Robert James Lionel Funnell

M, #1351, b. 6 Sep 1905, d. 8 Sep 1982
Father*Frederick Funnell b. Mar 1861, d. 10 Nov 1936
Mother*Amy Keeble b. Dec 1868, d. 6 Jun 1949
Birth*6 Sep 1905 East Grinstead, Sussex, England, Dec Q [E. Grinstead] 2b 122.1,2,3,4 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelNov 1913 Sailing with Amy Keeble, Frederick Funnell, Arthur Francis James Funnell, Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Irishman
Age 7.5 
Marriage*1942 Spouse: Betty Lorraine Elliott. VIC, Australia, #M1792.6
 
Military*25 May 1943Enlisted for military service: Melbourne, VIC, Australia, Royal Australian Air Force No 142024
Discharge 21 Feb 1945 Leading Aircraftman - 1 AIRFIELD CONSTRUCTION SQUADRON.7 
Land-UBeac*4 Sep 1945 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 7), 21 St Georges Road. Transfer from Amy Funnell to Robert James Lionel Funnell.8 
Residence*1949 St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia.9 
Land-UBeac*23 Dec 1953 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 7). Transfer from Walter Fergus Robinson to Robert James Lionel Funnell. 5a (long stretch - going from St Georges Road to Lot 8 - now 23+25 St Georges road.)10 
Land-UBeac*8 Oct 1958 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 7). Transfer from Robert James Lionel Funnell to Philip Maxwell Beck. 5a or thereabouts.11 
Land-UBeac*15 Jul 1966 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 8) l/p 72834, 53 St Georges Road. Transfer from Olive May Elliott to Robert James Lionel Funnell Betty Lorraine Funnell. Lot 1 of l/p 72834.12 
Death*8 Sep 1982 Heidelberg, VIC, Australia, #D22161 age 77.1 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1911Bunces Farm, Birch Grove, East Grinstead, Sussex, England(Head of Household) Frederick Funnell;
Age 5
Member(s) of Household: Amy Funnell, Arthur Francis James Funnell, Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell13
bt 1925 - 1927St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: motor-driver.14,15,16
bt 1928 - 1931c/- Hargreaves, High Street, Berwick, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: motor driver.17,18
bt 1934 - 1936"Birch Grove", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: motor driver. With Frederick Funnell and Amy Keeble and Arthur Francis James Funnell.19
1937"Birch Grove", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: motor driver. With Amy Funnell and Arthur Francis James Funnell.20
1949Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Betty Lorraine Funnell.21
bt 1967 - 1972St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Betty Lorraine Funnell.22,23,24
1977St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Betty Lorraine Funnell.25

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia26

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D22161 age 77."
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Dec Q [E. Grinstead] 2b 122."
  3. [S30] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWII, http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/, Date of Birth 6 Sep 1905 / Place of Birth SUSSEX, ENGLAND.
  4. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    has date of birth on 8 Sep 1905.
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B884/004.
  6. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  7. [S30] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWII, http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/, Locality on Enlistment NORTH FOOTSCRAY / Next of Kin FUNNELL, BETTY.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3902-306 - Amy Funnell to Robert James Lionel Funnell of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield Driver.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Jun 1949 p13 (Funeral Notice of Mother).
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4112-326 - Walter Fergus Robinson to Robert James Lionel Funnell of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield Driver - C/T 7999-085.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7999-085 - Philip Maxwell Beck of Emerald Road Beaconsfield Lubritorium Operator.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 8627-161 - Olive May Elliott to Robert James Lionel Funnell Foreman and Betty Lorraine Funnell Married Woman both of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield.
  13. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, 1911 census: Class: RG14; Piece: 4996; Schedule Number: 29.
  14. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  15. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  16. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  17. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  18. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  19. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980 "1934 + 1936 rolls."
  20. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  21. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  22. [S167] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1967.
  23. [S168] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1968.
  24. [S172] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1972.
  25. [S177] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1977.
  26. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
Last Edited1 Jul 2018

Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell

F, #1352, b. Sep 1902, d. 9 May 1966
Father*Frederick Funnell b. Mar 1861, d. 10 Nov 1936
Mother*Amy Keeble b. Dec 1868, d. 6 Jun 1949
Married NameWintle. 
Birth*Sep 1902 East Grinstead, Sussex, England, Sep Q [E. Grinstead] 2b 145.1 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelNov 1913 Sailing with Amy Keeble, Frederick Funnell, Arthur Francis James Funnell, Robert James Lionel Funnell to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Irishman
Age 11.2 
Marriage*25 Mar 1922 Spouse: William Henry Wintle. Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #M1930.3
 
Marriage-Notice*31 Mar 1922Wedding. Wintle-Funnell.
A pretty wedding was celebrated last Saturday afternoon, when Mr W. H. Wintle, of Foster, was married to Miss Alexandra (Queenie) Funnell, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Funnell, of "Birch Grove," Upper Beaconsfield.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. J Wilson, in the local church, which was prettily decorated with mauve asters, white flowers, and wedding bells. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked dainty in white, and wore a net veil held in place by a wreath of orange blossom. She also carried a pink and white bouquet. The bridesmaids, Misses Smith and Drake, were frocked in white, and wore large white hats, relieved with color. Mr. Arthur Funnell acted as best man.
During the signing of the register Miss Dowson sang "I love you truly."
About forty guests attended the reception, which was held in the clubroom at the hall. The table decorations were carried out in pink lilies and coral fern.4 
Death*9 May 1966 Canberra, ACT, Australia, #D150/1966 ACT.5 
Death-Notice*11 May 1966WINTLE, Alexandra A. L. (Queenie).— May 9 at Canberra, beloved wife of William Henry, loved mother of Bill and Ann (Mrs Mertz), loving grandmother of their children. A patient sufferer at rest.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1911Bunces Farm, Birch Grove, East Grinstead, Sussex, England(Head of Household) Frederick Funnell;
Age 8
Member(s) of Household: Amy Funnell, Arthur Francis James Funnell, Robert James Lionel Funnell7
bt 1924 - 1928Birch Grove House, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With William Henry Wintle.8,9,10,11,12
1931Cormore Store, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With William Henry Wintle.13
1943The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: peace officer. With William Henry Wintle.14
1949The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: peace officer. With William Henry Wintle. With William Frederick Wintle.14
1955The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: peace officer. With William Henry Wintle.14
1959The Lodge, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaWith William Henry Wintle.15

Grave

  • Woden Cemetery, Canberra, ACT, Australia, Anglican N/H/B/28216

Newspaper-Articles

  • 24 Jun 1949, RETURN THANKS. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. WINTLE and family desire to express their sincere thanks to doctors, matron, sisters and nursing staff for their kind attention to their mother through her long illness. Also many thanks to all kind friends for their messages of sympathy in their sad bereavement. Would all please accept this as their personal thanks.17

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [E. Grinstead] 2b 145."
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B884/004.
  3. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  4. [S188] Newspaper - Berwick County Times / The Times "31 Mar 1922."
  5. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, ACT BDM #D150/1966 ACT.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 11 May 1966, p30.
  7. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, 1911 census: Class: RG14; Piece: 4996; Schedule Number: 29.
  8. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  9. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  10. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  11. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  12. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  13. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  14. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980 "http://canberraheritageportal.org/default.php."
  15. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://hiddencanberra.webs.com/… - not online anymore Sep 2011.
  16. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.canberracemeteries.com.au/…
    Alexandra Annie L Wintle of 91 Wakefield Gardens Ainslie died on 9th May 1966 aged 64 years. Her grave in the Anglican section of Woden Cemetery was paid by Mr William Henry Wintle of the same address.
  17. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 24 Jun 1949, p4.
Last Edited7 May 2016

William Henry Wintle

M, #1353, b. Sep 1897, d. 3 Jun 1986
William Henry WINTLE - 1942

World War I

William Henry Wintle [SERN 3250] was a 19-year old farm labourer at Mount Best, Toora, when he enlisted on 12 August 1916. His unit, the 57th Battalion (8th Reinforcement) embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT A7 Medic on 16 December 1916. He saw service on the Western Front.
After the war he came to Upper Beaconsfield and married Queenie Funnell.1
Note* Siblings born Australia 1913 (Elsie at Toora) & 1917 (Blodwin at Forster.) 
Birth*Sep 1897 Abertillery, Wales, Sep Q [Bedwellty] 11a 89.2 
Marriage*25 Mar 1922 Spouse: Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell. Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #M1930.3
 
Marriage-Notice*31 Mar 1922Wedding. Wintle-Funnell.
A pretty wedding was celebrated last Saturday afternoon, when Mr W. H. Wintle, of Foster, was married to Miss Alexandra (Queenie) Funnell, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Funnell, of "Birch Grove," Upper Beaconsfield.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. J Wilson, in the local church, which was prettily decorated with mauve asters, white flowers, and wedding bells. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked dainty in white, and wore a net veil held in place by a wreath of orange blossom. She also carried a pink and white bouquet. The bridesmaids, Misses Smith and Drake, were frocked in white, and wore large white hats, relieved with color. Mr. Arthur Funnell acted as best man.
During the signing of the register Miss Dowson sang "I love you truly."
About forty guests attended the reception, which was held in the clubroom at the hall. The table decorations were carried out in pink lilies and coral fern.4 
Residence*2 Sep 1923 "Birch Grove House", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia.5 
Widower9 May 1966William Henry Wintle became a widower upon the death of his wife Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell.6 
Death*3 Jun 1986 Canberra, ACT, Australia, [par Frederick James WINTLE & Lily HANCOCKS]
late of Kankinya Nursing Home, Lyneham in the Australian Capital Territory, Retired.7 
Death-Notice*5 Jun 1986WINTLE, William Henry. — 3 June 1986, at Kankinya Nursing Home. Lovingly remembered, John, Barbara, Geoffrey and Douglas.
WINTLE, (Sgt) William Henry. — Aged 88. Sadly missed, David and Pam.8 
Death-Notice6 Jun 1986WINTLE, William Henry. — June 3, 1986. Lovingly remembered by daughter Ann and Werner.9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1922Amey's Track, Foster, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer.10
bt 1924 - 1928Birch Grove House, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: labourer. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Wintle.11,12,13,14,15
1931Cormore Store, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: labourer. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Wintle.16
1943The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell.17
1949The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell. With William Frederick Wintle.17
1955The Lodge, Government House, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell.17
1959The Lodge, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: peace officer & home duties. With Alexandra Annie Louise "Queenie" Funnell.18
196791 Wakefield Gardens, Ainslie, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaOccupation: no occupation.17

Grave

  • Woden Cemetery, Canberra, ACT, Australia, Anglican N/H/B/28219

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Dec 1931, PUBLIC MEETING AT BEACONSFIELD UPPER.
    A public meeting, convened by the local Traders’ Association, was held in the Hall on Monday evening. The president of the Association, Mr. W. Wintle, occupied the chair, and there was a good attendance. The chairman stated in his opening remarks that the meeting had been called for the purpose of trying to restore the daily two mail service to and from the city, which, operated some time ago. At present the service was a drawback to the progress of the district, and he illustrated this by stating that a letter posted here at 5 o’clock p.m. on Saturday was not delivered in Melbourne or suburbs until Tuesday morning. In addtion to the two mails per day, he thought that a loose mail bag should be made up and despatched on Sunday night. This would assist business people and help the district at large, and he also considered that the mail should come direct from the mail train instead of being delayed as at present on the route. A number of other speakers stressed the necessity for this service, and the secretary of the Association and Mr. Ken. Hudson reported on their correspondence and interviews with the responsible officers of the Postmaster-General’s department. The following motion, proposed by Mr D. N. McBride, and seconded by Mr. Baxter, was then carried unanimously.
    “That this meeting of resdents of Beaconsfield Upper give whole-hearted support to the Traders’ Association in their efforts to obtain a daily two mail service direct from mail train, and also that a loose bag be despatched from here on Sunday nights.”
    It was decided that a petition be prepared for submission to the P.M.G. asking that these facilities be granted and that the obtaining of signatures to this petition be left in the hands of the Association.20
  • 23 Mar 1933, At the Berwick Court, on Friday last, W. Wintle, storekeeper, of Upper Beaconsfield, was proceeded against by J. Nathan, another storekeeper, of the same place, with having aided and abetted some boys in disfiguring the latter’s window on New Year’s Eve, by painting a pawnbroker’s sign on it. He was fined £3.21
  • 13 Jan 1947, MEDALS FOR DUKE'S HOUSEHOLD STAFF. SYDNEY, Sun: The Duke of Gloucester at Admiralty House yesterday presented the Royal Victorian Medal to Mr Leslie William Brill, care-taker at Government House, Canberra; Mr George Ernest Freeman Robinson, caretaker at Admiralty House; Sgt David Mackay, ACT police force; Sgt William Henry Wintle, Commonwealth Police Officer; and Mr George William Gillham, head gardener at Admiralty House.22
  • 24 Jun 1949, RETURN THANKS. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. WINTLE and family desire to express their sincere thanks to doctors, matron, sisters and nursing staff for their kind attention to their mother through her long illness. Also many thanks to all kind friends for their messages of sympathy in their sad bereavement. Would all please accept this as their personal thanks.23
  • 14 Jul 1962, The Administrator of the Commonwealth, Sir Dallas Brooks, presenting the police long service and good conduct medals to Sergeant William Henry Wintle yesterday.
    Sergeant Wintle, 65, who has been stationed at Government House, Yarralumla, since 1938, was the first member of the Commonwealth Police Force to receive the award.
    Sergeant Wintle served with the 1st A.l.F. and was wounded at Ypres, Frances, in 1917.
    He holds two Royal Victorian medals.24
  • 9 May 1968, IN MEMORIAM. WINTLE. — In memory of my dear wife passed away 9th May 1966. still thinking of you. Dad, Bill, Ann, Lorna and family.25
  • 14 Feb 1994, WINTLE/BAKER (nee Bland), Ruth. — Passed away peacefully at Woden Valley Hospital February 11, 1994. Aged 88 years. Late of Brindabella Gardens Hostel, Curtin. Formerly of Coolamon, Wagga Wagga and Gladesville, Sydney. Loving wife of Bill (dec, ACT) and Archie Baker (dec, Coolemon). Supportive and loving mother and mother-in-law of Robert and Jenny Baker (Sydney), Margaret and Barry Rogers, John and Dorothy Baker. Loved grandmothor of Peter, Andrew, Tracy, Mark, Craig. Sean and Gabrielle, With all our love. At peace at last.26

Citations

  1. [S29] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWI.
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mother's maiden name HANCOCK."
  3. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  4. [S188] Newspaper - Berwick County Times / The Times "31 Mar 1922."
  5. [S29] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWI, Letter from Military File.
  6. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, ACT BDM #D150/1966 ACT.
  7. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.canberracemeteries.com.au/…
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 5 Jun 1986, p23.
  9. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 6 Jun 1986, p15.
  10. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922 "parents Frederick James & Lily Rosetta WINTLE, Mount Best, Toora farmer."
  11. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  12. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  13. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  14. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  15. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  16. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  17. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980 "http://canberraheritageportal.org/default.php."
  18. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://hiddencanberra.webs.com/… - not online anymore Sep 2011.
  19. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.canberracemeteries.com.au/…
    Alexandra Annie L Wintle of 91 Wakefield Gardens Ainslie died on 9th May 1966 aged 64 years. Her grave in the Anglican section of Woden Cemetery was paid by Mr William Henry Wintle of the same address.
  20. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Thu 10 Dec 1931, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201086144."
  21. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "23 Mar 1933, p4."
  22. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 13 Jan 1947, p2.
  23. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 24 Jun 1949, p4.
  24. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 14 Jul 1962, p7.
  25. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 9 May 1968, p35.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - The Canberra Times, 14 Feb 1994, p26.
Last Edited3 Jan 2019

William Desmond Richardson

M, #1355, b. 27 Jul 1873, d. 31 Dec 1941
Birth*27 Jul 1873 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #B14732.1 
Birth-Notice*30 Jul 1873RICHARDSON.— On the 27th inst., at Brighton, the wife of Marmaduke N. Richardson (late of H. M. 83rd Foot) of a son.2 
Marriage*17 Oct 1907 Spouse: Augusta Ross. St Hilary's Church, East Kew, VIC, Australia, #M7390.3,4
 
Marriage-Notice*7 Dec 1907RICHARDSON—ROSS.—On the 17th October, at St. Hilary's Church, East Kew, by the Rev. H. Collier, assisted by the Rev. W. T. C. Storrs, M.A., Wm. Desmond, eldest son of the late Marmaduke N Richardson, H. M. 83rd Regiment, to Augusta, only child of the late Eugene A. Ross, 4 Park Hill Road, Kew.4 
Land-UBeac*18 May 1911 GEM-D-20. Transfer from Victoria Anderson to William Desmond Richardson. 18a 3r 39p.5 
Land-Note*1 Nov 1911 GEM-D-20.21: Mortgagee: Alexander Fraser, Thomas Robert Burrows, James Robert Thear and Jonathan Edward Pittock - discharged 20 Dec 1913. Mortgagor was William Desmond Richardson.6 
Land-UBeac*1 Nov 1911 GEM-D-21. Transfer from William Gunner Good to William Desmond Richardson. 19a 0r 15p.7 
Residence*c 1912 Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, July 1912 (birth son); 16 Jul 1914 at Oakleigh (birth son.) 
Land-UBeac*20 Dec 1913 GEM-D-20.21. Transfer from William Desmond Richardson to George Reid Grieve. 37a ...8 
Land-Note*20 Dec 1913 GEM-D-20.21: Mortgagee: William Desmond Richardson. Discharged 26 Feb 1920. Mortgagor was George Reid Grieve.9 
Widower10 Feb 1923William Desmond Richardson became a widower upon the death of his wife Augusta Ross.10 
Death*31 Dec 1941 Bayswater, VIC, Australia, #D22690/1942 (Age 68) [par Marmaduke Nelson RICHARDSON & Mary CARSWELL].11 
Death-Notice*5 Jan 1942RICHARDSON.—On December 31, at his residence, Milleara, via Bayswater, William Desmond.12 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1909 - 1913Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist. With Augusta Richardson.13,14,15

Family

Augusta Ross b. 1873, d. 10 Feb 1923
Children 1.Mary St Barbe Richardson b. 26 Jan 1910
 2.Marmaduke Nelson Richardson b. 13 Jul 1912, d. 9 Jul 1914

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Jul 1873, p4.
  3. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#M7390."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Dec 1907, p13.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1120-988 - Victoria Robertson to Desmond Richardson of Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist - C/T 3498-401.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3547-291 - Mortgage No 299296 - Alexander Fraser, Thomas Robert Burrows, James Robert Thear and Jonathan Edward Pittock - discharged 20 Dec 1913.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2424-735 - Desmond Richardson of Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist - C/T 3547-291.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3547-291 + C/T 3498-401 - George Reid Grieve of Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3547-291 + C/T 3498-401 - Mortgage No 328479 - discharged 26 Feb 1920.
  10. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D1013 age 50 [par Eugene ROSS & Sarah]."
  11. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Jan 1942, p2.
  13. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  14. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  15. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
Last Edited20 May 2016

Augusta Ross

F, #1356, b. 1873, d. 10 Feb 1923
Married NameRichardson. 
Birth*1873 Melbourne South, VIC, Australia, possible birth 1871/#9006 as Unnamed Female at Emerald Hill. [par Eugene Alexander ROSS & Sarah MATTHEWS]1 
Marriage*17 Oct 1907 Spouse: William Desmond Richardson. St Hilary's Church, East Kew, VIC, Australia, #M7390.2,3
 
Marriage-Notice*7 Dec 1907RICHARDSON—ROSS.—On the 17th October, at St. Hilary's Church, East Kew, by the Rev. H. Collier, assisted by the Rev. W. T. C. Storrs, M.A., Wm. Desmond, eldest son of the late Marmaduke N Richardson, H. M. 83rd Regiment, to Augusta, only child of the late Eugene A. Ross, 4 Park Hill Road, Kew.3 
Death*10 Feb 1923 Caulfield, VIC, Australia, #D1013 age 50 [par Eugene ROSS & Sarah].4 
Death-Notice*13 Feb 1923RICHARDSON. On the 10th February, at private hospital, Caulfield, Augusta, beloved wife of Desmond Richardson, Milleara, Bayswater.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1909 - 1913Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With William Desmond Richardson.6,7,8

Family

William Desmond Richardson b. 27 Jul 1873, d. 31 Dec 1941
Children 1.Mary St Barbe Richardson b. 26 Jan 1910
 2.Marmaduke Nelson Richardson b. 13 Jul 1912, d. 9 Jul 1914

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#M7390."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Dec 1907, p13.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D1013 age 50 [par Eugene ROSS & Sarah]."
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 13 Feb 1923 p1.
  6. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  7. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  8. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
Last Edited20 May 2016

Mary St Barbe Richardson

F, #1357, b. 26 Jan 1910
Father*William Desmond Richardson b. 27 Jul 1873, d. 31 Dec 1941
Mother*Augusta Ross b. 1873, d. 10 Feb 1923
Birth*26 Jan 1910 Windarra, Toorak, VIC, Australia, #B139.1 
Birth-Notice*8 Feb 1910RICHARDSON.—On the 26th January, at Windarra, Toorak, the wife of W. Desmond Richardson, "The Hut," Upper Beaconsfield—a daughter.2 

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#B139 - reg. Armadale."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Feb 1910, p1.
Last Edited20 May 2016

Marmaduke Nelson Richardson

M, #1358, b. 13 Jul 1912, d. 9 Jul 1914
Father*William Desmond Richardson b. 27 Jul 1873, d. 31 Dec 1941
Mother*Augusta Ross b. 1873, d. 10 Feb 1923
Birth*13 Jul 1912 Windsor, VIC, Australia, #B23532 [reg Prahran].1 
Birth-Notice*21 Aug 1912RICHARDSON. - On the 13th July, at "Quisisana" private hospital, Dandenong-road, Windsor, the wife of Wm. Desmond Richardson, Upper Beaconsfield - a son.2 
Death*9 Jul 1914 Ferntree Gully Road, Oakleigh, VIC, Australia, #D11231 (Age 2.)3 
Death-Notice*29 Jul 1914RICHARDSON. On the 9th July, at "The Pines," Ferntree Gully Road, Oakleigh, Marmaduke Nelson, beloved eldest son of W Desmond Richardson, aged 2 years.4 

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#B23532 [reg Prahran]."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Aug 1912 p9.
  3. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Jul 1914 p1.
Last Edited20 May 2016

Thomas Cole Mackley

M, #1360, b. Sep 1852, d. 7 Mar 1909
Father*Thomas Cole Mackley b. 1813, d. 6 Jul 1869
Mother*Amelia Colley b. 1813, d. 15 Feb 1884
Birth*Sep 1852 Battersea, Surrey, England, Sep Q [Wandsworth] 1d 363.1 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Apr 1880 To Bombay, India. Ship MACKLEY T C MR A 'ASSAM' APR 1880 - BOMBAY APR 1880 001.2,3
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel28 Dec 1880 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship possible migration on Cathay - travelled via Bombay
no age given, travelling from foreign port.4 
Marriage*6 Aug 1881 Spouse: Mary Ann Reeves. Trinity Church, East St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M3224.5
 
Marriage-Notice*9 Aug 1881MACKLEY-REEVES.-On the 6th inst., at Trinity Church, East St. Kilda, by the Rev. Dr. Torrance, Thos. Cole, third son of the late T. C. Mackley, St. John's Hill House, New Wandsworth, Surrey, to Mary Ann, second daughter of I. G. Reeves, St. Kilda.6 
Residence*bt 1888 - 1909 "Ellim-Atta" (later "Calembeen"), A'Beckett Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, Part of Alott 124. Parish of Pakenham. 17 acres. - Property later known as Calembeen.7 
Land-UBeac*20 Apr 1888 PAK-124. Transfer from Thomas Cooper Hyde to Thomas Cole Mackley. 18a 0r 16p.8 
Land-Note*20 Jun 1888 PAK-124: Mortgagee: The Australian Deposit and Mortgage Bank Limited. Discharged 3 Apr 1889. Mortgagor was Thomas Cole Mackley.9 
Land-UBeac*7 Jan 1889 PAK-124. Transfer from Thomas Cole Mackley to Richard Noble Thomas James Crouch. 17a 1r 16p and creation of easement.10 
Related*bt 1892 - 1897 Todea Africana Thomas Cole MACKLEY was writing weekly columns for the South Bourke and Mornington Journal under the pen name of TODEA AFRICANA.11 
Widower31 Dec 1897Thomas Cole Mackley became a widower upon the death of his wife Mary Ann Reeves.12 
Land-UBeac25 Mar 1898 PAK-124. Transfer from Richard Noble Ernest William Marston Crouch to Thomas Cole Mackley. 17a 1r 16p.13 
Death*7 Mar 1909 106 Powlett Street, Melbourne East, VIC, Australia, #D2375 age 56 [par Thomas Cole MACKLEY & Amelia].14 
Death-Notice*8 Mar 1909MACKLEY.-On the 7th March, at 106 Powlett street, East Melbourne, Thomas Cole Mackley, secretary Charity Organisation Society, brother of Mrs. Richard Noble, who died on February 24 last. Aged 56.
MACKLEY.-The Friends of the late Mr. THOMAS COLE MACKLEY are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the Melbourne Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to move from his late residence, 106 Powlett-street, East Melbourne, To-morrow (Tuesday, 9th inst.), at 11 o'clock.15 
Probate (Will)*7 Apr 1909 110/467. Thomas Cole Mackley leaves all to niece Isabella Helena REEVES. Part of Allot 124 Parish of Pakenham, with 8-room unoccupied weatherboard house on 17.1.16 acres See: Richard Noble.16,17 
Land-Note*17 Apr 1909 Richard Noble of Bushy Park Briagolong Gippsland Gentleman and Isabella Helena Reeves of 106 Powlett Street East Melbourne Spinster as Executor and Executrix.18 
Land-UBeac*17 Apr 1909 PAK-124. Transfer from Thomas Cole Mackley to Isabella Helena Reeves. 17a 1r 16p.19 
(Mentioned) Village BellJul 1982The article reads: THE NOBLE FAMILY CAME HERE IN 1882 - AND AGAIN IN 1982
Several months ago our Postmaster received a request from a Mrs. Long, seeking information about the Noble family, residents in Upper Beaconsfield at the end of last century. We were able to offer only a few details, but she and her family felt encouraged to pursue the inquiry further, and were rewarded by a most enjoyable family reunion in the Village Hall on Sunday, 13th June.
Their forebears, three brothers, came from England in 1882, and on arrival stayed awhile in Melbourne, where they met the Mackleys, resulting in a lasting friendship and a marriage, between the two families.
For several years they lived at "The Steyne", now "Newstead Forest" in A'Beckett Rd., the Mackleys being at "Fassifern" [sic] close by. They took an active part in community life; they were members of the Cricket Club, and initiated the moves to establish the Recreation Reserve in 1898. The family left Upper Beaconsfield in 1903, and had no association with it since.
Sons of the first generation were at the Reunion, and three younger generations, making over a hundred people present. Mr. Joe Mack acted as Master of Ceremonies, and Mr. Derek Noble gave an official welcome. Members of the family were present from Canberra and Adelaide, and greetings were received from relatives in Britain, the U.S.A. Japan and Queensland. '
A great deal of preparatory work had been done, in which Mrs. Helen Long took a leading part. Family trees and dozens of family photographs were displayed. Other heirlooms were a diary kept by Amelia Maria Mackley during her voyage to Australia in 1882, her wedding dress and veil, and a beautifully illuminated farewell address to Richard Noble, dated 24th October 1903, and signed by two local residents Mr. Goff and the Rev. James Wilson.
Cr. Ewenson, Ray Ratcliff and John Milligan visited the gathering, and after lunch Ken Hudson took a party to view the family homes. There they were delighted to be offered seedling from a camellia dating back to the Noble's occupancy, while being shown around by Mrs Fullerton and her daughter Patricia.
A more detailed account of the family relationships appears in the "Weekly Times" of the 7th July, 1982.
In conversation with members attending the Reunion, it was apparent that when a family embarks on tracing its history, a great deal of interesting information comes to light, which is valued by the younger generations. Old friendships are renewed and new ones formed; a very worthwhile enterprise.20 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Emma T BENNETT (Proprietress of Ladies' School), Caterham, Surrey, EnglandAge 8 - Pupil With Louisa Kate Mackley21
2 Apr 1871Ferndale ..., Streatham, London, England(Head of Household) Amelia Mackley;
Age 18 - Articled Clerk
Member(s) of Household: Amelia Maria Mackley, Ellen Harriet Mackley, Louisa Kate Mackley, Friedrich Moritz Alphonse Felix De Paula22

Grave

  • Church of England Section F 493, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella
    second daughter of Isaac Godfrey and Ann REEVES
    who departed this life
    26 Mar 1870, age 23 yrs.
    She has gone from us now to her rest
    Released from her suffering great
    Oh, think of the joy and the peace
    of her happy and glorified state.
    also the above
    Isaac Godfrey REEVES
    who departed this life 20 Dec 1886
    age 77 yrs
    Ann REEVES
    wife of the above
    who departed this life 8 Oct 1891, age 70 yrs
    and of
    Mary Ann
    dearly beloved wife of Thomas Cole MACKLEY
    and daughter of the abovenamed Isaac Godfrey and Ann REEVES
    who died 31 Dec 1897
    after a long and painful illness.
    And he said to me There are they which came out of great tribulation
    and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes
    also the above
    Thomas Cole MACKLEY
    who died 7 Mar 1909, age 56 yrs.23

Newspaper-Articles

  • 1 May 1880, The R.M.S.S. Assam, with the mails for England and the East, left the graving dock jotty, Williamstown, at 10 minutes past 1 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon for Galle, via Adelaide and King George's Sound. The steaming capabilities of the Assam are being well tested at present, and it speaks well for the efficient working of her engines that she keeps such good time, while having such close and constant work. The Assam cleared out with mails and passengers and 31 boxes of treasure, consisting of coined and bar gold to the value of £158,008. The following is a list of the passengers.— ... For Suez—Mr. T. C. Mackley.3
  • 29 Dec 1880, Shipping. ARRIVED—DEC 28. Cathay, R.M.S.S., 2,983 tons, W. M. Robbie, commander, from London, via Bombay 3rd inst, Galle 9th inst, King George's Sound 22nd inst., and Adelaide 20th inst. Passengers -For Melbourne. From Venice—... and Mr T Mackley.24
  • 4 Jun 1881, South Australian, s. s., W. Brownlie, for Adelaide. Passengers cabin: ... T. C. Mackley.25
  • 15 Mar 1882, THE BELGIAN EXPORT COMPANY (Limited). Capital, £200,000. Head Office. ANTWERP, BELGIUM.
    GENERAL AGENTS for AUSTRALASIA.
    Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co , 24 Market buildings, Collins street west, Melbourne, and 5 East India Avenue, London.
    This company has been formed by a body of manu facturers aud capitalists in Belgium, with the object of promoting direct trade between that country and the colonies of Australia.
    Some of the shareholders were exhibitors at the Sydney and Melbourne Exhibitions, but beyond securing a certain number of awards, no practical result was achieved. Such displays, unless supported by responsible agents on the spot, prepared to supply intending purchasers not only with all the information requisite to judge the commercial value of the goods exhibited, but also to guarentee prompt deliveries and to afford the usual facilities of payment, are generally speaking of an unprofitable nature to the exhibitor.
    To meet these requirements, the directors have in structed their general agents, Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co , to select a suitable warehouse in Melbourne, and this they intend to keep well stocked with goods for which a ready sale may be anticipated. A description of these will be announced in due course.
    It is intended to establish similar stores in the other Australian capitals.
    As regards the direct importation of Australian products into Belgium and other Continental coun tries, the company's agents are instructed to give this subject their most careful attention, and Australians who take an interest in the extension of the trade of their country are kindly requested to further this object by communicating with Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co.
    It may be here stated that Belgium is not only a large consumer of products for which Australia is famous - namely, wool, tallow, grain, hides, and copper, but also to a great extent a carrier of these for the French, German, and Swiss markets.
    The annual home consumption may be estimated at £10,000,000, and the value of the goods carried through the country at £9,000,000 per annum.
    Antwerp is most favourably situated for this traffic, and the directors are sanguine that this port will be come one of the most important markets for Australian produce.
    Of the manufactures exported by Belgium, the following may be mentioned as the leading items - Iron of every description, machinery, zinc, lead, window glass, glassware, woollens, cotton and linen fabrics, paper, candles, spirits, and chemicals.
    It will thus be seen that the proposed operations afford the basis for a sound and mutually advantagious trade.
    The directors, while being assured that the course of trading which they have undertaken will be for the advantage of the commerial community, trust that they have made such arrangements as will meet with general approval, and they hope by the earnest efforts of the company and their representatives in carrying on the business as stated, and with such modifications as experience may suggest, to secure the support of the Australian public.
    For all particulars and information respecting this company please refer to Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co., 24 Market buildings, Collins street west, Melbourne.
    Antwerp, January, 1882.26
  • 15 Aug 1882, Sir Henry Parkes landed from the John Elder yesterday morning in excellent health having benefited greatly by his trip to America and Europe. At Menzies Hotel he was waited upon by a committee of gentlemen representing the citizens of Melbourne who were introduced by Mr C. J. Ham the mayor of Melbourne. The committee consisted of Mr F. S. Grimwade, president of the Chamber of Commerce ; Mr T. Loader chairman of the Harbour Trust ; Mr George Robertson, Mr G. F. Brind, Mr H. C. Fraser, Mr J Blyth, Mr W. G. Sprigg, and Mr T. C. Mackley.27
  • 4 Oct 1882, In accordance with anticipation, Messrs. de Paula, Mackley and Co., representing the Belgian Export Company, received a repeated telegram on 2nd Sept. from their principals in Belgium, in which the price of the five locomotives for which they tendered was given as £2751, to be delivered in six months; Mr. Bent is satisfied with the offer, and its formal acceptance has been made. This completes the number of locomotives to be purchased outside the colony, ten having been ordered from Beyer, Peacock and Co., of Manchester ; ten from the Baldwin Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia; and five from the Belgian Company referred to above.28
  • 2 May 1883, VICTORIA AND BELGIUM.
    About 12 months ago we noticed the fact that an organisation called the Belgian Export Company had commenced business in Melbourne. This company, as was announced in the prospectus published in our columns at the time, was formed by a body of manufacturers and capitalists in Belgium with the object of promoting direct trade between that country and Australia, but principally in the first instance, at all events - with Victoria. Belgium, it was pointed out, produces a large number of manufactures which Australia consumes, while Belgium is not only a large consumer of products for which Australia is famous, such as wool, tallow, grain, hides, and copper, but to a great extent is a carrier of these to the French, German, and Swiss markets. The proposed operations thus afforded, the pro moters submitted, a basis for a sound and muta ally advantageous trade. Arrangements were made for introducing Belgian manufactures into Australia, and on the other hand, the company's agents in Melbourne, Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co, were instructed to make every effort in their power to encourage a direct importation of Australian products into Belgium and other Continental countries. After the lapse of 12 months it will be of interest to note the progress which has been made in carrying out the object in view. It is to be remarked at the outset that companies of this sort can only be successful on the basis of reciprocal trade. If Belgian goods are introduced on a large scale they must be paid for in Australian products. Complete reciprocity, however, cannot be attained at once. At the beginning, the imports of Bel gian goods into Victoria will necessarily be greater than the export of Victorian pro ducts to Belgium. Belgian manufactures are already known and appreciated in Australia, and a market for them may be said to be established. But while there is a constant and active demand in Belgium for such products as Australia can supply, the quality of Australian products is unknown to the Belgians. It is the function, of course, of the company to bring these products into notice and establish them in the Belgium and other Continental markets, and this function the company is duly discharging. It commenced operations by shipping Belgian goods to Melbourne, and by tendering for and obtaining contracts for the supply of ironwork such as steel rails, carriage wheels, and fittings. In this branch of its operations the company has met with considerable encouragement. It has introduced large quantities of bar, rod, sheet, and plate iron, which have been worked up by Victorian manufacturers for Victorian use. A good trade has also been found for softgoods and articles of various kinds which are not manufactured in the colony.
    The following, Messrs DePaula, Mackley and Co inform us, is a list of the principal Government and other public contracts entered into by the company during the period under review, with the total amounts of each in round numbers: -With the Victorian Railway department- Contract for steel rails and fastenings 30,630 tons, £195,000, five locomotives, £14000, 60 railway carriage wheels, £5 000, 5,000 tons steel rails &c, transferred to our company, £35000.With contractors to the Victorian Railway department -Contract for upholstering and fitting railway carriages including window glass, £ 10,000.With the Maryborough Water Trust -Water pipes contract, £ 27,000 With the Tasmanian Government -Contract for steel rails and fastenings for the Mersey and Deloraine railway £ 21000 With the New South Wales Government - Iron telegraph poles and fittings £ 500. This makes altogether £ 307,500. In addition to the above the company has secured indents for contractors railway plant, tram rails, pig iron, quicksilver, newspaper, soft goods, &c , which, with the goods already imported and on the way for stock, would amount to £100,000 more.
    While the importation of Belgian goods has been going on, active steps have been taken to develop a return trade by sending to Belgium samples and trial shipments of Vic- torian products, as for example wool, wheat, wine, tallow, skins and hides, furs &c. For all these articles there is a constant and steady demand in Belgium, and as the company does not confine its operations to that country, but has agencies in Germany, France, and other parts of the Continent, there is every prospect that an extensive market for Australian products will be found. This anticipation is not based on mere con jocture From the advices which have been received by Messrs de Paula, Mackley, and Co , it is believed that Australian produce will be very welcome in Belgium. There is wool, for example. Belgium is a large consumer of this article, of which she imports largely from South America. The South American wool, however, is not as clean nor so generally acceptable to manufacturers as Australian, and when the latter is known it will become firmly established in the Belgian markets. Again, the quantity of raw material treated in the Belgian tanneries and fellmongeries is very great, so that a steady demand for Aus tralia hides and skins may be expected. The Belgian fur manufactories also absorb large quantities of raw material of which Victoria and the other Australian colonies are in a position to furnish a large supply. The company has already sent shipments of rabbit skins and the skins of native animals, together with specimens of Victorian made rugs, &c , in order to show how the raw material is worked up here. Belgium has been long noted for its fur manufactures, which it supplies in large quantities to countries where warm clothing is required, and Belgian ingenuity may be reckoned upon for turning to good account the materials of which Auatralia possesses such an abundant supply. There is also in Belgium a market for Australian tallow, and business in this product has already been done. As to wine, it may he stated that the company's agents, before the Bordeaux Exhibition was held, sent some samples of wines to Antwerp, where they were submitted to a number of experts. The wines were spoken very highly of, and the only objection found was that which was made subsequently at Bordeaux, viz., that the price was too high. Australian wines are required by Continental manufacturers principally for blending with other wines, and for this purpose cheapness, as well as soundness, is an essential. It has been suggested to the Belgian manufacturera that they should establish a company for the purpose of buying up and blending in Australia the wines of the small growers , and that they should also take up land and plant vineyards in Victoria and the other Australian colonies, bringing out from Belgium men skilled in vine growing and wine making. If this were done-and there seems to be a probability of it-we should have Belgium assisting to develop one of our most important industries and giving us at the same time fresh population of the sort we most require. Belgium appears determined to push trade in every direction, and especially with the Australian colonies. We are informed that a second company, similar to the one under notice, has been started in Brussels, and that the formation of other companies under tbe like conditions has been spoken of. The King of the Belgians who takes a lively interest in international commerce, has been kept informed of what has been going on by the Belgian Consul in Melbourne, and has expressed his satisfaction thereat. So much importance does Belgium attach to the extension of her commerce with foreign parts that she has founded a school of commerce, in which prizes of the nature of "commercial scholarships" if the expression may be used, are given. Provision is made by which the students most successful in the examinations are allowed a sum equal to about £210 per annum for three years, on condition that they travel or engage in trade in foreign countries, and send home periodical reports on matters that have come under their observation relating to trade and commerce. One of these successful students has found his way to Melbourne and has associated himself with the Belgian Export Company for the purpose of acquiring a knowledge of the Australian trade. It may be said in conclusion that the growth of the Australian-Belgian trade, and generally of trade between the Australian colo nies and the Continent, will be greatly promoted by the improved steam communi- cation which is one of the features of modern progress.There has already been established a direct line of steamers between Melbourne and Hamburg, the Messageries Maritimes Company furnish a monthly service with Marseilles, and it is expected that before long there will be direct communication with Austria. The Austrian Lloyd's already run steamers from Trieste to India and China, and it is believed that an extension of the service to Australia is in contemplation.29
  • 29 Mar 1884, BELGIAN EXPORT CO. LIMITED. Capital .. .. .. £200,000. HEAD OFFICE-ANTWERP.
    General Agents for Australasia: DE PAULA, MACKLEY and Co., 24 MARKET BUILDINGS COLLINS STREET WEST, MEBOURNE.
    Warehouse and Iron Yard-Spencer street
    Sample rooms-7 Market street
    LONDON HOUSE-6 EAST INDIA AVENUE.
    RAILS, Iron and steel
    LOCOMOTIVE MACHINERY, CONTRACTORS PLANT, &c.
    FENCING WIRE, drawn and rolled CAST-IRON WATERPIPES, &c.
    Galvanised, Corrugated and Plain Iron
    Bar, Plate, Sheet and Hoop Iron
    STEEL, cast, shear, spring and blister
    Wire Nails, Screws and, Floor Brads
    Glass, window ; Oils and White and Red Lead
    PIG IRON, ZINC, LEAD, TIN, COPPER
    Spouting, and Ridging, &c.
    Tweeds, Coatings and Italian Cloths
    Grease-proof Gros Grain SILKS
    Hats, Hat Linings, and Trimmings
    Belgian Ticks and Linens
    Shirts and Shirtings
    Tapestry Goods, Carpets and Curtains
    Lampware, Glassware and Cutlery
    Printing, Writing, and Packing PAPERS
    Lined and Unlined Strawboards
    DREHER's PRIZE LAGER BEER. (Sole agents.)
    German and Havannah CIGARS
    INDENTS for EVERY DESCRIPTION of GOODS.30
  • 19 May 1884, THE BELGIAN EXPORT COMPANY LIMITED, DE PAULA MACKLEY, and Co., Have the pleasure to announce that they have been Appointed SOLE AGENT For the Sale in Victoria of Messrs. ROBERT PORTER and Co.'s Bottling of BASS and Co.'s PALE ALE and GUINNESS and Co's STOUT, Under their well known BULL DOG Brand.31
  • 13 Sep 1884, SHIPPING. ARRIVED. September 12— Flinders, s s., 918 tons. A. Drysdale, commander, from Melbourne. Passengers—Saloon : Mr and Mrs Mackley, Mr. and Mrs. Veal, Mr and Mrs Crouch; Mesdames Noble, Burt, White, Mitchell, Simpson;32
  • 11 Feb 1885, NOTICE is hereby given, that the PARTNERSHIP heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, RUDOLPH DE PAULA and THOMAS COLE MACKLEY, hitherto carrying on business as iron merchants and agents, under the style or firm of "De Paula, Mackley, and Company," at No. 72 Bishopsgate-street Within, in the City of London, and at Market buildings, Collins-street, Melbourne, Australia, has been DISSOLVED by mutual consent as and from the first day of December, 1884.
    Dated this 4th day of December, 1884 (Signed) RUDOLPH DE PAULA. (Signed) T C MACKLEY. By John Warburton, his attorney T. C. MACKLEY, Melbourne, Feb. 9, 1885.33
  • 27 Jun 1885, PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. BY "THE VAGABOND." AT MARYSVILLE.
    ... The scribblers in the visitors' book must henceforth be for ever silent. The dispute is at an end. I have solved the question of the height of the Falls. Solved it vicariously, however, à la Mark Twain! Not that I would wish in everything to compare Mr. Mackley, of St Kilda, to Harris, the hero of The Tramp Abroad. But he has a good aneroid, and I have not possessed one since I was in New Guinea. Mr. Mackley, too, takes a delight in solving problems, and is sound of wind and tough in limb. He has scientific tastes, and has travelled so much and kept his eyes open whilst travelling to such good purpose, that I at first flatter Bismarck by imagining our companion to be a citizen of Vaterland. So when he offers to scale the Falls and take correct observations I do not enviously attempt to wrest the honour from him! I conquer the explorer's pride within me, and magnanimously let him do the hard work!34
  • 12 May 1886, NOTICE.—The AGENCY heretofore existing between the BELGIAN EXPORT COMPANY LIMITED of Antwerp Belgium and Messrs DE PAULA, MACKLEY, and Co., of 24 Market-buildings, Collins-street west, Melbourne, in the colony of Victoria, has this day been mutually DETERMINED, and all claims against the said agency will be paid and discharged and all debts due to the said agency will be collected and received by the said Messrs De Paula, Mackley, and Co., personally and exclusively.
    Dated the 9th day of April 1886.
    BELGIAN EXPORT COMPANY LIMITED.
    DE PAULA, MACKLEY, and Co.

    DE PAULA, MACKLEY, and Co., 24 Market-buildings, Collins-street west.
    Contractors for the supply of railway materials of all description, cast iron water pipes, railway contractor's plant, &c.
    Sole agents for Robert Porter and Co.'s Bull Dog ale and stout ; W. and A. Gilbey's wines and spirits. Indentors of every description of merchandise.35
  • 19 Mar 1887, ST. KILDA TOWN-HALL QUESTION. An influential meeting of ratepaypers was held at the Beaconsfield Hotel, West Beach, on Tuesday evening in support of the present site for the new town-hall. Mr. George Godfrey, who was elected chairman, said he had lived for many years in the locality, and he considered it would. be to the advantage of the residents of the West Ward that the new town-hall should be erected on the present site, which was in a central position; and to place it at the Greyhound; which was at the extreme end of St. Kilda, would be an iniquitous spoliation of the borough. The cast of the foundation alone would swallow up nearly the whole of the amount voted for the hall, and probably Elsternwick would separate from St. Kilda at no very distant period.
    ...
    A similar meeting was held on Monday night at the Village Belle Hotel, when Mr. T. C. Mackley occupied the chair. The hon. secretary, Mr. F. Tullett, explained that at a previous meeting it had been decided to hold meetings in each ward of those who favoured the retention of the site of the old town-hall.36
  • 15 May 1888, T. J.CROUCH, Architect aud Licensed Surveyor, invites TENDERS for ERECTION of Large Weatherboard VILLA, At Beaconsfield, for T. C. Mackley, Esq. Drawings and specifications may be seen at his offices, 75 Chancery-lane.37
  • 3 Nov 1888, Situations vacant. GENERAL. Beaconsfield, make butter. Mackley, corner Dickens, Mitford sts., St Kilda, near tram.38
  • 2 Jan 1889, SHIRE OF BERWICK. TENDERS will be received at the Offices, High Street, Berwick, up to Twelve o'clock at noon, on Saturday, the 12th January, 1889, for the undermentioned works—
    Clearing and Forming road to Noble's and Mackley's, Beaconsfield.
    By Order of the Council. G. W. ROBINSON, C.E., Shire Engineer.39
  • 9 Jul 1889, TIIE WINE INDUSTRY.—We have a little work from Messrs. Mackley and Co. of 24 Market Buildings, Collins street, Melbourne, giving an interesting account of Messrs. W. and A. Gilbey's Chateau Loudenne estate, Bordeaux, a great centre in the Medoc wine country. It will prove of value to vignerons, as it contains information as to drainage, planting of vines, use of manure, water supply, insect pests, treatment of phylloxera, wine growing and mode of production of the red wines of Medoc, besides a fund of other useful information in connection with the wine industry generally, together with a number of useful illustrations. Messrs. Mackley and Co. intimate that they will send a copy of the work post free to any address in the colony.40
  • 7 Nov 1889, Houses and Land to Let. ST KILDA EAST. Highest Part, Near Windsor Station and Tramway.—Brick VILLA, eight rooms, old garden, £90. Mackley and Co, 449 Collins-street.41
  • 30 Jul 1890, Berwick Shire Council Correspondence: From R. Noble and H. Mackley, Upper Beaconsfield, asking that two culverts to be made on road opposite Mrs. Crouche's. Referred to Clerk of Works.42
  • 3 Sep 1890, BULLDOG STOUT, Robert Porter and Co.'s., MACKLEY and CO., 449 Collins street.43
  • 26 Nov 1892, FRUIT CULTURE IN VICTORIA. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    Sir,-In the days of depression, and one might almost say despair, which have of late overtaken our fair colony, when Jeremiahs are legion, and Mark Tapleys few and far between, the least ray of sunshine is to be treasured tenfold.
    The public is pretty will aware by this time that if salvation is to be hoped for at all (which the Jeremiahs take leave to doubt) it certainly is not to be looked for from the direction of the town, at least not in the first instance. Most men are agreed that it is to the country we must look for our help, and, this being the case, it becomes of paramount importance to examine what sort of a country we have to help us. Now, much has been said and written of the capabilities of the vast plains of the North-west, and more than a little has been done to prove the truth of the tales we are told. The fertility of the Western district, and of the lowlands in our great eastern district of Gippsland, is known to all and so with many another portion of Australia Felix (as it was once called, and may be again when our true destiny is recognised). One class of country that we possess, however, seems up to the present to have received scant justice, even from many of the owners of the soil. I allude to the ranges, of which we may take those (so called) of Dandenong as a tvpe. Hitherto the general idea of this class of country seems to have been that, unless for residential purposes, on account of the beauty of situation (especially of that around Beaconsfield), the country was hardly worth occupying.
    However, some of the residents, who through good report and evil report have been true to the district, who have planted orchards and gardens on what a fewyears since was virgin forest, and have seen with their own eyes the marvellous results, thought it about time, for their own guid ance and the enlightenment of their neigh hours and the colony generally, to avail them selves of the facilities offered by the Government to obtain an expert, who should report upon the district, and give his advice generally on the matter of fruit culture.
    On the request ol the newly-formed Beaconsfield and Gembrook Fruitgrowers' Association, our courteous secretary of Agriculture readily accorded the services of Mr. George Neilson, the well-known curator of the horticultural gardens (now college), Richmond. This gentleman has now spent two days in this district inspecting the orchards, the first being devoted to Beaconsfield, the second to Gembrook. It is the former only that I am in a position to speak of at present, and that which I say will, I am sure, be willingly confirmed by Mr Neilson himself. Orchards were visited in various stages of development, from those planted the last season to those in a full bearing state. In short, all was seen of the district which was necessary to form a fair judgment of its capabilities in the direction of fruit growing. And in the evening, at a gathering of the residents, the opinion of our visitor on what he had seen, and the conclusions he drew therefrom, with the advice for our future guidance based thereon, were summarised.
    I will not enlarge upon the lecture given, with that blending of modesty and en thuaiasm so characteristic of the life long student of nature, nor the subsequent cate chism so generously invited and so cheerfully undergone - although it would be well worth the while - but I sincerely hope that the de partment may see fit (with the concurrence of Mr. Neilson) to publish the address in extenso for general information, for it proves conclusively, in my humble opinion, that the importance of the fruit growing industry in this colony is second to none, and should be fostered by all the means in our power.
    Suffice it now to say shortly that Mr Neilson considered we could here, amongst mam other fruits, grow apples equal to any that are sent out of Tasmania, berries to rival the Americans, and, he added, "This is the home of the plum."
    On the morning following the lecture, after an early stroll, our mentor expressed him sell as having had his favourable opinion confirmed, and before starting for Gembrook, by way of emphasing his previous remarks, gave the parting advice to grow strawberries by the acre, counsel which, anticipated by the few, is likely to be followed by the many.
    Trusting that you min find the foregoing of sufficient interest to the general public to warrant some mention in your columns, --I am &c.,
    T.C. MACKLEY,
    Hon. Secretary Beaconsfield and Gembrook
    Fruitgrowers' Association, Upper Beaconsfield, Nov. 2444
  • 11 Jan 1893, BEACONSFIELD AND GEMBROOK FRUITGROWING CAPABILITIES. Following is the report of Mr. Neilson; Government-expert, on the capabilities of Gembrook and Beaconsfield as a fruit producing district. Mr. Neilson's report is based upon a personal examination of the locality, in which he spent several days, and can not be but gratifying to those who have placed their faith in the suitableness of the district for fruit growing. There is evidently a prosperous future in store for Beaconsfield and Gembrook in connection with this industry, and it behoves the local Fruitgrowers' Association to see that it has that fostering care necessary to ensure success. The Government may be relied upon to render any reasonsable assistance, but the residents must trust mainly to their on perseverance to bring the matter to a successful issue, and from personal knowledge of many of them we are of opinion that Mr. Neilson's ideas will he earnestly considered, and and that the suggestions contained in his report will prove of great value, and be acted upon where necessary. Mr. Neilson concludes his report with a courteous tribute to the hospitable ness met during his trop, which will he appreciated by the local residents
    Subjoined is the report :—
    Royal Horticultural Gardens, Burnley, Dec. 28, 1892.
    D. Martin, Esq., Secretary for Agriculture.
    Sir,—I have the honor to report that, in accordance with instructions received, in memo, bearing date 29/10/92, I went to Beaconsfield on the morning of the 16th inst., and was kindly met at the station by several members of Beaconsfield and Gembrook Fruitgrowers' Association. Several places were visited during the day, amongst which were Messrs. Lenne, Beattie, Schlipalius, Dr. L. L. Smith, Walford, J. Kitchen and Mackley, all of whom have small orchards attached to their residences. In the evening a meeting took place in the Upper Beaconsfield Hall, when several matters in connection with the fruit industry were discussed. On the 17th I was taken by Mr. Lenne, accompanied by other gentlemen, to the Gembrook district, and visited the orchard and nursery of Mr. Nobelius and other places. On the 18th I visited the selections of Messrs. Hall and Graham (adjacent selections); other places were visited on the journey homewards, and I left for Richmond by the 6.30 p.m. train from Beaconsfield.
    I beg to state that, judging from what I observed in the places visited, the present appearance of the orchards already planted shows ample proof of the adaptability of the district for the culture of all hardy fruits if properly managed and systematically cultivated—a matter that at present is too much neglected.
    I consider the soil in the Beaconsfield district suitable for the apple, apricot, cherry, chestnut, currant, gooseberry, lemon, loquat, mulberry, nuts and filberts, pear, peach, plum, prune, quince, strawberry, and in some places the raspberry might be added. In the Gembrook district soil of a different nature is found, where the rasberry will always grow, and fruit far superior to the Upper Beaconsfield ranges. Both districts are, in my opinion, as regards soil and climate, well adapted for the above-named fruits, but the steep ranges and general contour of the district render it more difficult of cultivation than the level plains of the northern areas ; still there are products to be successfully grown that do not succeed in the north, which would compensate for the greater difficulty in cultivating. The apple, pear and plum seem to do as well as in other districts of the colony, and the strawberry is equal in bearing qualities, size of fruit and flavor to any district I have previously visited. The top soil in the Beaconsfield district, although apparently of a poor quality, is suitable for most fruits, especially as there is a fine light, yellow, mellow clay subsoil in every way suitable for the growing of hardy fruits. Thorough drainage, however, I consider to be absolutely necessary, and should be one of the first works under taken by those who contemplate planting; also an improved system of cultivation to that at present adopted.
    It is not sufficient to ensure success to merely lightly plough the land, dig a pit in the hard soil and plant, with a crop sown between the rows of trees, or to allow the weeds to take possession. The land should be ploughed to a depth of 15 inches, and between the trees strawberries could be planted at a width that would admit of a horse hoe being easily worked. This fruit, if managed properly, would give a return sufficient to repay the cost of thoroughly cultivating the fruit trees. A list of the kinds of fruit and their varieties was supplied to several gentlemen, and would be applicable to both Beaconsfield and Gembrook districts. As I stated, the Gembrook district appears to be better adapted for the seccessful cultivation of the raspberry than Beacons field; I had an opportunity of seeing this fruit in several places, and it is one of the mainstays of the holdings. Nuts and filberts are other fruits that could be successfully grown, as there are gullies in nearly every selection that could profit ably be utilised; for these there is always an unlimited demand, both in the green and the dried state. I noticed very few of the orchard pests in the district, with the exception of the aphis on the apple, and black spot on the pear. The peach aphis and the curl upon the leaf were not as bad as I have seen them in some other places this season; in fact, in one place visited there was no indication of either pest, and for young trees the crop was excellent. I am of opinion that the dis trict is well adapted for the production of good fruit if properly managed, and I must emphasise the fact alluded to previously that a better system of cultivation ought to be adopted than at present exists, notwithstanding the extra expense it will at first entail. I am conviced that fine fruit could be grown for market ing, export, drying and tinning. The Association will have ultimately to adopt the two latter methods of utiling the lower grades of fruits grown in the district. Irrigation will seldom be found necessary, though there are but few places in the district where water could not be conserved at small cost, sufficient for all necessary orchard purposes. The roads are at present a considerable draw back in the matter of carting produce, manure; etc; still time and the energy that is apparent in the district will enable the growers to overcome this difficulty if backed by a little public spirit. Thousands of acres between the Railway Station and Upper Beaconsfield are, as regards soil and aspect, just suited for orchard work, and other extensive areas of country from Upper Beaconsfield to Mr. Nobelius' Gembrook selection (the farthest point I was able to visit) could all be utilized. Mr. Nobelius' orchard and nursery is a special instance of what can be done by perseverance, and no one need despair going into the ranges to make a home if the same labor is spent upon it. I can not omit to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the Fruit Growers' Association for affording me an opportunity of visiting the principal places in the district, and for the unvaried courtesy and kindliness during my visit; and I trust they will avail themselves of the advantages your department affords to those embarked in the great industry they are fostering in their own borders. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, GEO. NEILSON.45
  • 3 May 1893, Berwick Shire Council Correspondence: From T. C. Mackley, Upper Beaconsfield, thanking the council for their kindness in helping the case of the old man mentioned by him and enclosing voucher duly signed; the amount had been spent on clothing and necessaries. The old man had the offer of the first vacancy in the home for Little Sisters of the Poor.—The letter was received.
    From same, stating that the new turning near Mrs. Crouche's corner and Messrs. Noble's and a'Beckett's, renders the approach to his place very dangerous, and asking that necessary alterarions be made; the cost would only be trifling.—To be done when the council is in funds.46
  • 31 May 1893, From T. C. Mackley, Upper Beaconsfield, referring to the case of "Jack the Digger," stating that a place has become vacant in the Home of the Little Sisters of the Poor, at Northcote, and " Jack" had been sent there, but he had since left on the plea of getting his swag at the railway station, and had not yet returned; he (Mr Mackley) would not therefore ask the council for any further assistance on his behalf.47
  • 30 Aug 1893, T. C. Mackley wrote asking that medical attendance be sent to 'Jack the Digger," who was in a dying state.-This matter was referred to the police to take whatever steps were necessary.48
  • 3 Jun 1896, Berwick Police Court, Wednesday, May 27. Before Mr Creswell, P.M., and Mr James Wilson, J.P.
    NEIGHBORS' QUARREL.
    T. C. Mackley, of Upper Beaconsfield, summoned a lot of children to answer for threatening language and general bad behavior. The first case was against Milly Richards for threatening language, and the next cases were for damaging property, the defendants being Milly, and her brother and sister Paddy and Janie Richards.
    Mr Coburn appeared for Mr Mackley and explained to the Court that these children were deliberately set upon by their mother to systematically annoy the Mackley family, and that Mr Mackley having stood it as long as possible now found it absolutely necessary to seek the protection of the Court.
    Mrs Richards, the mother of these children, appeared and took a prominent part in the proceedings, shewing at times a fair acquaintance with police court procedure but ultimately it was found impossible to get on with the evidence while she was present, and she was on the order of the Chairman expelled from the Court, when things again went smoothly.
    After a lot of evidence had been taken Mr Cresswell stated that the Bench were satisfied of the justice of Mr Mackley's complaint. He was very averse to sending these children to the Industrial Schools, and this seemed to be the only course open to the Court.
    Mr Coburn suggested that the Court should order sureties to be found for their good behavior, and thus the mother might be reached and made to feel that she must cease these annoyances.
    Mrs Richards was then called into Court and asked if she would become surety for their good behavior, and she declined. Mr Coburn then asked that a small fine might be inflicted, and costs awarded, as this would probably have to be paid by Mrs Richards, who was the person really complained against. All the defendants were thereupon fined 5s on each charge, and 24s costs.49
  • 26 May 1897, Wanted: A Good General Servant. Mackley, Upper Beaconsfield50
  • 2 Mar 1898, Last week bush fires throughout the district did extensive damage. ... At Upper Beaconsfield the following had a lot of fencing burnt: Messrs. Renfree, Cavalier, Mahon, T. Mackley, Noble and E. a'Beckett.51
  • 27 Sep 1899, BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Well furnished VILLA, 8 rooms, stables, coachhouse, 6, 12, 18 months. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Well built furnished VILLA, 20 acres, 3 acres orchard. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - ELLIM ATTA, good house, well furnished, splendid views, pure air. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Furnished RESIDENCE, large rooms, stables, coachhouse man's room, garden, orchard. Noble, Beaconsfield.52
  • 17 Oct 1903, UPPER BEACONSFIELD - 20 ACRES, 3 orchard, 8 rooms, coach, stable, man's, grand views. Mackley, 405 Swanston-st.53
  • 11 Feb 1905, TUESDAY FEBRUARY 28 At Three O Clock At Patterson's Rooms 313 Collins-street
    BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN HOME, UPPER BEACONSFIELD.
    GEORGE G HENDERSON, Equitable building, has received instructions to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION as above
    That well known property ELLIMATTA
    situated about one mile from the post office at Upper Beaconsfield, and comprising, a very thoroughly built W.B. villa, with verandah on every side and containing drawing and dining rooms, each 20 x 15, room about 30 x 18, 4 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen, store rooms, pantries, &c.
    The rooms, are all lined with varnished kauri. The outbuildings comprise stable, coachhouse man's room, washhouse, foul house with yards, The land (20 acres) is planted; 3 acres in good apple, plum and peach orchard, and nice garden. The water supply is perfect with large underground tank and numerous iron tanks and creek at foot of land. The property is 700ft above sea level, commands a beautiful view, and is one of the most perfect in this the most popular of our health resorts, and is to be sacrificed.
    THE HANDSOME FURNITURE CAN BE TAKEN AT VALUATION.
    Title. Certificate.54

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), MACKLEY T C MR A 'ASSAM' APR 1880 - BOMBAY APR 1880 001.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 1 May 1880, p14.
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), MACKLEY T MR      - DEC 1880 CATHAY F 185 003.
  5. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M3224."
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Aug 1881, p1.
  7. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1830-972 - Thomas Cole Mackley of Number 24 Market Buildings Collins Street West Melbourne Merchant - C/T 2009-778.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2009-778 - discharged 3 April 1889 - Mortgage No 92106.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2009-778 - Richard Noble of Beaconsfield Merchant and Thomas James Crouch of No 75 Little Collins Street Melbourne Architect - C/T 2111-075.
  11. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal.
  12. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "indexed as McKLEY."
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Thomas Cole Mackley of Ellim Atta Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman.
  14. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#D2375 age 56 [par Thomas Cole MACKLEY & Amelia]."
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Mar 1909 p1.
  16. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 110/467.
  17. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "Isabella Helena REEVES is the daughter of Charles John REEVES and Theresa Diespeek GUTMAN, born 1884/20914 St Kilda. C J REEVES was the brother of T C MACKLEY's wife."
  18. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Richard Noble of Bushy Park Briagolong Gippsland Gentleman and Isabella Helena Reeves of 106 Powlett Street East Melbourne Spinster as Executor and Executrix.
  19. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Isabella Helena Reeves of 106 Powlett Street East Melbourne Spinster.
  20. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "Jul 1982, p13 by Diana Rocke, Roy Harris, John Milligan.
    [The Mackleys did not live at Fassifern - but on lot 124 across the road (rate notices Shire of Berwick). Also Richard Noble and Amelia Mackley married in England, and all of their children were born there before migration. (Immigration records & UK BMD)]"
  21. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 445; Folio: 56; Page: 23; GSU roll: 542639."
  22. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 720; Folio: 42; Page: 39; GSU roll: 823348."
  23. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,
    "Melbourne General Cemetery memorial transcriptions [to 1989]."
  24. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Dec 1880, p4.
  25. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 4 Jun 1881, p14.
  26. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Mar 1882, p8.
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Aug 1882, p5.
  28. [S14] Newspaper - Illustrated Australian News (Melbourne, Vic.), 4 Oct 1882, p146.
  29. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 May 1883, p7.
  30. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Mar 1884, p6.
  31. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 May 1884, p4.
  32. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas), 13 Sep 1884, p2.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Feb 1885, p10.
  34. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 27 Jun 1885, p15.
  35. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 May 1886, p10.
  36. [S14] Newspaper - The Telegraph, St Kilda, Prahran and South Yarra Guardian (Vic), 19 Mar 1887, p6.
  37. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Tue 15 May 1888, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195997464
  38. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Nov 1888, p12.
  39. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Jan 1889, p2.
  40. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser, 9 Jul 1889, p2.
  41. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Nov 1889, p10.
  42. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 30 Jul 1890, p3.
  43. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Sep 1890, p4.
  44. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 26 Nov 1892, p6.
  45. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 11 Jan 1893, p3.
  46. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 3 May 1893, p3.
  47. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 31 May 1893, p3.
  48. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 30 Aug 1893, p3.
  49. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 3 Jun 1896, p3
    possibly refers to the Richards children living at PAK-117.

  50. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 26 May 1897, p2.
  51. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Mar 1898, p3.
  52. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1899, p3.
  53. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Oct 1903, p12.
  54. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Feb 1905, p3.
Last Edited10 Jul 2019

Mary Ann Reeves

F, #1361, b. 13 Mar 1844, d. 31 Dec 1897
Father*Isaac Godfrey Reeves
Married NameMackley. 
Birth*13 Mar 1844 Hobart, TAS, Australia.1 
Marriage*6 Aug 1881 Spouse: Thomas Cole Mackley. Trinity Church, East St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M3224.2
 
Marriage-Notice*9 Aug 1881MACKLEY-REEVES.-On the 6th inst., at Trinity Church, East St. Kilda, by the Rev. Dr. Torrance, Thos. Cole, third son of the late T. C. Mackley, St. John's Hill House, New Wandsworth, Surrey, to Mary Ann, second daughter of I. G. Reeves, St. Kilda.3 
Death*31 Dec 1897 "Ellim-Atta", Beaconsfield North, VIC, Australia, #D11348 (Age 51) [par Isaac Godfrey REEVES & Ann McGOWAN].4 
Death-Notice1 Jan 1898MACKLEY.-The Friends of Mr T. MACKLEY are respectfully requested to follow the remains of his late beloved wife to place of interment, Melbourne General Cemetery.
The funeral will leave his residence, Beaconsfield, at .. a.m., Saturday, January 1, arriving at Cemetery at ..30 p.m.
GRANT, Undertaker, Berwick.5 
Death-Notice*3 Jan 1898MACKLEY -On the 31st December at her late residence Ellim-Atta, Upper Beaconsfield, Mary Ann, dearly loved wife of Thomas Cole Mackley, and daughter of the late Hon. Isaac Godfrey Reeves.6 

Grave

  • Church of England Section F 493, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of
    Isabella
    second daughter of Isaac Godfrey and Ann REEVES
    who departed this life
    26 Mar 1870, age 23 yrs.
    She has gone from us now to her rest
    Released from her suffering great
    Oh, think of the joy and the peace
    of her happy and glorified state.
    also the above
    Isaac Godfrey REEVES
    who departed this life 20 Dec 1886
    age 77 yrs
    Ann REEVES
    wife of the above
    who departed this life 8 Oct 1891, age 70 yrs
    and of
    Mary Ann
    dearly beloved wife of Thomas Cole MACKLEY
    and daughter of the abovenamed Isaac Godfrey and Ann REEVES
    who died 31 Dec 1897
    after a long and painful illness.
    And he said to me There are they which came out of great tribulation
    and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes
    also the above
    Thomas Cole MACKLEY
    who died 7 Mar 1909, age 56 yrs.7

Newspaper-Articles

  • 5 Jan 1898, BEREAVEMENT CARDS. MACKLEY. -The husband and other relations of the late Mrs. Mackley, of Ellim Atta, Upper Beaconsfield, hereby heartily THANK their friends for the sympathy displayed throughout her long and painful illness, and since.8

Citations

  1. [S64] Archives Office of Tasmania. BDM Index Tasmania "baptised Trinity - Buckingham on 7 Apr 1844 - residence Macquarie Street, father Isaac REEVES, a hatter and Ann."
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M3224."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Aug 1881, p1.
  4. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "indexed as McKLEY."
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Jan 1898, p1.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Jan 1898 p1.
  7. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,
    "Melbourne General Cemetery memorial transcriptions [to 1989]."
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Jan 1898, p1.
Last Edited28 Dec 2014

Richard Noble

M, #1362, b. 31 Jan 1840, d. 28 Jun 1912
Note* The Steyne - the Mackleys at Fassifern.1 
Birth*31 Jan 1840 Bath, Somerset, England. [par Joseph NOBLE & Mary Farnsworth HICKS]2 
Marriage*22 Sep 1866 Spouse: Eliza Lydia Ekins. Middlesex, England.3
 
Widower5 Feb 1869Richard Noble became a widower upon the death of his wife Eliza Lydia Ekins.3,4 
Marriage*29 Jul 1873 Spouse: Amelia Maria Mackley. Immanuel Church, Streatham, London, England, Sep Q [Wandsworth] 1d 907.5,3
(Migrant) Migration/Travel1 Jun 1882 Sailing with Amelia Maria Mackley, Norman Mackley Noble, Walter Richard Noble, Thomas Mackley Noble, Herbert George Macklay Noble to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Manapouri
Age 35.6
Land-UBeac*7 Jan 1889 PAK-124. Transfer from Thomas Cole Mackley to Richard Noble Thomas James Crouch. 17a 1r 16p and creation of easement.7 
Land-UBeac*26 Jun 1891 PAK-124. Transfer from Thomas James Crouch to Richard Noble. Pursuant to the direction of the Commissioner of Titles in this behalf given under the 229th Section of the transfer of Land Act 1890, the within named Richard Noble is registered as the sole proprietor of the within land.8 
Land-UBeac*26 Jun 1891 PAK-124. Transfer from Richard Noble to Arthur Fletcher Rattray. 17a 1r 16p - joint proprietors.9 
Land-UBeac23 Aug 1894 PAK-124. Transfer from Arthur Fletcher Rattray to Richard Noble Ernest William Marston Crouch. 17a 1r 16p - joint proprietors.10 
Note30 Apr 1896 Richard Noble, sworn and examined.
386. To the Chairman.—I have retired from business. I reside a mile from here and have 54 acres. I have been there between eight and nine years. I cultivate abont 10 acres; an acre or two of fruit, and I propose increasing the orchard, and I have 6 or 7 acres of grass on which I grow hay for my own cows and horses. This year as an experiment I am sending 20 or 30 cases of fruit to Melbourne with fairly satisfactory results ; it is a good fruit country ; it is encouraging some of us to increase our orchards ; my trees are in full bearing. I picked from one tree seven cases, and two cases more have been stolen and fallen off; that is the stone pippin, and in splendid condition. I have pears, plums, peaches, and nectarines. I propose pntting in apples solely. I plant 100 trees to the acre. I speak simply for myself for Upper Beaconsfield. If we get a railway it would suit me if it came within 2 or 3 miles, if not, I may just as well go to Beaconsfield the same as now; but if this line from Oakleigh could be brought within 1 mile of this hall, which is the true centre of the district, then it would suit most of the residents within a circuit of 2 or 3 miles; if it does not come as far as that, it will be very little use to Upper Beaconsfield, which has been in the running for many years past; we have worked hard for that. I was told when I came we were certain to get a railway within twelve months, and I made inquiries and was told that both parties in the House had promised a railway, and on account of that I paid £40 an acre instead £20. For a mile round here the land has been taken up in 20-acre blocks for residential purposes, and when we were likely to get a railway they said they would put up cottages and sell them, and that would have made traffic. This is also a health resort, and many of the medical men send their patients here, and they say the result is marvellous for throat diseases and so on. I have not the slightest objection to this new idea of Oakleigh if it can be brought within a reasonable distance of the place where we are now sitting. We had in this hall on Easter Monday a fruit show, and some of the judges said they never saw finer fruit. We sent some cases of apples to the Brighton Chrysanthemum Show and carried off the first prize. We get a very heavy rainfall and arw not likely to call on the Government for money for irrigation works.
The witness withdrew.11 
Land-UBeac*21 Mar 1898 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from Blakely Tyson to Richard Noble. 13a 3r 38p (caveat lodged 1 Oct 1895.)12 
Land-UBeac25 Mar 1898 PAK-124. Transfer from Richard Noble Ernest William Marston Crouch to Thomas Cole Mackley. 17a 1r 16p.13 
(Witness) Probate (Will)30 Jul 1898Witnessed the will of John Hedrick.14 
Land-UBeac*13 Jan 1904 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from Richard Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. 13a 3r 38p.15 
Widower24 Feb 1909Richard Noble became a widower upon the death of his wife Amelia Maria Mackley.16 
(Executor) Probate (Will)7 Apr 1909Was an executor in the will of Thomas Cole Mackley: Richard Noble was named executor in Thomas Cole Mackley's will.17,18 
Death*28 Jun 1912 "Finchely", Maffra, VIC, Australia, #D6349 age 72 [par Joseph NOBLE].19 
Death-Notice*1 Jul 1912NOBLE—On the 28th June, at his son's residence, "Finchely," Maffra, Richard Noble, beloved father of Norman, Walter, Thomas and Herbert Noble. Aged 72 years. Interred privately Brighton Cemetery 29th ult.20 
Village Bell*Jul 1982The article reads: THE NOBLE FAMILY CAME HERE IN 1882 - AND AGAIN IN 1982
Several months ago our Postmaster received a request from a Mrs. Long, seeking information about the Noble family, residents in Upper Beaconsfield at the end of last century. We were able to offer only a few details, but she and her family felt encouraged to pursue the inquiry further, and were rewarded by a most enjoyable family reunion in the Village Hall on Sunday, 13th June.
Their forebears, three brothers, came from England in 1882, and on arrival stayed awhile in Melbourne, where they met the Mackleys, resulting in a lasting friendship and a marriage, between the two families.
For several years they lived at "The Steyne", now "Newstead Forest" in A'Beckett Rd., the Mackleys being at "Fassifern" [sic] close by. They took an active part in community life; they were members of the Cricket Club, and initiated the moves to establish the Recreation Reserve in 1898. The family left Upper Beaconsfield in 1903, and had no association with it since.
Sons of the first generation were at the Reunion, and three younger generations, making over a hundred people present. Mr. Joe Mack acted as Master of Ceremonies, and Mr. Derek Noble gave an official welcome. Members of the family were present from Canberra and Adelaide, and greetings were received from relatives in Britain, the U.S.A. Japan and Queensland. '
A great deal of preparatory work had been done, in which Mrs. Helen Long took a leading part. Family trees and dozens of family photographs were displayed. Other heirlooms were a diary kept by Amelia Maria Mackley during her voyage to Australia in 1882, her wedding dress and veil, and a beautifully illuminated farewell address to Richard Noble, dated 24th October 1903, and signed by two local residents Mr. Goff and the Rev. James Wilson.
Cr. Ewenson, Ray Ratcliff and John Milligan visited the gathering, and after lunch Ken Hudson took a party to view the family homes. There they were delighted to be offered seedling from a camellia dating back to the Noble's occupancy, while being shown around by Mrs Fullerton and her daughter Patricia.
A more detailed account of the family relationships appears in the "Weekly Times" of the 7th July, 1982.
In conversation with members attending the Reunion, it was apparent that when a family embarks on tracing its history, a great deal of interesting information comes to light, which is valued by the younger generations. Old friendships are renewed and new ones formed; a very worthwhile enterprise.21 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1871Caroline BLAKESLEY, Deptford, London, EnglandAge 31 - Warehouseman - Widower22
3 Apr 18817 Lacre House, Lee, Kent, EnglandHead of Household: Richard Noble. Age 41 - Merchant Clothier
Member(s) of Household: Amelia Maria Noble, Walter Richard Noble, Thomas Mackley Noble, Herbert George Macklay Noble.23
1903Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist. With Amelia Maria Noble. With Walter Richard Noble.24
1908Briagolong, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: independent means. With Amelia Maria Noble.25

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Brighton, VIC, Australia26

Newspaper-Articles

  • 27 Sep 1866, NOBLE-EKINS.-On the 22nd inst., St. Martin -in-the-Fields, London, Richard, youngest son of Joseph Noble, of this city, to Eliza Lydia, eldest daughter of Mr. W. R. Ekins, Ripley, Surrey.27,28
  • 19 Jan 1888, MONDAY, JANUARY 23. At Eleven On the Promises Ormond villa, Southey-street, ST KILDA.
    AUCTION SALE Of ELEGANT and WELL-MADE ENGLISH FURNITURE,
    Comprised in DRAWING, DINING, 6 BEDROOMS, &c.,
    Including UPRIGHT GRAND PIANO by HOPKINSON, of LONDON
    First-class DRAWINGROOM SUITE, Well made Massive Cedar BOOKCASE, with Glass Doors.
    Lot of Rare and Costly Engravings and Books. First class Bedstead and Bedroom Furniture.
    WM J. BUTCHER has been instructed by Richard Noble, Esq., owing to his removal to Beaconsfield, to SELL as above, The WHOLE of his FIRST-CLASS FURNITURE. Catalogues in preparation. On view Saturday, January 21. Without reserve.
    Wm J Butcher, auctioneer and estate agent, opposite Terminus St Kilda and Premier buildings, Collins-street east.29
  • 23 Jan 1888, THIS DAY At Eleven On the Premises ORMOND VILLA, SOUTHEY STREET, ST KILDA.
    Few Minutes' Walk from Village Belle Hotel, the Terminus of the Windsor and St Kilda Esplanade Omnibus Route. Omnibuses Pass St Kilda Station Every Few Minutes.
    AUCTION SALE Of ELEGANT and WELL MADE ENGLISH FURNITURE, Comprised in
    DRAWING, DINING, 6 BED ROOMS, &c,
    Including
    UPRIGHT GRAND PIANO By HOPKINSON, of LONDON
    First-class WALNUT DRAWINGROOM SUITE.
    Italian Walnut Drawingroom Chiffonier, with mirrored panels and back.
    Well-made Massive American WALNUT SECRETAIRE BOOKCASE (specially made and designed for the last Melbourne Exhibition).
    REVERSIBLE BILLIARD and DINING TABLE by ALCOCK, with Fittings Complete
    MAHOGANY DINING SUITE in BEST GRAINED MOROCCO LEATHER
    BRUSSELS and TAPESTRY CARPETS
    OAK BREAKFAST ROOM FURNITURE.
    Handsome Brass Tubular and Other Bedsteads.
    Horsehair and Feather Mattresses.
    FULL BEDROOM SUITE in FINEST SATIN BIRCH.
    CHINA DINNER SERVICE, 120 PIECES.
    Rare and Costly Minton China Dessert and Tea Services.
    Very Fine Watercolour Drawing and Steel plate Engravings
    Lot of Sterling Silver Spoons and Forks and Fruit Service.
    Capital Hereford Milch Cow (to Calve in a few Days)
    Culinary and Kitchen Utensils
    Patent Three roller Mangle, by Nicoll.
    Lot of Sundries in Garden
    M J BUTCHER has been instructed by Richard Noble, Esq owing to his removal to Beaconsfield, to SELL as above,
    The WHOLE of his FIRST CLASS FURNITURE. Catalogues to be had on application. Without reserve.
    Wm J Butcher, auctioneer and estate agent, opposite Terminus, St Kilda, and Premier-buildings, Collins street east.30
  • 2 Jan 1889, SHIRE OF BERWICK. TENDERS will be received at the Offices, High Street, Berwick, up to Twelve o'clock at noon, on Saturday, the 12th January, 1889, for the undermentioned works—
    Clearing and Forming road to Noble's and Mackley's, Beaconsfield.
    By Order of the Council. G. W. ROBINSON, C.E., Shire Engineer.31
  • 30 Jul 1890, Berwick Shire Council Correspondence: From R. Noble and H. Mackley, Upper Beaconsfield, asking that two culverts to be made on road opposite Mrs. Crouche's. Referred to Clerk of Works.32
  • 18 Oct 1893, Some excitement was caused in Upper Beaconsfield on Monday afternoon about 1 o'clock, when it was discovered that the residence of Mrs. Tyson, "Wood-grange," was on fire. "The neighbors were soon on the spot, but from the first it was seen that no hope could be entertained of saving any part of the building. Every ones', energies were therefore concentrated on rescuing as much of the furniture as possible. So rapidly did the flames spread, however, that not many articles could be salvaged, and in about half an hour from the first alarm being given, the place was completely gutted. There is little doubt that the conflagration had its origin in the kitchen. Mrs Tyson and her grand-daughter were in the garden when the latter's attention was suddenly arrested by an extraordinary amount of smoke and flame issuing from the neigh borhood of of the kitchen chimney. The two at once hurried back to the house, but by the time they arrived, access to that part of the house was barred by the fierceness of the flames issuing therefrom. Mr. Noble, whose house is situate on the opposite side of the road, was soon upon the spot to render any assistance that might be in his power. However, it was at once evident that all that could be done was to rescue some portion of the furniture and a few valuables, from the other rooms. With the ready aid of his four sons and some of the other neighbors, who had already been attracted to the spot by the smoke and flames, a partial clearance was soon effected; but, such was the rapidity of the fire-fiends advance, that even the wearing apparel of the inmates (exeepting such as they actually wore) had, for the most part, to be abandoned to his rapacious maw. As one stood helplessly by, watching the giant tongues of flame lapping up the walls of the building as eagerly as a dog would a saucer of milk on a summer's day, it was pitiful to see the poor young girl trying to console her grandparent for the loss of their little home, whilst herself struggling to restrain the unbidden tear. And yet, amidst all the excitement, one could not avoid being amused at the touch of comedy presented by the eager question of the sturdy little boy of six, " Grandma ! have yen saved my overcoat ? there's a penny in the pocket !" and again shortly, "'Grandma ! have you saved the chaff for Peter (the goat) ?" And yet, on consider ation, these matters would naturally be as important to this young hopeful, as her diamonds to the lady of fashion, or his haystacks to the farmer. But there is not much time for indulging in such cogitations; for, although the building is lost beyond recall, there are others across the half chain road which the all devouring element will quickly appropriate given the slightest opportunity. We are soon on the alert therefore, ready to dash a bucket of water over any spot of the neighboring house or outbuildings which may ignite by the flying sparks which the westerly wind is carrying across the road. It was for tunate that such readiness was displayed, as by this means further devastation was certainly prevented on more than one occasion. Anxious were the glances that were cast up at the handsome pine trees adjoining "The Steyne" (Mr. Noble's residence), as they visibly shrink and shri vel under the deadly breath of the scorch ing sirocco. Thankful are we now for the heavy rains, which it has pleased Providence to send of late, and which now stand us in such good stead ; for had such a fire followed on a prolonged period of drought, good-bye to the pines and the contiguous property. To one whose ac quaintance with the destructive element has previously been confined to the fires of a great-city, acoompanied by the furi ous rush of the fire brigade with the shouts of their jehus, the roar and crash of tailing beams and masonry, the hissing of the water as it descends in streams on red-hut bricks and iron, and the din and confusion generally. To such, I say, there seems something unreal, something stage-like, to be compelled to stand by and let things take their course; to watch the woodwork quickly consuming in the bright flames, and then falling, almost without a sound, its substance gone, a mass of charcoal. So bit by bit the build ing goes; a little smoke forces its way be tween the weatherboards, then is visible an orange streak, a hundred streaks, and then the bare uprights are left amidst the bright glare, to follow a few moments after. The galvanised iron roofing comes down like so many sheets of cardboard, and the galvanised iron tanks, filled now with boiling water, are the only objects which cause any material sense of excite ment to the uninvolved onlooker, as they descend with something like a crash, precipitating a huge volume of scalding hissing fluid over the incandescent embers of what was but half an hour agone a dwelling place-a home. And thus in a few brief moments disappears, like "the baseless fabric of a vision, that about which a thousand memories and old associations may have twined themselves, and leaves us ashes.33
  • 21 Feb 1894, From R. Noble, suggesting that some trees on the road in front of his residence be removed, and the road levelled, as Mrs Tyson has moved her fence back to its proper position.--On motion of Crs Goff and Wilson; clerk of works to have necessary work done.34
  • 30 Jan 1895, That was an accident which had like to have been something more than awkward that happened the other day on Crouch Hill, as we call it at this end. It appears that Mr Charlie Anderson, with his sister and a young lady friend, had just set down Mr. Harry Laurie, jun., at his gate, and were driving round the rather awkward bend between Mrs. Crouch's and Mr. Noble's, when one of the reins broke; the horse got restive, and, kicking violently, dashed his hoof through the splash board, inflicting a nasty wound on Miss ——'s leg. The young lady was carried into Mr. Noble's house, and Mr. Harry Laurie was soon in attendance. Fortunately this gentleman, who is studying medicine at the Melbourne University; proved fully equal to the occasion, and Dr. Bennie, who reports favorably on the case, bears testimony to the skill with which the deep flesh wound was sown up by the young disciple of Æsculapius.35
  • 28 Apr 1897, Berwick Shire Council Correspondence
    From John [sic] Noble, complaining of the great number of ruts on Einsiedel's road, Upper Beaconsfield.-Clerk of works to have repairs effected, dayman to be put on for a day.36
  • 15 Dec 1897, RICHARD NOBLE, farmer, Longwarry, reports stolen at Upper Beaconsfield, on or about the 20th November last, a dark bay horse, about 6 years old, 14 hands, white blaze on face, no visible brand. Value £6.-O.10576. 14th December, 1897.37
  • 2 Mar 1898, Last week bush fires throughout the district did extensive damage. ... At Upper Beaconsfield the following had a lot of fencing burnt: Messrs. Renfree, Cavalier, Mahon, T. Mackley, Noble and E. a'Beckett.38
  • 27 Sep 1899, BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Well furnished VILLA, 8 rooms, stables, coachhouse, 6, 12, 18 months. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Well built furnished VILLA, 20 acres, 3 acres orchard. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - ELLIM ATTA, good house, well furnished, splendid views, pure air. Noble, Beaconsfield.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER - Furnished RESIDENCE, large rooms, stables, coachhouse man's room, garden, orchard. Noble, Beaconsfield.39
  • 11 Oct 1899, LEONARD LOFT absconded from the care of his stepfather, Richard Nible, Upper Beaconsfield, on the 3rd inst. Description:-16 years of age, 4 feet 6 inches high, medium build, dark hair, dark complexion ; wore a grey suit ; has left leg off from below knee, and has a wooden support. Supposed to have come to Melbourne. -O.8149. 5th October, 1899.40
  • 18 Oct 1899, See Police Gazette, 1899, p. 326.
    LEONARD LOFT, absconder from his licensed service.-His stepfather's name is Richard Noble.-O.8200. 13th October, 1899.41
  • 14 Oct 1903, A valedictory social will be given to Mr Noble of Upper Beaconsfield by the residents of the district on 24th inst., prior to the sale of his goods and his departure from the district. The affair will be held in the Assembly Hall.42
  • 27 Oct 1903, Farewell Presentations.
    An enjoyable social was tendered to Mr and Mrs R. Noble and family on Saturday evening in the Assembly Hall, at Upper Beaconsfield, by their many
    friends. This was deemed to be the most fitting manner in which expression could be given to the feelings of general regret at the departure of Mr and Mrs Noble from the district, after 17 years' residence. An llluminuted address was presented from the friends and residents by the Rev. Mr Wilson, and from the Sunday school children the presentation of a handsome Bible was made by three of their number; while a beautiful basket of flowers was offered to Mrs Noble.
    Mr W. H. Goff, principal of the Grammar School, was chairman, and voiced the residents' sentiments; while Mr Renfree and Mr M'Lean, on behalf of the Fruitgrowers' Association and representatives of the Upper Beaconsfield Progressive League, spoke of the invaluable help Mr Noble had always given and the loss these societies sustained by his departure. To all of which Mr Noble made grateful and heartfelt response. A very good musical programme was rendered by Mrs Drake, Miss Holle, Miss Robertson, Mr Henderson and Mrs Francis (accompanist). Mr Noble marked his severance from the church work, in which he has taken very great interest, by the presentation of a number of individual communion cups.43
  • 28 Oct 1903, On Saturday night at the Assembly Hall Mr. Noble's farewell passed off pleasantly, a good number of people being present. He was presented with an illuminated address from the residents, and a handsome bible from the children of the Sunday school, of which he had been superintendent for many years. During that time his energies have not lagged.44
  • 7 Jul 1982, A Noble Gathering
    If Mary Noble were alive, she would have been proud to see the gathering of her descendants who celebrated the date of her birth 184 years ago.
    Actually the gathering at the Recreation Hall at Upper Beaconsfield, in the Dandenongs, was a reunion of the Noble's, one of Gippsland's best known families which was planned to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the date their common ancestors, Richard Noble and his wife Amelia, arrived in Australia before settling at Upper Beaconsfield.
    Mary Noble was born Mary Farnsworth Hicks in England on June 13, 1798. At the age of 26, she married Joseph Noble.
    Among their six children was Richard, who was born at Bath on January 31, 1840.
    Richard's first wife, Eliza, and their two young children died less than three years after their marriage and four years later Richard remarried, this time to Amelia Maria Mackley.
    In March 1882, Richard and Amelia and their four young sons left Scotland, for Melbourne, where they arrived on June 1 and were met by Amelia's brother Tom Mackley and his wife.
    They settled in St Kilda, then moved to Upper Beaconsfield where Richard and his sons established an orchard.
    Two of the sons, Tom (Thomas Mackley Noble) and Bert (Herbert George Mackley Noble), took up land at Boisdale, near Maffra, in 1901, and a third, Dick (Walter Richard), settled at Bushy Park. The fourth son, Norman, moved to Perth.
    Once established on their farms in Gippsland, the three brothers married three sisters — the daughters of Richard and Mary Little (nee Buntine), thus establishing a tightly-knit family.
    Bert married Jessie, Tom married Florence and Dick married Grace, thus fulfilling that well-known storybook phrase "three Noble brothers married three Little sisters."
    Dick and Grace had four children, Bert and Jessie five, while Tom and Florrie had nine, three sons and six daughters.
    Altogether there were nine sons, all of whom married, and nine daughters, of whom seven married. For the record, Dick's children were Derek, Lyle, Arnold and Kathleen (Mrs John Waugh, SA). Bert's were Mary (Mrs Stan Johnson), Athol, Murray, Jack and Dorothy (Mrs Berry Adams) and Tom's were Amie, Dick, Mack, Irene (Mrs Ken Trembath), Helen (Mrs Stan Long), Elsie, George, Win (Mrs Joe Mack) and Mickie (Mrs Bill Campbell).
    Some moved away from the Maffra district but many stayed and they and their sons and daughters are still prominent in that community today.
    Amelia Noble died in 1909 and Richard in 1912; their sons and their wives have been dead for a quarter of a century — but their spirit was very much alive at the reunion.2

Citations

  1. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "Jul 1982, p13 by Diana Rocke, Roy Harris, John Milligan."
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times, 7 July 1982, p48.
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Stoke Lane TREASURES - Owner: pandvtreasure.
  4. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  5. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [Wandsworth] 1d 907."
  6. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B404 004.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2009-778 - Richard Noble of Beaconsfield Merchant and Thomas James Crouch of No 75 Little Collins Street Melbourne Architect - C/T 2111-075.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Pursuant to the direction of the Commissioner of Titles in this behalf given under the 229th Section of the transfer of Land Act 1890, the within named Richard Noble is registered as the sole proprietor of the within land.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Richard Noble of Beaconsfield Merchant and Arthur Fletcher Rattray of Collins Street Melbourne Accountant are now the proprietors.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Richard Noble of Beaconsfield Merchant and Ernest William Marston Crouch of Dickens Street St Kilda Architect are now the proprietors.
  11. [S342] Railway Report 1896 online at: http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/vufind/Record/62438, (Taken at Beaconsfield.) Thursday, 30th April, 1896. Members present: Mr. Cameron, in the Chair ; The Hon. D. Melville, M.L.C. Mr. Harris, Mr. J. S. White.
    1896 Victoria. Report from the Parliamentary Standing Committee on railways on the question of selecting localities for the permanent survey of narow-gauge lines together with the appendices and minutes of evidence. Printed 18 August 1896, p95.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2329-714 - Richard Noble of Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman - (caveat lodged 1 Oct 1895).
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2111-075 - Thomas Cole Mackley of Ellim Atta Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman.
  14. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 74/883.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2329-714 - Arthur Vincent Kirkwood of Upper Beaconsfield Fruit Grower.
  16. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  17. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 110/467.
  18. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "Isabella Helena REEVES is the daughter of Charles John REEVES and Theresa Diespeek GUTMAN, born 1884/20914 St Kilda. C J REEVES was the brother of T C MACKLEY's wife."
  19. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#D6349 age 72 [par Joseph NOBLE]."
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Maffra Spectator, 1 Jul 1912, p3.
  21. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "Jul 1982, p13 by Diana Rocke, Roy Harris, John Milligan.
    [The Mackleys did not live at Fassifern - but on lot 124 across the road (rate notices Shire of Berwick). Also Richard Noble and Amelia Mackley married in England, and all of their children were born there before migration. (Immigration records & UK BMD)]"
  22. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 746; Folio: 123; Page: 39; GSU roll: 824721."
  23. [S83] Online index to the UK census "1881 census: Class: RG11; Piece: 731; Folio: 39; Page: 4; GSU roll: 1341170."
  24. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  25. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  26. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials in unknown parish "Brighton Cemetery."
  27. [S14] Newspaper - Bath Chronicle & Weekly Gazette, 27 Sep 1866, p5.
  28. [S14] Newspaper - Surrey Advertiser (England), 29 Sep 1866, p3.
  29. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 19 Jan 1888, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6101616
  30. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 23 Jan 1888, p2.
  31. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Jan 1889, p2.
  32. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 30 Jul 1890, p3.
  33. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 18 Oct 1893, p3 ; by Todea Africana.
  34. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 21 Feb 1894, p3.
  35. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 30 Jan 1895, p3.
  36. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 28 Apr 1897, p3.
  37. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 15 Dec 1897, p409.
  38. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Mar 1898, p3.
  39. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1899, p3.
  40. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 11 Oct 1899, p326.
  41. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 18 Oct 1899, p333.
  42. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Sep 1903, p2.
  43. [S13] Newspaper - Herald Sun "The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 27 Oct 1903, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article246094740."
  44. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 28 Oct 1903, p2.
Last Edited22 Jul 2019

Amelia Maria Mackley

F, #1365, b. 11 Jun 1835, d. 24 Feb 1909
Father*Thomas Cole Mackley b. 1813, d. 6 Jul 1869
Mother*Amelia Colley b. 1813, d. 15 Feb 1884
Married NameNoble. 
Birth*11 Jun 1835 Saint Leonards, Shoreditch, London, England, baptised 3 Jul 1835.1,2 
Marriage*29 Jul 1873 Spouse: Richard Noble. Immanuel Church, Streatham, London, England, Sep Q [Wandsworth] 1d 907.3,4
(Migrant) Migration/Travel1 Jun 1882 Sailing with Richard Noble, Norman Mackley Noble, Walter Richard Noble, Thomas Mackley Noble, Herbert George Macklay Noble to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Manapouri
Age 35.5
Land-UBeac*10 Apr 1888 PAK-123.125. Transfer from Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to Amelia Maria Noble. Caveat was lodged 11 Nov 1887.6 
Land-Note*10 Apr 1888 PAK-123.125: Amelia Maria Noble obtained a mortgage of £1400 from Alexander Kirkwood. On Kirkwood's death the property was transferred to Alexander's son Arthur Vincent Kirkwood.7 
Land-UBeac*5 Oct 1903 PAK-123.125. Transfer from Amelia Maria Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. 38a 3r 9p.8 
Death*24 Feb 1909 "Greystone", Barclay street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D3268 (Age 73.)9 
Death-Notice*25 Feb 1909NOBLE. —On the 24th February, at Graystone, 18 Barkly-street, St. Kilda, Amelia Maria, wife of Richard Noble, sister of T. C. Mackley, mother of Norman, Walter, Thomas, and Herbert, aged 73 years.10 
Village Bell*Jul 1982The article reads: THE NOBLE FAMILY CAME HERE IN 1882 - AND AGAIN IN 1982
Several months ago our Postmaster received a request from a Mrs. Long, seeking information about the Noble family, residents in Upper Beaconsfield at the end of last century. We were able to offer only a few details, but she and her family felt encouraged to pursue the inquiry further, and were rewarded by a most enjoyable family reunion in the Village Hall on Sunday, 13th June.
Their forebears, three brothers, came from England in 1882, and on arrival stayed awhile in Melbourne, where they met the Mackleys, resulting in a lasting friendship and a marriage, between the two families.
For several years they lived at "The Steyne", now "Newstead Forest" in A'Beckett Rd., the Mackleys being at "Fassifern" [sic] close by. They took an active part in community life; they were members of the Cricket Club, and initiated the moves to establish the Recreation Reserve in 1898. The family left Upper Beaconsfield in 1903, and had no association with it since.
Sons of the first generation were at the Reunion, and three younger generations, making over a hundred people present. Mr. Joe Mack acted as Master of Ceremonies, and Mr. Derek Noble gave an official welcome. Members of the family were present from Canberra and Adelaide, and greetings were received from relatives in Britain, the U.S.A. Japan and Queensland. '
A great deal of preparatory work had been done, in which Mrs. Helen Long took a leading part. Family trees and dozens of family photographs were displayed. Other heirlooms were a diary kept by Amelia Maria Mackley during her voyage to Australia in 1882, her wedding dress and veil, and a beautifully illuminated farewell address to Richard Noble, dated 24th October 1903, and signed by two local residents Mr. Goff and the Rev. James Wilson.
Cr. Ewenson, Ray Ratcliff and John Milligan visited the gathering, and after lunch Ken Hudson took a party to view the family homes. There they were delighted to be offered seedling from a camellia dating back to the Noble's occupancy, while being shown around by Mrs Fullerton and her daughter Patricia.
A more detailed account of the family relationships appears in the "Weekly Times" of the 7th July, 1982.
In conversation with members attending the Reunion, it was apparent that when a family embarks on tracing its history, a great deal of interesting information comes to light, which is valued by the younger generations. Old friendships are renewed and new ones formed; a very worthwhile enterprise.11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
30 Mar 18519 Hackney Terracce, South Hackney, London, England(Head of Household) Thomas Cole Mackley;
Age 15 - at home
Member(s) of Household: Amelia Mackley, Charles Chesman Mackley, Ellen Harriet Mackley12
7 Apr 18613 Kingsland Crescent, Hackney, London, England(Head of Household) Thomas Cole Mackley;
Age 25
Member(s) of Household: Amelia Mackley, Mary Mackley, Charles Chesman Mackley, Ellen Harriet Mackley13
2 Apr 1871Ferndale ..., Streatham, London, England(Head of Household) Amelia Mackley;
Age 34 - Interest of Money and Houses
Member(s) of Household: Ellen Harriet Mackley, Thomas Cole Mackley, Louisa Kate Mackley, Friedrich Moritz Alphonse Felix De Paula14
3 Apr 18817 Lacre House, Lee, Kent, England(Head of Household) Richard Noble;
Age 45
Member(s) of Household: Walter Richard Noble, Thomas Mackley Noble, Herbert George Macklay Noble15
1903Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Richard Noble. With Walter Richard Noble.16
1908Briagolong, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Richard Noble.17

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Brighton, VIC, Australia18

Newspaper-Articles

  • 16 Nov 1888, WANTED.—GENERAL SERVANT, age 20 to 30 ; six in family. Wages 14s. Apply MRS. NOBLE, Steyne, Beaconsfield.19
  • 20 Sep 1894, Situations Vacant. GENERAL. country, plain cook and laundress ; references. Mrs. Noble, Upper Beaconsfield.20
  • 7 Jul 1982, A Noble Gathering
    If Mary Noble were alive, she would have been proud to see the gathering of her descendants who celebrated the date of her birth 184 years ago.
    Actually the gathering at the Recreation Hall at Upper Beaconsfield, in the Dandenongs, was a reunion of the Noble's, one of Gippsland's best known families which was planned to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the date their common ancestors, Richard Noble and his wife Amelia, arrived in Australia before settling at Upper Beaconsfield.
    Mary Noble was born Mary Farnsworth Hicks in England on June 13, 1798. At the age of 26, she married Joseph Noble.
    Among their six children was Richard, who was born at Bath on January 31, 1840.
    Richard's first wife, Eliza, and their two young children died less than three years after their marriage and four years later Richard remarried, this time to Amelia Maria Mackley.
    In March 1882, Richard and Amelia and their four young sons left Scotland, for Melbourne, where they arrived on June 1 and were met by Amelia's brother Tom Mackley and his wife.
    They settled in St Kilda, then moved to Upper Beaconsfield where Richard and his sons established an orchard.
    Two of the sons, Tom (Thomas Mackley Noble) and Bert (Herbert George Mackley Noble), took up land at Boisdale, near Maffra, in 1901, and a third, Dick (Walter Richard), settled at Bushy Park. The fourth son, Norman, moved to Perth.
    Once established on their farms in Gippsland, the three brothers married three sisters — the daughters of Richard and Mary Little (nee Buntine), thus establishing a tightly-knit family.
    Bert married Jessie, Tom married Florence and Dick married Grace, thus fulfilling that well-known storybook phrase "three Noble brothers married three Little sisters."
    Dick and Grace had four children, Bert and Jessie five, while Tom and Florrie had nine, three sons and six daughters.
    Altogether there were nine sons, all of whom married, and nine daughters, of whom seven married. For the record, Dick's children were Derek, Lyle, Arnold and Kathleen (Mrs John Waugh, SA). Bert's were Mary (Mrs Stan Johnson), Athol, Murray, Jack and Dorothy (Mrs Berry Adams) and Tom's were Amie, Dick, Mack, Irene (Mrs Ken Trembath), Helen (Mrs Stan Long), Elsie, George, Win (Mrs Joe Mack) and Mickie (Mrs Bill Campbell).
    Some moved away from the Maffra district but many stayed and they and their sons and daughters are still prominent in that community today.
    Amelia Noble died in 1909 and Richard in 1912; their sons and their wives have been dead for a quarter of a century — but their spirit was very much alive at the reunion.21

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#D3268 age 73."
  2. [S31] IGI "C04080-7."
  3. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [Wandsworth] 1d 907."
  4. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Stoke Lane TREASURES - Owner: pandvtreasure.
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B404 004.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 & 1435-848 - Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to Amelia Maria Noble the wife of Richard Noble of The Steyne Upper Beaconsfield formerly of Ormond Villa Southey Street Saint Kilda Gentleman. Caveat was lodged 11 Nov 1887 - lapsed 10 April 1888. - C/T 2955-857.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 & C/T 1435-848 - Mortgage Amelia Maria Noble to Alexander Kirkwood - a second mortgage was obtained on 2 Apr 1889.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 & C/T 1435-848 - Amelia Maria Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood of "Karlvera" Church Street Brighton Marine Engineer - C/T 2955-857.
  9. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 Feb 1909 p1.
  11. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "Jul 1982, p13 by Diana Rocke, Roy Harris, John Milligan.
    [The Mackleys did not live at Fassifern - but on lot 124 across the road (rate notices Shire of Berwick). Also Richard Noble and Amelia Mackley married in England, and all of their children were born there before migration. (Immigration records & UK BMD)]"
  12. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: HO107; Piece: 1506; Folio: 236; Page: 13; GSU roll: 87840."
  13. [S83] Online index to the UK census "1861 census: Class: RG 9; Piece: 156; Folio: 82; Page: 38; GSU roll: 542583."
  14. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 720; Folio: 42; Page: 39; GSU roll: 823348."
  15. [S83] Online index to the UK census "1881 census: Class: RG11; Piece: 731; Folio: 39; Page: 4; GSU roll: 1341170."
  16. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  17. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  18. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials in unknown parish "Brighton Cemetery."
  19. [S14] Newspaper - Warragul Guardian and Buln Buln and Narracan Shire Advocate, 16 Nov 1888, p2.
  20. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Thu 20 Sep 1894, p8.
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times, 7 July 1982, p48.
Last Edited22 Jul 2019

Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick

F, #1371, b. Mar 1852, d. 15 Jul 1902
Harriet Rowell Harriet ELPHINSTONE-DICK
(1858-1902)
Photograph by Imaging Studio
Father*Philip George Rowell b. 1826, d. 26 Jun 1902
Mother*Harriett Smith b. 1824, d. 31 Mar 1891
Name Variation Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick was also known as Harriet Elizabeth Rowell. 
Note Annie Seeley Miss Annie SEELEY was a storekeeper at the McBride Road site from 14 Apr 1886 to 8 October 1887, when she sold the land to Ann Fraser, widow, Beaconsfield. Annie Seeley bought the land from Mrs Craik.
An Annie SEELEY, spinster of Highett, witnessed the will of Miss Harriet Elizabeth ROWELL, also of Highett, on 23 Feb 1900. Annie is still alive when the probate is executed on 5 Aug 1902.
As they were both residents of UB in the 1880s this may be the same Annie SEELEY. 
Birth*Mar 1852 Brighton, Sussex, England, Mar Q [Brighton] 2b 173 - as Harriet Elizabeth ROWELL.1 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel5 Dec 1875 Sailing with Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Newcastle sailing from England - arriving 26 Mar 1876
as Miss Emily Howell - Age 22.2
(Migrant) Migration/Travel6 May 1878 Sailing with Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to England. Ship Durham sailing from Melbourne
as Miss Rowell - Age 30.3 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel5 Dec 1878 Sailing with Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Assam sailing from Bombay - arriving March 1879
As Miss Rowell.4
Propertybt 13 Oct 1880 - 11 Oct 1883 AC Moon and Elphinstone Dick were rated for Brick House in St Hilliers Street NAV30 (1883 - NAV32) owned by A C Moon.5 
Residence*bt 21 Feb 1883 - 11 Nov 1887 "The Steyne", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, title from 21 Feb 1883 (from Universal Permanent Building and Investment Society) to 11 Nov 1887 (Caveat lodged by Amelia NOBLE - transferred title 10 Apr 1888.)6 
Civil Case*13 May 1887 1887/2431 H Elphinstone Dick A C Moon v S P Needham. Harriet & Alice sued Needham for the sum of £7 11s plus interest and costs of £2 14s 10d, total £10 5s 10d.7 
Property-Rates*30 Sep 1888 Caroline Mercy Alice Moon and Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick were rated at Archibald Street North Brighton for a house NAV 40, Elphinstone Dick for 50ft rated NAV 10.8 
(Witness) Note1894 (an unknown value); In 1894, the Victorian Coal Mining Company sank a shaft opposite the abattoir. Coal was in great demand for power and heating. According to the first volume of the History of St Kilda, the company’s actions were guided by a spirit entity called Pat who communicated with one of the owners, Geraldine Minet. Pat proved unreliable and the venture was unsuccessful. Miss Minet’s partner was Agnes Simmons who taught swimming at Hegarty’s Baths with her fellow instructor, Miss Harriet Elphingstone Dick. There was a feminist flavour to the coal venture with the driving engine named Helena. Apparently Simmons and Minet owned a farm at Clayton where male animals were banned and after her death, Miss Simmons left her estate to the Society for the Protection of Animals.9 
(Witness) Note1898 (an unknown value); Rieke Parker lived with Anna, Ellen and Josephine McCormick at The Steyne in Abbotsford. This house formerly belonged to Alice Moon. 
Probate (Will)* 84/382. Harriett E ROWELL Date of grant: 19 Sep 1902; Date of death: 15 Jul 1902; Occupation: Spinster; Residence: Highett - left her money to Miss Margaret (Peggy) Montgomery See: Margaret Montgomery, Harriett Tabitha Noot, Annie Seeley.10 
Death*15 Jul 1902 South Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D8941 (Age 48) [par Philip G ROWELL & Harriet SMITH] - died from dilated and fatty heart and heart failure. She had suffered from this for 15 months, and was last seen by her doctor Janet L Greig on 8 July 1902. Occupation masseuse.11
Death-Notice*22 Jul 1902DICK.—On the 15th July, at Highett, suddenly, of heart failure, Harriett Elphinstone Dick, formerly of Brighton, Sussex, England.12 
Note* Harriet Elphinstone-Dick (1852–1902), also known as Harriet Elizabeth Rowell, was an early English and Australian swimming champion, and physical fitness teacher.
Originally from Brighton, England, she taught swimming at Brill's Baths in Pool Valley and won local fame with a series of public swimming feats including a 2 hour 43 minute swim in a rough September sea from Shoreham to Brighton.
In 1875, she migrated to Melbourne, Australia aboard The Newcastle with her partner, Alice Moon, and she started to teach swimming at the St Kilda Sea Baths, while also winning prizes in swimming competitions at various venues around Melbourne’s Port Phillip Bay.
She had an intense interest in physical fitness and in 1879 opened Melbourne's first women's only gymnasium, in the Queen Victoria Building, which used to stand where the Melbourne City Square is now. Physical fitness for women was a popular idea of the 1880s and the gym attracted many of Melbourne's independent career women, particularly teachers from the city's growing number of private girls' schools. Miss Dick taught the Swedish Ling Method and ran her gym until 1901.
Miss Dick and Miss Moon lived at the Melbourne suburb of Brighton. She died at home in South Brighton in 1902 and was buried in the Cheltenham Cemetery.13 
Note9 Sep 2007 Desperately Seeking From: Sunday Herald Sun
ROWELL: Harriet Elizabeth Rowell (aka Harriet Elphinston Dick), born January 5, 1852 and died June 26, 1902, who was my great-great aunt. Harriet was a distance swimmer and instructor in Melbourne in the 1870s and '80s. Harriet also taught young ladies calisthenics in Melbourne and Sydney gymnasiums. In the expectation of writing a biography, I have collected quite a bit of information on Harriet and her partner, Alice Moon. Any additional information in the form of photographs, location of swimming medals and trophies would be appreciated. I know she was awarded a silver cup in 1877 for winning a two-mile-plus swim against a male competitor. The Governor's wife, Lady Bowen, presented Harriet with an inscribed gold bracelet in 1878 for her services as a swimming instructor. Contact: Wayne, 9870 0623 or wsalt@bigpond.net.au.14 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Philip G ROWELL (Watch and Clock maker), 31 Old Steine, Brighton, Sussex, EnglandAge 9 - Scholar15
2 Apr 1871Philip G ROWELL (Watchmaker & Jeweller), 17 Castle Square, Brighton, Sussex, EnglandAge 1916

Grave

  • 105*DCE*O, Cheltenham Cemetery, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia, V: In / loving memory / Harriett. E. ROWELL / born Brighton. Sussex. / England.17

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Sep 1875, BRIGHTON. Yesterday afternoon a great swimming feat was accomplished by two young ladies, instructed at Brill Baths Miss H. E. Dick and Miss Saigman, who essayed to swim from Shoreham harbour to Brighton West Pier, a distance of about seven miles. The sea was rather rough and a strong wind from SSW, afterwards changing when about half the distance was accomplished to SW. The tide was also flowing in swiftly, and, altogether, the circumstances were decidedly unfavourable for the enterprise. Nevertheless Miss Dick accomplished the whole distance in two hours 43 minutes, and Miss Saigeman got as far as Mill terrace, when she was seized with cramp, and had to take refuge iu the accompanying boat after being in the water two hours.18
  • 16 Sep 1875... ANOTHER SWIMMING FEAT. Miss Ellen Saigeman, the swimming mistress at the Brighton Baths, and Miss H. E. Dicks, an accomplished amateur, and the daughter of local tradesman started from Shoreham the other morning for a swim to Brighton, a distance of between ...19
  • 9 Dec 1876, A Miss Elphinston Dick, who lately arrived from England, gave an exhibition of her skill as a swimmer at Kenny's Baths, St. Kilda, on Wednesday morning. Miss Dick was formerly of Brill's Baths, Brighton, England, where she was well known as celebrated swimmer. Her best feat was swimming from the mouth of Shoreham Harbour to the west pier, Brighton, a distances of nearly six miles, in two hours and 43 minutes, with a very heavy sea running at the time. Miss Dick seems perfectly at home in the water, and gave an illustration of the various styles of swimming, performing her feats with singular ease and dexterity. Miss Dick is under engagegment to Mr. Kenny to give lessons to ladies and children at the Victoria Ladies' Baths.20
  • 15 Dec 1876, CAPTAIN KENNEY'S SWIMMING TOURNAMENT Saturday next. The greatest ocean swimmer in the world, Miss Elphinstone Dick.
    CAPTAIN KENNEY'S SWIMMING MATCHES, the Bathing-ship Baths. Miss Elphinstone Dick will compete two mile match.21
  • 6 May 1878, Cleared Out 4 May. Durham, s.s., 2,284 tons, Frederick Anderson, for London, via Suez. Passengers: saloon. Miss Moon, Miss Elphinstone
    Dick.22
  • 11 May 1878, SWIMMING MATCHES AT ST. KILDA.
    The stay of Miss Elphinstone Dick in this colony and the lessons she has given to ladies in the art of swimming have had the effect of reviving and materially increasing the interest in this highly useful and healthful pastime.
    During her two seasons at St. Kilda she has, we are informed, taught over 300 ladies and children to swim, has taken part in four entertainments at Captain Kenney's bathing ship, and has given two series of swimming matches for ladies and children at the Victoria Ladies' Baths.
    She is a native of Brighton, in Sussex, and learned swimming in the rough waters of the Channel. It was at one of the swimming entertainments alluded to, held on April 13, that our artist sketched the scene depicted in our engraving. The occasion was made, the last appearance at the bathing ship of Miss Dick before leaving for England. The prin cipal events were the diving match, won by Terry ; the running headers, won by Kenney ; and the 200 yards match for Mr. D. Henry's prize. This was a spirited contest between Kitts and a young Fijian, Kitts being the winner. The handicap 200 yards match was also won by Kitts. Miss Dick gave an exhibition of fancy swimming, after which the solid silver cup given by Mr. Henry, which was won at the last meeting by M'Indoe, was presented by the donor. A day or two afterwards Miss Dick's second series of swimming matches for ladies and children was held at the Victoria Ladies' Baths, in presence of a large attendance, which included Lady Bowen and the Misses Bowen. At the end of the swimming Lady Bowen pre sented to Miss Dick a testimonial in the form of a massive gold bracelet, the gift of her Melbourne pupils and friends. In presenting it Lady Bowen expressed admiration of Miss Dick's swimming, and her conviction that she thoroughly deserved this mark of her pupils' esteem. Her ladyship also spoke in flattering terms of Miss Dick's excellent method of teaching; which her daughters had experienced, and concluded by an earnest hope that Miss Dick would return to Victoria. Miss Dick expressed great gratification on receiving such a valuable mark of the good opinion of her pupils and friends, and, after thanking Lady Bowen for her kind wishes, stated that it was her intention to return here next summer. The bracelet was a very hand some plain strap, weighing nearly five ounces, manufac tured to order by Messrs. Kilpatrick and Co. It bore the following inscription: — "Presented to Miss Elphinstone Dick by her Melbourne pupils, in recognition of her successful efforts to promote the art of swimming among the ladies of Victoria, and in admiration of her skill as a swimmer and her efficiency as a teacher. April 16, 1878."23
  • 7 Dec 1878, Arrived. Dec. 5. Assam, R.M.S.S., 3,033 tons, N. Stewart, R.N.R., commander, from Bombay, via Galle, 15th ult., King George's Sound 28th ult., and Glenelg, S.A., 3rd inst. Passengers.—For Melbourne—Miss Moon, Miss Rowell (Miss Elphinstone Dick)24
  • 7 Dec 1878, By our advertising columns it will be seen that Miss Elphinstone Dick has returned to Melbourne and is resuming her very useful labors at St. Kilda. Wo understand that Miss Dick's visit to England was for the express purpose of gaining a practical knowledge of hygiene and gymnastics under the tuition of the eminent London physician, Dr Roth, who is celebrated for his success in curing remediable deformities by the application of Ling's system of Movements. It is Miss Dick's intention to open a gymnasium for ladies and children in Melbourne, and we feel assured much good will arise from it, both to such of our young people as require particular exercises to strengthen and develop them, and to those who are suffering from curvature of the spine or other deformity. The latter cases Miss Dick will have special appliances for, and will treat strictly under medical guidance. We can perceive the value of an institution to which a doctor can send a deformed patient for treatment, with confidence that his instructions will be carefully carried out by a competent person ; and we also think it highly desirable that a ladies' gymnasium should be conducted by a lady.25
  • 6 Mar 1879, MISS ELPHINSTONE DICK, arrived by the Assam from England, has RESUMED TEACHING, Captain Kenney's Victoria Ladies' Baths.26
  • 31 Mar 1879, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM (conducted by Miss Elphinstone Dick) OPENS 4th APRIL, Classes commene 18th April. No. 6 Mutual Provident Buildings, corner of Collins and William streets.27
  • 4 Apr 1879, GYMNASTICS. Miss Elphinstone Dick, a lady who is already favorably known to the Melbourne public as a very successful teacher of swimming, has established a gymnasium for ladies at the Mutual Provident Society's-buildings, at the corner of Collins and William streets. Miss Dick is a lady of considerable scientific attainments, and thoroughly qualified to teach the proper methods of muscular development. She has for several years studied "rational gymnastics," and she holds a certificate of competency from Dr. Bernard Roth, of London, for competency to treat curable deformities. Her knowledge of elementary physiology, anatomy, and medical gymnastics is of especial advantage in the treatment of curvature of the spine, stiff and weak joints, contracted chest, high shoulders and other deformities which are benefited by judicious exercise and careful management. The gymnasium, however, besides being furnished with every requisite for the cure of patients afflicted as above mentioned, is also fitted with every requisite for the proper development of the muscular system of young ladies. Of the excellent institution established by Miss Dick, with whom is associated Miss A C. Moon, daughter of Dr. Henry Moon, of London, we can speak in terms of the utmost commendation. The work of fitting up the gymnasium has been done by Mr. Turnbull, of North Fitzroy.28
  • 5 Apr 1879, A LADIES GYMNASIUM.
    Miss Elphinstone Dick who is well known in Melbourne for her success as a teacher of swimming is about to open a gymnasium for ladies where they will be enabled to receive what may be fitly termed a physical education - a branch of instruction by no means unrequired in these days of tight-lacing and high heeled shoes. Miss Dick has associated with her as co-teacher Miss Moon daughter of Dr Henry Moon, of London, and there is no doubt that both ladies are thoroughly qualified in their profession. The gymnasium has been established in a large room in the Mutual Provident Buildings, Collins-street, which is admirably adapted for the purpose, and has been fitted up with all the appliances used in such establishments for the practice of healthful exercise of the body and limbs and to promote strength and graceful movement. The gymnastic apparatus has been made by Mr Turnbull, of Harker street, Fitzroy, and appears to be of a very complete character. The floor is covered with coconut matting, padded underneath so that besides being springy to the foot any pupil who chances accidentally to "come to the ground," has little chance of being injured. Violent gymnastic feats, however, it should be said, do not form part of Miss Dick's scheme of physical instruction so much as a gradual development of the muscles which will induce her pupils after they have undergone a course of instruction in her establishment to continue healthy exercises themselves. The love of exercise by which a country-bred girl is so strongly distinguished from her town-bred cousin arises from the habitual exertion which is incident to rural life, and if Miss Dick can instil similar tastes into her Melbourne pupils she will undoubtedly accomplish good work for the future mothers of Victoria. It is satisfactory to leam that Miss Dick has in establishing her gymnasium received strong encouragement from many of the leading ladies of the colony. Lady Bowen, before her departure from the colony, wrote expressing her intereat in the undertaking and Mrs Moorhouse and Mrs Thornton have given their patronage to what the former lady recognises as "a useful and valuable institution." In addition to teaching what she terms "Rational Gymnastics" Miss Dick has also obtained all the appliances used in the treatment of curable deformities and her last visit to England was for the express purpose of studying elementary physiology, anatomy and medical gymnastics under the celebrated Dr Roth (physician to the London Institution for the Treatment of Deformities) and Dr Bernard Roth from whom she holds a certificate of competency. Among the deformities she is prepared to treat under her system (only, however after consulting a medical man in order to ascertain whether the deformity arises from muscular contraction or weakness, and not from disease) are lateral and other curvatures of the spine and stiff and weak joints, contracted chest, high shoulders, infantile paralysis and other deformities that can be cured or benefited by movements. Mr Barwell, surgeon to the Charing Cross Hospital, says that a large number of cases of deformities depend on muscular conditions. The cure therefore is better and more perfectly effected by causing the muscles to act aright than by preventing their acting at all.
    It may be well to repeat that all remedial position implies to a considerable extent exercise of those muscles which in the malposture are unused. These observations may be said to explain the principles upon which Miss Dicks system of treating deformities rests. As Miss Dick has made her scale of charges very moderate (£1 1s and £2 2s per quarter for the gymnastic classes and £5 5s per quarter for special treatment) she will require extensive support to render her undertaking profitable to herself as well as to her pupils. To that larrge class, parents of growing girls, Miss Dick's institution ought to commend itself.29
  • 10 Jul 1879, LADIES GYMNASIUM, Mutual Provident buildings, Collins street west. Conducted by Miss Elphinstone Dick. Classes daily. Guinea quarterly.30
  • 27 Feb 1880, The annual costume swimming matches at the eastern baths will take place this afternoon. The baths will, of course, be open for the admission of lady spectators, as each competitor will wear a costume. No doubt the great attraction of the day will be the second appearance in the waters of Corio Bay of Miss Elphinstone Dick, whose reputation as a swimmer is so favorably known in the colony. The programme of the sport for the afternoon embraces thirteen items, and, as good prizes are offered, there ought to be keen competition for each. The 480 yds. handicap match should prove very interesting. A band of musicians will be in attendance during the afternoon. The contests will commence at half-past two o'clock.31
  • 31 Mar 1880, It will be seen by our advertising columns that Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, of the Ladies' Gymnasium, Collins street, Melbourne, intend to form a gymnastic class in Ballarat, if a sufficient number of pupils should offer for the purpose. The object is to give young ladies a fine erect carriage, and a graceful style of walking; and no doubt many young ladies of Ballarat will avail themselves of this opportunity to secure these advantages. The terms will vary from £1 1s to £3 3s a quarter, according to the extent of the attendance. Miss Dick and Miss Moon have been engaged to teach the young ladies studying at the Sturt street Convent. They propose to start the private class in the room where Mr Bridges exhibited his pictures in the Academy of Music; and they only await the requisite number of applications to make a beginning.32
  • 2 Apr 1880, GYMNASTIC CLASSES FOR Young Ladies In Ballarat,
    Conducted by Miss ELPHINSTONE DICK and Miss A. C. MOON, of the Ladies' Gynasium, Collins street, Melbourne
    Particulars will be duly advertised.33
  • 3 Jul 1880, THE LADIES GYMNASIUM, No 6 Mutual Provident Buildings, Collins street West Conducted by Miss ELPHINSTONE DICK and Miss A. C. MOON, With Assistants.
    Miss DICK begs to call the attention of parents and principals to the superior advantages offered by her GYMNASIUM, where GIRLS receive judicious and thorough Physical Training from a competent LADY INSTRUCTOR, who does not permit violent exercise, but carries on a gradual systematic development of the whole body by exercises carefully adapted to each individual, calculated to counteract the effects of constant study, and insuring good health, ease of movement, and graceful carriage. Terms—Guinea Quarterly.34
  • 16 Jul 1881, A SKETCH AT THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM. Our artist has here given a sketch representing in the use of the Indian clubs at the Ladies' Gymnasium of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, Collins-street west. Miss Dick, by her services as a teacher of swimming and of gymnastics, has done much to inculcate a taste for healthful physical exercise among the young ladies of Melbourne, and it is well to know that her exertions in this way are not wanting in public recognition. Misses Dick and Moon have, we understand, about 190 pupils under their tuition besides those they discipline at private schools. In view of the importance of this subiect, a few remarks on physical exercises for women will perhaps not be deemed out of place. The gymnastic exercises considered so necessary for men are equally so for the other sex, although many of them need considerable modification before they are suitable for women. It is not desirable to aim at making athletes of our girls, but it is more than desirable that they should grow up healthful and capable, possessing in a sufficient degree tho muscular power which alone imparts grace to movement, and that lightens domestic duties and all the business of daily life. We have no sympathy with those people who consider feebleness a female charm. Many ladies affect to consider disgusting and indelicate an acquaintance with the structure and requirements of their own bodies. This voluntary ignorance of what most nearly concerns them leads them to daily infringe the most simple laws of health, and has resulted in so many women being weak and ailing that we have lost sight of the fact that such a state of things is not natural or inevitable. The ignorance of such women is also their misfortune, because Nature does not admit ignorance to be an exemption, but visits every infringement of her laws, sooner or later, with a penalty proportioned to the offence. Neglect of education in this direction amounts to a national injury, since the race depends largely for its stamina on the mothers. Girls are now emulating their brothers in intellectual attainments but this will soon reach tho inevitable breaking-down point unless they, like their brothers, make their bodies robust in proportion. The severer the mental strain, so much the stronger must the body be to bear it ; and mens sana in corpore sano applies to both sexes. Physical exercise is indispensable to symmetrical development and the main tenance of vital energy. The women of ancient Greece and Rome, who served as models for those statues whose unsur passed beauty excites our admiration, were trained from childhood with their brothers, only less severely. What a contrast between the Venus of Milo and our typical woman of the period ! Instead of the noble contour, with its soft lines full of power and grace, we see 'a figure,' a cramped and distorted form, having angles in place of flowing outlines, its respiration and circulation impeded by the cuirass-like corset, the natural arches and balance of the body destroyed, and its gait crippled by high heels. In many cases the corset is adopted by young girls with the mistaken idea of "forming the figure ;" in others, because absence of physical training has rendered an erect bearing impossible without an artiticial support. Fancy the Venus unable to "sit up" without stiff stays ! It is, unfortunately, not the custom for girls to indulge in healthy outdoor games (except lawn tennis); if it were so, their clothes would soon be improved. At present, the only means girls have of obtaining systematic bodily training is by attending a gymnasium ; and it is significant of tho irrationalism of female attire that they cannot do so in their conventional dress, but must exchange it for one that does not obstruct the use of the limbs. Physical training should go hand in hand with education ; it should be rational, progressive, and suited to individual requirements. The signal success of the Ladies' Gymnasium conducted by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon is an evidence that public opinion is moving onwards, while it encourages us to hope that in the future Victoria's daughters, as well as her sons, will have reason to be proud of their physique.35
  • 27 Jul 1881, A series of lessons in elementary physiology, for ladies only, will be conducted by Miss H. Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon at the Ladies' Gymasium, commencing on the 8th prox. These lessons will aim at teaching in a clear and simple manner the essential facts of physiology, i.e., how the body is constructed, how its vital processes are carried on, and what conditions are necessary for maintaining it in health and vigor. These lessons are also designed to prepare girls intending to compete at the examination in physiology to be held by the Australian Health Society in November next.36
  • 30 Jul 1881, Miss Elphinstone Dick, with whom is associated Miss A. C. Moon, has already done good service by land and sea to the young women—the future mothers in Vic toria. Miss Dick has a new project in hand, which deserves publicity and encouragement. Increasing experience in the gymnasium strengthens her conviction that much of the ill-health and suffering so common amongst women is owing to their ignorance of, and even contempt for, sanitary laws and important facts relating to the preservation of health. Miss Dick considers rightly enough that the defect is, to a great extent, an educational one, and that something in the direction of remedy can be be done by practical instruction, having for its leading principle that "Human Physiology is the basis of Hygiene." To give effect to this idea Miss Dick and Miss Moon are about giving a series of lectures and lessons, open to women only, upon the structure and more important functions of the body. This idea is a capital one, deserving of encouragement, and no money could be better spent than in the moderate fee which Miss Dick will charge for her valuable instruction. And, again, it is a kind of instruction that can be best imparted to women by one of their own sex.37
  • 15 Aug 1881, Local Subjects
    Miss H. Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon are giving a series of lessons in Elementary Physiology at the Ladies' Gymnasium, Collins Street West. The course, which is intended for ladies only, is divided into the following sections:—General Structure of the Body ; Respiration ; Circulation of the Blood ; Alimentation ; The Brain and the Nervous System ; The Skin ; The Organs of the Senses, and Application Physiological Knowledge to the Preservation of Health. Such information as the above programme indicates cannot fail to be of immense value to young ladies, and the intelligence hitherto displayed by Miss Dick and Moon in the conduct of their gymnasium, is a good earnest of their capabilities to undertake such a project. We wish them every success.38
  • 4 Feb 1882, BATHING IN THE YARRA. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS
    Sir,—Within four days two boys have been drowned in the Yarra, close to Johnston street Bridge. Their lives might perhaps have been saved had there been a buoy on the bridge. Still, at however short intervals buoys were stationed, people would probably bathe and get drowned between them. What is wanted in this neighbourhood is a public bath, where boys could bathe in safety, without offence to anyone, and could leam to swim. I am informed that two years ago nearly £200 was collected for this purpose, a suitable site near Dight's-falls selected, and plans got out, but the money still lies idle in the bank. If the sum be insufficient, let the authorities invite further contributions, and they will surely be forthcoming. I for one will help. I am, &c.
    H. ELPHINSTONE DICK.
    Abbotsford, Feb. 3.39
  • 12 Apr 1882, We lately, in these columns, advocated a better physical education for girls, and quoted several eminent names to prove that mental vigor may be as fully doveloped in them as in boys, by careful exercise in calisthenics. We are glad to find, therefore, that a Ladies' Gymnasium is to be established here by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, assisted by the Misses M'Cormick, and that the class will be opened in the large hall of the Mechanics' Institute on the 20th inst.40
  • 26 Mar 1883, PUBLIC NOTICE.
    Calisthenics & Gymnastics.
    A CLASS is being formed for Calisthenics and Gymnastics, under the supervision of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss Moon.
    Ladies desirous of joining will please make an early application to Miss M'Cann, Clifton House, Newtown Hill.41
  • 4 Aug 1883, Last week one of the subjects dealt with at the mothers' meeting was 'Hints on Clothing' by Miss Elphinstone Dick, long and favourably known amongst us in connection with our gymnastic school. She dwelt at length—and I cannot help urging the subject in these columns—on the great mistakes so many of us make by our irrational mode of dress, which, in ordinary cases, has too much the effect of unequal distribution of heat. We give seven or eight layers of stuff to protect our waists, and but one to protect our arms. We wear three or four petticoats and the thinnest of shoes and stockings. And we treat our children like ourselves, by crowding upon their poor little bodies chemises, frequently two, flannel and calico, drawers, stays, flannel petticoat, white petticoat, and dress, while, if we studied the laws of mother Nature, we should wear but three warm garments, consisting of combination garments, Princess-shaped petticoat, and the ordinary dress. In summer they could he made in light materials, while for winter flannel and felt could replace linen or calico. Stays, Miss Dick declared to be unhealthy, ungraceful, and unnecessary, and went so far as to declare, on the authority of a physician, that out of a hundred female diseases stays were accountable for eighty. She implored her audience to discard them, or, if that were impossible, to wear only riding stays, which could not permanently injure the figure. She spoke with all the enthusiasm of a reformer ; but I doubt if her eloquence had much effect on her audience. They are willing to be taught about sprains and bruises, cut fingers, and broken noses, but they don't place very much faith in the statement that the stayless woman is the really graceful one, nor do they think their stays are tight enough to injure their healths, Who ever admitted they laced tightly ?42
  • 1 Feb 1884, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM
    The principals of this popular and valuable institution have recently removed into central and commodious promises in Hanson's Buildings, No. 2 Little Collins street east, only two doors from Elizabeth street, and adjoining the well-known Sports Depot. They have here secured a fine lofty gymnasium 100 x 25ft, and have spared no expense in providing it with apparatus. Those fittings, partly imported and partly constructed by Messrs Wolter and Echberg on tho newest models, have excited the admiration of all who have examined them, and have been pronounced by an experienred authority to be more complete than anything of the kind yet in use in the colonies, while, despite the number of those appliances, they have been so skilfully arranged that they can be drawn upward or to one side so as to leave almost the whole floor available for standing exercises. The system of physical training pursued by Misses Dick and Moon is thoroughly rational and judicious, and can therefore afford to be judged by the results it produces. The prosperity that has attended this work is certain to be largely augmented now that pupils are offered increased accommodation in a part of the city accessible to all.43
  • 4 Feb 1884, The Ladies Gymnastic Institution conducted by Misses Dick and Moon has been removed from Collins street west to Little Collins street east on the second floor above the Athletic Sports Depot. Occasion has been taken in connexion with this change to introduce several new features into the arrangements so that now the gymnasium includes
    every appliance which can be used with advantage in scientific feminine gymnastics.
    Miss Dick has also been giving considerable attention to the evils arising from such modes of female dress as tend to hinder the normal movements of the body and she is, we are informed gaining converts among her pupils to the more rational belief that both health and grace of movement are better promoted by allowing the trunk and limbs their natural freedom.44
  • 16 Feb 1884, The physical training and systematic development of the human body by a thorough system of gymnastics has for many years in England and the Continent commanded the earnest attention of the medical profession and the heads of universities and echolastic institutions, and the results which have followed the establishment of medical gymnastic institutions have been exceedingly satisfactory. In Melbourne there are several gymnasiums, the most of them being for males, which are conducted on different systems. The Ladies' Gymnasium, presided over by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, with the Misses M'Cormick as assistants, has become exceedingly popular, and the attendance of pupils is very large. Indeed, they have increased to such an extent that the principals have been compelled to remove the gymnasium from Collins-street to more commodious premises in Hansen's-buildings, No. 2, Little Collins-street. The main room of the gymnasium, which has been fitted up with all the latest gymnastic appliances from England and America, is 100 feet long by 25 feet wide.
    The fittings were imported by Messrs. Wolter and Echberg, and have been constructed on the newest models. The institution is ably managed by Miss Dick and Miss Moon. The system of gymnastics provides for a gradual and natural development of the body, whether of sickly or healthy females, and the results which have followed have been exceedingly gratifying.45
  • 5 Apr 1884, A shocking collision occurred on Wednesday night, 2nd inst., near the Little River station between a goods and a passenger train.
    ...
    LIST OF THE INJURED. It is quite impossible at present to compile a complete list of the persons who sustained injuries, but the following comprises the more serious cases, as far as can be ascentained:—
    Samuel Best, about 25 years old, the guard of the 8.20 goods train, was severely shaken and bruised about the body.
    Charles Proctor Guest, aged 24 years, the fireman on the passenger train, was also severely injured. He joined the railway service on the 15th October, 1877.
    Walker, the fireman of the goods train, has his ribs fractured, and complained very much of the pain and loss of blood through a cut on the head. He was permitted to return home to Geelong.
    Mrs. Phoebe Hart is 47 years of age, and resides at 163 Latrobe-street east. She is badly braised about the body, and complains of pain in her head, but the medical attendants cannot find any injuries there.
    Mrs. J. O. Cummins, Ferrars-street, South Melbourne, is suffering from a wound on the knee and back, and has been terribly shaken. She complains of severe pain at the back of the neck, and is bruised in several places.
    Mrs. Milne, who lives with Mrs. Cummins, has a black eye and cut over the forehead, and is very much shaken.
    Mr. Richards, who resides in Bridport street west, near the gasworks, has been seen by Dr. Barratt, who reports that he is suffering from an abrasion on the knee. He also is shaken and braised on the body.
    Mrs. Katherine Beaty, aged 40 years, living at 31 Latrobe-street west, has a fractured thigh, and is braised on the lower portions of the body.
    Mrs. Ann Pell, widow, 47 years of age, gatekeeper at Somerton, has sustained severe injuries about the chest, and several scalp wounds.
    Miss A. C. Moon and Miss Elphinstone Dick, directresses of the well-known ladies' gymnasium, were passengers in the train. They were in a second class carriage (not the one which was smashed), and just before the accident Miss Moon fell asleep. Miss Dick says she had no warning of the collision, and the first she knew of it was a terrific crash which threw her violently from her seat to the opposite side of the compartment, her head stricking the woodwork. She soon recovered, and saw that her companion was more seriously hurt, her forehead being cut in three places over the right eye. Miss Dick assisted her to alight, and attended to her wounds, and to those of two other ladies in distress. On their arrival in Melbourne they were driven to Dr. Geo. Teague's, and thence to their residence, Abbotsford, where they are now confined to their rooms under strict injunctions from their medical adviser to remain quiet for a few days.
    David M'Murtrie, the guard of the passenger train, has his collar bone broken, a nasty scalp wound, and is bruised severely all over the body.
    Miss Adams, who lives at Dahlke's Filter Works, Sandridge-road, near Prince's-bridge, is suffering from shock, causing hysteria, but the doctors are confident there are no bones broken.
    Mr Dawes, the landlord of the Council Hotel, Brighton, has a deep wound at the back of the head, and is injured in the neck and on one foot.
    Miss Dawes, daughter of above, severe shock and bruises.
    R. B. Thompson, a new arrival from England, has received a severe injury to the knee-joint, and was badly shaken. He is at present at the Sydney Arms Hotel, William-street.
    P. W. Donnelly, staying at the Royal George, Elizabeth-street, head badly cut.
    Mrs. Woodburn, of Dunkeld, near hamilton, Western District, nose fractured, contusions on various parts of the body, and badly shaken.
    Mr. Ettleston, 5 Victoria-street, Queen-street, melbourne, badly bruised, and suffering from severe shock.
    John Peel, a resident of Geelong, suffering from some contusions, and shock.
    David Bird, cattle dealer, several cuts and bruises.
    Mr. W. Davies, Meredith; Mr. Brach ....46
  • 18 Apr 1884, The Little River Collision.—The Herald says that the Misses Dick and Moon, the well known lady gymnastic instructresses have been seriously injured in the Little River railway accident. Miss Moon's eyesight is likely to be permanently impaired, and Miss Dick suffers from concussion of the heart, besides a terrible rupture of the vein over the right temple.47
  • 19 Nov 1884, SKETCHES AT MISS DICK'S GYMNASTIC EXHIBITION. We give a full description in another part of our issue of the successful demonstration of the skill and cleverness of the pupils of Miss Elphinstone Dick's gymnasium given in the Melbourne Town-hall on October 25.48
  • 29 Oct 1885, MISS H. ELPHINSTONE DICK And Miss. A. C. MOON Offer to their PATRONESSES And PUPILS WARMEST THANKS For the most kind PRESENTATION
    Made to them yesterday at the Town-hall. Ladies' Gymnasium, October 29, 1885.49
  • 29 Oct 1885, LADIES' COLUMN. Ladies' Gymnastic Display.
    A very interesting musical gymnastic display was given yesterday afternoon by about 190 pupils of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon. It was held in the Town Hall, Melbourne, before a numerous assemblage of attentive spectators. On the platform were seated Lady Loch and the Misses Loch, Lady Clarke, and some members of her family, and several other ladies well known in society.
    The proceedings commenced by what were termed "Free Exercises," in which all the limbs were brought into full play, and which elicited much applause from those present. These movements were followed by some with white wands, which were extremely graceful, and testified to the skill and ability of both teachers and pupils. Some exercises with dumb-bells were then gone through with great ease and accuracy, and were very pleasing to witness. The pupils, both junior and senior, joined in all the above-named movements, but in the fencing lesson, which immediately followed it, the ages of the young ladies varied from 12 to 16 years. The teacher in this instance was Miss Dick herself, a pupil of professor Paul Aubert. The manoeuvres were cleverly executed. One of the prettiest displays was that with Indian clubs. It was, with justice, very much admired, the pupils acquitting themselves most gracefully, aud the younger ones in particular showing great suppleness, ease, and agility in the various movements required of them.
    Marching in musical time was evidently appreciated by the spectators, as the applause was very loud at its conclusion. Several figures were happily introduced during its performance, which the pupils went through in admirable time, the only drawback being the selection of some rhymes, not the prettiest that could be heard within nursery walls. The effect of the constant "great" in the second song being decidedly more peculiar than pleasant to hear.
    At the conclusion of this exercise, Lady Loch kindly presented to the successful competitors the handsome gold and silver medals, bearing a design of a Maltese cross upon them, which were awarded by Miss Moon and Miss Dick.
    The senior championship gold medal was gained by Miss Josephine Russell, and silver ones for free exercises by the Misses Hoddle, Peng, C. Mendall and D. Watson. For ladders, the same distinction was won by the Misses Graupner, Jenkins and Rosenwax. That given for jumping was received by Miss Spowers ; whilst the Misses G. and S. Watson and White were awarded those for the Indian clubs. For walking and attention, the winners were the Misses M. Brady and Amy Evans, and the former young lady and Miss Wilson. Silver medals were also given to the following "Old pupils" Free exercise, Miss Amy Horne; ladders, Miss Bertie Hay ; and Indian clubs, Miss Wood. The junior competitors were Miss H. Pearson, champion for the gold medal; and the Misses T. Brown, P. Doret, Masters, Mullen, Rede and Valerie Scratchley for the silver ones bestowed for free exercises.' The same distinction was given to the following young ladies : Misses A. Dale and E. Martie, for ladders ; Miss Ethel Devan for Roman rings ; Miss Dempster, for jumping : the Misses A. Browne J.Jenkins, Moor, and R. Woodmason, for Indian clubs ; Miss M. Neild. for climbing ; Miss M. Duffy, for walking; Miss Merry, for attention; and the Misses Ethel Bevan and M. Rich for the greatest improvement.
    When the prizes were all distributed, a very pleasing ceremony took place, which evidently took both Miss Moon and Miss Dick completely by surprise. A silver salver bearing an extremely richly chased tea and coffee service, was carried by a gentleman to Lady Loch, with the request that she would kindly undertake the presentation of it. The gift proved to be from all the pupils of the Gymnasium to the ladies just mentioned, and putting aside its own beauty, must have been gratifying to the recipients as a proof of the good-will and affection felt for them by those so long under their kindly charge. This incident brought the proceedings to a close, and the spectators left, well pleased with most of the movements they had been witnessing.
    The National Anthem was played by Mr Harcourt Lee at both the entrance and departure of Lady Loch.
    The medals awarded yesterday were those won at the recent annual competition (the fourth) held in the Ladies' Gymnasium in Little Collins street.
    The piano used on the occasion was one of the Kaps grand instruments, and was lent by Messrs J. Blackburn and Co.
    E.A.C.50
  • 7 Nov 1885, GIRLS' GYMNASTICS.
    The annual display of musical gymnastics by the pupils of Miss Dick and Miss Moon took place in the Town-hall on the afternoon of the 28th. There was an enormous attendance of parents, guardians, friends, and others, and the keen interest evidenced by them in the proceedings was very marked, and showed how strongly the question of physical training for young and growing girls has commended itself to this community. There is no doubt that this movement is one in the right direction, provided always that it is kept in reasonable bounds. Moderate and regular exercise develops the frame, expands the chest, strengthens the muscles of the trunk and abdomen, and averts many of those ills which so frequently arise in the transition from girlhood to womanhood. But teachers should be very discriminating in the amount and quality of work they give to each pupil. For instance it would be unwise to give the same amount and the same kind of exercise to a young delicate girl that it would to a fine robust one. Swimming is an exercise that every girl should indulge in. Rowing also is very serviceable, strengthening the muscles of the trunk and abdomen, and imparting grace and elegance to the figure. The question of dress until lately proved a great obstacle to the free motions of the body. Among the ancient Greeks all those exercises were comprised in the term gymnastics which were performed with the body partly naked (Greek gymnos, naked or lightly clad). How ever a sensible costume, but not quite what it should be, has been adopted, it consists of a loosely kilted white skirt with a hip each of blue sateen, sailor jacket and collar and loose bishop sleeve, and, of course, flat shoes. At practice the knickerbocker and tunic dress is affected. Lady Loch and her little daughters, accompanied by Miss Robinson, Lady Clarke and party, watched the evolu tions from the platform. Free exercise of the hands and arms showed good useful work, and the time kept was excellent "Wand exercise" followed, and the younger pupils excelled in this pretty movement, The "dumbells" were fairly well done, and the "fencing lesson" by five of the elder girls and Miss Dick brought down the house,
    The "Indian club" exercise was the most effective of the series, and had more spirit and "go"in it than those that preceded it. The marching finished up the programme, and this was most picturesque, the pupils singing quaint nursery ditties, the while they performed intricate and graceful figures. At the conclusion of the performance the prizes were distributed to the successful competitors by Lady Loch, who addressed a few words of encouragement to each. Miss Hilda Pearson carried off the gold medal amongst the juniors, and Miss Josephine Russell was the champion of the seniors. After the prizes had been distributed a silver tea and coffee service was presented to Miss Dick and Miss Moon by Her Ladyship on behalf of the pupils.51
  • 25 Oct 1887, GIRLS' GYMNASTIC DISPLAY.
    The fourth annual gymnastic display given by the members of the Ladies' Gymuasium, conducted by Misses Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M'Cormick, took place on Saturday afternoon in the Town Hall, when there was a large attendance of friends of the pupils, Lady Loch presented the prizes. A band of music under Herr Schwartz accompanied the proceedings, which included free exercises, wand exercised by the kindergarten class, dumbbell practice, Indian clubs and marching. An interesting feature was the performance of the Kindergarten class, the children ranging from 4 to 8 years of age. The pupils of the evening class presented the principals with two very handsome floral horseshoes, tied with the gymnasium colors and bearing silver badges suitably inscribed. The following is the prize list:—
    Champion: Senior, Miss Dillon; junior, Miss E. Woodmason. Free exercises: Senior, Miss Robertson, Miss Taylor, Miss Tozer; junior, Miss Marks. Miss L. Wilson. Dumbbells: Senior, Miss Brown; junior, Miss Dewar, Miss Marshall, Miss Meudell, Miss Moses junior. Miss Lindsay. Clubs : Senior, Miss L. Dillon, Miss Draper, Miss Garner, Miss Watson; junior, Miss Reid, Lauders: senior, Miss Hunter, Miss Tate: junior, Miss B. Wilson. Running jump: Senior, (1) Miss Dempster. (2) Miss Exeter; junior, Miss Coghill. Standing jump: Miss Dempster. Walking; Senior, Miss Goldstein; junior. Miss Moses. Attention : Miss Blashki, Miss Browne, Miss Meudell, Miss Wilson. Improvement: Miss B. Cole. Miss Fox, Miss Johnstone, Miss Southwick. Miss Welsh. Boys under 12 years: Dumbbells, Master M'Eachearn; ladders, Master Brain; climbing Master Herman.52
  • 27 Oct 1887, Our party made their patronage a dual item on Saturday afternoon as we first went to the Naval and Military concerts and afterwards proceeded to the Town Hall, where the pupils of Miss Elphinstone Dick and M'Cormick held their annual exhibition. There was a very fashionable attendance at the sports, but not quite so large as last year. The events we saw contested were most interesting, while the excitement of the onlookers was fully wholesome, one gallant lieutenant, whose commercial calling necessitates his daily presence in Queen-street, nearly excelling in the matter of vociferous plaudits. The Governor, Lady Loch, the Misses Loch, Miss Heyman, Captains Traill and Keith-Falconer arrived early and remained until it was necessary for Lady Loch to proceed to the Town Hall, to distribute the prizes, to the successful gymnastic competitors of Miss Dick's class. With scarcely an exception, the ladies present wore the gowns which they had donned on the previous Saturday at the Caulfield Cup races. After partaking of the ...ality of the officers, we left for the Town Hall and arrived in time to see the pupils form into a double line, through which Lady Loch and her escorts passed. Miss ...son presented Lady Loch with a lovely basket of flowers and the programme forthwith commenced. The ensemblage was composed principally of happy school girls and their admiring maters, although a goodly number of gentlemen were present desirous of educating themselves on the abilities and development of muscle, which is to be a feature with the coming women. Miss Dick seemed on excellent terms with the pupils amongst whom are several pretty girls. I was most pleased with the club exercise for the senior girls, which was very gracefully performed. The clubs were decked with ribbons, and each movement was in harmony with a waltz tune, played by the orchestra, and I could not help thinking that in exercises of this ... the Misses Dick and M'Cormick train the ear as well as the muscle.53
  • 3 Nov 1887, THE annual musical gymnastic display given by the members of the gymnasium conducted by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss Josephine M'Cormick was held in the Town Hall on Saturday, 22nd Oct., and was honoured by a large and fashionable assemblage, including the Governor and Lady Loch, who arrived late in the afternoon from the Naval and Military. Sports. On the arrival of Lady Loch, the pupils formed themselves into a double line, through which she passed, accompanied by Mdlle. Heyman and Lieutenant Officer. One of the pupils advanced and presented Her Excellency with a beautifully-arranged basket of flowers, a presentation which Lady Loch smilingly acknowledged. The hall was filled in every -part except the centre, which was reserved for the gymnastic exhibitions. The marching and evolutions were intricate, interesting and well-arranged; the programme also included free exercises, wand exercises by Kindergarten class, dumbbell aud club exercises. An Indian club exercise for the senior pupils was remarkably pretty, tbe clubs were all gaily decked with ribbons, and the different movements were gone through in corresponding time to the music of a popular waltz, which was played by a strong orchestra. At the close of the programme Lady Loch presented the successful pupils with the prizes won, and at the conclusion the pupils once more formed into double lines, through which the Vice-regal party passed as tbey left the ball. The following is the prize list ;— Champion: Senior, Miss Dillon; junior, Miss E. Woodmason. Free exercises: Senior, Miss Robertson, Miss Taylor, Miss Tozer ; junior, Miss Marks, Miss L. Wilson, Dumbbells: senior, Miss Brown; junior, Miss Dewar, Miss Marshall, Miss Meudoil.Miss Moses; junior, Miss Lindsay. Clubs : Senior, Miss L. Dillon, Miss Draper, Miss Garner Miss Watson junior, Miss Reid. Ladders: Senior, Miss Hunter, Miss Tate; junior, Miss B. Wilson. Running jump: Senior(l), Miss Dempster, (2) Miss Exeter; junior, Miss Coghill. Standing jump: Miss Dempster. Walking: Senior, Miss Goodstein ; junior, Miss Moses. Attention: Miss Blashki, Miss Browne, MissMeudelJ, Miss Wilson- Improvement: Miss B. Cole, Miss Fox, Miss Johnson Miss South wick, Miss Welsh. Boys under 12 years' Dumbbells: Master M'Eachearn ; ladders, Master Brain; climbing, Master Herman.54
  • 30 Jan 1888, UNDER VICE-REGAL and DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE. THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, 2 LITTLE COLLINS-STREET EAST, An established institute for physical culture, having efficient instructors and the best apparatus. Children are here provided with the means for that physical development which I essential to a sound education, while cases of infantile paralysis, arrested development, spinal weakness, curvature and rotation, &c., &c., find rational curative treatment by medical gymnastics, i.e., prescribed movements, electricity und massage.
    PRINCIPALS:
    Miss H. ELPHINSTONE DICK (certificated by Dr. Roth, of London), and
    Miss JOSEPHINE M'CORMICK.
    Gymnastic classes tor ladies and children held daily.
    Musical drill and gymnastics for school girls Tuesday, 4 p.m; Saturday, 10.30. Special Saturday class for boys under 12.
    Classes held in the principal suburbs.
    Pupils prepared in Physiology for the Science (Educational department) and Matriculation Examinations.55
  • 31 Jan 1888, LADIES' GYMNASIUM, 2 Little-Collins-street East.—Principals, H. Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M'Cormick. CLASSES daily.56
  • 6 Dec 1888, THE LADIES GYMNASIUM.
    The pupils of the Misses H. Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M'Cormick assembled at the Ladies' Gymnasium, Little Collins-street east, for their annual prize distribution yesterday afternoon. After the prizes had been presented to the successful competitors nearly 141 pupils and friends wore entertained with afternoon tea at the Central Luncheon Rooms, Elizabeth-street. Following is the list of prize winners Misses Burke, Burke, jun., Brind, C. Coghill (Junior Champion), Sc. John Clarke, Currie, Davies, Dewar, Dempster, Ferguson, Ford, Ficzgerald, Fox, Grover (Senior Champion), Creig, Gullett, Griffiths, Hosier, Halliday, Hermann, Hermann, jun., Harrison, Honshall, Inglis, Joyne, James, Joynt, jun., Johnstone, Kidd, Kreitmayer, Long, Lyons, Levy, Loel, M. Morris, Mitchell, Pilclier, Price, Pobjoy, M. Pearson, Perry, Perry, jun., N. Pearson, Reid, Spooner, Stuart, Seelenmeyer, Sawyers. Thomson, Troedel, Tozer, Taylor, Turner, B. Wilson, T. Wilson, Wood.57
  • 27 Apr 1889, UNDER VICE-REGAL and DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE. THE LADIES ' GYMNASIUM,
    2 Little Collins-street East, Melbourne (Between Elizabeth-street and Royal Arcade).
    Principals—MISS H. ELPHINSTONE DICK and
    Miss JOSEPHINE M'CORMICK.
    THE MELBOURNE LADIES' GYMNASIUM.
    Is an established Institute for Physical Culture, having thoroughly efficient instructors and the best apparatus. It compares favourably with kindred establishments in Europe and America, visitors from home recognising in its system and appliances the latest improvements. Children are here provided with the means of developing those physical powers which are essential to a sound education, and failing which mental progress is too often accomplished at the expense of health. Classes daily. The Saturday Class (10.30 to 12) is particularly convenient for girls attending school or residing in the suburbs, and a special feature of this lesson is the Musical Drill, which parents are invited to witness. The principals pay great attention to the cultivation of a graceful carriage and mode of walking. Circulars posted.58
  • 6 Oct 1890, An exhibition ot calisthenic exercises was given on Saturday afternoon in the Town hall by the members of the ladies' gymnasium conducted by Miss H. Elphinstone Dick and Miss Josephine M'Cormick. The centre of the hall was reserved for the exercises by the pupils, and the stage and galleries, as well as all the seats round the hall, were filled with the friends and guests of those who took part in the exhibition The young ladies, who were dressed in a neat uniform costume of blue and white, admirably couducive to freedom of movement, went through a number of evolutions to a musical accompaniment with great precision. The programme, in which 68 young ladies took part, comprised exhibitions of free exercises, dumb bells, wand exercises, ring exercises, Indian clubs, and marching. The last-named item included a variety of complicated figures, which were gone through with wonderful smoothness and accuracy, and the graceful carriage of all who took part in the display testified to the value of the physical education which they had received.59
  • 23 Mar 1892, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM. Sydney : Hyde Park (under Unitarian Church). Melbourne: Little Collins-street. (Established 1879). Principals : Miss H. Elphinstone Dick, and Miss J. M'Cormick. Gymnasium open daily from 10.30 to 12.30. Circulars posted.60
  • 9 Apr 1892, UNDER VICE-REGAL and DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE.
    The LADIES' GYMNASIUM,
    318 Little Collins-street East.
    Principals : Misses H. ELPHINSTONE DICK and JOSEPHINE M'CORMICK.
    Classes Daily, from One Guinea per Quarter.
    The leading schools visited.
    Massage, Electricity, and Medical Gymnastics, for the treatment of ill-health, spinal affections, and other deformities.61
  • 18 May 1892, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM,
    318 Little Collins-street east.
    Principal: Misses H. ELPHINSTONE DICK
    And JOSEPHINE M'CORMICK.
    Classes daily, from 1 guinea per quarter.
    The leading schools visited. Prospectus, Mullen's.62
  • 13 Jul 1892, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, (under Unitarian Church), Hyde Park. Conducted by Miss H ELPHINSTONE DICK
    Classes daily. Circulars posted.63
  • 4 Oct 1893, THE Ladies' Gymnasium, Watson's-ch., Flinders-l.
    Principals, Misses H. Elphinstone Dick, Josephine M'Cormick. Classes daily.64
  • 8 Nov 1893, THE Ladies' Gymnasium, Watson-ch., Flinders-l.—Principals, Misses H. Elphinstone Dick, Josephine M'Cormick. Classes daily.65
  • 5 May 1894, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, Watson-chambers, Flinders-lane, near Swanston-street.
    Principals, Misses H. Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M'Cormick. Classes daily from 1 guinea per term.
    The leading schools visited.
    Prospectus, Mullen's.66
  • 30 Jun 1894, The Misses Duff, accompanied by Miss Ottman, attended the performance given by Miss Elphinstone Dick's pupils at the Ladies' Gymnasium on Monday last. There were also present Mrs. F. B. and Miss Suttor, Mrs. Gullett, Mrs. Riley, Miss Madeline Decker, and Millie East. The Misses Duff expressed themselves as greatly pleased with the afternoon's display.67
  • 5 Jul 1894, A girls' gymnastic class is to be started in Sale under the management of Miss Maude Harvie, a former pupil of Miss Elphinstone Dick. There will no doubt be a large number of young ladies who will take advantage of such an excellent institution. Particulars as to terms may be learnt from Miss Harvie.68
  • 1 Oct 1894, GIRLS' GYMNASTIC CLASS. Conducted by MISS MAUDE HARVIE, Pupil of Miss H. Elphinstone Dick.
    Classes at the Old Mechanics' Institute on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Terms, 15s and 10s 6d.
    Monday Evening Class. Terms, 7s 6d.69
  • 24 Nov 1894, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, Watson's Chambers, Flinders-lane. Principals. Misses H. Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M'Cormick. Classes daily, from one guinea per term.
    ANNUAL COMPETITION will be held TO-DAY.70
  • 19 Jan 1895, THE Ladies' Gynasium, Watson's-ch., Flinders-l.— Principals, Misses H. Elphinstone Dick, Josephine M'Cormick. Classes resume, 21st January.71
  • 20 Apr 1895, THE Ladies' Gymnasium 177 Liverpool-st., Hyde Park
    Principal—Miss H Elphinstone Dick. Circular posted.72
  • 28 Nov 1895, LADIES' Bicycle Classes, l'ge hall, Mon next, cond'ted by Mr and Miss Elphinstone Dick. See advt. Satur'y.73
  • 16 Dec 1895, LADIES' Bicycle School, New Masonic-hall, Castlereagh-st., DAILY, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mr. and Miss Elphinstone Dick.74
  • 1 May 1897, AMUSEMENTS. GYMNASTICS, Elsternwick Hall, opposite, Elsternwick station.—Class commencing Monday, May 3, 3.30. Particulars H. Elphistone Dick, Josephine McCormick, Ladies' Gymnasium, 236 Flinders-lane.75
  • 27 Jan 1898, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, Watson's-chambers, Flinders-lane. Principals Misses H Elphinstone Dick and Josephine M Cormick. Classes daily, from one guinea per term. Leading schools visited. Prospectus Mullen's.76
  • 30 Jan 1899, EDUCATIONAL.
    THE Ladies' Gymnasium, Watson's-ch., Flinders-l. —Principals, H. Elphinstone Dick, Josephine M'Cormick. Classes daily. Schools visited. Adult class, Monday evenings.77
  • 29 Mar 1899, A SCHOOL of PHYSICAL CULTURE and MEDICAL GYMNASTICS Will OPEN on TUESDAY, 11th APRIL, In the FOURTH VICTORIA-BUILDINGS, COLLINS-STREET, Under the Superintendence of Miss H ELPHINSTONE DICK And Miss G. E. GAUNT.
    The Department of Medical Gymnastics will be under the Personal Supervision of Miss Elphinstone Dick.
    Full particulars in future advertisements.78
  • 4 May 1899, IT is generally admitted that mentally the female is the equal, if not the superior, of the male. Woman has attacked the various professions and with marked success. She gives her mind the mental training of the man, but neglects a man's precautions to preserve nuns (and women's) sana in corpora nano. Men train, row, box or indulge in some form of physical culture to keep the sound body, without which a sound mind is almost impossible. Women are harrassed and cuirassed by fashion in a manner unknown to men ; it is therefore all the more necessary for them to pay attention to physical culture. A School of Physical Culture and Gymnastics has been opened by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss Gaunt at 243 Collins-street, Special attention is paid by Miss Dick to massage and to all exercises calculated to develop the figure without interfering with health. Miss Dick claims, and not unreasonably, that the complete accessories with which her rooms are furnished cannot be available at schools and colleges, where physical culture forms but a small part of the curriculum. The rooms are central (close to the Age office) and comfortably equipped. The dressingroom and lavatories are all new, and fitted with every modern convenience.79
  • 5 May 1899, Physical Culture.
    In the very heart of Collins Street, next door to the Union Bank, Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss Gaunt carry on their gymnasium and school of physical culture. A large roomy apartment handsomely fitted up, and equipped with dumb-bells, clubs, poles and other implements brought into the play of gym nastics, with ladders of rope forming angles round the room, and mattresses stretched beneath, lets one into the secret of how one of the best schools of phy sical culture in Melbourne is worked. To see the various departments of the school in full operation is an education in the matter of training, exercising, or strengthening the limbs. The system is the great Swedish one which cannot be improved. With the analytical and discerning eye of a medical practitioner Miss Dick, and her assistant, discover any muscular defects or weaknesses, and these, by a system of massage and culture, are strengthened in a sure and certain manner. As for massaging it is well known that Miss Dick was one of the first, if not actually the first, to introduce this scientific treatment of the body into the colony. For many years she has proved the efficacy of massage, and had some startling results; more and more cases were entrusted to her skilful hands till at length she was induced to open up, with Miss Gaunt, the present commodious school in Collins-street (opposite White head's), where an elaborate gymnasium and school of physical culture were combined. Mothers anxious for the healthiest development of their girls are wise to entrust that branch of their culture to the principals of this school. Long experience and excellent work for many years in Melbourne have established Miss Dick as the finest instructress of gymnastics and masseuse combined in Melbourne. Her pupils of the gymnasium can be recognised anywhere by their splendid figures, fine carriage, and graceful movements. For, as the Greeks of old taught, strength is noth ing without grace, and grace a poor thing without strength. Both are cultivated at this school for growing girls and children suffering from muscular deformity. The beneficial results of physical culture are witnessed every day, and it is by submitting cases in the early stages of weakness or deformity, that the remedy in Miss Dick's hands will be the quickest and the surest. The same applies to girls going in for gymnastics. The earlier they attend to this important part of their education, the better, now and later in life, when the healthy exercise and training of their limbs and body will stand them in good stead. A due attention to physical culture has been an indispensable factor in the upbuilding of every great nation, and it rests with the young girls of Victoria to become the present-day representatives of Cornelia, whose enduring maternal fame is in the reflected glory of the strength and heroism of her noble sons, the gracchi.80
  • 16 Jun 1899, The School of Physical Culture and Medical Gymnastics, 243 COLLINS-STREET. (Close "Age" Office).
    Principals—Miss H. ELPHINSTONE DICK and Miss G. E. GAUNT,
    WILL OPEN TUESDAY, APRIL 18
    CLASSES TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY, 10.30 a.m., 2.30 p.m. SATURDAY 10.30 a.m.
    FEES. Per Qtr.
    Medical Cases, requiring Massage, &c. ... £5 5 0
    Three attendances per week.
    Pupils' Classes (special instruction) ... 2 2 0
    Two attendances per week.
    Saturday Morning Class ... ... ... 1 1 0
    Each pupil receives the individual attention of the principals, Miss Dick's experience during 20 years under the physicians and surgeons of Melbourne being a guarantee of her skill and care in the treatment of muscular weakness, infantile paralysis, and general debility.81
  • 22 Jul 1899, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM, Watson's-chambers, Flinders-lane. Established 1870. Principal, Miss JOSEPHINE M'CORMICK. CLASSES daily. MEDICAL GYMNASTICS, MASSAGE. Prospectus Mullen's.
    MISS ELPHINSTONE DICK has opened a new SCHOOL of Physical Culture at 213 Collins-st. Circulars posted.
    MEDICAL GYMNASTICS, for spinal and other muscular deformities, under medical advice. Miss Elphinstone Dick, 243 Collins-st.82
  • 21 Jul 1902, Miss H. Elphinstone Dick, the well-known teacher of swimming and gymnastics, whose death was announced on Saturday, was born in 1853, and was a native of Brighton, England, being the eldest daughter of Mr. P. G. Rowell, jeweller, who is still living there. Being blessed with a large following of brothers, she shared all their pursuits, and early imbibed a taste for and a knowledge of their recreations.
    In particular she took up swimming, and in September, 1875, gave a public test of her powers by swimming in a heavy sea from Shoreham to Brighton, a distance of six miles, in 2hours 43 min. It was on this occasion that Miss Rowell assumed for the first time the professional name by which she was always afterwards known. Shortly after she came to Melbourne, accompanied by her friend, the late Miss A. C. Moon. Here she took up systematically the physical culture of girls, first in the teaching of swimming, which she carried on at St. Kilda for many years. But her more important work was the general physical training on the Swedish system, which she and her partner (Miss Moon) bestowed on many hundreds of girls at a time when the importance of physical culture for growing womanhood was much less understood than it is today. In Victoria, at least, it is largely owing to the efforts of the deceased lady that it is so understood. In 1892 Miss Dick removed to Sydney, where she carried on her work for six years. Of late she has taught but little, and was residing at Highett at the time of her death, although not in the best of health latterly, she was at no time an invalid, or even confined to her room, and her friends had no idea of any danger. She was seized with a heart attack last Tuesday, and died in a few minutes.83
  • 30 Aug 1902, This week's Australian mail brings news of the death of Miss Elphinstone Dick, who achieved renown as a swimmer both in England and Australia. Her first feat was in September 1875, when she swam in a heavy sea from her native brighton to Shoreham in 2h 43min. She soon afterwards emigrated to Australia, and became a teacher of swimming and gymnastics in Sydney, where she passed away in her fiftieth year.84
  • 15 Sep 1902, Probate has been granted by the registrar, Mr. Singleton, to the wills of the following:- Harriett E. Rowell, £30;85

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Last Edited26 Jul 2019

Caroline Mercy Alice Moon

F, #1372, b. 4 Jul 1855, d. 21 Apr 1894
Caroline Mercy Alice MOON
(1855-1894)
Father*Henry Moon b. 26 Jun 1811, d. 2 Oct 1879
Mother*Caroline Gardner b. 1822, d. 25 Mar 1867
Related* Mary Rose Merewether Alice Moon and Mary Rose Merewether were friends, and Alice was staying with the Merewethers when she died. 
Related* Anna Julia Josephine McCormick Josephine McCormick and Alice Moon were friends. 
xref-link*Short stories by Alice Caroline Moon
Birth*4 Jul 1855 Brighton, Sussex, England, Sep Q [Brighton] 2b 140 [par Henry MOON & Caroline GARDNER]
baptised 7 Sep 1855: Chapel Royal, Brighton, Sussex, England.1,2 
Birth-Notice*10 Jul 1855MOON.—July 4, at 9, Old Steine, Brighton, the wife of Henry Moon, Esq. M.D., of a daughter.3 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel5 Dec 1875 Sailing with Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Newcastle sailing from England - arriving 26 Mar 1876
as Miss Alice Caroline MOON - Age 25.4
(Migrant) Migration/Travel6 May 1878 Sailing with Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick to England. Ship Durham sailing from Melbourne
as Miss MOON - Age 26.5 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel5 Dec 1878 Sailing with Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Assam sailing from Bombay - arriving March 1879
As Miss Moon.6
Note*bt 1880 - 1882 Committee member of the Australian Health Society. Published pamphlets on various topics in 1882:
Cookery for the sick room (with Mrs Bartrop); Kitchen Physic (with Mrs Bartrop); Preservation of the teeth. 
Propertybt 13 Oct 1880 - 11 Oct 1883 AC Moon and Elphinstone Dick were rated for Brick House in St Hilliers Street NAV30 (1883 - NAV32) owned by A C Moon.7 
Property*bt 1881 - 1883 Rated at Johnston Street/Rich Street - vacant land frontage 33 feet (Block 93 Lot 2) NAV 5.8 
Land-Notebt 1883 - 1887 PAK-125: 1883/84 - Entry 406 Miss Alice Moon no description, NAV10 - paid 28 May 1884
1884/85 - Entry 408 Miss Alice Moon no description, NAV 35 - paid 10 Jun 1885
1885/86 - Entry 427 Miss Moon 20 acres Pakenham, NAV 30 - paid 24 Dec 1885
1886/87 - Entry 285 Miss Alice Moon 40 acres and house Beaconsfield, NAV 30 - paid 14 Feb 1887.9 
Land-UBeac*15 Jan 1883Caroline Mercy Alice Moon selected land from the Crown. PAK-135. 19a 1r 38p - Land File 756/49. Forfeited block of W. H. PONTON. Relinquished by Moon 5 Feb 1883 - this land is now within the Beaconsfield Reservoir.10 
Land-Note*15 Jan 1883 PAK-135: Caroline Mercy Alice Moon stated that she was a teacher of gymnastics, and her business address was 6 Mutual Provident Buildings Collins Street West, Melbourne. She already owned an allotment in Abbotsford, one in Collingwood and one in North Fitzroy.11 
Land-Note5 Feb 1883 PAK-135: Sir, I beg to relinquish the land recently applied for by me in the Parish of Pakenham, Yours obediently C. M. Alice Moon.12 
Land-UBeac*21 Feb 1883 PAK-125. Transfer from The Universal Permanent Building and Investment Society to Caroline Mercy Alice Moon.13 
Residence*bt 21 Feb 1883 - 11 Nov 1887 "The Steyne", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, title from 21 Feb 1883 (from Universal Permanent Building and Investment Society) to 11 Nov 1887 (Caveat lodged by Amelia NOBLE - transferred title 10 Apr 1888.)14 
Land-UBeac*24 Sep 1886 PAK-123. Transfer from Charles Parsons to Caroline Mercy Alice Moon. 19a 3r 36p. The land at Pakenham was sold for £119:17:0. A deposit of 19:17:0 was paid and the balance was secured with a promissiory note for £100 due 17 September 1886. The land was fenced but otherwise unimproved.15,16 
Civil Case*13 May 1887 1887/2431 H Elphinstone Dick A C Moon v S P Needham. Harriet & Alice sued Needham for the sum of £7 11s plus interest and costs of £2 14s 10d, total £10 5s 10d.17 
Property16 Dec 1887Transferred to an unknown person PRAHRAN-35 Lot 111 (part), 4 Archibald Street, Elsternwick, VIC, Australia. This property had a frontage of 44 feet, and a depth of 100 feet. Alice obtained a mortgage form Charles Thomas Perks (No 87577) on the same day, which was discharged on 25 July 1888, when the property was transferred to The Premier Permanent Building Land and Investment Company Association of 54 Collins Street East Melbourne. They sold it to Elizabeth Jane Snowball of Orrong Road Elsternwick Spinster on 25 Oct 1897.18 
Land-UBeac*10 Apr 1888 PAK-123.125. Transfer from Caroline Mercy Alice Moon to Amelia Maria Noble. Caveat was lodged 11 Nov 1887.19 
Property-Rates*30 Sep 1888 Caroline Mercy Alice Moon and Harriet Rowell Elphinstone Dick were rated at Archibald Street North Brighton for a house NAV 40, Elphinstone Dick for 50ft rated NAV 10.20 
Death*21 Apr 1894 "Lurlie", Double Bay, Woolahra, NSW, Australia, died of a heart attack
NSW#D14854 [par Henry & WELLS].21,22 
Death-Notice23 Apr 1894MOON.—April 21, suddenly at Lurlie, Double Bay, Alice Caroline Moon, daughter of the late Dr Moon, of The Steyne, Brighton, England, Funeral will leave Double Bay at 2 p.m. for South Head Cemetery.23 
Death-Notice*28 Apr 1894MOON.—On the 21st inst., at the residence of Walton L. Merewether, Double Bay, Sydney, suddenly of heart disease, Alice C. Moon, daughter of the late Dr Henry Moon, The Steyne, Brighton, England.24 
Death-Notice28 Apr 1894MOON.— April 21, suddenly, at Lurlie, Double Bay, Alice Caroline Moon, daughter of the late Dr. Moon.25 
Probate (Will)*16 Jun 1894 Mary Rose Merewether was the principal beneficiary of Alice Moon's will, though the value of the estate was much lower than anticipated under £45. The will suggested that her estate would have been much larger.26 
Note*1898 Frederika 'Rieke' Parker Rieke Parker lived with Anna, Ellen and Josephine McCormick at The Steyne in Abbotsford. This house formerly belonged to Alice Moon. 
Village Bell*Sep 1982The article reads: TWO PIONEER PERSONALITIES
In the Village Bell issue of May 1979 we printed extracts from an article by "Vagabond" (Julian Thomas) in the Argus of November 28, 1885, about his visit to Upper Beaconsfield. He was the guest of Professor Halford, after whom Halford Road (next the Milk Bar) is named. We know that "Vagabond" was a journalist of repute, and that his host was a very early home-owner here, in the house which he called "St. George's Hill" in St. George's Parade. The house was later "Windarra" and the Parade became Salisbury Road. But who was Professor Halford?
From an inquiry to Mr. H.N. Warren of, the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, we learn that he was quite a personality, and (like J.M. Reed who was the subject of an article in our March 1982 issue) he deserves a place among our residents of note.
George Britton Halford (1824 - 1910) was born in Sussex, England. He studied medicine at St. George's Hospital in London and took his degree at the prestigious University of St. Andrews. Besides a private practice he did original research on the heart. In 1862 a medical school was being planned for Melbourne University and he was selected for the Chair. He was described as "One of the most distinguished experimental physiologists of the day. His name would give distinction to any University". He collected books and specimens to start a medical school and arrived in Melbourne in December 1862.
Until the new building was ready in 1863, he held classes at his residence in Madeline St. Carlton. He was the only lecturer in the growing school for seven years, until an assistant was engaged. His enlightened proposal to admit women to the school was blocked by the University Council until 1880. His work, mostly single-handed, established a high reputation for the medical faculty. He experimented with snake venom, and in 1868 he appeared as an expert witness in a case known as "homicide by snake bite". Though appointed for life he had no pension, and went on half-pay when overwork and ill-health compelled him to retire at 72.
Evidently the Professor named his house after the hospital of his student days, and the name survives in our St. Georges Road. His connection with Upper Beaconsfield appears to have been about the 1880's before his retirement. He died and was buried at Inverloch.
Collecting scraps of history is like detection ... by patience and coincidence, pieces fit together. When "Vagabond" was sightseeing on horseback with his host the Professor, he visited Miss Moon at "The Steyne" in A'Beckett Road (now Mrs. Fullerton's "Newstead Forest", and mentioned in an article about the Noble family in the July 1982 issue). He admired her arrangements for rearing and breeding pure-bred fowls, and he made a reference (cryptic to us) to her muscle-building activities. Now, a few days ago, an inquiry from a student preparing a thesis for her degree, throws more light on Miss Alice Caroline Moon. She and her partner, Miss Harriett Elphinstone Dick, managed a Ladies Gymnasium in Melbourne from 1872 onward. Hence the allusion to muscle-building.
Settlement had only just commenced in Upper Beaconsfield and they were probably the first owners of "The Steyne". Shire records show that they had 20 acres in 1883, and from 1885 to 1888 40 acres and a house in which they lived. Miss Moon also had the "Central Restaurant" at the corner of Elizabeth and Little Collins Sts. in the City. The menu was printed daily in the "Argus" and "Vagabond" was evidently a patron, for he wrote (not in the article about Upper Beaconsfield) that it was the best restaurant in Melbourne, particularly for ladies. The food was epicurean, and presumably some of the pure-bred fowls contributed to the bill of fare.
As Professor Halford was born only a few miles from Brighton, Sussex, where "The Steyne" is a local landmark, it is open to speculation that he may have been already acquainted with Miss Moon or her partner in England, where Miss Dick had made a name for herself as a swimmer.
Miss Moon was obviously quite a personality, and must have been outstanding against her Victorian background, when ladies' interests were supposed to be devoted to the household and the Church. Another resident of note.27 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 18619 Old Steine, Brighton, Sussex, England(Head of Household) Henry Moon;
Age 5 - Scholar
Member(s) of Household: Caroline Moon, Mary Hooper Moon, Myra Woodward Moon, Alfred Morton Moon, Sarah Ann Moon, Grace Ethel Moon, Nathaniel Edward Moon28
2 Apr 18719 Old Steine, Brighton, Sussex, England(Head of Household) Henry Moon;
Age 15 - Scholar
Member(s) of Household: Myra Woodward Moon Grace Ethel Moon29

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 May 1878, Cleared Out 4 May. Durham, s.s., 2,284 tons, Frederick Anderson, for London, via Suez. Passengers: saloon. Miss Moon, Miss Elphinstone
    Dick.30
  • 4 Apr 1879, GYMNASTICS. Miss Elphinstone Dick, a lady who is already favorably known to the Melbourne public as a very successful teacher of swimming, has established a gymnasium for ladies at the Mutual Provident Society's-buildings, at the corner of Collins and William streets. Miss Dick is a lady of considerable scientific attainments, and thoroughly qualified to teach the proper methods of muscular development. She has for several years studied "rational gymnastics," and she holds a certificate of competency from Dr. Bernard Roth, of London, for competency to treat curable deformities. Her knowledge of elementary physiology, anatomy, and medical gymnastics is of especial advantage in the treatment of curvature of the spine, stiff and weak joints, contracted chest, high shoulders and other deformities which are benefited by judicious exercise and careful management. The gymnasium, however, besides being furnished with every requisite for the cure of patients afflicted as above mentioned, is also fitted with every requisite for the proper development of the muscular system of young ladies. Of the excellent institution established by Miss Dick, with whom is associated Miss A C. Moon, daughter of Dr. Henry Moon, of London, we can speak in terms of the utmost commendation. The work of fitting up the gymnasium has been done by Mr. Turnbull, of North Fitzroy.31
  • 5 Apr 1879, A LADIES GYMNASIUM.
    Miss Elphinstone Dick who is well known in Melbourne for her success as a teacher of swimming is about to open a gymnasium for ladies where they will be enabled to receive what may be fitly termed a physical education - a branch of instruction by no means unrequired in these days of tight-lacing and high heeled shoes. Miss Dick has associated with her as co-teacher Miss Moon daughter of Dr Henry Moon, of London, and there is no doubt that both ladies are thoroughly qualified in their profession. The gymnasium has been established in a large room in the Mutual Provident Buildings, Collins-street, which is admirably adapted for the purpose, and has been fitted up with all the appliances used in such establishments for the practice of healthful exercise of the body and limbs and to promote strength and graceful movement. The gymnastic apparatus has been made by Mr Turnbull, of Harker street, Fitzroy, and appears to be of a very complete character. The floor is covered with coconut matting, padded underneath so that besides being springy to the foot any pupil who chances accidentally to "come to the ground," has little chance of being injured. Violent gymnastic feats, however, it should be said, do not form part of Miss Dick's scheme of physical instruction so much as a gradual development of the muscles which will induce her pupils after they have undergone a course of instruction in her establishment to continue healthy exercises themselves. The love of exercise by which a country-bred girl is so strongly distinguished from her town-bred cousin arises from the habitual exertion which is incident to rural life, and if Miss Dick can instil similar tastes into her Melbourne pupils she will undoubtedly accomplish good work for the future mothers of Victoria. It is satisfactory to leam that Miss Dick has in establishing her gymnasium received strong encouragement from many of the leading ladies of the colony. Lady Bowen, before her departure from the colony, wrote expressing her intereat in the undertaking and Mrs Moorhouse and Mrs Thornton have given their patronage to what the former lady recognises as "a useful and valuable institution." In addition to teaching what she terms "Rational Gymnastics" Miss Dick has also obtained all the appliances used in the treatment of curable deformities and her last visit to England was for the express purpose of studying elementary physiology, anatomy and medical gymnastics under the celebrated Dr Roth (physician to the London Institution for the Treatment of Deformities) and Dr Bernard Roth from whom she holds a certificate of competency. Among the deformities she is prepared to treat under her system (only, however after consulting a medical man in order to ascertain whether the deformity arises from muscular contraction or weakness, and not from disease) are lateral and other curvatures of the spine and stiff and weak joints, contracted chest, high shoulders, infantile paralysis and other deformities that can be cured or benefited by movements. Mr Barwell, surgeon to the Charing Cross Hospital, says that a large number of cases of deformities depend on muscular conditions. The cure therefore is better and more perfectly effected by causing the muscles to act aright than by preventing their acting at all.
    It may be well to repeat that all remedial position implies to a considerable extent exercise of those muscles which in the malposture are unused. These observations may be said to explain the principles upon which Miss Dicks system of treating deformities rests. As Miss Dick has made her scale of charges very moderate (£1 1s and £2 2s per quarter for the gymnastic classes and £5 5s per quarter for special treatment) she will require extensive support to render her undertaking profitable to herself as well as to her pupils. To that larrge class, parents of growing girls, Miss Dick's institution ought to commend itself.32
  • 2 Dec 1879, Death of father: MOON.—On the 2nd of October, at St Leonard's, Sussex, Henry Moon, M.D., F.R.C.P., of 9 Old Steyne, Brighton, England.33
  • 31 Mar 1880, It will be seen by our advertising columns that Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, of the Ladies' Gymnasium, Collins street, Melbourne, intend to form a gymnastic class in Ballarat, if a sufficient number of pupils should offer for the purpose. The object is to give young ladies a fine erect carriage, and a graceful style of walking; and no doubt many young ladies of Ballarat will avail themselves of this opportunity to secure these advantages. The terms will vary from £1 1s to £3 3s a quarter, according to the extent of the attendance. Miss Dick and Miss Moon have been engaged to teach the young ladies studying at the Sturt street Convent. They propose to start the private class in the room where Mr Bridges exhibited his pictures in the Academy of Music; and they only await the requisite number of applications to make a beginning.34
  • 2 Apr 1880, GYMNASTIC CLASSES FOR Young Ladies In Ballarat,
    Conducted by Miss ELPHINSTONE DICK and Miss A. C. MOON, of the Ladies' Gynasium, Collins street, Melbourne
    Particulars will be duly advertised.35
  • 14 Jun 1880, Miss A. C. Moon, not Miss Moore, was the lady who was elected at the recent meeting of the Australian Health Society as a member of the council, in place of Mrs Duerdin.36
  • 3 Jul 1880, THE LADIES GYMNASIUM, No 6 Mutual Provident Buildings, Collins street West Conducted by Miss ELPHINSTONE DICK and Miss A. C. MOON, With Assistants.
    Miss DICK begs to call the attention of parents and principals to the superior advantages offered by her GYMNASIUM, where GIRLS receive judicious and thorough Physical Training from a competent LADY INSTRUCTOR, who does not permit violent exercise, but carries on a gradual systematic development of the whole body by exercises carefully adapted to each individual, calculated to counteract the effects of constant study, and insuring good health, ease of movement, and graceful carriage. Terms—Guinea Quarterly.37
  • 16 Jul 1881, A SKETCH AT THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM. Our artist has here given a sketch representing in the use of the Indian clubs at the Ladies' Gymnasium of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, Collins-street west. Miss Dick, by her services as a teacher of swimming and of gymnastics, has done much to inculcate a taste for healthful physical exercise among the young ladies of Melbourne, and it is well to know that her exertions in this way are not wanting in public recognition. Misses Dick and Moon have, we understand, about 190 pupils under their tuition besides those they discipline at private schools. In view of the importance of this subiect, a few remarks on physical exercises for women will perhaps not be deemed out of place. The gymnastic exercises considered so necessary for men are equally so for the other sex, although many of them need considerable modification before they are suitable for women. It is not desirable to aim at making athletes of our girls, but it is more than desirable that they should grow up healthful and capable, possessing in a sufficient degree tho muscular power which alone imparts grace to movement, and that lightens domestic duties and all the business of daily life. We have no sympathy with those people who consider feebleness a female charm. Many ladies affect to consider disgusting and indelicate an acquaintance with the structure and requirements of their own bodies. This voluntary ignorance of what most nearly concerns them leads them to daily infringe the most simple laws of health, and has resulted in so many women being weak and ailing that we have lost sight of the fact that such a state of things is not natural or inevitable. The ignorance of such women is also their misfortune, because Nature does not admit ignorance to be an exemption, but visits every infringement of her laws, sooner or later, with a penalty proportioned to the offence. Neglect of education in this direction amounts to a national injury, since the race depends largely for its stamina on the mothers. Girls are now emulating their brothers in intellectual attainments but this will soon reach tho inevitable breaking-down point unless they, like their brothers, make their bodies robust in proportion. The severer the mental strain, so much the stronger must the body be to bear it ; and mens sana in corpore sano applies to both sexes. Physical exercise is indispensable to symmetrical development and the main tenance of vital energy. The women of ancient Greece and Rome, who served as models for those statues whose unsur passed beauty excites our admiration, were trained from childhood with their brothers, only less severely. What a contrast between the Venus of Milo and our typical woman of the period ! Instead of the noble contour, with its soft lines full of power and grace, we see 'a figure,' a cramped and distorted form, having angles in place of flowing outlines, its respiration and circulation impeded by the cuirass-like corset, the natural arches and balance of the body destroyed, and its gait crippled by high heels. In many cases the corset is adopted by young girls with the mistaken idea of "forming the figure ;" in others, because absence of physical training has rendered an erect bearing impossible without an artiticial support. Fancy the Venus unable to "sit up" without stiff stays ! It is, unfortunately, not the custom for girls to indulge in healthy outdoor games (except lawn tennis); if it were so, their clothes would soon be improved. At present, the only means girls have of obtaining systematic bodily training is by attending a gymnasium ; and it is significant of tho irrationalism of female attire that they cannot do so in their conventional dress, but must exchange it for one that does not obstruct the use of the limbs. Physical training should go hand in hand with education ; it should be rational, progressive, and suited to individual requirements. The signal success of the Ladies' Gymnasium conducted by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon is an evidence that public opinion is moving onwards, while it encourages us to hope that in the future Victoria's daughters, as well as her sons, will have reason to be proud of their physique.38
  • 27 Jul 1881, A series of lessons in elementary physiology, for ladies only, will be conducted by Miss H. Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon at the Ladies' Gymasium, commencing on the 8th prox. These lessons will aim at teaching in a clear and simple manner the essential facts of physiology, i.e., how the body is constructed, how its vital processes are carried on, and what conditions are necessary for maintaining it in health and vigor. These lessons are also designed to prepare girls intending to compete at the examination in physiology to be held by the Australian Health Society in November next.39
  • 30 Jul 1881, Miss Elphinstone Dick, with whom is associated Miss A. C. Moon, has already done good service by land and sea to the young women—the future mothers in Vic toria. Miss Dick has a new project in hand, which deserves publicity and encouragement. Increasing experience in the gymnasium strengthens her conviction that much of the ill-health and suffering so common amongst women is owing to their ignorance of, and even contempt for, sanitary laws and important facts relating to the preservation of health. Miss Dick considers rightly enough that the defect is, to a great extent, an educational one, and that something in the direction of remedy can be be done by practical instruction, having for its leading principle that "Human Physiology is the basis of Hygiene." To give effect to this idea Miss Dick and Miss Moon are about giving a series of lectures and lessons, open to women only, upon the structure and more important functions of the body. This idea is a capital one, deserving of encouragement, and no money could be better spent than in the moderate fee which Miss Dick will charge for her valuable instruction. And, again, it is a kind of instruction that can be best imparted to women by one of their own sex.40
  • 15 Aug 1881, Local Subjects
    Miss H. Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon are giving a series of lessons in Elementary Physiology at the Ladies' Gymnasium, Collins Street West. The course, which is intended for ladies only, is divided into the following sections:—General Structure of the Body ; Respiration ; Circulation of the Blood ; Alimentation ; The Brain and the Nervous System ; The Skin ; The Organs of the Senses, and Application Physiological Knowledge to the Preservation of Health. Such information as the above programme indicates cannot fail to be of immense value to young ladies, and the intelligence hitherto displayed by Miss Dick and Moon in the conduct of their gymnasium, is a good earnest of their capabilities to undertake such a project. We wish them every success.41
  • 30 Mar 1882, NOTES AND COMMENTS.
    From time to time at the meetings of the Australian Health Society excellent papers on subjects of great importance to the general community are read, and we are glad to find that those are in future to be published in a cheap form for general circulation. In this way much good will be done in educating the people on the all important subject of health, and how dress and diet may conduce to preserve it. At last night's meeting the papers were of more than ordinary interest. Dr D. B. Reid exhibited and explained the model of an improved means of ventilation, the use of which, he contended, would place the Melbourne Hospital in a sanitary condition; if this is so, it is to be hoped that Dr Reid can convince the committee of the fact. We have no doubt its members are open to conviction, but the man, lay or professional, has not yet been found who can convince them that they do not know everything, or that the hospital is not a paragon of perfection. Mrs Webster read an excellent paper by Mrs Bartrop and Miss A. C. Moon, on Cookery for the Sick Room, the publication of which will, we think, be eagerly welcomed.
    Mr Blackett read an interesting paper on Economy of Fuel and Smoke Abatement and if the author will give some of the many easy means by which the smoke nuisance may be abated he will confer a great favor upon the citizens of Melbourne. Economy in fuel is a matter in which all are interested, and if Mr Blackett treats his sub ject in a practical way his paper will be a valuable one. Dr J. P. Ryan, in a most interesting paper, dealt in a trenchant manner with stimulants, their use and abuse. There are few subjects in which the public more really desire trustworthy information than this, and the full text of Dr Ryan's excellent lecture will be anxiously looked for. Altogether, we congratulate the society on the good work which, in an efficient and unobtrusive manner, is being done by it.42
  • 12 Apr 1882, We lately, in these columns, advocated a better physical education for girls, and quoted several eminent names to prove that mental vigor may be as fully doveloped in them as in boys, by careful exercise in calisthenics. We are glad to find, therefore, that a Ladies' Gymnasium is to be established here by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, assisted by the Misses M'Cormick, and that the class will be opened in the large hall of the Mechanics' Institute on the 20th inst.43
  • 20 May 1882, THE PROPOSED WORKING MEN'S COLLEGE. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    Sir, Will Mr. Ormond permit a suggestion that working women should have some direct participation in the advantages to be offered by the proposed Working Men's College. There are many women employed in businesses or domestic service who would gladly avail themselves of cheap instruction, especially in directions likely to increase their earning capacity. Mr Ormond may have this intention, but as he has given no hint of it, I venture, in support of my suggestion, to indicate one want in particular which such an institution might supply namely, instruction to girls and women in matters pertaining to what may he called domestic science. Such knowledge although of the utmost value in promoting health, comfort, and economy, is seldom present in the workman's house, since it forms no port of ordinary education, unless girls have exceptionally good training at home or in service, their only guide to house keeping being parental tradition and practice Ihat this is too frequently inadequate and that few women possess the intuitive faculty for domestic management which seems to be expected of them, is plainly shown by the great number of ill ordered houses in all quarters. The artisan's home may be termed his wife's workshop, its operations and economy being her business, to fit her for which she requires special teaching, just as he needs apprenticeship to his trade. It has been truly observed that "No sanitary reform can be accomplished until the masses are taught the laws of health, and it is obvious that in teaching them to women we ahould be teaching them to the most directly executive part of the community, and should establish a protection against disease, by promoting an active recognition of sanitary responsibilities, neglect of which, in the aggregate, may be said to determine the health of a city.
    This subject is receiving increasing attention in England, where girls in the national schools are now taught "domestic economy," including a knowledge of foods and their preparation where class instruction in cooking is available in most places, and where practical lessons on the preservation of health have been successfully given in connexion with board schools and by various sanitary associations to the working women in many of the large towns. These lessons have included an elementary study of the structure and functions of the body care of the person and clothing, properties and relative value of foods, necessity of good water, principles and art of cooking, cleanliness ventilation, drainage, and other characteristics of a healthy dwelling infant hygiene, prevention of disease, and nursing of the sick.
    Should Mr. Ormond initiate such a movement in Melbourne, he would undoubtedly reccive hearty co-operation from medical men and others qualified to assist, I am, &c. A. C. M. Abbotsford, May 1844
  • 28 Sep 1882, THE AUSTRALIAN HEALTH SOCIETY.
    The seventh annual meeting of the Australian Health Society was held last evening in one of the rooms at the Town-hall. Mr. Justice Higinbotham, the president, occupied the chair. There was a large attendance.
    In the absence of Mr. Burrows, the secretary, Mr J. H. Haydon read the report of the council. In this reference was made with regret to the deaths of the Hon Robert Ramsay and the Rev. J. G. Stobbs, both members who had taken a warm interest in the work of the society. Thirty four new members had,
    it was reported, joined during the year. The finances were in a satisfactory condition, a credit balance of £68 2s 11d. being exhibited. The following new tracts had been published by the society during the year:—"The Nervous System ; Its Use and Abuse," by J. Smith ; "Little Stomachs," by A. Sutherland, and "Kitchen Physic," by Mrs Bartrop and Miss Moon. The lectures given under the auspices of the society had become more popular than formerly, and the council was of opinion that they had performed efficient service. The Geelong branch of the society was vigorously pursuing the objects for which it had been formed. The council noted "with extreme satisfaction that the question of hygienic dress for ladies had been prominently discussed in the columns of that powerful and widely circulated newspaper "The Australasian." It was added that the council had under consideration a proposition to establish a central depot for the better carrying on of the business of the association.
    The CHAIRMAN said the council considered that the report recorded on the whole satisfactory progress made by the society during the last year. He concluded his remarks with a regretful reference to the deaths of Messrs. Ramsay and Stobbs.
    The meeting then proceeded to the election of officers.
    Mrs. WEBSTER proposed in complimentary terms the re-election as president of Mr Justice Higinbotham.
    Mrs G. W. SELBY seconded the motion, which was agreed to.
    The other officers appointed were as follows:—Mrs. John Webster and Professor Elkington, vice presidents , Mr. Wm. Crellin, hon. treasurer, Mrs G. W. Selby, hon secretary ; Mrs. Duerdin, librarian, and the council, Mrs F. Wilkinson, Miss Isabella Niven, Miss A. C. Moon, Messrs. Lloyd Tayler, A. Sutherland, Thos Brodribb, J. Gill, F. J. Gladman, J. H. Haydon. P. Moloney, J. P. Ryan, C. B. Blackett, and W. M. Fehon.
    READING OF PAPERS
    Mr H. K. RUSDEN read a paper on "Health and Happiness." He applied his remarks mainly to the nurture of children, who, he said, should be carefully instructed in the principles of physiology. He also spoke of the evil effect of the excessive use of sugar and salt in articles of food and drink, making special reference to the use of salt in beer.
    Mrs. WEBSTER next read a paper on "Exercise," in the course of which she said that a reform in dress must come before girls could have the active exercise they ought to have to give them a well developed body. This reform would come, she thought, the more speedily through girls acquiring a love for out-door games than by any other means. It was always found when a woman had real work to do she instinctively modified her dress to give herself greater freedom of movement. There was a large field of most useful exercise for girls in domestic work—she meant the less ambitious domestic duties of cleansing and keeping the house in order. In the case of women living in towns the only form of exercise that presented itself as constantly available was walking. By this she did not mean a languid stroll or an afternoon's shopping. If it were not considered so unladylike she should like to say that in walking the arms should swing—at any rate the elbows should not be pinched into the sides like the legs of a trussed fowl. Two short walks of this kind every day, even if they did not last more than 10 minutes each, would do more real good than a long stroll of the ordinary type. In addition, there should be about 10 minutes' work with the arms before dressing in the morning.
    Dr. JAMIESON, and other speakers, condemned the "cramming" for examinations, as preventing a due amount of exercise by students, and one gentleman suggested that the society should adopt a resolution to the effect that the tasks required at home of the children for the state schools should be less rigorous. Dr. Moloney pleaded for moderation in athletic exercises.
    The CHAIRMAN questioned whether the subject had been so thoroughly gone into by the society as to warrant them that evening in adopting a definite resolution on the subject of the studies that are exacted from children out of school. At the same time he quite agreed with several speakers, that the length of time given to study after school hours in the evening was, under the present system, excessive. He believed, however, that there would be no reform in this direction until there was an improvement in the art of teaching, which would necessarily be accompanied by a diminution in the time of mental labour required from the pupils. Though young people devoted now a larger number of hours to study than was formerly the case, it must also be remembered that they gave a larger amount of time to physical exercise, and he thought it was a gratifying feature of the times that so much attention was given to such pursuits. This feature had, he thought, already produced a very marked effect on the physique of our young men. With Dr. Moloney be agreed that in these matters moderation was the safest rule to follow. He thanked Mrs. Webster for insisting in her paper on young ladies using their limbs freely, and therefore gracefully.
    A paper by Mr. S. Gibbons on "Street Ethics," in which he advocated a greater regard to politeness in the public thoroughfares, and an observance of the rule of the road in walking, brought the meeting to an end.45
  • 26 Mar 1883, PUBLIC NOTICE.
    Calisthenics & Gymnastics.
    A CLASS is being formed for Calisthenics and Gymnastics, under the supervision of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss Moon.
    Ladies desirous of joining will please make an early application to Miss M'Cann, Clifton House, Newtown Hill.46
  • 1 Feb 1884, THE LADIES' GYMNASIUM
    The principals of this popular and valuable institution have recently removed into central and commodious promises in Hanson's Buildings, No. 2 Little Collins street east, only two doors from Elizabeth street, and adjoining the well-known Sports Depot. They have here secured a fine lofty gymnasium 100 x 25ft, and have spared no expense in providing it with apparatus. Those fittings, partly imported and partly constructed by Messrs Wolter and Echberg on tho newest models, have excited the admiration of all who have examined them, and have been pronounced by an experienred authority to be more complete than anything of the kind yet in use in the colonies, while, despite the number of those appliances, they have been so skilfully arranged that they can be drawn upward or to one side so as to leave almost the whole floor available for standing exercises. The system of physical training pursued by Misses Dick and Moon is thoroughly rational and judicious, and can therefore afford to be judged by the results it produces. The prosperity that has attended this work is certain to be largely augmented now that pupils are offered increased accommodation in a part of the city accessible to all.47
  • 4 Feb 1884, The Ladies Gymnastic Institution conducted by Misses Dick and Moon has been removed from Collins street west to Little Collins street east on the second floor above the Athletic Sports Depot. Occasion has been taken in connexion with this change to introduce several new features into the arrangements so that now the gymnasium includes
    every appliance which can be used with advantage in scientific feminine gymnastics.
    Miss Dick has also been giving considerable attention to the evils arising from such modes of female dress as tend to hinder the normal movements of the body and she is, we are informed gaining converts among her pupils to the more rational belief that both health and grace of movement are better promoted by allowing the trunk and limbs their natural freedom.48
  • 16 Feb 1884, The physical training and systematic development of the human body by a thorough system of gymnastics has for many years in England and the Continent commanded the earnest attention of the medical profession and the heads of universities and echolastic institutions, and the results which have followed the establishment of medical gymnastic institutions have been exceedingly satisfactory. In Melbourne there are several gymnasiums, the most of them being for males, which are conducted on different systems. The Ladies' Gymnasium, presided over by Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon, with the Misses M'Cormick as assistants, has become exceedingly popular, and the attendance of pupils is very large. Indeed, they have increased to such an extent that the principals have been compelled to remove the gymnasium from Collins-street to more commodious premises in Hansen's-buildings, No. 2, Little Collins-street. The main room of the gymnasium, which has been fitted up with all the latest gymnastic appliances from England and America, is 100 feet long by 25 feet wide.
    The fittings were imported by Messrs. Wolter and Echberg, and have been constructed on the newest models. The institution is ably managed by Miss Dick and Miss Moon. The system of gymnastics provides for a gradual and natural development of the body, whether of sickly or healthy females, and the results which have followed have been exceedingly gratifying.49
  • 5 Apr 1884, A shocking collision occurred on Wednesday night, 2nd inst., near the Little River station between a goods and a passenger train.
    ...
    LIST OF THE INJURED. It is quite impossible at present to compile a complete list of the persons who sustained injuries, but the following comprises the more serious cases, as far as can be ascentained:—
    Samuel Best, about 25 years old, the guard of the 8.20 goods train, was severely shaken and bruised about the body.
    Charles Proctor Guest, aged 24 years, the fireman on the passenger train, was also severely injured. He joined the railway service on the 15th October, 1877.
    Walker, the fireman of the goods train, has his ribs fractured, and complained very much of the pain and loss of blood through a cut on the head. He was permitted to return home to Geelong.
    Mrs. Phoebe Hart is 47 years of age, and resides at 163 Latrobe-street east. She is badly braised about the body, and complains of pain in her head, but the medical attendants cannot find any injuries there.
    Mrs. J. O. Cummins, Ferrars-street, South Melbourne, is suffering from a wound on the knee and back, and has been terribly shaken. She complains of severe pain at the back of the neck, and is bruised in several places.
    Mrs. Milne, who lives with Mrs. Cummins, has a black eye and cut over the forehead, and is very much shaken.
    Mr. Richards, who resides in Bridport street west, near the gasworks, has been seen by Dr. Barratt, who reports that he is suffering from an abrasion on the knee. He also is shaken and braised on the body.
    Mrs. Katherine Beaty, aged 40 years, living at 31 Latrobe-street west, has a fractured thigh, and is braised on the lower portions of the body.
    Mrs. Ann Pell, widow, 47 years of age, gatekeeper at Somerton, has sustained severe injuries about the chest, and several scalp wounds.
    Miss A. C. Moon and Miss Elphinstone Dick, directresses of the well-known ladies' gymnasium, were passengers in the train. They were in a second class carriage (not the one which was smashed), and just before the accident Miss Moon fell asleep. Miss Dick says she had no warning of the collision, and the first she knew of it was a terrific crash which threw her violently from her seat to the opposite side of the compartment, her head stricking the woodwork. She soon recovered, and saw that her companion was more seriously hurt, her forehead being cut in three places over the right eye. Miss Dick assisted her to alight, and attended to her wounds, and to those of two other ladies in distress. On their arrival in Melbourne they were driven to Dr. Geo. Teague's, and thence to their residence, Abbotsford, where they are now confined to their rooms under strict injunctions from their medical adviser to remain quiet for a few days.
    David M'Murtrie, the guard of the passenger train, has his collar bone broken, a nasty scalp wound, and is bruised severely all over the body.
    Miss Adams, who lives at Dahlke's Filter Works, Sandridge-road, near Prince's-bridge, is suffering from shock, causing hysteria, but the doctors are confident there are no bones broken.
    Mr Dawes, the landlord of the Council Hotel, Brighton, has a deep wound at the back of the head, and is injured in the neck and on one foot.
    Miss Dawes, daughter of above, severe shock and bruises.
    R. B. Thompson, a new arrival from England, has received a severe injury to the knee-joint, and was badly shaken. He is at present at the Sydney Arms Hotel, William-street.
    P. W. Donnelly, staying at the Royal George, Elizabeth-street, head badly cut.
    Mrs. Woodburn, of Dunkeld, near hamilton, Western District, nose fractured, contusions on various parts of the body, and badly shaken.
    Mr. Ettleston, 5 Victoria-street, Queen-street, melbourne, badly bruised, and suffering from severe shock.
    John Peel, a resident of Geelong, suffering from some contusions, and shock.
    David Bird, cattle dealer, several cuts and bruises.
    Mr. W. Davies, Meredith; Mr. Brach ....50
  • 9 Apr 1884, THURSDAY, 10th APRIL. At 12 o'Clock. On the Premises, St. Helier-street, Abbotsford, City of Collingwood. THE "STEYNE." To those in search of a Picturesque Residence on the Yarra River, with Fruit and Flower Garden, close to City. WILLIAM IEVERS, Jun., auctioneer, 97 Cardigan-street, Carlton, has been instructed by the owner, who is leaving Melbourne, to sell by auction at a sacrifice—That well built Brick Villa of 5 rooms, cellar bathroom, out offices, with ample verandah round house, passages, gas, &c., having a frontage of 45 ft. to St. Heliers-street, Abbotsford, running down to the River Yarra—a very noble depth. The house faces the Yarra, and the grounds are tastefully laid out in flower and fruit garden, containing many choice varieties of both. Persons inclined towards angling and boating have now a chance of securing those delightful and healthy amusements in addition to a fine residence, for a moderate sum. N.B.— Property within 3 minutes of Johnston-street 'bus depot. Inspection invited. Title perfect. Terms easy, at sale. Also, at half-past 12 o'clock, on the ground, a fine block of land, Johnston-street, city of Collingwood, near junction of Hoddle-street, alongside Dulio-street, and opposite Park-street, having a frontage of 33 ft. to Johnstone-st. by the grand depth of 132 ft. to a 20 ft. right of way at back. Remember, the 'bus stand is close by, giving easy access to the city, and land values in this street are rapidly rising. Title, certificate. Terms easy, at sale. - Titles at J. H. Wyburn's, solicitor, Elizabeth-st. Inspection invited.51
  • 18 Apr 1884, The Little River Collision.—The Herald says that the Misses Dick and Moon, the well known lady gymnastic instructresses have been seriously injured in the Little River railway accident. Miss Moon's eyesight is likely to be permanently impaired, and Miss Dick suffers from concussion of the heart, besides a terrible rupture of the vein over the right temple.52
  • 29 Oct 1885, LADIES' GYMNASIUM, Melbourne.—A principal in this well known business (established seven years), being desirous of retiring, is willing to treat for the SALE of her SHARE. Application by letter in the first instance), to Miss Moon, 2 Little Collins-street east.53
  • 29 Oct 1885, MISS H. ELPHINSTONE DICK And Miss. A. C. MOON Offer to their PATRONESSES And PUPILS WARMEST THANKS For the most kind PRESENTATION
    Made to them yesterday at the Town-hall. Ladies' Gymnasium, October 29, 1885.53
  • 29 Oct 1885, LADIES' COLUMN. Ladies' Gymnastic Display.
    A very interesting musical gymnastic display was given yesterday afternoon by about 190 pupils of Miss Elphinstone Dick and Miss A. C. Moon. It was held in the Town Hall, Melbourne, before a numerous assemblage of attentive spectators. On the platform were seated Lady Loch and the Misses Loch, Lady Clarke, and some members of her family, and several other ladies well known in society.
    The proceedings commenced by what were termed "Free Exercises," in which all the limbs were brought into full play, and which elicited much applause from those present. These movements were followed by some with white wands, which were extremely graceful, and testified to the skill and ability of both teachers and pupils. Some exercises with dumb-bells were then gone through with great ease and accuracy, and were very pleasing to witness. The pupils, both junior and senior, joined in all the above-named movements, but in the fencing lesson, which immediately followed it, the ages of the young ladies varied from 12 to 16 years. The teacher in this instance was Miss Dick herself, a pupil of professor Paul Aubert. The manoeuvres were cleverly executed. One of the prettiest displays was that with Indian clubs. It was, with justice, very much admired, the pupils acquitting themselves most gracefully, aud the younger ones in particular showing great suppleness, ease, and agility in the various movements required of them.
    Marching in musical time was evidently appreciated by the spectators, as the applause was very loud at its conclusion. Several figures were happily introduced during its performance, which the pupils went through in admirable time, the only drawback being the selection of some rhymes, not the prettiest that could be heard within nursery walls. The effect of the constant "great" in the second song being decidedly more peculiar than pleasant to hear.
    At the conclusion of this exercise, Lady Loch kindly presented to the successful competitors the handsome gold and silver medals, bearing a design of a Maltese cross upon them, which were awarded by Miss Moon and Miss Dick.
    The senior championship gold medal was gained by Miss Josephine Russell, and silver ones for free exercises by the Misses Hoddle, Peng, C. Mendall and D. Watson. For ladders, the same distinction was won by the Misses Graupner, Jenkins and Rosenwax. That given for jumping was received by Miss Spowers ; whilst the Misses G. and S. Watson and White were awarded those for the Indian clubs. For walking and attention, the winners were the Misses M. Brady and Amy Evans, and the former young lady and Miss Wilson. Silver medals were also given to the following "Old pupils" Free exercise, Miss Amy Horne; ladders, Miss Bertie Hay ; and Indian clubs, Miss Wood. The junior competitors were Miss H. Pearson, champion for the gold medal; and the Misses T. Brown, P. Doret, Masters, Mullen, Rede and Valerie Scratchley for the silver ones bestowed for free exercises.' The same distinction was given to the following young ladies : Misses A. Dale and E. Martie, for ladders ; Miss Ethel Devan for Roman rings ; Miss Dempster, for jumping : the Misses A. Browne J.Jenkins, Moor, and R. Woodmason, for Indian clubs ; Miss M. Neild. for climbing ; Miss M. Duffy, for walking; Miss Merry, for attention; and the Misses Ethel Bevan and M. Rich for the greatest improvement.
    When the prizes were all distributed, a very pleasing ceremony took place, which evidently took both Miss Moon and Miss Dick completely by surprise. A silver salver bearing an extremely richly chased tea and coffee service, was carried by a gentleman to Lady Loch, with the request that she would kindly undertake the presentation of it. The gift proved to be from all the pupils of the Gymnasium to the ladies just mentioned, and putting aside its own beauty, must have been gratifying to the recipients as a proof of the good-will and affection felt for them by those so long under their kindly charge. This incident brought the proceedings to a close, and the spectators left, well pleased with most of the movements they had been witnessing.
    The National Anthem was played by Mr Harcourt Lee at both the entrance and departure of Lady Loch.
    The medals awarded yesterday were those won at the recent annual competition (the fourth) held in the Ladies' Gymnasium in Little Collins street.
    The piano used on the occasion was one of the Kaps grand instruments, and was lent by Messrs J. Blackburn and Co.
    E.A.C.54
  • 7 Nov 1885, GIRLS' GYMNASTICS.
    The annual display of musical gymnastics by the pupils of Miss Dick and Miss Moon took place in the Town-hall on the afternoon of the 28th. There was an enormous attendance of parents, guardians, friends, and others, and the keen interest evidenced by them in the proceedings was very marked, and showed how strongly the question of physical training for young and growing girls has commended itself to this community. There is no doubt that this movement is one in the right direction, provided always that it is kept in reasonable bounds. Moderate and regular exercise develops the frame, expands the chest, strengthens the muscles of the trunk and abdomen, and averts many of those ills which so frequently arise in the transition from girlhood to womanhood. But teachers should be very discriminating in the amount and quality of work they give to each pupil. For instance it would be unwise to give the same amount and the same kind of exercise to a young delicate girl that it would to a fine robust one. Swimming is an exercise that every girl should indulge in. Rowing also is very serviceable, strengthening the muscles of the trunk and abdomen, and imparting grace and elegance to the figure. The question of dress until lately proved a great obstacle to the free motions of the body. Among the ancient Greeks all those exercises were comprised in the term gymnastics which were performed with the body partly naked (Greek gymnos, naked or lightly clad). How ever a sensible costume, but not quite what it should be, has been adopted, it consists of a loosely kilted white skirt with a hip each of blue sateen, sailor jacket and collar and loose bishop sleeve, and, of course, flat shoes. At practice the knickerbocker and tunic dress is affected. Lady Loch and her little daughters, accompanied by Miss Robinson, Lady Clarke and party, watched the evolu tions from the platform. Free exercise of the hands and arms showed good useful work, and the time kept was excellent "Wand exercise" followed, and the younger pupils excelled in this pretty movement, The "dumbells" were fairly well done, and the "fencing lesson" by five of the elder girls and Miss Dick brought down the house,
    The "Indian club" exercise was the most effective of the series, and had more spirit and "go"in it than those that preceded it. The marching finished up the programme, and this was most picturesque, the pupils singing quaint nursery ditties, the while they performed intricate and graceful figures. At the conclusion of the performance the prizes were distributed to the successful competitors by Lady Loch, who addressed a few words of encouragement to each. Miss Hilda Pearson carried off the gold medal amongst the juniors, and Miss Josephine Russell was the champion of the seniors. After the prizes had been distributed a silver tea and coffee service was presented to Miss Dick and Miss Moon by Her Ladyship on behalf of the pupils.55
  • 3 Dec 1885, Matrimonial.
    THE " Vagabond" has expressed an eager desire to get possession of Miss Moon's selection at Beaconsfield, together with the chickens thereon. There may be a possibility of his wish being gratified. It may be merely a matter of arrangement, but instead of suggesting anything of the kind in the Argus in such a public manner, let him try the effect of a private, personal proposal, and await the result with patience. The "Vagabond" has evidently been moonstruck, in one sense.56
  • 27 Aug 1887, SALE OF STUD STOCK. PECK, HUDSON and RAYNOR will sell by public auction, at the National Agricultural Society's Show Ground, Flemington, selections of stud stock from the following pure herds, as under: — On TUESDAY, 30th AUGUST. At 11 o'clock. JERSEYS, On account of Miss Moon, The Steyne.57
  • 8 Oct 1887, Probably the advertisement for The Steyne:
    AT Ievers's Carlton. - Upper Beaconsfield, 40 ACRES, lovely mountain Residence, sea view, dairy, garden £1600.58
  • 24 Oct 1888, WILL OPEN NOVEMBER 1, A New and Superior Refreshment Resort For Ladies and Gentlemen.
    "The CENTRAL" LUNCHEON and TEA ROOMS, Corner Elizabeth-street and Little Collins-street East.
    LIGHT LUNCHEON, AFTERNOON TEA, EVENING MEAL. Cuisine under the Direction of Mons. E. Grenet, late Chef to His Excellency Sir Henry B. Loch.
    Two Ice Rooms. Telephone No 1181. Parcels office, writing table, &c. for the convenience of patrons
    Proprietor A. C. MOON.59
  • 2 Nov 1888, A necessity has always existed in Melbourne for there being a ladies' resort, which, while it possessed all the advantages of a club, was without its dis advantages. Through the enterprise of Miss A. C. Moon, an institution entitled The Central has been started, which supplies the requirement so long wanting. The Central, situated at the corner of Little Collins and Elizabeth streets, was opened yesterday, and great admiration was expressed at its perfect arrangements. There are three very large rooms—with seating capacity for 200—elegantly fitted up with marble topped tables, draped panel mirrors, and every necessary which can possibly add to the comfort of its patrons. A telephone (1181) has been attached ; stamps are sold at the counter ; a writing-table is always at hand ; and a page-boy is always in attendance to call cabs, etc. In addition there is an office for the receipt of letters, telegrams and parcels ; the menu is of a very superior kind ; the charges are moderate ; and the ventilation has received every attention. A retiring room for ladies has also been included in the building which is in charge of an attendant. Altogether, Miss Moon's undertaking is of great importance and deserving of universal patronage.60
  • 10 Nov 1888, "THE CENTRAL.—By this name beautifully appointed luncheon and tea rooms, which Miss A. C. Moon has opened at 114 Elizabeth-street (corner of Little Collins-street), will be known. And the name is certain to become very early familiar, for at the Central the lounger on "the block," the city man, and the country visitor will find in the way of service and accommodation anything and everything a first-class hotel can supply in the midday hours. It is most important that the cuisne is in charge of a chef who graduated in his art in the Parisian school, and not unimportant that the telephone and a parcels receiving and delivery office, with facilities for postal cor respondenee, will be at the service of visitors. Miss Moon is not unmindful that on Fridays certain people require that special provision shall be made for their wants, and she will not be forgetful of it.61
  • 8 Mar 1889, Miss Moon, of the Central, is giving a special second luncheon to-day at two o'clock, for the convenience of all the ladies and gentlemen returning from seeing Sir Henry and Lady Loch "off" in the Arcadia. A delicious menu is prepared.62
  • 20 Mar 1889, OUR LADIES MELBOURNE LETTER.
    On going into the Central Dining rooms in Elizabeth-street to-day, I found that the mistress of the establishment is Miss Moon, who was formerly partner to Miss Elphinstone Dick in the Collins-street gymnasium. Miss Moon is a doctor's daughter, well educated and gifted, and would have shone as a journalist. But instead she opened the Central, knowing that supplying nutriment to the body would prove more remunerative than meting out nourishment to the brain, and she has not been disappointed. The entrance to the Central is down a flight of steps off Elizabeth street near Little Collins-street. The rooms are beautifully arranged ; everything is most excellent to the handsomely draped gasaliers and windows grated without and filled inside with graceful ferns. At mid-day the numerous tables were surrounded by parties of three, four, or six, all of whom were of the better class of citizens, most of them merchants and professional gentlemen, and about an equal number of ladies. The utmost regularity and despatch prevailed, and the waitresses all acting under Miss Moon's personal supervision, seemed a very superior class of girls. I was much pleased with my visit to the Central, and glad to find that Miss Moon had found a vocation so satisfactory in its results. There is every convenience for visitors--writing tables and a commodious parcels press, with sliding doors; also cloak rooms for both ladies and gentlemen.63
  • 23 Mar 1889, "Melbourne is very marvellous, but in its catering arrangements for the public is not sufficiently advanced. Miss Moon's restaurant and tea rooms in Elizabeth-street being the only establishment abreast of the times in providing for ladies as well as for gentlemen".
    In an article about Brittany by 'The Vagabond64'
  • 27 Apr 1889, THE CENTRAL BASEMENT.
    114 Elizabeth-street
    (Opposite, Jas. M'Ewan and Co.'s).
    TO-DAY'S LUNCHEON MENU.
    SOUP.—Kidney. FISH.—Fried flounders, boiled fish. ENTREES.—Veal cutlets à l'Italienne, eggs au gratin, lambs' trotters à la Poulette, steak and oyster pie, pork cutlets à la diable. JOINT.—Sirloin with Yorkshire pudding. SWEETS.—Apple tart, macaroni pudding, compôte of quinces with custard, pastry with cream.
    THE CENTRAL,
    Proprietor, A. C. Moon65
  • 25 May 1889, THE CENTRAL. BASEMENT, 114 Elizabeth-street (Opposite Jas. M'Ewan's).
    TO-DAY'S MENU.
    SOUPS—Vermicelli, oyster. FISH—Flounders, trumpeter, ENTREES—Braized fillets of chicken with oyster sauce, lamb cutlets a la Bohemienne, ox-kidneys sante, fillet steak with champignons. JOINT—Sirloin with Yorkshire pudding. SWEETS—Cinnamon pudding, apple tart, baked bread custard, compote of fruit. SAVOURY—Welsh rarebit.
    AFTERNOON TEA.
    DINNER is served from 5.30 to 7.30 ; five courses, 2s. 6d.
    ROSEBROOK SEPARATOR BUTTER.
    Miss Moon of The Central, having been appointed sole agent for this excellent butter, can now supply it in ANY QUANTITIY at current rates or contract price, as preferred. Orders of 10lb, and upwards delivered free in Melbourne and suburbs. Purchasers of butter from Government Dairy during the late Exhibition can again procure the "separator" butter they liked so much. The ROSEBROOK BUTTER is in use Daily at THE CENTRAL.66
  • 22 Aug 1889, THE CENTRAL, 114 Elizabeth-street (Opposite Jas. M'Ewan's).
    LUNCHEON MENU TO-DAY.
    SOUPS—Consommé de riz, tomato. FISH—Fried fillets of bream, boiled Murray perch sauce royale. ENTREES—Ragout of veal with green peas, lambs' tongues sauce piquante, Irish stew, chicken and ham pie, haricot ox tail, JOINTS—Sirloin, Yorkshire pudding, boiled leg lamb parsley sauce. SWEETS—College pudding, Swiss tart, bread and butter custard, pineapple fritters, jelly au cognac.
    Light Luncheon. Afternoon Tea.
    DINNER and GRILL served from 5.30 to 7.30
    ROSEBROOK SEPARATOR BUTTER (fresh in) in use and for sale at the Central. Families suppiled at current rates, and all orders delivered free.
    The Central.—Proprietor, A. C. Moon.67
  • 5 Oct 1889, WAITRESS, first class, required. The Central, 114 Elizabeth-st.68
  • 30 Oct 1889, LADIES' GYMNASIUM.—All PUPILS invited to ATTEND on Wednesday afternoon, 30th inst., at 2.30. The prizes will be presented by Lady Clarke. Afternoon tea at the Central.69
  • 23 Nov 1889, POULTRY. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. " A. Moon."—Egg Pickle.—2gal cold soft water, 2lb. of lime in the stone, ¾lb. common salt, 2oz. cream of tartar; let this stand two or three days, turning it several times daily, when it will be ready for use. The eggs must be put in as you gather them, care being taken that no more are put in than the pickle will cover. The egs must not have been sat upon even for a single night. Disease in Fowls.—1. We refer you to the article on roup by "Black-Red" in "The Australasian" for November 2. 2. Clip off the warts with a pair of sharp scissors, and apply lunar caustic.70
  • 21 Dec 1889, THE CENTRAL, 114 Elizabeth-street (opposite Jas. M'Ewan's)TODAY'S MENU. Best Luncheon in Town. Ready from 12 o'clock. TO-DAY's MENU.
    Soups.—Consomne a l'Italienne, kidney. Fish.—Boiled schnapper and egg sauce. Entrées.—Jugged hare and jelly, lamb cutlets and chip potatoes, fricassee of calf's feet, beef olives, veal and ham pie, curried lamb and rice. Roasts.—Sirloin and Yorkshire pudding, haunch of mutton and jelly, roast teal and port wine toast. Colds.—Sirloin, roast lamb, York ham. Sweets.—Mince pies, Swiss tart, rice custard, cabinet pudding. Dessert.—Strawberries and cream, bananas, cherries, apricots and cream.
    Afternoon tea. Dinner served from 5.30 to 7.30. Five courses for 2s 6d.
    Rosebrook Separator Butter is in use at the Central, where it is also for sale.71
  • 18 Jan 1890, Melbourne Gossip. By Viva. MELBOURNE, January 13.
    Since Moliére wrote "Les Femmes Savantes" societies of women have always been a favourite subject of attack for the pen of the satirist. It shows some courage on the part of the literary women of this city that they have determined to form a society. Its objects and even its name are, as the French say, 'in the air' at present. It will probably be a club open to all women workers in literature, art, aud music ; and its chief object will be to bring these workers together in a social manner. Some half-dozen literary women met at the home of a well-known lady journalist last Thursday afternoon to drink tea and discuss the matter. Mrs. Axel Gustasson, a writer in Harper's Magazine, was one of them. This lady is a typical American, with bright eyes, charming manners, and a mode of speaking that reminds one of Henry James's heroines. She wore a dainty gown of gray-flowered muslin made with elbow sleeves, and with a scarf or pink Liberty silk folded round the bodice. The costume was a perfect one for so hot a day as last Thursday, and the wearer of it contributed a good deal of vivacity and a good many ideas to the meeting. Mrs. Gustasson quoted a large and powerful American women's society, called by the quaint title of the 'Sororsis.' This association admits women workers in literature, science, and art, and devotes itself to promoting the interests of women in general. Melbourne is so rapidly increasing that there is really no reason why there should not be an Australian 'Sororsis.' Miss A. C. Moon — notable as almost the first Australian lady who had the courage to go into trade and establish a high-class restaurant — was another of the literary half-dozen : Miss Connor O'Brien, a charming young Melbourne journalist with some dramatic faculty, was another. A thoroughly enjoyable afternoon was spent, despite the facts that the thermometer registered 98deg. in the shade, and that all the assembled women were more or less blue. The half-dozen les bleus perpetrated jokes, capped each others' stories, made impossible propositions, and declined to take life au grand serieux. This is an age of societies, and when we read of the Primrose League, the Women's Liberal Association, and the hundred and one American women's clubs, we realise that the frailer sex are not behindhand in banding themselves together for work or amusement. The Metropolitan Liedertafel began with the meeting together of half-a-dozen men in a small room, and there seems no cause why this society of Australian women-workers should not grow and flourish.72
  • 24 Jan 1890, KNIFEMAN, good, wanted, at once. Central, 114 Elizabeth-st.73
  • 25 Jun 1890, WARNING TO LADIES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
    Sir,—I should like to offer, through the medium of your valuable journal, a few words of warning to the ladies of Sydney, more especially to those who consider a " handbag " an indispensable requisite for an afternoon's shopping. Last Saturday I witnessed, in the busiest and most respectable part of the city, viz., King-street, in broad daylight, one of the most daring robberies it is possible to conceive of. A lady was walking along in quite a becoming manner, carrying a small handbag in the usual careful way, when she was approached by a very respectfully-dressed young man, who deliberately opened the bag and abstracted a purse therefrom, without exciting the suspicion of the lady in question. I need not add more than that the purse was missed just in time—to be too late. I am, &c., A. C. M.74
  • 16 Jul 1890, GAS Range, splendid, suitable for club or restaurant, cheap. Central Luncheon Rooms, 114 Elizabeth-st.75
  • 12 Sep 1891, Mining Notices. THE FAHL-ORE SILVER MINING
    COMPANY, NO LIABILITY. APPLICATION TO REGISTER, I, the undersigned, hereby make application to register the Fahl-Ore Silver Mining Company, No Liability, as a No Liability Company, under the provisions of the Mining Companies Act, 1884.
    1. The name of the Company is to be the Fahl-Ore Silver Mining Company, No Liability.
    2. The place of intented operations is at Mount Dundas, in Tasmania.
    3. The registered office of the Company will be situated at Patterson street, Launceston.
    4. The number of shares in the Company is one hundred thousand of five shillings each, of which number twenty-five thousand will be issued as fully paid-up and seventy-five thousand as paid up to four shillings each.
    5. The number of shares subscribed for is one hundred thousand.
    6. The name of the manager is Augustus Simson.
    7. The names and addresses and occupations of the shareholders, and the number of shares held by each are as below :—
    Names. Addresses. Occupations. Shares.
    Moon, Alice C., Launceston, investor ... 100
    Dated this 9th day of September, 1891.
    Aug. SIMSON, Manager.
    Witness to signature Edw. H. HART.76
  • 17 Dec 1892, SYDNEY BOUDOIR GOSSIP. [BY ZARA.]
    An item, however, of rather more interest was the launch party, given by Sir George Dibbs in honor of Miss Shaw, the travelling representative of the London Times. A small party, strong in the journalistic element, " did" the harbour. Among those invited were Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Ward, Mrs. Gullett, Mrs. H. E. Russell, and Miss A. C. Moon. We had also the honour of meeting Sir Roderick Cameron, a Canadian baronet, who has a station in Queensland and Mr. Tuygabra, a Japanese B.A. fresh from Cambridge.
    Miss Louisa Macdonald, M A., Principal of the Women's College, gave an evening reception at Strathmore of mtimato friends to welcome her sister, Dr. Bella Macdonald of Bombay, and Miss Dickinson, who are both on a visit to her. Miss Dickinson is a rising young London writer whose first novel "A Vicar's Daughter" recently attracted some attention. Dr. Bella Macdonald was obliged to leave Bombay on account of her health, and there is some probability of her practicing here after she becomes a little stronger. We shall then have two lady doctors as Miss [Francis] Dick has been settled here some time and is getting on splendidly. If Dr. Bella proves as charming as her "professor" sister, her ultimate success will not be long doubtful. Of course there wore heaps of professors, and other literary lights of social Sydney, to meet our two distinguished visitors.77,78
  • 24 Dec 1892, It argues a great enthusiasm for politics amongst the ladies of Sydney for the ladies' gallery to look as animated as it did on Wednesday and Thursday during the debate on the motion of censure. For really it is much easier to read the debate at breakfast next morning, with the grammar set straight and the h's in their right places, than to sit in a hot gallery and crane down to see Sir George Dibbs endangering the life and property of everyone and everything within reach, and to watch members such as Mr. Walker apparently speaking at the imminent risk of apoplexy. On Wednesday the gallery was packed both in the afternoon and evening, amongst its occupants being Mrs. F. B. Suttor and her daughter, Miss Louisa Macdonald and her sister, Dr. Macdonald, Miss Shaw, Mrs. Merewether and Miss Moon, besides many others who were packed away in the back seats where they
    could only hear and not see. Quite late in the evening the arrival of Mrs. Burdekin and Mrs. Pilcher, with their daughters, in evening dress, lent a touch of fashion to the gallery in which, hitherto, an air of intellect rather than style had obtained, quite throwing the other occupants, in their morning dress, into the shade. All the same, it was an example that might well be followed, for morning dress by gas light is distinctly unbecoming, and as the authorities here are more enlightened than in London, where the ladies are cooped behind a grating, the least they might do in return is to look nice.79
  • 10 Jan 1893, A LADY'S LETTER FROM SYDNEY. [By Parthenope.]
    It was certainly not the women of Sydney who said—
    Politics we bar
    They are not our bent ;
    On the whole we are
    Not intelligent,
    As witness the crowded ladies' gallery during the recent debate on the motion of censure. It was not enough for them to read the debate in the paper next morning ; they wanted to see the speakers and witness the exact degree of enthusiasm exhibited by each, and to enjoy 'English as she is spoke' in the House, and not as varnished by kindly reporters. Amongst the animated throng upstairs were Mrs. and Miss Burdekin, Mrs. and Miss Pilcher, Miss Louisa Macdonald and her sister, Dr Macdonald, Mrs Meretheller, Miss Shaw, Miss Moon, Mrs. Suttor, etc.80
  • 4 Apr 1893, SERICULTURE. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
    Sir,—In the interesting account you publish on Saturday of Mr Campbell's efforts to encourage silk-growing in New South Wales you mention the difficulty of obtaining reliable information of the results of the experiments which have already been made in this industry. The establishment of a silk farm at Corowa by the late Mrs Bladen Neill, and her promotion of a sericultural company must be within the recollection of many for this was a topic of general interest in Victoria some 16 years ago. I think Sir George Verdon was connected with the enterprise, and he could probably put Mr Campbell in possession of the experience gained in what must have been the first organised attempt to introduce silk-culture. I remember that a great deal of interest was aroused in London on the occasion of Mrs Neill's visit there in 1875. She always had a pocketful of cocoons, talked enthusiastically about grains and worms, presented the Prince of Wales with a pair of socks made from silk spun at Corowa, and having put herself in communication with European experts, must have carried home a fund of valuable information. On the various kinds of petite culture which could be profitablv developed in Australia, there is none more promising than silk. It is an industry that could be carried on in conjunction with the farm, the orchard, or the vineyard, and as a separate business is suitable to be undertaken on a large scale by women with a little capital. Our climate is well adapted for it, the white mulberry thrives and matures earlv here, and the graine could undergo the necessary "regeneration" in the colder regions of our ranges. Mrs Bladen Neill was as sanguine as she was energetic, but these are the qualities of a pioneer, and by and by when New South Wales has a place among silk-producing countries it should not be forgotten that she was one of the first to exploit this future source of wealth.
    I am &c., A. C. M.81
  • 29 Apr 1893, Mrs. Louis Haigh, of Rose Bay, gave a ladies' luncheon last Saturday. Among those present were Miss Windeyer, Miss Curnow, Miss Scott, Miss A. C. Moon, Miss May Manning, and Miss Tilley. Several ladies were prevented from coming by the reception at the University, but the pleasant little party had a decidedly literary flavor.82
  • 12 Aug 1893, On July 31 Mrs. Curnow, at her residence, Clifton, gave a reception to "meet Mrs. Cooper Oakley." It was a terrible night, but that did not affect the attendance. The rooms were delightfully decorated with flowers, and among the company were Sir William and Lady Windeyer, Mrs. Josephson, Dr. and Mrs. Thring, Dr. and Miss O'Neill, Mrs. Walton Merewether and Miss A. C. Moon, and Mr. and Mrs. Isaacs. Mrs. Cooper-Oakley sailed from Sydney on August 7 on board the steamer Alameda bound for San Francisco, via New Zealand.83
  • 19 Aug 1893, Dr. Frances Dick, who, accompanied by Miss Josephson, shortly proceeds to Europe, gave a farewell luncheon to several of her friends at Glengarrah, the residence of Mr. T. H. Kelly, her brother-in-law. The company included Miss L. Macdonald, Miss Dickinson, Mrs. Walton Merewether, Mrs. Louis Haigh, Mrs. Hanbury Davies, Mrs. Spong, Dr. Iza Coghlan, Miss Moon, and Miss Josephson.84
  • 19 Aug 1893, On Wednesday Mrs. Butterworth held an "at home" at her charming residence in Double Bay for the purpose of showing her friends the exquisite miniatures and specimens of woodcarving she is sending to the Art Society's Exhibition. Miss Clara Leary sang some charming numbers for the entertainment of Mrs. Butterworth's guests, among whom we noticed Lady and Miss Salomons, Mrs James Fairfax, Mrs. G. F. Fairfax, Miss Macdonald, Mr. and Miss Jackson, Mrs. Herbert Harris, Mrs. Chipman, Mrs. Merewether and Miss Moon, and Mrs. E. Simpson.85
  • 25 Nov 1893, The Sydney Quintet Society played Bach's concerto, Grieg's charmingly original quartet, and many other delightful items before a large and fashionable audience on Tuesday evening. The Y.M.C.A.-hall was crowded in every part, and the excellence of the programme excited warm recognition. Mme. Charbonnet-Kellerman, wearing a becoming cerise satin gown, played with her usual charm of manner, and Miss Britton, B.A., dressed in a simple white toilet, received many compliments for her clever performance in Bach's concerto. Mme. Aengenheyster was the vocalist on this occasion, but a severe cold prevented her from doing justice to her selections. Among the audience we noticed the Misses Bowden-Smith, Miss Clara Manning, M. and Mme. Biard d'Aunet, Sir Patrick Jennings, Dr. and Miss Macdonagh, Mrs. Walton Merewether, aud Miss Moon, Mrs. Brown-Lane, Mrs. Chamier, Mrs. Warden-Graves, Mrs. Hanbury Davies, Mr. and Mrs. Chard, Mr. and Mrs. Horrocks, Mrs. Hooton Smith, Mr. Ward, Mr. Allard, Mr. and Mrs. Fisher, Mrs. Flood, Consul-General Pelldram, Miss Robertson, Miss Webster.86
  • 27 Jan 1894, The week's carnival terminated on Saturday by a polo match on the pretty recreation grounds at Burradoo. Visitors and Members drove up in large numbers, and soon a brilliant throng promenaded the well-kept lawn, or sat in groups before the pavilion, chatting together, or watching the game. Under a picturesque little tent, Mrs. Herbert Harris, who was hostess for the occasion, disponscd delicious tea, with the usual accompanying dainties, and a little further on, tennis was being played on the floral-framed asphalt courts. Perfectly royal weather accompanied a scene truly Australian, and the really attractive costumes worn by the ladies gave an additional charm to the gathering. His Excellency the Governor, accompanied by his four daughters and Miss Sylvia Darley, was present, with Captain the Hon. Rupert Leigh and Captain Baird in attendance. There were also Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Loughnan, and Miss M'Lean, Mrs. Merewether, and Miss Moon, Mrs. T. Simpson and Miss de Lauret, Mr. and Mrs. Lane Campbell, Mrs. Rich, Mr. and Mrs. and the Misses Toohey, Mr. and Mrs. Scroggie, Miss Isabel Fraser, Miss Clare Leary, Mrs. Inskip, Miss Fairfax, Mr. and Mrs. Chipman, Dr. and Mrs. Murray Oram, Dr. and Mrs. Twynam, Mr. and Mrs. Prendergast, Mr. Bruce Smith, Mr, Lee Pullin, Mr. Browning, Mr. Bayly Macarthurar, Mr. Morris, etc. The committee must be complimented on the gaining popularity of their club, and as each meeting gains a fresh supply of supporters, it is to be hoped that ere long all the residents of the district will follow the example of his Excellency the Governor and enroll their names as members. To the members, of the race club hearty congratulations must also be tendered, upon the very excellent arrangements made by them for the various entertainments of the week.87
  • 13 Mar 1894, THE SEWERAGE QUESTION AND THE LIERNUR SYSTEM. To the editor of the Daily Telegraph.
    Sir,—The observations of Mr. Backhouse in yesterday's Daily Telegraph on the Liernur system of sewerage, however interesting, do not apply to Mr. M'Garvie Smith's report on the presence of germs in sewer-air, and the necessity of destroying these germs before the sewer-air is discharged into the atmosphere. All sanitarians are acquainted with the pneumatic systems of sewerage, of which Liernur's is the oldest. The Berlier, an exhaust system of automatic action, is in use in one part of Paris. The Shone, in which sewage is raised to the required height by means of compressed air, is in operation at Eastbourne, Wrexham, Southampton, Warrington, and Henley (towns unfavorably situated for disposal of sewage by gravitation), and at the Houses of Parliament, Westminster ; the original Liernur system prevails at Amisterdam, but there is no other town whose sewage is entirely treated by it. It was inevitable that the simpler and cheaper single system should before long be preferred to the pneumatic system of sewerage. In the latter costly machinery is needed to suck the sewage into the reservoirs. In the former water carriage does the work of machinery. In the latter two separate sets of sewers are required, one to carry off house-drainage, the other waste waters. In the former a single sewer takes everything, and as the surface water from the streets of a city is almost as foul as sewage proper, there is but little gain to compensate for the double expense of carrying them separately. Under both systems foul air is liberated into the atmosphere ; the hermetically-sealed pneumatic iron pipes give it off in great volumes from the reservoirs, the single masonry sewers discharge it from their out let shafts along the course of the current. "The Liernur system, from a sanitary point of view, is," says Baldwin Latham, "little better than the pail system ; and, in spite of the value put on the manure (the concentrated dried sewage sold as poudrette), it is, when compared with a proper system of sewers and water carriage, very expensive." These may have secured more justification in 1880 than there is now for advocating the pneumatic system, but the people of Sydney are not likely to favor any proposal to duplicate the lines of sewer in which so large a sum of money has been spent, more especially when the sanitary experience of later years indicates that nothing would be gained by such additional outlay. There can be little doubt that all sewage will be ultimately disposed of on the land, its natural destination, towards the partial accomplishment of which tentative efforts are now being made in Sydney ; and with regard to the sewer-germs difficulty raised by Mr. Smith, the Liernur system does not possess any advantage over our existing system. In either ease, bacteriological demonstrations convince that the danger of sewer-gas is vital, not chemical, and that the most perfect sewer construction needs to be supplemented by apparatus insuring the destruction of bacterial life and its noxious products before the sewer-air is liberated. It is natural that the attention of Mr. Backhouse, as an architect, should be centred on mechanical construction, a sound principle of which is the basis of all successful sewerage systems ; but the protection of the public health from sewer exhalations is a micro-biological question, and under this new aspect it is necessary now for the sewerage engineer to take counsel, not with the expert in inorganic chemistry, but with the bacteriologist. — Yours, etc., A. C. M.88
  • 26 Mar 1894, GERMS IN SEWER GAS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY TELEGKAPH.
    Sir,—A.C.M., in your issue of the 13th, is of opinion that the expert in "inorganic chemistry " should no longer be consulted in matters pertaining to the disposal of sewage. Why the expert in inorganic chemistry? Very few chemists limit their studies to this branch. The scientific chemist, generally speaking, gives more thought to the wonders of organic nature, and to keep abreast of the time he must of necessity be cunning in bacteriology as well, as was that great chemist and prince of bacteriologists, Pasteur. Indeed, one could make but a poor bacteriologist out of a man who had not first acquired great cunning in chemistry, both organic and inorganic. But for various other reasons, bacteriology apart, the chemist proper must, without detracting in any way from the importance of the architect or the engineer, remain primus inter omnes in sanitary councils, the opinion of "A.C.M."
    notwithstanding. — Yours, etc., JALAMA.89
  • 28 Mar 1894, GERMS IN SEWER GAS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY TELEGRAPH.
    Sir, —Talma perverts the assertion in my letter of the 13th inst., to which he takes exception. What I said was, not that 'the expert in inorganic chemistry should no longer be consulted in matters pertaining to the disposal of sewage,' but that "the protection of the public health from sewer exhalations is a micro-biological question, and under this new aspect it is necessary now for the sewerage engineer to take counsel, not with the expert in inorganic chemistry, but with the bacteriologist." What I said of sewer ventilation he applies to the disposal of sewage. As to chemist and bacteriologist being interchangeable terms, I agree with him so far as that a bacteriologist must "of necessity" be a chemist, but it is news to me that every chemist is a bacteriologist. — Yours, etc., A.C.M.
    March 26.90
  • 14 Apr 1894, The Rosehill races will be a very fashionable meeting to-day. Exceilent arrangements have been made in connection with the trains, and we hear that a very smart launch party has been organised to go up the river. In regard to the social functions of the week, the honor of originality falls to Professor Haswell, who last Saturday invited some friends to join his launch party for dredging. The weather was perfect, and the excitement, of a regatta gave an additional charm to the beauty of the surroundings. A halt was made in Middle Harbor for luncheon on board and a ramble on shore. Dredging was carried on at various points, and the outing was thoroughly enjoyable. Professor Haswell included among his guests Professor and Mrs. Macmillan, Professor and Mrs. David, Mr. and Mrs. Walton Merewether, Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. Bioxame, Miss Faithful and Miss Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Merivale, Mr. and Mrs Hanbury Davies, Mr. and Mrs. Butterworth, Miss A.C.Moon, Mr.Grimshaw, Miss Wallis, Mr. Llift, M. Hill, and Mr and Mrs. Fesq.91
  • 24 Apr 1894, DEATH OF MISS Moon.—Yesterday the City Coroner, Mr J O Woore, J P, hold an inquest in the Royal Oak Hotel, Double Bay, touching the death ot Miss Alice C Moon, who died suddenly on Saturday afternoon at the residence of Mr W L Mereweather, Double Bay, where she resided. Miss Moon was seen at about 3 p m on Saturday, when she appeared to be in her usual health. A little while afterwards groans were heard issuing from her room. Immediate attention was given to Miss Moon, and Dr Ellis was sent for, but when the doctor arrived he pronounced life extinct. Medical evidence was given that the cause of Miss Moon's death was heart disease, and a verdict to that eftect was recorded. Miss Moon was well known in literary circles. It was in connection with this journal that she first appeared as a newspaper contributor in Sydney. Miss Moon was a woman of no little intellectual ability, she was also an accomplished writer, and as the result of diligent study was the possessor of a large store of literary and general information. Miss Moon was esteemed by a large circle of friends, to whom, as to many who knew her less intimately, her untimely death will be a matter for much regret.92
  • 25 Apr 1894, A Lady Journalist.
    Miss Alice Caroline Moon, in the front rank of lady journalists in Sydney, died very suddenly at Double Bay on Saturday from heart disease, and was buried yesterday.93
  • 28 Apr 1894, DEATH OF MISS A. C. MOON.
    It is with deep regret we have to record the death, from heart disease, of Miss Alice Caroline Moon, one of the few ladies who reached the first rank of journalists in the colonies. As an all-round press writer, for talent, breadth of knowledge, clearness of thought, and incisiveness of expression, she certainly made a distinctive mark in all branches of newspaper literature. While resident in Sydney, as the guest of Mrs. W. L. Merewether, at 'Lurlie,' Double Bay, she made hosts of friends, and there was a widespread feeling of sorrow on the announcement of her sudden death there on Saturday last. Miss Moon was born at The Steyne, Brighton, England, and was a daughter of the late Dr. Moon, who had a somewhat extensive medical practice in that town. About 15 years ago, when quite a young woman, she left England for Melbourne with friend, Mrs. Dick, where they both engaged in business for a number of years, and it may be stated that while there Miss Moon obtained a large press connection. About four years ago she removed to Sydney and went to reside with Mrs. W. L. Merewether, a friend of many years' standing, at Lurlie, Double Bay. She resided there as one of the family up to the time of her death. The press connection which she gained in Melbourne she kept up and extended in Sydney, and among other periodicals whose columns have been enriched by her contributions are the Daily Telegraph, the Sydney Morning Herald, the Freeman's Journal, and the Medical Gazette, while she had a rather extensive clientele among English journals. The deceased wrote two stories, 'The Red Haired Boy ' and 'Unlucky George,' to our last Christmas number, and had been a frequent and valued contributor to our columns for several years.
    Those who saw her in her last moments say that it just appeared as though the heart had stopped beating and the life had passed out without an instant of pain.
    An inquest was held by the City Coroner on Monday morning, and in accordance with the medical evidence a verdict of death from natural causes was returned.94
  • 28 Apr 1894, Miss Alice Caroline Moon, a lady journalist with connections in both Melbourne and Sydney, died very suddenly on Saturday at the residence of Mr. W. L. Merewether, Double Bay, where she had been staying since coming to Sydney from Melbourne four years ago. Medical examination showed fatty degeneration of the heart as the cause of death.95
  • 28 Apr 1894, PASSING NOTES. By Faustine.
    An obituary notice is always too saddening for repetition. But I feel that I cannot pass over in my "Notes" the death of a very dear friend, Miss Moon. Ten days ago she was with me ; encouraging, bracing, exhilarating, as she always was. Now, all now ! I have lost her. And I did not even recognise how much she was to me until I lost her. I have known her for 14 years, both in Melbourne and here, and she was always the same—one of the sweetest, cleverest, largest-minded women God ever created. The mystery of birth and death—it has haunted me all the week. It haunts me yet. But she—sleeping there in the spot she loved—what new mysteries may not have broken upon her soul's vision ? We do not know. We can never know. All we are conscious of is that in losing her we have left Sydney poorer, and ourselves with a true, loyal friend the less.96
  • 3 May 1894, Readers of the pleasant, chatty, and intelligent columns of news, that used to appear weekly in the Daily Telegraph under the title of 'Literature' or 'Books up to Date,' heard with profound regret that the talented authoress of those terse and pithy criticisms, had died suddenly of heart disease on Saturday afternoon last. On that same day her last contribution to the Telegraph was published, and showed no signs of abated vigour to indicate that the hand that so recently had guided the pen would soon be stilled. The young lady, whose demise has left a serious gap in the ranks of Australian journalism, was Miss Alice Caroline Moon, daughter of the late Dr. Moon, one time English practitioner at Brighton, from who she inherited strong predilections and ability for the study of medicine in which she became very proficient. Besides the Daily Telegraph, and Medical Gazette, to which she was a regular contributor, Melbourne and English journals have often been enriched by contributions from her facile pen, and her versatility and range of subjects was surprising in this connection. Miss Moon numbered amongst her friends most of the leading intellectual lights of Sydney, who testified their extreme regret at losing one so attractive in manner and so gifted in intellect.97
  • 5 May 1894, A LADY'S LETTER FROM SYDNEY. BY MIRABEL. SYDNEY. APRIL, 29.
    I cannot close my letter without mentioning the sad loss in journalistic circles that we have sustained by the very sudden death of Miss Moon, who was, I believe, as well known in Melbourne as in Sydney. She died of heart disease on Saturday week at the residence of her great friend, Mrs. W. Merewether, of Lurlie, Double Bay, being up to the time of her death in comparative good health and strength. During the time Miss Moon was in Sydney she wrote articles and reviews for the daily journals (the Herald at one time and Telegraph at another) and corresponded with English journals.98
  • 5 May 1894, SUDDEN DEATH OF A LADY JOURNALIST.
    Australia cannot boast of so many ladies engaged in journalism that any of them can be spared, and when one of them, among the most accomplished and well read, as well as versatile, passes away the loss is keenly felt. Miss Alice Caroline Moon, who died suddenly in Sydney about 10 days ago, at the residence of Mr. W. L. Merewether, Double Bay, was born at The Steyne, Brighton, England, and was a daughter of the late Dr. Moon, who had a somewhat extensive medical practice in that town. About 15 years ago, when quite a young woman, she left England for Melbourne with a friend, Miss Dick, where they both engaged in business for a number of years. While there Miss Moon obtained a large press connection. About four years ago she removed and went to reside with Mrs. W. L. Merewether, a friend of many years' standing, at Lurlie, Double Bay. She resided there as one of the family up to the time of her death. The press connection which she gained in Melbourne she kept up and extended in Sydney, and among other periodicals whose columns have been enriched by her contributions are the Daily Telegraph and the Medical Gazette, while she had a rather extensive clientele among English journals. She possessed a marvellous faculty of assimilating what she read ; it seemed as though she intuitively grasped the meaning of any question to which she turned her attention, and though her reading was of the most diffuse character so far as subjects went, she had no difficulty in proving that there was an entire absence of superficiality in her accomplishments in this direction. She was acquainted with physics and meta physics. If anyone ventured to enter the lists against her on social or scientific subjects, he had to make very sure of his ground before advancing ; but with all her breadth of view and quickness of perception, there was not the faintest trace of masculinity or assertiveness. In the more elegant accomplishments which are supposed to form an indispensable part of a woman's education, Miss Moon was no novice ; her brush has been instrumental in turning out many pretty little pictures, her faculty for sketching was marked, and she has left behind among her friends many souvenirs of little outings and choice bits of scenery met with on these excursions. Those among her friends who had the privilege of being admitted to her confi dence were charmed with her manner and her fund of information.
    Her death was terribly sudden. On Saturday afternoon, 21st April, shortly before 3 o'clook, she was apparently in her usual health, and retired to her room to read, when she fell back and died. An autopsy to ascertain the cause of death was performed by Dr. Rennie, the Government Pathologist, and it was found to have resulted from extensive disease of the heart. Those who saw her in her last moments say that it just appeared as though the heart had stopped beating, and the she had passed out without an instant of pain.
    One of Miss Moon's favorite walks during her life was to South Head, and it was in the cemetery at that place that her body was laid, the funeral being attended by many personal friends. The Rev. G. E. C. Stiles, of Watson's Bay, conducted the service at the grave, which is situated on a slope overlooking the ocean, and the location was chosen by herself. The coffin was covered with bouquets sent by friends, among them Mr. and Mrs. Merewether, Miss Macdonald, Miss Dickenson, Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, Miss Dick, Dr. and Mrs. Thring, Mrs. and Miss Leary, Miss Kemmis, the directors of the Daily Telegraph Newspaper Company, Professor and Mrs. Threlfall, Miss Darchy, Mrs. Chipman, Miss Rose Scott, Miss May Manning, Mrs. Louis Haigh, Mr. and Mrs. Fesq, Mr. and Mrs. Hanbury Davies, Mr. Stannard, Mrs. Josephson, Mrs. and Miss Stafford, Mrs. John Leary, Miss May Curtis, Mr. J. M'Garvie Smith, Mr. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. Butterworth, Mr. H. Selkirk, Mr. Reginald J. Black, Mr. Harvey and Mr. Creed.99
  • 16 May 1894, The sudden death is recorded In the Sydney papers of Miss Alice Caroline Moon, a lady who was formerly extensively known in Melbourne as partner of Miss Elphinstone Dick, whose athletic classes for young ladies were largely attended. In Sydney Miss Moon was well known and esteemed as a journalist, and her sudden death from heart disease has excited much sympathetic interest.100
  • 16 May 1894, The sudden death is recorded In the Sydney papers of Miss Alice Caroline Moon, a lady who was formerly extensively known in Melbourne as partner of Miss Elphinstone Dick, whose athletic classes for young ladies were largely attended. In Sydney Miss Moon was well known and esteemed as a journalist, and her sudden death from heart disease has excited much sympathetic interest.101
  • 19 May 1894, The enterprise of the Melbourne Conservative organ is something appalling. In the matter of country news it is occasionally not more than 24 hours behind The Age. The latest startling feat of this journal was the announcement on 16th May of the death in Sydney of Miss Alice Caroline Moon. This lady, at one time well known in Melbourne as the proprietor of the Central Restaurant, and afterwards as a stock and share broker, died in Sydney on 26th April. A notice of her death appeared in The Age of 30th April. A short biography of Miss Moon also appeared in The Leader of 5th May.
    After this specimen of tip to date journalism, the Conservative organ will perhaps some morning astonish its readers with the news that Queen Ann is dead.102

Citations

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    Listed in 1880, 1881, 1882 (as Teachers of Gymnastics), 1883 (as Professionals).
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    1884/85 - Entry 408 Miss Alice Moon no description, NAV 35 - paid 10 Jun 1885
    1885/86 - Entry 427 Miss Moon 20 acres Pakenham, NAV 30 - paid 24 Dec 1885
    1886/87 - Entry 285 Miss Alice Moon 40 acres and house Beaconsfield, NAV 30 - paid 14 Feb 1887
    A caveat was lodged by Mrs Noble on 11 Nov 1887.
  10. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/3766 1500/49.4. JEANIE GRAY MELVILLE DUNSTONE. WILLIAM HENRY PONTON. ALFRED PENDERGAST. CAROLINE MERCY ALICE MOON. PAKENHAM. 135. 19--1--38. 1877 - 1888.
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  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1335-832 - The Universal Permanent Building and Investment Society to Caroline Mercy Alice Moon - C/T 1435-848 Caroline Mercy Alice Moon of The Steyne Saint Heliers Street Abbotsford Spinster.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 Memo No 6450. James Parsons of Patterson Street Abbotsford Collingwood, Platelayer, and Eliza Stacey, wife of William Owen Stacey of Patterson Street Abbotsford Collingwood are registered as proprietors of the within described land as Executor and Executrix to whom Probate of the Will of Charles Parsons who died on the 12th day of January 1885 was granted on the 5th day of February 1885. Dated 24th September 1886.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 Caroline Mercy Alice Moon of The Steyne Beaconsfield Spinster is now the proprietor registered 24 Sep 1886. Alice paid a deposit of £19.17, the balance £100 of the purchase money was issued as a promissory note due 17 Sep 1886. The probate of Charles Parsons showed the land as fenced, no other improvements, valued at £50.
  17. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 267/ P7 unit 707, item 1887/2431 - viewed 23 July 2019.
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    Copy of Will NSW written 9 Sep 1891:
    - bequeaths all estate and interest in property known as Viney's Hotel Falmouth Tasmania to Mary Rose Merewether of Sydney, and any sum due to me by Mary Rose or Walter Lockyer Merewether in respect of Alice's interest in that Hotel.
    - £1000 or same amount in shares/stocks held by me to Florence Agnes, wife of Erskine James Rainey Parker of Tasmania Squatter (in codocil changed to all shares held by me in Tasmania Silver Mining Co
    - Residue to Josephine Julia Anna McCormick of "The Steyne" Abbotsford Spinster
    - Appointed George Peter Mills of Melbourne and Robert Alex Vaughan Rae of Melbourne Merchant as Executors - they renounced probate
    - In Codicil 15 Nov 1892 Alice revoked the bequest of £1000 to Florence Agnes Parker, but bequeathed her instead her shares in Tasmanian Silver Mining Companies.
    - Bequeathed to Josephine Julia McCormick her reversionary interest in marriage settlement of her late sister Grace Ethel Hall
    - to Mary Rose Merewether all her personal effects at "Lurlie", incl clothing, jewellery, books, pictures, papers and my boat "the Lark"
    The Probate was valued at under £45 (16 June 1894).
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  52. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser, 18 Apr 1884, p2.
  53. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Oct 1885, p12.
  54. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 29 Oct 1885, p3
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  55. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 7 Nov 1885, p7
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  56. [S14] Newspaper - Melbourne Punch, 3 Dec 1885, p9.
  57. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Sat 27 Aug 1887, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article190638352
  58. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 8 Oct 1887, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7947537
  59. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 24 Oct 1888, p20
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  60. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 2 Nov 1888, p20.
  61. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne), 10 Nov 1888, p12.
  62. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 8 Mar 1889, p11.
  63. [S14] Newspaper - The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Wed 20 Mar 1889, p4
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  64. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 23 Mar 1889, p4.
  65. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 27 Apr 1889, p16
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  66. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 May 1889, p16.
  67. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Aug 1889, p8.
  68. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 5 Oct 1889, p6.
  69. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 30 Oct 1889, p12
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  70. [S14] Newspaper - Australasian, 23 Nov 1889, p11.
  71. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Dec 1889, p16.
  72. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), Sat 18 Jan 1890, p131
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162073026
  73. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 24 Jan 1890, p7.
  74. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wed 25 Jun 1890, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13788984
  75. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 16 Jul 1890, p3.
  76. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Sat 12 Sep 1891, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39577808
  77. [S14] Newspaper - The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Sat 17 Dec 1892, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19017800
  78. [S14] Newspaper - The Hay Standard and Advertiser for Balranald, Wentworth, Maude...(Hay, NSW : 1871 - 1873; 1880 - 1881; 1890 - 1900), Wed 21 Dec 1892, p2
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    similar article.
  79. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Sat 24 Dec 1892, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235963766
  80. [S14] Newspaper - The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tue 10 Jan 1893, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13265673
  81. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 4 Apr 1893, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13903538
  82. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Sat 29 Apr 1893, p9
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  83. [S14] Newspaper - Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), Sat 12 Aug 1893, p35
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  84. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), Sat 19 Aug 1893, p377
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  90. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Wed 28 Mar 1894, p3
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  92. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 24 Apr 1894 p5.
  93. [S14] Newspaper - National Advocate (Bathurst NSW), 25 Apr 1894, p3.
  94. [S14] Newspaper - Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW), 28 Apr 1894, p16.
  95. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne), 28 Apr 1894, p37.
  96. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Sat 28 Apr 1894, p10
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  97. [S14] Newspaper - Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld), 3 May 1894, p3.
  98. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 5 May 1894, p35
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  99. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne), 5 May 1894, p37.
  100. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 16 May 1894, p5
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  101. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 May 1894, p4.
  102. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 19 May 1894, p22.
Last Edited26 Jul 2019

Arthur Vincent Kirkwood

M, #1373, b. 20 Apr 1870, d. 20 Apr 1939
Father*Alexander Kirkwood b. 1822, d. 20 Jul 1902
Mother*Emma Bleckly b. 1839, d. 7 Oct 1887
Birth*20 Apr 1870 South Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #B8639.1 
Birth-Notice*21 May 1870KIRKWOOD.-On the 20th ult, at Emerald-hill, Mrs. Alex Kirkwood of a son.2 
Marriage*1895 Spouse: Catherine 'Laura' Maher. VIC, Australia, #M1078 [Laura married as Catherine MAHER].3
 
Land-UBeac*5 Oct 1903 PAK-123.125. Transfer from Amelia Maria Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. 38a 3r 9p.4 
Land-UBeac*13 Jan 1904 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from Richard Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. 13a 3r 38p.5 
Residence*bt 1914 - 1922 "The Steyne", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, mentioned as playing croquet in 1922. 
Land-UBeac*25 Jan 1921 GEM-D-3 (part), 24 St Georges Road. Transfer from Samuel Linton to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. 2a 2r (block along St Georges Road.)6 
Land-UBeac*7 Feb 1924 PAK-123.125. Transfer from Arthur Vincent Kirkwood to Katie Hudson. 38a 3r 9p.7 
Land-UBeac7 Feb 1924 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from Arthur Vincent Kirkwood to Katie Hudson. 13a 3r 38p.8 
Land-Notebt 1932 - 1940 GEM-D-3 (pt) 'Akaroa', St Georges Road: George Henry Marsh Ada Mary Marsh were probably renting this property. Pays rates from 1932/3 to 1939/40.9 
Death*20 Apr 1939 Mont Park, VIC, Australia, #D3503 (Age 66) [par Alex KIRKWOOD & Emma BLECKLEY].10 
Death-Notice*22 Apr 1939KIRKWOOD.—On the 20th April Arthur Vincent Kirkwood, beloved husband of Laura Kirkwood, Inkerman road Caulfield (Private Interment 21st April.)11 
Inquest1939Inquest held 1939/516. Cause of Death: Arteria renal sclerosis.12 
Land-Note*9 Apr 1940 GEM-D-3 (part), 24 St Georges Road: Arthur Vincent Kirkwood died on 20 Apr 1939. Probate of his will has been granted to Catherine 'Laura' Kirkwood of 15 Empress Road East St Kilda Widow.13 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1905 - 1924Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist. With Catherine 'Laura' Kirkwood.14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27
1931580 Inkerman Road, Caulfield West, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: engineer. With Catherine 'Laura' Kirkwood.28

Grave

  • IND A 0843, Boroondarra Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, In loving memory of Emma, beloved wife of Alexander KIRKWOOD, d at Hawthorn Friday 7 Oct 1887, aged 48 years, also Arthur V. KIRKWOOD beloved husband of Laura KIRKWOOD, d 20 Apr 1939, aged 67 years,
    In memory of Alexander KIRKWOOD, b at Campbelton Argyllshire Scotland 2 Aug 1822, d at Brighton Victoria 20 Jul 1902. (text)29,30

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Aug 1863, KIRKWOOD-BLECKLY.-On the 15th inst., at Collins street Baptist Church, by the Rev. James Taylor, Alexander Kirkwood, to Emma, second daughter of G. W. Bleckly, late of Southampton.31
  • 14 Mar 1914, BUSH FIRES. THE BEACONSFIELD HILLS. WOMEN FIRE-FIGHTERS.
    UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.—Two alarming fires occurred in the last two days. A fire burning in the gully near the township, on Wednesday, fanned by the northerly wind, broke away and threatened to cause serious damage. The fire swept up the hill, along the side of Mr. Kirkwood's orchard. It jumped the chain-wide lane dividing the properties, and tore up the rise. With difficulty it was checked before it reached the cottage on the crown of the hill.
    While the fire-fighters were busy at Fassifern another outbreak occurred two miles further east. This fire began in some dense forest country lying between the properties of Mr W G L Spowers, Mrs Anderson and Mr John Knox. The northerly wind took the fire along the range at a great pace. There were fears that it might run down into the Tumuc Valley, towards Pakenham, where there is one of the largest and most prosperous apple orchards in the State. However, with the setting sun the breeze dropned and, though the fire burned fiercely in the dry timber and undergrowth, it did not spread.
    During the onrush of the flames on Wednesday afternoon and evening, Mr and Mrs Austin, acting as caretakers for Mr J. Knox, who with his wife and family are in Tasmania, were deeply concerned for the safety of the homestead. On Thursday, while Mr Austin was down in the gully trying to turn back the flames the homestead was again threathened. The fire took a hedge of blackberry briars in its stride, and tore through the orchard as though nothing would stop it. Mr Austin checked it at one corner of the orchard with buckets of water, but it broke through at another point. Mrs Austin, single-handed, was fighting hard but seemed powerless. Just at this stage, however, Miss Christy, a lady gardener, who had arrived to do some pruning work came on the scene. By this time the fire was within 20ft of the house. It had already caught an outbuilding, over which were some dry honeysuckle and other creepers; but the two women got the hose to work, and the water beat the fire. Then other help arrived and, as if a reward for the plucky women who had done their work so well, the wind changed and the fire turning away up the gully, the homestead was saved.32
  • 17 Mar 1914, BEACONSFIELD HILLS FIRE. In the account published on Saturday of the bush fires on the Beaconsfield Hills it was stated that the fire swept up the hill along the side of Mr. A. V. Kirkwood's orchard. Mr. Kirkwood states that the nearest the fire was to his orchard was 517ft. and it was 650ft. from his residence. Mr. Kirkwood has no bush within 300ft. at the nearest to the house or outbuildings, and regards himself as perfectly safe from fire.33
  • 12 Sep 1916, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-The ladies of the Red Cross Society held a garden fete at The Steyne, Beaconsfield Upper, on Thursday, at the invitation of Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Kirkwood. The net result was over £50.34
  • 9 Apr 1924, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-At Cormore tea rooms Mr A V Kirkwood was at home to his friends in Beaconsfield at a smoke night and a very pleasant evening with snooker and supper was spent.35

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D3503 age 66 [par Alex KIRKWOOD & Emma BLECKLEY]."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 May 1870, p4.
  3. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#M1078."
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-433 & C/T 1435-848 - Amelia Maria Noble to Arthur Vincent Kirkwood of "Karlvera" Church Street Brighton Marine Engineer - C/T 2955-857.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2329-714 - Arthur Vincent Kirkwood of Upper Beaconsfield Fruit Grower.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3915-899 - Arthur Vincent Kirkwood of "The Steyne" Beaconsfield Orchardist.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2955-857 - Katie Hudson of "The Steyne" Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2329-714 - Katie Hudson of "The Steyne" Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  9. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  10. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Apr 1939 p8.
  12. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3915-899 - Arthur Vincent Kirkwood died on 20 Apr 1939. Probate of his will has been granted to Laura Kirkwood of 15 Empress Road East St Kilda Widow.
  14. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  15. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  16. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  17. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  18. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  19. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  20. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  21. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  22. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  23. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  24. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  25. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  26. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  27. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  28. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  29. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    IND A0843 buried with his parents Alexander & Emma.
  30. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
  31. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Aug 1863, p4.
  32. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 14 Mar 1914, p20.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Mar 1914 p10.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Sep 1916 p8.
  35. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Apr 1924, p11.
Last Edited10 Jan 2018

Catherine 'Laura' Maher

F, #1374, b. 1872, d. 29 Jul 1953
Married NameKirkwood. 
Birth*1872 Ballarat, VIC, Australia.1 
Marriage*1895 Spouse: Arthur Vincent Kirkwood. VIC, Australia, #M1078 [Laura married as Catherine MAHER].1
 
Land-Notebt 1932 - 1940 GEM-D-3 (pt) 'Akaroa', St Georges Road: George Henry Marsh Ada Mary Marsh were probably renting this property. Pays rates from 1932/3 to 1939/40.2 
Widow20 Apr 1939Catherine 'Laura' Maher became a widow upon the death of her husband Arthur Vincent Kirkwood.3 
Land-Note*9 Apr 1940 GEM-D-3 (part), 24 St Georges Road: Arthur Vincent Kirkwood died on 20 Apr 1939. Probate of his will has been granted to Catherine 'Laura' Kirkwood of 15 Empress Road East St Kilda Widow.4 
Land-UBeac*11 Feb 1944 GEM-D-3 (part), 24 St Georges Road. Transfer from Catherine 'Laura' Maher to Ena Isla Ellen Dean. 2a 2r.5 
Death*29 Jul 1953 'Alvena' Private Hospital, Chapel Street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D8574 (age 81) [par Alex McDOUGALL & Catherine MAHER].3,6 
Death-Notice*31 Jul 1953KIRKWOOD.—On July 29, at East St Kilda, Laura, beloved wife of the late Arthur Kirkwood. Private interment.7 
Probate (Will)* Laura Kirkwood. Widow. Garden Vale. 29 Jul 1953. 468/053.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1905 - 1924Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Arthur Vincent Kirkwood.9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22
1931580 Inkerman Road, Caulfield West, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Arthur Vincent Kirkwood.23
1937584 Inkerman Road, Caulfield West, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.24
194233 Melby Avenue, Caulfield West, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.25
19493 Elster Avenue, Caulfield West, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.26

Newspaper-Articles

  • 26 Oct 1916, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Under the auspices of the Women's National League, a meeting was held in the hall on Saturday night, to encourage and all-round vote of "Yes" be soundly returned on Saturday night. There was a great rally of the residents in fact the hall was filled to overflowing. Mrs A. V. Kirkwood, president of the league opened the proceedings, and at her desire, Mr W. J. Harvey Smith, J.P., occupied the chair. Mr Smith very briefly stated the very important object in view in calling the meeting which was to secure an all round support for the referendum, and he very earnestly appealed to all for personal and national credit to vote "yes." Mr Keast, M.L.A., was the principal speaker, and his appeal went home to the audience. So clearly did the audience show their decision to vote "yes" that on a show of hands all were united on voting in support of the Government. Mr Cloes, president of the shire, then after made a few remarks, urging all present to vote "yes" and to use their influence all round to the same effect. Sergeant E. Gardner, an "Anzac Hero," spoke of his experience in the trenches, and urged for yes in order that the boys should get a spell. It may be remarked that the only dissenting voices in the meeting were those of a man named Clements, who has a block here, and is now under orders to go into camp, and that of a sister a Mrs Clements, from Berwick, whom we are informed is the wife of Sergeant Clements, enlisting seargeant, whose head quarters are the town hall, Melbourne. The two of them were ejected at the outset of the proceedings for their unsatisfactory remarks by Constable Lombard. The usual vote of thanks to the speakers brought the meeting to a close.27
  • 14 Sep 1917, The garden fete in aid of the Red Cross and War Relief Fund, which was held in Mr Kirkwood's spacious garden on the 5th, was a pronounced success. For some time the ladies of the district and their friends have been working very hard, and the result of their labors could be seen when one visited the various stalls, which were stocked with all sorts of useful and ornamental articles. All the afternoon a good business was done. In some instances the stalls were sold clean out, which was an evidence of the fair stallholders' persuasive power. It would take up too much space to mention all those who worked to make the affair such a success, so I will content myself by saying that all interested in the fete did their utmost. It is expected that when all the money comes in over £80 will have been raised for the fund.28
  • 9 Nov 1917, Berwick Shire Council. CORRESPONDENCE. From Laura Kirkwood, Beaconsfield Upper, enclosing balance sheet of recent garden fete. - The receipts totalled £89 11s 6d and the expenditure £3 8s 6d.-Received.29
  • 15 Feb 1918, Berwick Shire Council. CORRESPONDENCE. From Laura Kirkwood, Beaconsfield Upper, seeking permission to hold a concert for patriotic funds.-Permission granted.30
  • 27 Jun 1918, Berwick Shire Council. Correspondence. From Laura Kirkwood, Beaconsfield, applying for permission to hold a Red Cross benefit. —Permission granted.31
  • 5 Jul 1923, Dance at Upper Beaconsfield.
    At the invitation of Lt.-Col. and Mrs. G. H. Knox, a number of their friends from Upper Beaconsfield and the surrounding districts, and also Melbourne were present at the delightful dance held in the Assembly Hall, Upper Beaconsfield, on Friday evening, June 22. The guest of the evening was Miss K. Bird, cousin of the hostess, who is on a visit from England, and the dance was given in honor of her twenty-first birthday. The supper room of the hall was converted into a cosy lounge, with easy chairs, carpets, and a glowing fire. Bridge tables were provided for non-dancers. On a large table in the supper-room was arranged a buffet supper.
    The hall was gaily decked with cerise and violet streamers festooned from a centrepiece arranged with hoops of paper flowers of the same color and greenery. Tall oriental lamps and festoons of greenery, with cerise flowers, made a very effective screen round the dias, on which the musicians were seated. Mr. K. R. Pinkerton (of Berwick) was responsible for the artistic decorations of the hall. At 10 p.m. the guests retired to Salisbury House, opposite the hall, to partake of a sit-down supper.
    After midnight a large birthday cake, with twenty-one candles burning brightly on it, was carried into the hall, and cut by Miss Bird. The hostess (Mrs. G. H. Knox) wore a gracefully draped frock of apricot changeable taffeta, caught at the side with monkey fur: she carried an Early Victorian posy of autumn tints. Miss K. Bird was dressed in dainty mauve taffeta, with panels of Valenciennes lace, and a deep collar of georgette edged with similar lace.
    Among the guests present were.—Messrs. R. Knox (Melbourne), Dare (Melbourne), Lester, Beauchamp, Capt. Tate, Messrs. J. F. Sturken, Bunt, Day, K. R. Pinkerton, J. Swords, R. Glover, Berglund, Carsewell, Lorimer, Brown, McBride, E. Blain, Seely, Harvey Smith, Cant, Reed, Lester, Miss Margaret Clarke (Melbourne), flame-colored crepe de chine, with tulle pointed overskirt. Mrs. E. W. Harris, blue marocain, with flowing ninon sleeves, blue wreath. Miss Margaret Crossley, mauve crepe de chine, satin waist-line caught with cabachon of violets. Mrs. Beecham (Scoresby), blue shot taffeta, draped skirt, caught at sicie with handsome cabachon of feathers. Mrs. Lister (Scoresby), black crepe de chine, with jet trimmings. Mrs. R. P. Frances, black tulle, beaded with jet and iridescent beads, beads over crepe de chine. Mrs. John Sturken, brocaded crepe de chine, white waist-line finisher with pearl girdle, long ninon sleeves. Mrs Harvey Smith, black taffeta inlet with lace, finished at waist with gold and jet girdle. Mrs. Bunt, black charineuse, with silver trimmings.
    Mrs. James Wilson, black crepe de chene with steel trimmings. Mrs. P. C. Anderson, blue shot taffeta, with pink flowers at waist and in hair. Miss Campbell, black crepe de chine with black lace. Miss Towl (Melbourne), apricot charmeuse pointed skirt, finished at waist with same color. Miss Cunningham, powder blue georgette Miss Walker, slate grey silk, black tulle sash, deep collar Maltese lace. Miss Peterson, eau-de-nil cachemire de sole. Miss Shorthouse, shot taffeta, pink finished with flowers at waist. Miss King, shot pink, with tulle trimmings. Mrs Cyril Davey, pretty white georgette, with pointed skirt over crepe de chine.
    Miss Ashley, black cachemire de sole panels of radium lace, finished at waist with fuchsia flower trimmings. Miss D. Ashley, stamped mauve velvet, trimmings of silver and silver girdle. Miss Barker mauve taffeta silk, with pretty pointed skirt over trimmed underskirt. Miss R Gamble, fuchsia colored cachemire de sole. Miss Bunt, flame colored crepe de chine, Miss M. Bunt, turquoise blue crepe de chine. Miss Dayey, royal blue figured georgette, with side panel of steel color. Miss M. Davey, jade green georgette, Miss McLean, black cachery re de sole, kingfisher blue let in at side. Miss N. McLean, mole cachemire de sole, sleeves of gold georgette, skirt caught with blue and gold cabachon. Miss Stenhouse, pale blue crepe de chine, with bead trimmings. Mrs. Gamble, black crepe de chine. Mrs. Jack Ashley, black and gold figured georgette. Mrs. F. Griffin, black charmeuse, with radium lace trimmings. Mrs. Love, green and gold brocaded georgette. Mrs Hurditch, pink ninon, with pale blue finishings. Mrs. Kirkwood, black velvet draped frock caught at sides with jet or naments. Mrs. McBride, black crepe de chine, with jet girdle. Mrs. Fung, black crepe de chine. Miss Lockey, royal blue figured georgette.32
  • 30 May 1927, TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS. Sir,-Though religious services are still 11th on the list, I hope that they will not be dropped from the programmes. As I have lived in the country, I realise what it means to those far back or near to the city to hear fine services broadcast. May I mention Billy Bunny's Sunday night talks to the children? I think they must appeal to old and young alike. Near as we are to the churches we always like to hear religions services broadcast.—Yours, &c., LAURA KIRKWOOD. Caulfield. May 27.33
  • 16 Dec 1940, SHEPHARD - On December 14 at Park street, Brighton, Isabel, beloved friend of Laura Kirkwood.34

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#M1078."
  2. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3915-899 - Arthur Vincent Kirkwood died on 20 Apr 1939. Probate of his will has been granted to Laura Kirkwood of 15 Empress Road East St Kilda Widow.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3915-899 - Ena Isla Ellen Dean of Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  6. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, LynneCooper72.
  7. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Fri 31 Jul 1953, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206446244
  8. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P4, unit 603; VPRS 7591/P3, unit 14.
  9. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  10. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  11. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  12. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  13. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  14. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  15. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  16. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  17. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  18. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  19. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  20. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  21. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  22. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  23. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  24. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  25. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  26. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  27. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "26 Oct 1916, p2."
  28. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "14 Sep 1917, p2."
  29. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "9 Nov 1917, p3."
  30. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "15 Feb 1918, p3."
  31. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 27 Jun 1918, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88816166."
  32. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 5 Jul 1923, p36.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 May 1927, p13.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Dec 1940, p4.
Last Edited7 Jun 2018

Henry Plant Singleton

M, #1377, b. 1821, d. 7 Jul 1909
Birth*1821 Dublin, Ireland.1 
Marriage*1 Mar 1851 Spouse: Maria Elizabeth Clarke. Rathdown, Dublin, Ireland, Mar Q [Rathdown] 9 565.2,3
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelDec 1854 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Lincluden Castle sailing from Liverpool as Cabin Passengers.4
 
Widower9 Jul 1883Henry Plant Singleton became a widower upon the death of his wife Maria Elizabeth Clarke.2 
Marriage*26 Apr 1887 Spouse: Henrietta Ghinn. St. Matthew's Church, Prahran, VIC, Australia, #M2040.5,1
 
Marriage-Notice*30 Apr 1887SINGLETON—GHINN.—On the 26th inst., at St. Matthew's Church, Prahran, by the Rev. Canon Chase, assisted by the Rev. H. A. Langley, Henry Plant Singleton, of Malvern, to Etta, second daughter of Henry Ghinn, of Burnett-street, St. Kilda.6 
Residence*bt 1900 - 1909 Lived in a house named "Killara", which was situated on lot 8 l/p 1265. 
Death*7 Jul 1909 "Killara", St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D7406 (Age 88) [par William SINGLETON & Mary LEWIS].7 
Death-Notice*8 Jul 1909SINGLETON. —On the 7th July, at Killara, Upper Beaconsfield (suddenly), Henry Plant Singleton, only surviving brother of the late Rev. William Singleton and the late Dr. Singleton, of East Melbourne, aged 88 years.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1903 - 1908Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: independent means. With Henrietta Singleton.9,10,11

Grave

  • Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, In loving memory of Henry Plant SINGLETON
    brother of the late Dr Singleton who fell asleep 7 Jul 1909 age 88 yrs
    There remaineth therefore a rest for the people of God
    John Wesley SINGLETON beloved husband of the late Marion Agnes
    also beloved father of Henry, Charles and Herbert born 23 Jun 1838 died 16 Apr 1924
    also of R.H.SINGLETON youngest son of Dr John Singleton died 31 Aug 1927
    With Christ which is far better12

Newspaper-Articles

  • 25 Jan 1892, GHINN. - On the 23rd ist., at the residence of his son-in-law, E. J. Thomas, Risca, Elsternwick, Henry Ghinn, of Ballandry Station, N.S.W., formerly Colonial Architect of Victoria, dearly-loved father of Mrs. Henry Plant Singleton and Mrs Malcolm A. Campbell.13
  • 27 Sep 1902, COUNTRY HOME beautifully situated, one lady would be received as paying Guest. "Killara," Upper Beaconsfield.14
  • 28 Nov 1903, FURNISHED, "Killara," 5 rooms, bathroom, large tanks, vegetables, high situation, lovely views; 25/. H. Singleton, Upper Beaconsfield.15
  • 25 Jan 1904, A. —Upper Beaconsfield.—Picturesquely situated PROPERTY, magnificent views sea and mountain, comfortable house, 5 rooms, with all accessories, 32½ acres good land, good roads. Singleton, 317 Collins st.16
  • 10 May 1904, NO. 34,723.—TRANSFER OF LAND ACT, 1890.— HENRY PLANT SINGLETON, of "Killara," Upper Beaconsfield, in the County of Mornington, gentleman, and WILLIAM JONES SINGLETON, of "Wakool," Cheltenham, in the County of Bourke, gentleman, have applied to bring the land described at the foot hereof under the above Act; and the Commissioner of Titles has directed notice of the application to be advertised in "The Herald" newspaper, and has appointed fourteen days from such advertisment, after which time the land may be brought under the operation of the Act unless a caveat shall be lodged forbidding the same.
    Dated 6th day of May, 1901.
    LAND REFERRED TO.
    Part of Crown portion 21, at Sandringham Parish of Moorabbin, County of Bourke, commencing at the intersection of the south side of Bamfield street south and the east side of Beaumont street thence southerly 171 feet 3 inches along Beaumont street thence easterly 44 feet 4 inches along Crown portion 22, thence northerly 171 feet 8 inches and thence west 47 feet 6 inches along Bamfield street south to the point of commencement. Granting this application will affect land comprised in Certificate of Tltle Vol. 2095 Fol. 418878 now in the name of Alice Elizabeth
    Davenport or cause a Certificate of Title to issue inconsistent with such certificate to the extent shown by a plan now open for inspection at the Office of Titles and bearing the number of this application. Thos Byrne. Registrar of Titles.17
  • 21 Mar 1908, UPPER BEACONSFIELD.—For a few weeks, furnished, 5 rooms, splendid views, elevated; 25/ weekly; convenient. Singleton.18
  • 8 Jul 1909, BEACONSFIELD UPPER - The death of Mr Henry Plant Singleton took place on Wednesday morning at his residence, "Kilarra," Beaconsfield Upper. He was a brother of Dr Singleton of East Melbourne and of the Rev William Singleton, and uncle of the Misses Singleton, of Ormiston College. He was 88 years of age.19
  • 12 Jul 1909, DEATHS OF OLD CITIZENS. The funeral look place on Saturday of Mr Henry Plant Singleton, a well known old colonist who commenced his Australian career in 1854, arriving in the ship Lincluden Castle. He was in his 89th year, and retained an unusual measure of bodily and mental vigor to the last. Mr Singleton who was the youngest of a family of ten, was a brother of the late well-known philanthropist, Dr John Singleton and of the late Rev William Singleton, the latter of whom arrived in Australia in 1848. On reaching here, Mr H P Singleton entered upon some private enterprises, taking and executing several large contracts, but having been in the Bank of Ireland he was offered an appointment in the Union Bank, which he accepted and held for many years. Ultimately he decided to enter into business on his own account. Mr Singleton took a deep interest in the affairs of St Matthew's Church, Prahran, and in the Asylum for the Blind, of both of which institutions he was treasurer during a long period. He was much esteemed by a large circle for his integrity and for his perennial cheerfulness of disposition. Of late years he had lived in retirement at Upper Beaconsfield.20
  • 15 Jul 1909, The death occurred on 7th instant at Beaconsfield of Mr Henry Plant Singleton at the age of 88 years. The deceased gentleman was the only surviving brother of the late Rev. Wm. Singleton, first incumbent of Christ Church, Kilmore, who reared a large and respectable family here, and many of whom attained high positions. It will be remembered that, a few years back, I think four sons of the late Rev. Wm. Singleton paid a visit to Kilmore, where they were warmly welcomed by many old friends.21
  • 17 Jul 1909, A very well known resident of Prahran, and a widely esteemed colonist in the person of Mr. Henry Plant Singleton, has joined the great majority. Mr. Singleton, who was in his 85th year, arrived in Australia in 1854, and was always exceptionally active, physically and mentally. Deceased was a brother of the late Dr. John Singleton, the philanthropist, and of the late. Rev. Wm. Singleton. The deceased entered the service of the Union Bank here, but, after long service, went into private business interests. He always took an interest in the affairs of St. Matthew's Church, Prahran, and in many charitable institutions. His charming manner won him a wide circle of friends.22

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "spouse Henry SINGLETON."
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ireland, Select Marriages, 1619-1898 [database on-line].
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Series: VPRS 7666; Series Title: Inward Overseas Passenger Lists (British Ports) [Microfiche Copy of VPRS 947].
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Oct 1927, p17.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Apr 1887, p1.
  7. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Jul 1909 p1.
  9. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  10. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  11. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  12. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 Jan 1892, p1.
  14. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1902, p16.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 28 Nov 1903, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10584868
  16. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 25 Jan 1904, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10594406
  17. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 10 May 1904, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241916058
  18. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 21 Mar 1908, p13 (also advertised on 26 Mar 1908)
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10666186
  19. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Jul 1909, p8.
  20. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Jul 1909, p8.
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954), Thu 15 Jul 1909, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58274581
  22. [S14] Newspaper - The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 - 1930), Sat 17 Jul 1909, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article144514035
Last Edited30 Jun 2018

Percy Sharples Cowper

M, #1378, b. 17 Aug 1874, d. 10 Mar 1954
Father*William Cowper
Mother*Mary Smith
Probate (Will)* Percy S Cowper. Retired. Ringwood. 10 Mar 1954. 473/394.1 
Anecdote*Percy was an inventor of gadgets. If you turned on the outside tap, the pressure of water would push the clothesline up.
He had an extensive berryfruit garden, which was a constant joy to his nieces.2 
Birth*17 Aug 1874 Boroondara, VIC, Australia, #B16385.3,4 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel22 Nov 1908 To New York, USA. Ship leaving Queenstown, Ireland - arriving New York 22 Nov 1908.
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1924 To Sydney, NSW, Australia. Ship Arlanza from Buonos Ayres arriving Southampton 6 May 1924
Moreton Bay
Age 49 - clerk, travelling to Sydney. Last permanent residence Chile.5 
Marriage*12 Jun 1926 Spouse: Ottilie Emilie Voullaire. VIC, Australia.6
 
Marriage-Notice*17 Jun 1926COWPER-VOULLAIRE- On 12th June, by Rev I R Bradbury, of Ringwood, Percy Cowper, Norwood, Upper Beaconsfield, to Ottilie Emilie, eldest daughter ot R M Voullaire, Zeist, Merbein.7 
Land-UBeac*19 Jun 1926 GEM-E-3D. Transfer from Edward Allott Hardy to Percy Sharples Cowper. 116a 1r 31p.8,9 
Land-Note*19 Jun 1926 GEM-E-3D: Mortgagee: Evan Thomas Cowper. Discharged 22 Jun 1936. Mortgagor was Percy Sharples Cowper.10 
Occupation*bt 1928 - 1947 Postmaster of Emerald until his retirement.11 
Land-UBeac*23 Dec 1946 GEM-E-3D. Transfer from Percy Sharples Cowper to Agnes Alice Gibbs. 116a 1r 31p.12,13 
Death*10 Mar 1954 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D2650 (Age 79) [par William COWPER & Mary SMITH].14 
Death-Notice*11 Mar 1954COWPER, Percy Sharples.—On March 10 (suddenly), loved husband of Ottilie (Voullaire) Cowper, and loved father of David, in his 80th year, late postmaster of Emerald.
COWPER. - The Funeral of the late Mr. PERCY SHARPLES COWPER, of 16 Kendall street, Ringwood, and formerly of Emerald, will leave the R. McKenzie Memorial Chapel. 199 Clarendon street. South Melbourne. THIS DAY (Thursday), after a service commencing at 2 p.m., for the Spring Vale Crematorium.15 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1925Norwood, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist.16
bt 1926 - 1928Norwood, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist. With Ottilie Emilie Cowper.17,18,19
bt 1931 - 1942Post Office, Emerald, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: postmaster. With Ottilie Emilie Cowper.20,21,22,23
bt 1949 - 195416 Kendall Street, Ringwood, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Ottilie Emilie Cowper.24,25

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia26

Newspaper-Articles

  • 22 Aug 1945, “THIS ROAD IS in such a bad state of repair that I will hold council responsible for any accident,” wrote J. Costello, “Norwood,” Beaconsfield Rd. Emerald, in reminding council that he had previously asked that the road into Cowper’s property be made - or repaired.
    “This property can be made good by a good worker—and I am going to make good,” he declared in asking council to either repair the road or place the material for doing same at his disposal. —Referred to the engineer.27

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P4, unit 687; VPRS 7591/P3, unit 32.
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cowper-93 - accessed 23 Feb 2014
    Memories of P S COWPER by Nicolette Atkinson.
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cowper-93 - accessed 23 Feb 2014
    gives birthplace as Hawthorn.
  5. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960
    Ancestry.com. UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D26723 age 73 [par Rudolf H VOULLAIRE & Jeanne Ettie DERMOUT]."
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jun 1926 p1.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2913-452 - Percy Sharples Cowper of Emerald Orchardist.
  9. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 rated 1924-25 (dated 17.6.1925) now Cowper N40
    rated 1925/26 N40 - address changed from Emerald to Norwood Upper Beaconsfield.
    The rate books still note the owner as being Davidson, but this is not correct.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2913-452 - Mortgage No 542053 - Discharged 22 Jun 1936.
  11. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cowper-93
    accessed 23 Feb 2014.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2913-452 - Agnes Alice Gibbs of 52 Empress Road Surrey Hills Married Woman.
  13. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1957-60 Agnes Alice Gibbs pays rates for GEM-E-3D (N69); 1961-65 N119.
  14. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Mar 1954, p12.
  16. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  17. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  18. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  19. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  20. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  21. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  22. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  23. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  24. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  25. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  26. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
  27. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Wed 22 Aug 1945, p3."
Last Edited28 Jul 2017

Ottilie Emilie Voullaire

F, #1379, b. 20 Jun 1890, d. 25 Dec 1963
Probate (Will)* Ottilie Emilie Cowper. Widow. Ringwood. 25 Dec 1963. 608/349.1 
Anecdote"I had examples of her intricate embroidery framed many years ago and are displayed in my home. Ottilie made my mother's wedding gown and I have the underlay petticoat, cut on the cross and stitched by hand. I also have some of her pictures (embroidered) of her memories in Batavia"
- see image.2
Married NameCowper. 
Birth*20 Jun 1890 Batavia (now Jakarta), Dutch East Indies. [par Rudolph Marc VOULLAIRE & Jean Etiennette DERMOUT]3,4 
Marriage*12 Jun 1926 Spouse: Percy Sharples Cowper. VIC, Australia.5
 
Marriage-Notice*17 Jun 1926COWPER-VOULLAIRE- On 12th June, by Rev I R Bradbury, of Ringwood, Percy Cowper, Norwood, Upper Beaconsfield, to Ottilie Emilie, eldest daughter ot R M Voullaire, Zeist, Merbein.6 
Widow10 Mar 1954Ottilie Emilie Voullaire became a widow upon the death of her husband Percy Sharples Cowper.7 
Death*25 Dec 1963 Box Hill, VIC, Australia, #D26723 (Age 73) [par Rudolf H VOULLAIRE & Jeanne Ettie DERMOUT].7 
Death-Notice*27 Dec 1963COWPER (nee Voullaire).—On December 25, at the Box Hill District Hospital, Ottillie Emilie, loving wife of the late Percy, dearly loved mother of David, loved mother-in-law of Joan, dear granny of Greg, Val and Pauline. At rest.
COWPER (nee Voullaire).—On December 25, Ottillie Emilie of Ringwood, eldest daughter of the late Rudolph and Jeanne Voullaire (Merbein), loving sister of Rudolph, Lydia, John, Ettie, Tony, Henry, Marthe and Nicolette (deceased), sister-in-law of Muriel (deceased), Dora, Arthur, Jean and Arch, aunt of Marc, Geoffrey, Ern, Yvonne, Janice, Jean, Hazel, Lucille, Jennifer, John, Nicolette and Margaret, aged 73 years.
COWPER.—The funeral of the late Mrs. OTTILLIE EMILIE COWPER will leave Padbury's chapel, 89 White Horse Road, Ringwood, THIS DAY, after a service commencing at 9 am, for the Springvale Crematorium.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1926 - 1928Norwood, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Percy Sharples Cowper.9,10,11
bt 1931 - 1942Post Office, Emerald, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: art needlework. With Percy Sharples Cowper.12,13,14,15
bt 1949 - 195416 Kendall Street, Ringwood, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: art needlework. With Percy Sharples Cowper.16,17

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia18

Newspaper-Articles

  • 17 Sep 1919, After several years absence from Mildura Miss Ottilie Voullaire returned to this district last Sunday. She has spent most of the time in Holland and during the war was engaged in nursing.19
  • 4 Apr 1930, Mrs. Cowper At The Exhibition:
    THE needlework section of the Australian Exhibition has been judged - and today the judge, Mrs. Ottilie Voullaire Cowper will return to Melbourne.
    She has been greatly impressed with some sections of the work, more especially the tapestry which, she thinks, is magnificent.
    THREE YEARS COURSE IN HOLLAND: Mrs. Cowper is a woman of vast needlework experience. She is a teacher of art needlework, and is a graduate of the Industrial College, Utrecht, Holland. She was born in Java, of Dutch parents, who are both, however, of French descent. She came to Australia as a tiny girl, with her parents, who settled in Mildura. In 1911 she went to Holland and stayed there for eight years. The war broke out before she completed her art needlework training, and so she was prevented from returning to Australia until 1919. The course through which Mrs. Cowper passed at the Utrecht Industrial College was comprehensive, and to any true lover of the work the first year would have been tedious. In it, were mastered all the various stitches used in plain sewing, darning, knitting, patching, and cutting out by measurement.
    ANCIENT AND MODERN ART: The second and third years were occupied in solving the intricacies of fancy needlework of all kinds, knitting and crochet, drawing and designing, and studying the entire history of needlework, which even necessitated an excursion into the artistic development of the different countries, going back to ancient Egyptian times. Nor was this all. Architecture was even brought into the horizon of study. So was heraldry. This was, firstly, so that the designs used in ecclesiastical embroidery, would be traced in keeping with its surroundings.
    Mrs. Cowper brought with her samples of her own handiwork - which is wonderful and showing extreme versatility, and comprises a large range of Oriental works. She has samples of Spanish, Dutch, Armenian, Turkish, Arabian, Chinese, and Norwegian embroideries in gorgeous colour schemes. Her French whitework, such as Richelieu and Hedebo is a revelation.20
  • 11 Apr 1936, Judge of Needlework
    MRS. OTTILIE VOULLAIRE COWPER, who spends practically all her time either doing needlework herself or else judging that of others, was in Adelaide recently for the judging of the thousands of entries in the competitive needlework section at the Centennial Empire Exhibition.
    Mrs. Cowper, who lives in Victoria, is a graduate of the Col- lege of Industry at Utrecht, Holland.
    She was born in Batavia, but has spent most of her life in Australia.21
  • 20 Sep 1938, The entries for classes in the section for arts and crafts have increased considerably this year, and they will be judged by Miss Enid Thompson, a former secretary of the Arts and Crafts Society. Mrs. Harvey Smith and Mrs. P. S. Cowper, who are "old hands" at the game, will judge the needlework sections, as they have on many previous occasions. Miss Ruth Evans and Mrs. George Collins will again have the unenviable task of selecting the winners of the cookery contests. Entries for many classes In this section are very large and will involve much "cutting and tasting" by the judges.22

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P4, unit 3105; VPRS 7591/P3, unit 523.
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cowper-93 - accessed 23 Feb 2014
    Memories of Ottilie COWPER by Nicolette Atkinson.
  3. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "siblings born at Mildura from 1893, a brother died South Yarra 1892."
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Voullaire-5 - accessed 23 Feb 2014.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D26723 age 73 [par Rudolf H VOULLAIRE & Jeanne Ettie DERMOUT]."
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jun 1926 p1.
  7. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  8. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 27 Dec 1963, p12.
  9. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  10. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  11. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  12. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  13. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  14. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  15. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  16. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  17. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  18. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
  19. [S14] Newspaper - The Mildura Cultivator (Vic), 17 Sep 1919, p7.
  20. [S14] Newspaper - The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA), 4 Apr 1930, p12 (Illustrated).
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Australian Women's Weekly, 11 Apr 1936, p21.
  22. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Sep 1938, p20S (extract).
Last Edited22 Jul 2017
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.