug 1899 PAK-156: Memo 22700: George Joseph Stirling and James Belton Stirling both of Bridge Road Richmond Drapers are registered as proprietors of the within described land as executors to whom Probate of the Will of Joseph Bosisto who died on the 8th November 1898 was granted on the 13th December 1898.10 
Land-UBeac*2 Aug 1899 PAK-156. Transfer from Joseph Bosisto to Charles James Jago. 19a 2r 15p.11 
Anecdote*Bosisto, Joseph. Born 21 March 1824 (Leeds). Died 8 November 1898. (Richmond)
Parents: William and Maria (nee Lazenby) Marriage: 1852 Adelaide, Eliza Johnston; no children
Occupation: Chemist Religion: Methodist
Education: Attended Leeds School of Medicine; took up pharmacy; served apprenticeship London
Career: Arrived Adelaide 1848; to goldfields Forest Creek, Vic. 1851; opened pharmacy Richmond and a distillery for eucalyptus oil. Founding member Pharmaceutical Society of Vic., later president; president Board of Pharmacy 1877-1882. CMG 1886. Mayor Richmond 1864-1866
MLA for Richmond Dec 1874 (b/e) to Mar 1889 MLA for Jolimont and West Richmond May 1892 to Sep 1894 Other seats contested: Richmond 1889, Jolimont and W. Richmond 1894 Appointments: Royal commission tariff 1881, technological and industrial instruction 1886-1887 (appointed commissioner 1880.)12 

Grave

  • C/E B 1533, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, Erected by Joseph Bosisto M.L.A. of Richmond in affectionate memory of his beloved wife Eliza, died 7 Jan 1885, aged 60 years. In loving memory of Joseph Bosisto C.M.G. died at Richmond 8 Nov 1898 aged 74 years.13

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 Dec 1878, EXCURSION TO BEACONSFIELD. A large party of excursionists, numbering about 120 ladies and gentlemen, among whom were the Commissioner of Railways, and Dr. L. L. Smith and Mr. Bosisto, M's. L. A., took a trip, on Saturday last, to Beaconsfield, a place about four miles and a-half from Berwick on the Gippsland line. The Argus, which gives a very correct account of the outing, states that the excursionists were conveyed to Oakleigh in omnibuses provided by the Melbourne Omnibus Company and thence by a special train which left Oakleigh at half-past 10. At Berwick station about 30 vehicles were in readiness to convey the party to Beacons- field, where arrangements had been made for holding a picnic on a large scale. Beaconsfield is a settlement which has been formed within the last two years by se lectors of 20-acre blocks under the 49th section of the Land Act. Three hundred blocks have been taken up, chiefly by residents in Melbourne. Very few of them have as yet been built upon, but there are substantial evidences of settlement. The allotments are all fenced, and a very large amount of money bas been expended in clearing. The excursion was organised for the purpose of drawing the attention of the Commissioner to the requirements of the selectors in the matter of railway accommodation. Some months ago, a company was formed for the purpose of constructing a tramway to take the timber, stone, and firewood from the hills to the railway line. The shares in the proposed undertaking were readily taken up; but the operations of the company were stopped by a hitherto unforeseen difficulty. They could not take the line across a road without the sanction of an act of Parliament. The Government have promised to introduce a bill dealing with the tramway question generally, but till this is done the company can proceed no further, and in the meantime the selectors are desirous of having a station erected near the Kardinia Creek. The settlement is at no great distance from Berwick station, but the nature of the country is such as to render it very difficult of access. At present the selectors have to travel by a very circuitous route, and even then they cannot avoid a steep hill, over which it would be almost an impossibility to convey a heavy load of produce. The spot at which the selectors desire to have a station was pointed out by Mr. Brisbane to the Commissioner of Railways, who admitted that a good case had been made out, and promised that it should receive early attention.
    The party then proceeded to the residence of Mr. Brisbane, which is situate on the top of a hill about 1,200ft. above the level of the sea. Driving up the steep ranges was a work of some difficulty, and many of the travellers found themselves compelled to alight, and make the rest of the journey on foot. They were, however, amply rewarded for their toil. The weather was pleasantly cool, and the top of the hill on which Mr. Brisbane's handsome residence is perched commands a view of an extensive sweep of country, comprising the Baw Baw ranges, Mount Macedon, Western Port, Phillip Island, and Port Phillip Bay. Luncheon was laid in the dining room, at which Professor Halford presided: "The Queen" having been honoured in the customary manner, the health, of "The Commissioner of Railways", was proposed by Mr. Brind. Mr Woods, in responding, said if there was one thing he valued more than another it was the good opinion of his neighbours. Allusion had been made to the administra tion of his department, but when he reminded them that there were no less than 4,000 persons employed in his department, and £2,000 had to be found every day to pay them, they would be able to form some idea of the difficulties he had to contend with. He had departed somewhat from the beaten track, and in doing so had risked fame and reputation; but the day would made when the public would be fully satisfied with the results. With regard to the particular object which had brought them together that day, he remarked that railways were constructed for the conve nience of the public, and if they could not accommodate the public, they did not fulfil one of the primary purposes for which they were constructed. He saw no reason why these grand hills should not in the course of a very few months be made accessible onto the young and feeble, who wanted to escape from the impure air of Melbourne. When the station was open on the spot he had been shown that morning, he would put on a morning train if the traffic was sufficient to justify it—(cheers)—and when the connexion with Melbourne was finished, it would be quite possible for a resident of these hills to leave home at 8 o'clock in the morning, reach Melbourne in an hour and after his day's business return again to his residence in the hills by six o'clock. (Applause). He concluded by proposing the health of Mr. Brisbane, who responded. "The prosperity of Beaconsfield" was pro posed by Mr. L. L. Smith, and responded to by Mr. Bosisto. "The Chairman" was then proposed by Mr. McKean, and res- ponded by Professor Halford.
    The party then broke up, and dipersed themselves among the many beautiful hills and gullies in the neighbourhood till half-past five o'clock, when a start was made for Berwick station, which was reached without accident, and the excursionists got to town a little before 10 o'clock.14
  • 5 Dec 1891, BOSISTO'S PARROT BRAND EUCALYPTUS OIL is both curative and preventative. Its antiseptic principle immediately destroys all poisonous germs.
    Mr Joseph Bosisto was the first to distil and introduce Eucalyptus Oil into Europe, and his oil may be known by the trademark, the "Parrot" brand. He first exhibited his Eucalyptus Oil at the Paris Exhibition of 1855, then again in the London Exhibition of 1861, receiving the highest honours for his exhibits. In 1886 the Society of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce of London (incorporated by Royal Charter in 1847, and established in 1754) CONFERRED ON Mr BOSISTO the silver medal of the society in RECOGNITION of his services to medicine and the arts in INTRODUCING the Eucalyptus Oil of the Australian flora INTO THE COMMERCE of Europe.
    From the earliest years of its introduction into Europe Bosisto's oil of eucalyptus has filled the European demand and will be found in the hospitals, and also dispensaries and in the laboratories of the leading chemists of Europe.
    BOSISTO'S PARROT BRAND EUCALYPTUS OIL has as trade mark a parrot on the top of the wrapper. See you get this from your chemist, and so avoid imitations.
    Sold in bottles, 1s. and 2s. each, by all family and dispensing chemists in every town or district in Australia and in wholesale quantities by all the leading drug houses in the colonies and in Europe.15
  • 27 Oct 1894, Anecdotal Photograph. Mr. Joseph Bosisto, C.M.G.
    Roughly speaking, every man, woman and child in the city of Richmond knows, or has heard of, Mr. Joseph Bosisto. The young have heard of his eucalyptus oil when they have suffered from infantile croup, and the old have found in it a balm in the sorrows of rheumatism and asthma. For a couple of generations he has been known in nearly every house in Richmond where there has been illness of any sort, for, in the words of the Red Indian, he has been the great medicine man of the place. The larrikins of Richmond "knew him well," just as truants knew the schoolmaster of the Deserted Village. For years he was the best known figure on the local bench. Then, later on, every man in Richmond who had a vote for the municipal council or the legislative Assembly knew him for a long span of years—for he represented the people in both places. He is called " Bos." by his familiar friends ; and truly he has been a "boss" of a versa tile character in Richmond for 40 years.
    Mr. Bosisto was born at Hammersmith, London, in 1824, and the family settled at York, but he lost his father by death when he was very young. His mother then removed to Brentford, near London—the place which is said to have had, at a remote period, two kings reigning conjointly and so harmoniously that they rode through the town together smelling the same rose ! Little Bosisto spent a portion of his childhood at Egham, in Surrey, near Windsor, where the famous Royal residence is situated. In 1839 he was taken from school and apprenticed to a chemist and druggist in Yorkshire for five years and seven months, and he completed his apprenticeship and his minority simultaneously. Then for a few months he was assistant in an establishment at Bradford after which he became attached to the wholesale house of Messrs. Bell and Brooks, in Leeds, where he remained three years, and gained valuable experience as well as a good status in his profession.
    In the latter end of 1847, Mr. Bosisto went to London and presented himself for examination by the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, and obtained certain certificates. He did not remain sufficiently long in the metropolis to get his diploma from the society, but in later years obtained the society's diploma of honorary membership. About that time the whole sale drug house of Faulding, of Adelaide, South Australia, wrote to a kind of commission of chemists in York, asking them to select a qualified young man who was acquainted with the wholesale drug trade to come out to Adelaide. Mr. Bosisto, who had then returned from London to Leeds, was recommended for the appointment and accepted it. In 1886—nearly 40 years afterwards—when Mr. Bosisto was on a visit to England, he went to York, and found that the Lord Mayor was one of his early friends in the ancient city. And the Lord Mayor remembered well the young chemist, who now returned as the quasi ambassador of a great and flourishing colony at the antipodes!
    In June, 1848, Mr. Bosisto sailed from London for Adelaide in the ship Competitor, commanded by Captain Hyde, who afterwards became captain of the Great Eastern—the floating babel, constructed to carry 5,000 persons from London to Australia, and which fell into the hands of the sheriff's officers in 1861! Probably, this was the biggest and queerest place the " bums" were ever "in possession." The Competitor does not appear to have been a successful competitor for rapid passages to Australia, for she took 120 days to make the voyage from London to Adelaide when Mr. Bosisto was onboard. The young chemist was engaged for three years to the house of Faulding, and the term began to run when he accepted the engagement in England ; so when he reached Adelaide it was convenient for him to find that he had four months' salary to draw.
    In Adelaide, in 1848, Mr. Bosisto made the acquaintance of a gentleman (now a nobleman) who was then a neighbour of his, only 100 yards off, and is now, after the lapse of 40 years, still a neighbour, for Bridge-road is not very far from the Botanical Gardens. This is no other than the Baron Von Mueller, the Government Botanist of Victoria. Doctor Mueller was then connected with the establishment of a German chemist in Adelaide, close to the English chemist's store where Mr. Bosisto was located, and a friendship sprung up between the two young men, which is now well-nigh half a century old.
    Mr. Bosisto kept his three years' engage ment in Adelaide with Faulding, and in October, 1851, on the discovery of gold in Victoria, came hither, and went to Forest Creek (now Castlemaine) to seek his fortune. The present President of the Legislative Assembly, Mr. W. A. Zeal, was on the same goldfield about this period, but Mr. Bosisto seems to have been gone when Mr. Zeal arrived. The former remained at the Creek only six months, his success as a miner not being great. He returned to Adelaide and was married therein 1852 to a young lady whose brother after wards settled down in business in Richmond, and whose house up to the present day is one of the landmarks of the suburban city. "Stirling's Corner" is as well-known in Richmond as Hyde Park Corner in London. Dr. Stirling, the well-known medical man, formerly one of the resident physicians of the Melbourne Hospital, and who for many years has been in practice on his own account in Lonsdale street, opposite that institution, is a nephew by marriage of Mr. Bosisto. Mrs. Bosisto died in 1885.
    While Mr. Bosisto was in Adelaide after his experi ence of the Forest Creek gold rush, he received intimation from a friend m Melbourne that there was a good opening for a retail chemist in Richmond, and he was recommended to come over and open in that suburb. He came at once.
    Society was in a very rude state in Richmond in 1852. Quarters were scarce and expensive. Mr. Bosisto looked around Richmond for a place in which to open a chemist's shop, and decided that the most suitable place, under all the circumstances, was a stable in Waltham-street, at the rear of the Star and Garter Hotel—a hostelry named after the celebrated one of Richmond on the Surrey side of the Thames. Waltham-street stands where it did in those days—running at right angles to Bridge-road, with the "Star and Gaiter" at the corner, but the inn has been pulled down and re-built since 1852, and is now a large and prominent building. In the early days of Richmond it was a wayside inn of a rustic kind. Well, Mr. Bosisto put a front to the stable in Waltham-street and opened his chemist's shop. He at once dropped into a large trade in physic and all the other goods usually sold by a retail chemist. The nearest chemist shop was Mr. Long's, of Bourke-street, Melbourne, and was commonly known as "Doctor" Long, from the accident that his initials were "D. R." One of Mr. Bosisto's customers in those days was the Right Hon. Hugh Culling Eardley Childers, who since then bus become a prominent politician and statesman in England. Mr. Childers resided in Vic toria from 1850 till 1857, and was a member of the first Ministry formed under responsible Govern ment, in 1855. Previously he had held the post of Auditor-General for the colony. When Mr. Bosisto first settled in Richmond, Mr. Childers lived at the foot of Bridge-road, on the Hawthorn side of the Yarra.
    In those days Richmond proper consisted of only 50 or 60 houses, scattered over the place, and was frequently subjected to raids of a party of bush rangers known as "Flash Jack's party." On a certain night in the early fifties a gentleman was "stuck up" by this party of highwaymen at a little wooden bridge over the Yarra close to Mr. Childers' house. The mounted police soon heard of the out rage and went in pursuit of the robbers. At this precise moment Mr. Bosisto was peacefully dispensing a prescription in his shop in Waltham street—alone—when a wild and excited individual, armed with a pistol in either hand, rushed into his presence. The chemist did not wait for any explanation of the intrusion, which he took for granted was booty, but dashed out of the shop, bare headed, and down Bridge-road towards the police station, which occupied just the same position which it now holds in that thoroughfare. Presently his flight was intercepted by a mounted trooper, who ran him down and demanded why he was running? It was another case of John Gilpin ! Mr. Bosisto explained that he was the chemist of Waltham street, that his shop had just been "stuck up" by a doubly-armed man, and that he was running to the police station for assistance. The trooper returned to the shop with Mr. Bosisto, but the robber had departed, and without making any plunder. To be sure, physic is not a tempting thing to steal, but money is, and the till was untouched. Mr. Bosisto now believes that the bushranger who dropped into his shop was merely in search of a hiding place from the police, who were in pursuit, and had no intention to injure the chemist's person or property.
    About a week after this adventure Mr. Bosisto had another, in which his life would seem to have been in real peril. "Flash Jack's party of four" had taken up their quarters at an inn in Church street kept by Mr. Michael Sheedy, who is, happily, still a resident of Richmond. One had to be civil to those "flash" gentry, and however anxious the land lord might be to get rid of his guests, it was far from advisable to tell them so. Well, one of the quartet got very ill, and appeared to be in a dying state. There was no doctor at hand, and the humane host sent for Mr. Bosisto as the next best. Indeed, Mr. Bosisto possessed such on intimate knowledge of diseases and their treatment, as well as of medi cine, that he was usually called "Doctor Bosisto." Mr. Bosisto went to Mr. Sheedy's inn, and found a very sick man lying upon a stretcher. His three companions, however, made merry and "chaffed" the poor wretch, who seemed at death's door. Mr. Bosisto became indignant, and told them that if "anything happened" the sick man they would be responsible for his death. This aroused the brutal, ferocity of the trio, who thereupon locked the room door and swore that Mr. Bosisto should not leave the house alive. The landlord heard the loud altercation and the brutal threats, and telling some respectable men who were in the house at the time that the "flash" fellows were "going to kill the Doctor," formed an impromptu rescue party, who broke open the bedroom door and saved Mr. Bosisto from violence.
    "The Doctor" had yet another experience of robbers, and on this occasion his personal liberty was for a while menaced. One very wet night a man drove a waggon of barrelled American flour to his shop door. Well, of course, the sight of a barrel of flour was not near so alarming as that of a pistol barrel of powder, but, nevertheless, this load of Yankee flour became a source of much worry and, trouble to Mr. Bosisto. The driver represented that he had lost his way and was wet to the skin, and begged to be allowed to put up his waggon and load in Mr. Bosisto's yard for the night. Mr. Bosisto, hospitably allowed him to do so, and the man departed—as might be supposed, for "something hot" and a pair of blankets to get between. The next day the owner of the flour did not "turn up," but the detectives did. They said they had been in search of some stolen flour, and that they were informed it was on his premises. Mr. Bosisto told them a plain unvarnished tale of how it came there, but the agents of the law were not satisfied, and gave him to understand that he was under arrest. Mr. Bosisto told them they must be mad or drunk, and they then demanded the name of some respectable person who knew him. "Go to Dr. Eades, the Mayor of Melbourne," said Mr. Bosisto. And to the Mayor they went. "What! arrest poor old 'Bos.' for receiving stolen property?" said Dr. Eades, amused and astonished. "Oh, that's good !" and he laughed himself purple in the face. The Mayor, had been in practice in Adelaide before he came to Melbourne, and had known Mr. Bosisto well in the South Australian capital. The police removed the load of flour from Mr. Bosisto's yard, and that was the last that "Bos." heard of the business.
    About the beginning of 1855, Mr. Bosisto removed from Waltham-street to Church-street, nearly opposite the site now occupied by the Church of St. Ignatius. The residence of Dr. Lalor covers, the spot upon which the four-roomed brick house, rented by Mr. Bosisto at £5 a week, stood. The landlord was the late Mr. Burnley, at one time a well-known citizen of Richmond, and who was for some years, a member of the local municipal council. Mr. Burnley's name was given to a street in the east end of Richmond, which, in time, has given its name to a railway station and a district, Mr. Bosisto remained in Church-street a couple of years, and then removed to Bridge-road, first on the south and then on the north side, and since 1856 he has been located in the same spot till the present day.
    In the year 1860 Mr. Bosisto was elected a member of the Richmond Municipal Council, and he held his seat for 12 years, during which time he proved him self an eminently useful member, and did good work for the district. The meetings in those years were held in the local court house, the fine town hall which now stands in Bridge-road not having yet, been built, and the reporters, during the proceedings, occupied the bench. The most prominent men who sat in the council with Mr. Bosisto were the late Dr. Cornelius Stewart, the late Mr. Burnley, Mr. Joseph Griffiths, the late Mr. Philip Johnson, solicitor, the late Mr. W. W. Shelley, Mr. Michael Egan, whose son was the architect of the public offices in the Treasury Gardens, and Mr. W. Gleadell. During two years Mr. Bosisto was Mayor of Rich mond, and filled the office with credit and dignity. In 1870 he was appointed to the commission of the peace, and for six successive years was chairman of the Richmond bench. His conduct in that capacity was characterised by care, patience and impartiality.
    The late Mr. J. G. Francis in 1874 retired from the representation of Richmond in the Legislative Assembly, owing to ill-health, and Mr. Bosisto succeeded him in Parliament. This was Mr. Bosisto's first entry into Parliamentary life, and his presence in the Assembly gave great satisfaction to his numerous old friends and supporters, who for a quarter of a century had observed his career amongst them. Mr. Bosisto then ceased to sit at the local police court, feeling, no doubt, that the two positions of magistrate and Parliamentary representative would hardly harmonize. His first colleague in the representation of Richmond—the district then, as now, returned two members to Parliament—was Mr. R. S. Inglis ; then he had in succession Mr. L. L. Smith, the late Mr. W. F. Walker, and Mr. G. H. Bennett. At the general election of 1889 Mr. Bosisto was defeated by Mr. W. A. Trenwith, but in 1892 West Richmond and Jolimont wore created a sepa rate electorate and Mr. Bosisto was chosen to repre sent it. He held that seat till the dissolution of Parliament this year at the instance of the Patterson Government, and at the election on September 20 was defeated by Mr. Thoodore Fink, who won by 85 votes. Mr. Bosisto all along supported the Patterson Government, and it is believed that his defeat at Jolimont and West Richmond was due chiefly to the vote of the civil servants, who feared that if the Patterson Ministry remained longer in office they would return to the charge on the public service with the view to further and more widespread "retrenchment."
    During the 18 years that he sat in the Legislative Assembly, Mr. Bosisto was not a frequent speaker, nor what is called a "brilliant" one, but he was an eminently useful and practical member, who could never be charged with wasting the time of the House. "When he spoke he was listened to with attention, because it was felt that he had "something to say." His name is specially associated with two very important measures which became law. One of these is the Act creating the College of Pharmacy, which has its headquarters in the old County Courthouse, in Swanston-street, and the other is the Poisons Act. He introduced the former bill into Parliament, and seconded the readings of the latter. At the College of Pharmacy, colonial students are now qualified for the profession of Chemists before commencing business, instead of the community being dependent upon other parts of the world for thoroughly qualified men. Mr. Bosisto is the examiner in Materia Medica and Medical Botany at the College. For his services in connection with the foundation of this valuable institution, the pharmaceutical profession presented Mr. Bosisto with a handsome silver epergne. Under the Poisons Act no one is allowed to sell poisons but a chemist, druggist or medical man.
    In the year 1876, Mr. Bosisto retired from the retail branch of his business, and devoted himself exclusively to the distillation of the Eucalyptus oil. In this interesting and eminently useful industry Mr. Bosisto has decidedly "struck oil." The Eucalyptus is a purely Australasian vegetation. Its home is Tasmania, but there are 154 different species scattered over all these colonies. In 1853, Mr. Bosisto was the first to extract the wondrous healing oil from the Eucalyptus tree. Since then the oil has attained a world-wide celebrity. The tree has now been acclimatised in Rome and San Francisco, and Mr. Bosisto sends his oil to England, France, Germany, America, India, South Africa, and all the Austrplasian colonies. The Eucalyptus oil became an article of commerce in Great Britain so far back as 1865. Mr. Bosisto is the holder of about 50 medals—gold, silver and bronze—obtained at Exhibitions in various parts of the world, including London, Paris, Dublin, Philadelphia, Calcutta and Vienna, for the Australian oil with its wonderful curative properties.
    Mr. Bosisto acted as Executive Commissioner for Victoria at the Indian Exhibition, held at Calcutta in 1883-4, and in the same capacity at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, held in London in 1886. While in Calcutta, Mr. Bosisto delivered, before a dis tinguished assemblage of Europeans and native princes, a lecture on "Australia as it is," and in London he read a valuable paper on "The Indigenous Vegetation of Australia." Mr. Bosisto has contribu ted largely to the literature of Australian botany. In May last he delivered a lecture in Richmond on "Perfumed Plants," which is about to be printed, pro bono publico, by the Minister for Agriculture; and in the following month he gave a singularly appropriate and useful lecture in the Melbourne Town Hall on "Silk Culture," at a time when that industry was occasioning much attention and discussion.
    During his visit to England in 1886 Mr. Bosisto was summoned by Her Majesty to Osborne House, in the Isle of Wight, where the Queen personally decorated him with the insignia of the Companion ship of St. Michael and St. George. His old friend, Dr. Mueller, was, in 1869, the first Australasian colonist to receive the Companionship of that "most distinguished order." On the occasion of Mr. Bosisto's decoration sixteen other gentlemen received honours at the hands of the sovereign. One of these was Mr. Graham Berry, then Agent-General for Victoria, now Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, who was created a Knight Companion of the same order.
    In person, Mr. Bosisto is of medium height and slender build. His hair and complexion are "sandy," and the full beard which he wears is tinged with grey, while the hair of his head is yet untouched by time. His voice and manner are gentle, and his expression and disposition kindly. For many years he and the late Mr. John Thomas Smith were the only men in the colony who wore the "frilled" shirt-front, which was universal in England 60 years ago. One word more: Only in connection with his shirt-front has Mr. Bosisto ever "put on frills."16
  • 9 Nov 1898, DEATH OF Mr. J. BOSISTO.
    A figure well known in the political, municipal, and business circles of Melbourne passed away yesterday when Mr. Joseph Bosisto, C.M.G., died, after a brief illness. Mr Bosisto was in his usual health on Sunday, but early on monday morning he was attacked by hemorrhage of the brain, following on the rupture of a blood-vessel—or, in other words, by an apoplectic fit—and lapsed into unconsciousness. Mr Stirling, surgeon, a nephew of the deceased gentleman, was summoned to his side, but the case was hopeless from the first, and at 7 o'clock yesterday morning Mr. Bosisto died at the age of 75.
    Mr. Bosisto was born in Yorkshire, and was educated at the Leeds School of Medicine and subsequently in London. He was originally intended for the medical profession, but his leanings lay towards pharmacy, and, having qualified himself as a chemist, he came out to Adelaide in 1848. Three years later he came to Victoria, and settled in Richmond, where he resided up to the time of his death. He was elected by that constituency to the Legislative Assembly in December, 1874, when Mr J.G. Francis resigned his seat, and until 1889 he held the seat continuously. On the redivision of the eletorates in 1889 Mr. Bosisto sought re-election for his old constituency, and Mr. C. Smith, his colleague, turned his attention to Jolimont and West Richmond. Mr Bosisto was unsuccessful in his effort, the present members, Messrs. Bennett and Trenwith, gaining the seats. Mr Smith retired from Jolimont in 1892, and Mr. Bosisto was again returned to Parliament in his place. In 1894 Mr. Fink unseated him, and Mr. Bosisto then finally retired into private life. He represented Victoria at the exhibition held in Calcutta in 1883, and was chairman of the Victorian commission at the Indian and Colonial Exhibition in London in 1886. For his serviced on this occasion he was created by Her Majesty a companion of the order of St. Michael and St. George. On his return to Victoria he was appointed chairman of jurors and awards at the Centennial Exhibition opened in 1888, a position which involved the expenditure of much time and entailed a great deal of worrying labour. He was accounted a very good botanist, and was an examiner in medical botany at the College of Pharmacy. he was one of the first to turn to commercial account the extraction of the essential oil of the eucalyptus, an industry now largely followed throughout the colonies. Chairman of the Technological Commission and trustee of the Exhibition-buildings were amongst other positions held by the deceased gentleman, and when his fellow trustees met yes terday afternoon for their ordinary meet ing they adjourned at once out of respect to the memory of their late colleague. Mr Bosisto was also prominent in municipal life. He was twice mayor fo Richmond, and was for many years chairman of the local roster of justices. In every posistion he was respected for his common sense and his intelligence, and personally liked for his geniality and his urbanity.
    The deceased gentleman was a widower, but leaves no family.
    The remains of the decesed will be interred in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, this afternoon.17
  • 12 Nov 1898, OBITUARY. MR. BOSISTO.
    Mr. Joseph Bosisto, C.M.G., died on Tuesday, at the age of 75. Born in York-shire, he came to Australia in 1848, and in 1851 settled in Richmond, then a mere string of houses along Bridge-road. He established a chemist's and druggist's shop that has done good business ever since. He had special knowledge of botany, and turned it to good practical account. His great achievement was making known the curative properties of the oil contained in the leaves of the eucalypts. Eventually, he devoted the whole of his attention to the manufacture and sale of eucalyptus oil, and went out of business as a chemist and druggist. His principal supplies of leaves were obtained from the mallee scrub in the Dimboola district. Mr. Bosisto busied himself in municipal matters in Richmond, and was twice mayor. He was for many years chairman of the Bench. When a vacancy occurred in the representation of Richmond in 1874, Mr. Bosisto offered himself for election, and such was the esteem in which he was held that he was returned time after time until 1889, when a re-division of the electorates changed the character of the constituency. Richmond now became too radical to be content with a quiet, moderate man like him. In 1892 he stood successfully for the adjoining electorate of Jolimont and West Richmond, and held the seat for one Parliament. Mr. Bosisto was scarcely cut out for politics, yet did much useful service. In 1883 he represented Victoria at the Calcutta Exhibition; and in 1889 was principal Victorian representative at the Indian and Colonial Exhibition in London, when he got the C.M.G.-ship. He might have died fairly rich had he stuck exclusively to the eucalyptus industry, which, thanks to the intelligence and straightness with which he carried it on, proved very lucrative. But, like other people, he got entangled in boom speculations, and lost a great deal of his well-earned money. His intellectual attainments were considerable, but he was ever too modest to show them, and only the scientific men be came in contact with as a pharmacist and botanist knew how capable he was, and withal so honourable and so true in all his dealings.
    The funeral of the late Mr. J. Bosisto, C.M.G., took place on November 9, the remains being interred in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew. The procession started from the residence of the deceased gentleman, and proceeded to St. Stephen's Church, Richmond, where a short service was conducted by the Rev. T. B. Tress.
    The pall-bearers were Messrs. L. L. Smith, F. S. Grimwade, M.L.C., A. Felton, T. Bent, E. J. Dixon, J. E. Sherrard, G. H. Bennett, M.L.A., J. Harris, M.L.A., Dr. Fulton, and Mr. J. Sheedy, mayor of Richmond.18

Australian Dictionary of Biography

BOSISTO, JOSEPH (1824-1898), chemist and parliamentarian, was born on 21 March 1824 at Leeds, England, son of William Bosisto and his wife Maria, née Lazenby, both of Huguenot extraction. As a child he lived in Yorkshire and Surrey, left school in 1839, was apprenticed to a druggist and gained certificates in 1847 from the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain which later made him an honorary member. Engaged by F. H. Faulding of Adelaide he sailed in the Competitor in June 1848. Soon after arrival he met Ferdinand Mueller; their friendship lasted nearly fifty years. In 1851 he went to the Forest Creek goldfields where he seems to have spent more time examining local flora than digging for gold. In 1852 he returned to Adelaide and married Eliza Johnston. They settled at Richmond, Victoria, where in a renovated hotel stable he soon had a prosperous pharmacy and was consulted as 'Doctor' Bosisto.
His decoctions of eucalyptus oil used in a variety of medicinal products were to make Bosisto a household name. His first stills were near Dandenong but his search for suitable leaves led him far afield. He was not the first to distil eucalyptus oil, for Surgeons John White, Dennis Considen and Robert Officer had done so long before 1853, but Bosisto was probably first to make it commercially and to win repute for manufacturing Australia's first 'original' product. The parrot on the yellow label was his most famous trademark, familiar to every valetudinarian. His 'Syrup of Red Gum' was advertised as having a 'delicate mucilaginous astringency [that] renders it effectual in all affections of the mucous membrane of the Stomach and Bowels, inducing a feeling of repose and tranquility'. His products were known in Britain by 1865 and later in Europe, India and South Africa. In 1882 he became a partner of Felton & Grimwade and in 1885 his original firm became their subsidiary. When Bosisto had financial difficulties in 1889 he mortgaged his share to his partners.
Bosisto was no huckster or quack but an earnest man of science with an eye for business. He was a founder of the Pharmaceutical Society of Victoria in 1857 and later its president and co-editor of its Journal. In 1858 he joined the Royal Society of Victoria and was later a councillor, publishing extensively in its Proceedings. His writings were notable for their expertise and lucidity, and reveal a questioning mind. Affirming that the eucalypt was a 'Fever Destroying Tree', he credited it with 'an active agency' superior to that in vegetation of other countries, affecting even virulent fever so that it 'dies at its opening day'; without this 'happy and benign influence [which exists] independent of ourselves, we might mourn our fate'. Bosisto's lecturing style was also popular and allusive: his subject of 'Perfume Plants' easily led him to the 'Song of Songs' and Akenside's Pleasures of the Imagination. His reports from the Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886 in London were almost Benthamite, emphasizing the training of artisans and the need for Australians to study scientifically the growing of silk, vines, tobacco, etc. Some fifty medals from international exhibitions and a C.M.G. conferred at Osborne House in 1886 testify to his repute.
Known to his friends as 'Bos', he was kindly, dignified and committed to public service. At Richmond he served for twelve years on the Municipal Council and was mayor in 1865-67. As chairman of the bench for six years he was noted for his impartiality and patience. He represented Richmond in the Legislative Assembly in 1874 until defeated in 1889; according to the Richmond Guardian, he had become too remote from his electoral committees and constituents, and his age fitted him more for the Legislative Council. After electorates were realigned he represented Jolimont and West Richmond in 1892-94. More didactic than forceful, his parliamentary speeches show him to be instinctively moderate and uncertainly conservative. Although a free trader in principle, he upheld a moderate tariff because it was the settled policy of the colony and helped infant industries. Priding himself on integrity and independence, he deprecated mere obstruction and tended to vote with governments which tried to fulfil electoral promises. He believed in universal suffrage but also in the dual vote. He opposed payment of members yet claimed, amid the ironical cheers of Richmond electors, to be a friend of the working man and an opponent of class legislation. Staunchly adherent to the status quo, he claimed that female suffrage would cause domestic unhappiness and defended imprisonment for debt. In 1894 he advocated an increased property tax but opposed income tax and voted against the Patterson government which he had helped to form. The highlight of his parliamentary career was his pharmacy bill, introduced in 1876 with lucid and painstaking explanations. He also helped to establish the College of Pharmacy and to limit the sale of poisons to druggists and doctors. He was chairman of the Technological Commission and claimed that a university chair of pharmacy would be far more valuable than one of comparative philology.
Bosisto lost heavily in the building society crashes and spent his last years in straitened circumstances. Modest and genial, he still wore the frilled shirts which were going out of fashion when he left England. The Bulletin, 17 October 1896, noted that he 'embarks joyously in perfume manufacturing on his Wimmera farm'. He was predeceased by his wife; they had no children. He died aged 74 in Richmond on 8 November 1898 and was buried in the Anglican section of Boroondara cemetery. He left a deficit of £56 and a request for no flowers.19

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The South Australian Register, Adelaide, 27 Feb 1852, p2.
  4. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 859/P0/000001 (Unit).
  5. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/3911
    92/49 JOSEPH BOSISTO PAKENHAM 156 19--2--15. 1877 - 1879
    Bosisto states that he is now the holder of a license for chemical works and distillery &c. for eucalyptus and other indigenous vegetation at Worree Yallock beyond Emerald.
    W Brisbane is his agent, and he applies for sale by auction on 2 Nov 1878.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1100-826 - Joseph Bosisto of Richmond.
  7. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Nov 1898, p1.
  9. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 69/911. CMG. Richmond.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1100-826 - Memo 22700: George Joseph Stirling and James Belton Stirling both of Bridge Road Richmond Drapers are registered as proprietors of the within described land as executors to whom Probate of the Will of Joseph Bosisto who died on the 8th November 1898 was granted on the 13th December 1898.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1100-826 - Charles James Jago of Springvale Gentleman.
  12. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/re-member/bioregfull.cfm

    References: Australian Dictionary of Biography, 3; Stirling, A., 'Joseph Bosisto', Melbourne, 1970.
    Initial data source: Thomson, K & Serle, G, 'A Biographical Register of the Victorian Legislature 1851-1900', ANU Press, 1972.
  13. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,.
  14. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 4 Dec 1878, p3.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Dec 1891, p13.
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 27 Oct 1894, p12.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Nov 1898, p5.
  18. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 12 Nov 1898, p37
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138667833
  19. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A030187b.htm

    Select Bibliography: T. W. H. Leavitt and W. D. Lilburn (eds), The Jubilee History of Victoria and Melbourne, vols 1-2 (Melb, 1888); R. Grimwade, Flinders Lane: Recollections of Alfred Felton (Melb, 1947); J. R. Poynter, Russell Grimwade (Melb, 1967); Votes and Proceedings (Legislative Assembly, Victoria), 1864-65, 1 (A10), 2 (D33), 1876, 1 (D3), 1877-94; Richmond Australian, 5, 12 Dec 1874, 14 Apr 1877, 12 May 1894, 12 Nov 1898; Australasian Sketcher, 14 Mar 1883, 2 June 1884; Richmond Guardian, 5, 13, 27 Mar 1886, 2, 30 Mar, 6 Apr 1889, 27 Feb 1892, 2 Apr, 8 Sept 1894, 9 Nov 1898; Age (Melbourne), 9 Nov 1898; Argus (Melbourne), 9 Nov 1898; Table Talk, 27 Oct 1894, 11 Nov 1898; M. J. Finlayson, Victorian Politics 1889-94 (M.A. thesis, University of Melbourne, 1964).

    Print Publication Details: James Griffin, 'Bosisto, Joseph (1824 - 1898)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 3, Melbourne University Press, 1969, pp 197-198.
Last Edited14 Apr 2019

Eliza Stirling

F, #1465, b. 1825, d. 7 Jan 1885
Father*James Stirling
Mother*Margaret Bradley
Married NameBosisto. 
Birth*1825 Ireland. 
Note21 Jul 1850 Death of husband: #D2/29.1 
Note*b 1852 Previously married to Mr JOHNSTON. 
Marriage*17 Feb 1852 Spouse: Joseph Bosisto. Adelaide, SA, Australia, #M12/381.1
 
Marriage-Notice*27 Feb 1852Married on Tuesday, February 17th, 1852, by special license, at the residence of Mr. Thos. Padman, Stephens-place, Adelaide, by the Rev. D. J. Draper, Mr. Joseph Bosisto to Eliza, relict of the late Mr. Andrew Johnston.2 
Death*7 Jan 1885 Church Street, Richmond, VIC, Australia, #D3028 (Age 60) [par James STIRLING & Margaret BRADLEY].3 
Death-Notice*8 Jan 1885BOSISTO.-On the 7th inst., at Church-street, Richmond, Eliza, the beloved wife of Joseph Bosisto, M.L.A.
THE Friends of Mr. JOSEPH BOSISTO, M.L.A., are informed that the remains of his late beloved wife will be interred in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew.
The funeral is appointed to move from St. Stephen's Church, Church-street, Richmond, on Friday, the 9th inst, at 3 o'clock.
HERBERT KING, undertaker, 18 Lennox-street, Richmond, and Burwood-road, Hawthorn.4 

Grave

  • C/E B 1533, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, Erected by Joseph Bosisto M.L.A. of Richmond in affectionate memory of his beloved wife Eliza, died 7 Jan 1885, aged 60 years. In loving memory of Joseph Bosisto C.M.G. died at Richmond 8 Nov 1898 aged 74 years.5

Newspaper-Articles

  • 22 Jul 1850, CORONER'S INQUEST. THE LATE MR ANDREW JOHNSTON.
    An inquest was held on Saturday morning, at the Hospital, before W. Wyatt, Esq., J.P., on the body of the above ill-fated gentleman, who was killed the previous day by a fall from his horse.
    The Rev. D. J. Draper sworn — About half past one o'clock yesterday I left home, having previously arranged with deceased to accompany me into the country. I rode into the yard at the back of his house, and found there a horse ready saddled for him. A few minutes afterwards he came out, got on the horse, and we proceeded together up Rundle-street, east ward. I had engaged to visit a place called the Belt, about three miles north of Albert Town, in order to report upon its eligibility as a site for a chapel. Deceased called at my house yesterday morning, and when hearing my intention, expressed a wish to accompany me. I accepted his offer gladly, and he proposed to visit a person at Norwood, saying I might ride round while he called. From the Stag Inn, Rundle-street, we proceeded across the Park Land towards the southern side of Norwood. We rode slowly down the hill to wards the creek, after crossing which our horses went off at a good fast canter. When we had proceeded a few hundred yards, de ceased said, "your saddle seems to be rather un comfortable," alluding to the girths, which were rather loose. I said, "I will tighten them." He said, "My horse is easier in his paces than yours, and I think we had better change horses." I replied, "Oh, no; I rode this horse to Brighton on Tuesday last; there is no occasion to change, I feel very comfortable." He said, "I think we'd better change." I replied, " Do you think you are a better horse-man than I am." He said, "No, but I think this the easier horse." He dismounted, and I did so likewise, and tightened the girths. Deceased took the bridle of the horse out of my hand tightened the girths himself, and gave up the other horse to me, requesting that I would ride it. I was raising my foot to the stirrup, when I heard a sort of plunge, and on looking round, saw that he had sprung into his sad dle, and in doing so his hat fell off, and rolled to some distance. I was on the near side of his horse when he passed me. Simultaneously to seeing the hat rolling on the ground, I saw the horse pass swiftly by, as if frightened, and rush in the direction of Dr. Kent's cottage. I stood still, as I thought he would be able to rein the horse up and return, thinking that I would pick his hat up and return it. As soon as his horse had got out of my sight, I thought it was time to follow, so I called out to a man to pick the hat up, and followed as fast as I could. A short distance on, I saw the horse he had been riding, going towards the Hospital with-out a rider, and near Dr. Kent's fence, I saw the deceased's body lying on the ground on the ordinary track. I called out to Mr Johnston.
    There was no answer, and I went towards him and lifted him up. He was lying on his face, and the blood was pouring from his eyes and nose. I called out to some men I saw at a distance, and some men came from the hospital, and assisted me to lift him upon a dray. We then took him to the Hospital, when Dr. Nash attended him. I was not present at his death. I went away to prepare the mind of his widow, and to summon Dr. Eades, his personal friend.
    By a juror—I do not know whether the horse had run away before. Mr Watt's told his man he was a good saddle horse. I rode him to Brighton the previous Tuesday, and he required neither whip nor spur.
    The foreman of the Jury observed that the hat falling off was most likely the cause of the accident by frightening the horse.
    The Coroner and Mr Draper concurred in that opinion.
    J. G. Nash, Colonial surgeon sworn. Yes terday afternoon about two o'clock, a man on horseback called at my house, and said a gentleman had been thrown from his horse, and he was afraid had been very severely hurt. I asked him where, and he told me on the Park Land near the Hospital. I said the gentleman had better be taken to the Hospital, and that I would see him directly. I immediately proceeded to the Hospital and arrived a few minutes after the deceased had been carried in. I found him in the accident ward suffering from compression of the brain. The pupils were dilated, stertorous breathing and complete insensibility. I bled him; had his head shaved and awaited the arrival of Dr. Eades. Dr. Bayer by this time arrived at the hospital. As soon as Dr. Eades came we held a consultation on the case ; we agreed that their was dangerous pressure on the brain, and that the operation of trepanning would alone give him a chance of life. I performed the operation assisted by Drs. Eades and Bayer.
    We found the skull fractured but no extravasation between the skull and the dura mater; about the time of the completion of the operation deceased breathed his last. I made a post mortem examination this morning, and found a severe fracture extending from the left side of the cranium to the base of the skull. I did not proceed farther with the examination for fear of disfiguring the body as I should not have been able to replace the bone. I attribute death to the fracture of the skull and its consequences.
    Richard Eades, M.D.—I arrived at the Hospital yesterday afternoon about half an hour after the accident. I found the deceased labouring under compression of the brain as described by Dr Nash, and concurred with him on the propriety of immediately operating. The deceased having been my personal friend, I wish publicly to testily to the prompt and able manner in which Dr Nash conducted the operation; and his readiness and courtesy, not withstanding it being my week of Hospital duty.
    The Coroner addressed the Jury, and said the evidence appeared to be so conclusive, as to leave but little for him to direct them upon. The two points for their consideration were the nature of the accident, as to whether there was any blame to be attached to any one ; and the result of death as described by the medical testimony. It was apparent that it was utterly impossible for deceased's life to be saved; and that the attempts were the only ones that could have been, under the circumstances, resorted to.
    The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."6
  • 5 Aug 1850, INTESTATE. - Andrew Johnston, late of Rundle-street, accountant. Citation for the 16th instant, at 11 a.m. Administration to Eliza Johnston, widow ; proctor, Mr Maguire.7
  • 27 Jun 1876, STIRLING.—On the 17th April last, at Tullamoore, of inflammation of the lungs, Thomas L. Stirling, brother of Mrs. J. Bosisto and George Stirling, Richmond. His remains were interred at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin.8

Citations

  1. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The South Australian Register, Adelaide, 27 Feb 1852, p2.
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Jan 1885 p1.
  5. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 - 1858), Mon 22 Jul 1850, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207117547
  7. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian (Adelaide, SA : 1844 - 1851), Mon 5 Aug 1850, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71626883
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Jun 1876, p1.
Last Edited13 Sep 2018

Thomas Bissell

M, #1466, b. 1844, d. 1 May 1891
Birth*1844 Staffordshire, England.1 
Marriage*1869 Spouse: Esther Jane Davies. VIC, Australia, #M3545.2
 
Event-Misc*28 Apr 1891 Escaped from the Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum. 
Death*1 May 1891 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D9276 age 47 [par John BISSELL & Pheobe].3 
Inquest24 Jul 1891Inquest held 1891/892. Male, Bissell, Thomas, Exposure.4 
Probate (Will)*5 Jan 1894 53/539. Salesman. South Melbourne.5 
(Mentioned) History At Inebriates Asylum, Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, The Inebriates Asylum at Beaconsfield
On September 30, 1889 the Governor in Council ordered that the buildings and premises situate at Beaconsfield and hitherto known as Craik’s Boarding House shall be an Asylum for Inebriates. Thomas Elmes was appointed the Superintendent of the Asylum on October 1, 1889.
On November 4, 1889 the Governor in Council ordered that The buildings and premises belonging to Mrs M. H. Blair, situate at Beaconsfield, and known as Walnut Gove, shall be an Asylum for Inebriates, to be used for the care and treatment of female patients only.
Inebriates were defined as a person who habitually used alcoholic liquors and could be committed to an Inebriate Asylum for detention and curative treatment for up to three months. Inebriate Asylums were established in 1888, previously inebriates were committed to the Lunatic Asylum. Beaconsfield was the first Asylum to be established, and one was also established at Northcote in 1890.
The Victoria Government Gazette of December 20, 1899 lists the Regulations for the Management, Supervision and Regulation of Asylums for Inebriates. The Regulations covered the amount of food allowed to each inmate; intoxicating liquor was banned; inmates were banned from having money or stamps and all letters were opened before being handed to inmates. Regulations also covered what to do if an inmate became insane (they were sent to a Lunatic Asylum) or died (a letter was sent to the local Coroner and to the ‘person who shall have made the last payment on account of such patient). The Fees were also set out - £2 per week for patients on the ‘lower scale’ and £5 per week for those on the ‘higher scale”
On May 15, 1891, the Victoria Government Gazette reported that Thomas Bissell, a patient was missing. The Argus of July 21, of the same year, reports that his skeleton was found in the Gembrook ranges, about 12 miles from the Asylum.
On January, 6 1892 The Argus reported that an inmate, Francis Key had committed suicide, by shooting himself, after being admitted to the Asylum suffering from alcoholism and in weak state. Apparently his wife was aware that he had a gun in his room, and she wrote to the Asylum expressing her concern and telling them of her husband’s suicidal tendency. In spite of this it appears the gun remained in his room and as the Inquest noted ‘sufficient precaution was not exercised by the Officials’.
Both Beaconsfield and Northcote were closed in 1892, Beaconsfield in September 1892 (see news report below) Another report in The Argus of September 4, 1894 says that the Asylum buildings were destroyed by fire. The owner, Mr Craik of Kincraik Boarding House, had the buildings insured for £700.
The Asylum gave its name to the surrounding area and even as late as 1925 a report in The Argus called the area Inebriates Hill. It is now known as Guys Hill.6 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 May 1891, COUNTRY NEWS. BERWICK, SUNDAY.
    On Wednesday night a man named Thos. Bissell, suffering from delirium tremens, who was only partly dressed, escaped from the Government Inebriate Asylum in the Beaconsfield Ranges and up to now has not been found, although the police and the black trackers have searched continuously for him. Today about 100 civilians mounted and on foot turned out to assist the police, and under Constable Roberts scoured the neighbouring bush with out finding any trace ot the missing man. It is generally believed that he has not perished, but has got clear away, and is making towards the city His wife keeps a shop in Clarendon street, South Melbourne.7
  • 6 May 1891, BERWICK, Tuesday. No trace of the missing man Thomas Bissell who escaped from the Beaconsfield Inebriate Retreat on Wednesday has yet been found, and it is now believed that he has perished in the bush. A continual search is being made of the numerous gullies and creeks of the surrounding district, but the thick scrub and the limited population renders the work of the searchers a very difficult one. The action of the retreat authorities in not giving more publicity of the escape is strongly commented upon.8
  • 6 May 1891, INQUIRY is requested for Thomas Bissell, who, on the night of the 28th ult., escaped through his bedroom window from the Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum, wherein he was a patient. Description:—47 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high, thin and gaunt looking, large nose, prominent cheek-bones, grey moustache and goatee, beard of about 12 days' growth on cheeks ; left in nightshirt, drawers, and socks only. The bush around the asylum has been scoured by a large search party, aided by black trackers, but without finding a trace of the patient. It is thought he may have obtained old clothes in a deserted hut, and made his way to Melbourne, where he will endeavour to obtain drink. His wife keeps a fancy goods shop in Clarendon-street, South Melbourne.
    -0.3658. 6th May, 1891.9
  • 7 May 1891, THE MISSING MAN AT DANDENONG. TO THE EDITOR OP THE ARGUS.
    Sir,—There is little hope of the missing man Thomas Bissel being found alive. Great activity has undoubtedly been shown by numbers of men in scouring the bush, but what particularly puzzles me is why the river has not been dragged. He is reported to have been seen in the Beaconsfield park, through which a deep river flows, in some places 9ft in depth. Then there is a brick clay dam within a few hundred yards of this park. Men suffering from delirium tremens quickly take to the water. Yet there is no raft or boat, no one to think that probably he has been drowned. -I am, &c., J.C. Dandenong, May 6.10
  • 20 May 1891, See Government Gazette, 15th May, 1891, p. 2021.
    BEACONSFIELD ASYLUM FOR INEBRIATES.—THOMAS BISSELL (A PATIENT) MISSING. FIFTEEN POUNDS REWARD.
    NOTICE is hereby given that a Reward of Fifteen pounds will be paid by the Government for information which will lead to the discovery of the whereabouts of Thomas Bissell, a patient who escaped from the Beaconsfield Asylum for Inebriates on Tuesday, the 28th April last.
    The missing man is 47 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high, thin and gaunt looking, large nose, prominent cheek-bones, grey moustache and goatee, had whiskers about 12 days' growth on his cheeks, and, when he left the asylum was dressed in nightshirt, drawers , and socks only.
    A. MCLEAN, Chief Secretary 's Office, Chief Secretary. Melbourne, 8th May, 1891.11
  • 21 Jul 1891, DISCOVERY OF A HUMAN SKELETON. AN ESCAPED INEBRIATE. BERWICK, Monday.
    At about 9 o'clock this morning Constable Roberts, of Berwick, was informed that the skeleton of a man had been found in the Gembrook Ranges, about 12 miles from the Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum, by two young men who were out wallaby shooting on Friday. Constable Roberts at once obtained a pair of horses and trap, and driving to the place, discovered that the remains were those of Thomas Bissell, who escaped from the Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum about three months ago. The skeleton was clothed in a white shirt singlet, and socks by which means it was identified. A portion of the left hand was missing, but the remainder ot the skeleton was intact and was partly covered with sand. The discovery was made in an inaccessible gully about four miles from any thoroughfare, and the remains had to be carried in a bag by the constable for a considerable portion of that distance. They are now at Berwick pending instructions from the coroner. An inquest will probably be held.12
  • 29 Jul 1891, See Police Gazette, 1891, p. 141.
    MISSING FRIEND, THOMAS BISSELL.-On the 17th inst. a skeleton was found in a remote position in the Gembrook Ranges, four miles from any thoroughfare, and there is no reason to doubt but the remains are those of the missing friend referred to. The only clothing found on the skeleton were a shirt, a singlet, and the legs of a pair of socks. On the shirt was a pearl stud, and on the tail of it the numbers 2, 1200, 16. Three shirts, the property of Thomas Bissell, the missing man, remained at the Inebriate Asylum, Beaconsfield, and they have been examined, and it has been found they are all branded with the same numbers and in the same place as that found on the skeleton. Deceased also wore pearl studs in his shirts. A magisterial inquiry was held on the remains on the 24th inst., when the following verdict was recorded : --" That the remains are those of Thomas Bissell, who escaped from the Beaconsfield Asylum on the 28th April, 1891, and that the said Thomas Bissell died from exposure, he being almost nude and in very feeble health at the time he escaped. "-0.3658. 29th July, 1891.13

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D9276 age 74 [par John BISSELL & Pheobe]."
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M3545."
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D9276 age 47 [par John BISSELL & Pheobe]."
  4. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 24/P0000 unit 583, item 1891/892
    Male, Bissell, Thomas, Exposure, Berwick, 1891/892, 24 Jul 1891,.
  5. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 53/539. Salesman. South Melbourne.
  6. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://caseycardinialinkstoourpast.blogspot.com/2010/10/…
    Victoria Government Gazette, October 4 1889, p. 3320. The Victoria Government Gazette can be found at http://gazette.slv.vic.gov.au/
    Victoria Government Gazette, November 8, 1889, p.3834.
    Victoria Government Gazette, May 15 1891, p.2021.
    The Argus, January 6, 1892 p. 6 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8392912
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 May 1891 p6.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 May 1891 p7.
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 6 May 1891, p141.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 May 1891 p9.
  11. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 20 May 1891, p152.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 July 1891 p5.
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 29 Jul 1891, p220.
Last Edited30 Jan 2017

Francis Thomas Key

M, #1467, b. 1844, d. 3 Jan 1892
Father*John Sayers Key
Mother*Maria Benbow
Birth*1844 Market Drayton, Shropshire, England.1 
Marriage*1 Jan 1872 Spouse: Ellen Smith. Launceston, TAS, Australia.2
Illness*10 Nov 1891 Admitted to Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum.3 
Death*3 Jan 1892 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D720 (Age 48) [par Unknown].4 
Inquest5 Jan 1892Inquest held 1892/21. Self inflicted gunshot wound, Beaconsfield. Jurors were William Fuller, William Wilson junior, Tomas Henderson, Alexander Miller and Douglas Manger.5 
Probate (Will)*15 Sep 1892 49/839. Cordial Manufacturer. Seymour.6 
(Mentioned) History At Inebriates Asylum, Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, The Inebriates Asylum at Beaconsfield
On September 30, 1889 the Governor in Council ordered that the buildings and premises situate at Beaconsfield and hitherto known as Craik’s Boarding House shall be an Asylum for Inebriates. Thomas Elmes was appointed the Superintendent of the Asylum on October 1, 1889.
On November 4, 1889 the Governor in Council ordered that The buildings and premises belonging to Mrs M. H. Blair, situate at Beaconsfield, and known as Walnut Gove, shall be an Asylum for Inebriates, to be used for the care and treatment of female patients only.
Inebriates were defined as a person who habitually used alcoholic liquors and could be committed to an Inebriate Asylum for detention and curative treatment for up to three months. Inebriate Asylums were established in 1888, previously inebriates were committed to the Lunatic Asylum. Beaconsfield was the first Asylum to be established, and one was also established at Northcote in 1890.
The Victoria Government Gazette of December 20, 1899 lists the Regulations for the Management, Supervision and Regulation of Asylums for Inebriates. The Regulations covered the amount of food allowed to each inmate; intoxicating liquor was banned; inmates were banned from having money or stamps and all letters were opened before being handed to inmates. Regulations also covered what to do if an inmate became insane (they were sent to a Lunatic Asylum) or died (a letter was sent to the local Coroner and to the ‘person who shall have made the last payment on account of such patient). The Fees were also set out - £2 per week for patients on the ‘lower scale’ and £5 per week for those on the ‘higher scale”
On May 15, 1891, the Victoria Government Gazette reported that Thomas Bissell, a patient was missing. The Argus of July 21, of the same year, reports that his skeleton was found in the Gembrook ranges, about 12 miles from the Asylum.
On January, 6 1892 The Argus reported that an inmate, Francis Key had committed suicide, by shooting himself, after being admitted to the Asylum suffering from alcoholism and in weak state. Apparently his wife was aware that he had a gun in his room, and she wrote to the Asylum expressing her concern and telling them of her husband’s suicidal tendency. In spite of this it appears the gun remained in his room and as the Inquest noted ‘sufficient precaution was not exercised by the Officials’.
Both Beaconsfield and Northcote were closed in 1892, Beaconsfield in September 1892 (see news report below) Another report in The Argus of September 4, 1894 says that the Asylum buildings were destroyed by fire. The owner, Mr Craik of Kincraik Boarding House, had the buildings insured for £700.
The Asylum gave its name to the surrounding area and even as late as 1925 a report in The Argus called the area Inebriates Hill. It is now known as Guys Hill.7 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 Jan 1892, THE SUICIDE IN AN INEBRIATE ASYLUM. CENSURE ON THE OFFICIALS. BERWICK, TUESDAY.
    An inquest regarding the death of Francis Key, who committed suicide by shooting himself in the Beaconsfield Inebriate Asylum on Sunday morning last, was held at the asylum to day before Dr. Neild and a jury of five. The deceased was admitted into the institution on 10th November last for a period of three months. At the time of his admission he was suffering from alcoholism and in a weak state. Under medical treatment, however, he rapidly improved, and appeared cheerful and contented until a few days before his death, when he expressed a wish to obtain his release. On the 30th ult. his wife visited him at the asylum, when she noticed that he had a gun in his bedroom, and on her return home on the following day she wrote to Mr Williams, the secretary of the asylum, cautioning him, " On no consideration to allow her husband to have firearms in his possession, as he was very cunning, and had a suicidal tendency." The letter was received by the secretary on the 2nd inst., but beyond submitting it to the visiting medical superintendent, no action was taken in regard to it, and on the following morning the deceased shot himself. Two letters the deceased had written to his wife, but had not posted, showed that the act was premeditated. The jury found that the deceased, Francis Key, came to his death through a gunshot wound inflicted by himself during a fit of alcoholic mania," and added a rider, "That we also think sufficient precaution was not exercised by the officials, after the letter of warning from deceased's wife, received on the day before his death, intimating his tendency to commit suicide."3

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D720 age 48 [par unknown]."
  2. [S64] Archives Office of Tasmania. BDM Index Tasmania.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 Jan 1892 p6.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 24/P0000 unit 590, item 1892/21
    Male, Key, Francis, Self inflicted gunshot wound, Beaconsfield, 1892/21, 05 Jan 1892,.
  6. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 49/839. Cordial Manufacturer. Seymour.
  7. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://caseycardinialinkstoourpast.blogspot.com/2010/10/…
    Victoria Government Gazette, October 4 1889, p. 3320. The Victoria Government Gazette can be found at http://gazette.slv.vic.gov.au/
    Victoria Government Gazette, November 8, 1889, p.3834.
    Victoria Government Gazette, May 15 1891, p.2021.
    The Argus, January 6, 1892 p. 6 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8392912
Last Edited11 Jul 2017

Ellen Smith

F, #1468, b. 1850, d. 21 Sep 1920
Married NameKey. 
Birth*1850 
Marriage*1 Jan 1872 Spouse: Francis Thomas Key. Launceston, TAS, Australia.1
Widow3 Jan 1892Ellen Smith became a widow upon the death of her husband Francis Thomas Key.2 
Death*21 Sep 1920 Seymour, VIC, Australia, #D12234 age 70 [par SMITH].3 
Death-Notice*22 Sep 1920KEY.—On the 21st September, at her son-in-law's residence, Mr. J. McIntosh, Ellen, relict of the late Francis Key, and beloved mother of Frances Mary (deceased), Mercy, Isabella (Mrs. McIntosh), Alica (deceased), Thomas (deceased), Queenie (Mrs. Marlin, Mamana, N.S.W.), aged 70. At rest.
KEY.—Friends of the late Mrs. ELLEN KEY, relict of the late Francis Key, are respectfully invited to follow her remains to the place of interment, in the Seymour (Old) Cemetery.
The Funeral will leave her residence, Wallis street, Seymour, THIS DAY (Wednesday), at 3 pm. J POTTS, Undertaker. 'Phone 72.4 

Citations

  1. [S64] Archives Office of Tasmania. BDM Index Tasmania.
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  3. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#D12234 age 70 [par SMITH]."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Sep 1920 p1.
Last Edited25 Jul 2017
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.