Eunice Camille Russell

F, #19788, b. 9 Nov 1881, d. 2 Jul 1957
Probate (Will)* 516/629. Eunice C RUSSELL Date of grant: 31 Jul 1957; Date of death: 02 Jul 1957; Occupation: Gentlewoman; Residence: Sth Yarra.1 
Married NameChia. 
Birth*9 Nov 1881 Emerald Hill, VIC, Australia, #B23276 [par Edward Charles RUSSELL & Marie Agnes THOMSON] - as Unice Camille.2,3 
Birth-Notice*16 Nov 1881RUSSELL.—On the 9th inst., at Oxford-terrace, Sandridge-road, Emerald-hill, the wife of Edward C. Russell of a daughter.4 
Marriage*2 Jan 1913 Spouse: Thomas Jones Chia. St Peter's Church, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M382.5
Note1917 Death of father: Edward Charles RUSSELL
#D9639 (Age 59) [par Geo Pollock RUSSELL & Jemima CROSSLAND] Melbourne South.5 
Death*2 Jul 1957 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D7489 (Age 78) [par George RUSSELL & Mary Agnes THOMSON].5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1913Sandringham House, Sandringham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Feb 1881: Marriage of parents: RUSSELL—THOMSON.—On the 2nd inst., at the Wesleyan parsonage, Emerald-hill, by the Rev. W. P. Wells, Edward Charles, second son of G. P. Russell, Esq., late timber merchant, to Mary Agnes, eldest daughter of the late James Thomson, both of Emerald hill. Edinburgh papers please copy.7
  • 17 Jan 1913: Much interest and discussion has lately raged round a prominent Melbourne girl, Miss Eunice Russell, a pretty gentle blonde, who sometime ago made quite a hit on the stage, last week married Mr. Thomas Chia, secretary to the Chinese Consul. His many friends name him a cultured, intersting, gentleman, but what about our Kiplingesque belief that—"East is East" and West is West And never the twain shall meet." Thomas Jones Chia8
  • 16 Apr 1913: Departure of Mrs Chia. Mrs Thomas Chia (formerly Miss Russell) is leaving with her mother, Mrs Russell, for England to-morrow. It is stated that Mrs Chia intends returning to the stage.9
  • 22 Jul 1920: Chia Divorce Suit
    In the Practice Court yesterday Mr. Justice Cussen said that he would make the order asked for by Mr. L. S. Woolf on the previous day that the evidence of Eunice Camille Russell, the petitioner in the pending divorce suit against Thomas Jones Chia should be taken in London on commission. He stipulated that the evidence on commission should not be used except on the order of the judge after he had an opportunity of perusing it. That applied whether the respondent entered in appearance or not. It would also be subject to any further order requiring the personal attendance of the petitioner. Thomas Jones Chia10
  • 11 Feb 1921: ACTRESS SUES FOR DIVORCE. CHIA SHOOTING RECALLED. QUESTION OF DESERTION.
    In the Second Civil Court, before Mr. Justice Cussen yesterday, Eunice Camille Chia (formerly Eunice Camille Russell) petitioned for a dissolution of her marriage with Thomas Jones Chia, on the ground of desertion. The allegation in the writ was that Chia had deserted his wife on October 3, 1916, and for three years afterwards. The parties were married at St Peter's Church on January 2, 1913, and there was one child of the marriage. The child subsequently died. Mr L. S. Woolf appeared for the petitioner, and the petition was undefended.
    Arnold C Westley, who had acted as solicitor for Chia when the latter was in Melbourne, was called by Mr Woolf to give evidence concerning domicile. He identified a photograph of Chia, and said that the respondent had intended to settle in Victoria. He had known Chia both as legal adviser and as a personal friend. Dr. William Maloney, M H R , was asked by Mr. Woolf if he identified a photo graph as that of Chia.
    Witness .—Yes, that is my friend.
    Do you know that he is now in New York?—I know he was there. He used to write to me. He had intended to settle in Victoria.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—Dr Maloney says that this is a photograph of his friend. Is it a photograph of the respondent in this case?—It is Thomas Jones Chia.
    Mr Woolf said that the evidence of the petitioner had been taken on commission in London. When an order for the taking of this evidence was made the judge had stipulated that the evidence should only be produced with the consent of the judge presiding when the petition was heard. He now asked to be allowed to put in the evidence.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—I will not allow it yet; you can go on.
    Mr. Woolf put in affidavits and other documents to show that after the marriage the parties had lived at Sandringham. On April 15, 1913, Chia was presented at the criminal sittings of the Supreme Court on a charge of having shot at Yung Liang Kwang, the Chinese Consul. Chia was sentenced to five years' imprisonment, and after having served three years he was released. He then left Australia. The following letter written by Chia to Mrs Chia was put in as evidence;—
    Oriental Hotel,
    The Bund, Canton
    To Mrs T. J. Chia,
    Care Mr E. C. Russell,
    Melbourne
    Dear Madam,
    You were once my adored wife, and I still bear very kindly recollection of you, notwithstanding your unwifely attitude towards me on an occasion when I most needed your honourable support.
    You left me in Melbourne to go away to England in March 1913 without even the common civility of farewell. Since my return to China I have had copy of your letter to your father, dated February 22, 1916 translated and filed with my petition in the local Chinese Court, endevouring to obtain a divorce, more for your sake than for mine. Being a Chinese citizen, having sworn allegiance to the Chinese Government our marriage in a foreign land (not legalalised at the Chinese Consulate General in Melbourne) is not recognised by the Chinese Government as valid. Hence my several but futile efforts to get the lawful freedom for you, and, according to our law, I stand at an advantage whereas you with your law, at a great disadvantage. I write this so that you may have
    evidence to obtain a divorce at London or in the Australian Court or wherever you may be.
    I do not think I shall meet you again in this life. I have returned to my homeland without you and never to see you again and all my interests will be wedded to the salvation work of my own country (China). As you have desired it I shall vow never to have marital relations with you again.... You had better be guided by your counsellor and try to obtain the earliest possible relief that the British Government may see fit to grant in your favour. Failing this you can write me a letter embodying all you had said to your father in your letter of February 22, 1916, and send it to my Melbourne solicitors, Messrs. Westley and Dale, who will forward it to me in Peking, on receipt of which I shall approach the British Ambassador with our higher authority, there to get your freedom.
    Mr Justice Cussen.—What is the meaning of that phrase beginning "as you have desired it?"
    Mr. Woolf.—I do not know.
    Other documents put in by Mr. Woolf showed that respondent said that he was a British subject, that he was born in the Malay States and was a graduate of Jesus College, Cambridge. When the charge was laid against Chia, counsel said, the wife contracted brain fever and she went to EngIand under medical advice. When the child was born she had another serious illness and the doctor forbade her to take another sea voyage. Petitioner was now making her living as an actress but she was now so ill that she frequently had to lie down between the acts.
    Mr Justice Cussen.—The evidence concerning their relationship before the separation is most unsatisfactory. I said that if I granted the order for the taking of evidence on commission the evidence should be full. This is not full, and it is somewhat unsatisfactory.
    Lillian Catherine Prowse of Middle Brighton, a sister of the mother of petitioner said that when petitioner left for England she was very ill.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—Could not this petition have been lodged under another section?
    Mr Woolf.—No; it does not come under the other section. The sentence under the section would have to be seven years and for a capital offence. It might be—indeed it probably was—that she was glad to get this man out of her life, as he had been convicted for a serious offence but it was the conduct of the respondent that they had to look to.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—I do not agree with that at all.
    Mr. Woolf—It is clear that the man has made up his mind that this East and West business is a failure.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—Perhaps she made up her mind on the point, too. Was the relationship terminated by her conduct in 1913?
    Mr. Woolf—In one sense there was no relationship to be brought to an end. From the morning that he shot the consul he had never written to her, contributed to her support or asked about the child.
    Mr. Justice Cussen.—Was that very strange seeing that he ascertained that she left for England immediately?'
    Mr. Woolf.—If a woman goes away for her health that is not desertion. She may have been glad of the separation, but she did nothing to bring it about.
    Judgment was reserved. Thomas Jones Chia11

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P4 unit 1400, item 516/629
    VPRS 7591/ P3 unit 172, item 516/629.
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Original data: Marriage Registers. St. Peter’s Eastern Hill, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Description: Series 02, Register 1903-1913; Reference Number: M2/17.
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 16 Nov 1881, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11524010
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  6. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 10 Feb 1881, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5982395
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Coburg Leader (Vic.), Fri 17 Jan 1913, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67424686
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Ovens and Murray Advertiser (Beechworth, Vic.), Wed 16 Apr 1913, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200688623
  10. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 22 Jul 1920, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4594643
  11. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Fri 11 Feb 1921, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1736157
Last Edited7 May 2018

Elizabeth Clarence Graney

F, #19800, b. 1857, d. 11 Oct 1949
Probate (Will) Elizabeth Cadell. Widow. Harrisfield. 11 Oct 1949. 442/007.1 
Name Variation Elizabeth Clarence Graney was also known as Ethel Vernon Caldwell. 
Married NameCadell. 
Note* It is not entirely clear if Elizabeth Cadell / Ethel Vernon Caldwell are the same person, but it is very likely. 
Birth*1857 Liverpool, NSW, Australia.2 
Birthabt 1860 NSW, Australia. 
UBeac Research1860 Ethel Vernon CALDWELL: born NSW - in Colchester Essex 1891 census as visitor, married, age 31, living on own means staying with Henry GRIMWADE. 
Marriage1888 Spouse: Alfred Cadell. VIC, Australia, #M4589.3
 
Land-UBeac10 Jul 1920 PAK-74 l/p 5014 696089. Transfer from Annie Maud Latham to Elizabeth Clarence Cadell. Part Lot 9.4 
Land-UBeac2 Apr 1947 PAK-74 l/p 5014 696089. Transfer from Elizabeth Clarence Cadell to Noel Ernestine Walkeden. Pt Lot 9 - now joint proprietors.5 
Death*11 Oct 1949 Harrisfield, VIC, Australia, #D23694 (Age 92) [par John CADELL & Elizabeth CHILDS].6,7 
Death-Notice13 Oct 1949CADELL.—On October 11, at Dandenong, Elizabeth, the dearly loved wife of the late Alfred Cadell, formerly of Beaconsfield, aged 92 years.
CADELL.—The Friends of the late Mrs. ELIZABETH CADELL, formerly of Beaconsfield, are notified that her Funeral will arrive at the Springvale Crematorium THIS DAY, at 11.15 a.m. Service by the Rev. P. S. Lawrence.
W. J. GARNAR & SON. Dandenong. Phone 308.8 
Land-Note28 Mar 1950 PAK-74 l/p 5014 696089 Noel Ernestine Walkeden. Noel Ernestine Walkenden the survivor of the proprietors is now the sole proprietor.9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1912 - 1917Ethel Vernon CALDWELL, 442 Punt Road, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.10,11,12
bt 1921 - 1924Elizabeth CADELL, 34 Hawksburn Road, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.13,14
1924Ethel Vernon CALDWELL, 444 Punt Road, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.14
bt 1931 - 1949Ethel CADELL, The Humptie, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: pensioner.15,16,17,18,19

Newspaper-Articles

  • 8 Jun 1916: CALDWELL, Edith, 442 Punt-road, South Yarra, reports stolen from her dwelling, between February last and the 4th inst., 3 single blankets, white; a double white blanket; a lady's navy-blue long golf coat, darned in front; an oil painting, in frame, representing a white horse being led by an old man through a swamp; a china inlaid serviette ring, "No. 1" on it: a nun's veiling nightdress and jacket; dinner, pudding, and cheese plates; 2 pink china bread and butter plates; linen table cloths; serviettes; and children's clothes. Value £12. Entrance was effected through a window—O.4287. 7th June, 1916.20
  • 15 Jun 1916: See Police Gazette, 1916, p349. CALDWELL'S ETHEL, larceny.—Isabel Fraser and Bertha Backus have been arrested by the Berwick police for the offence, and portion of the property traced to their possession.—O.4287. 10th June, 1916.21
  • 21 Jun 1916: BERWICK POLICE COURT. At the Berwick Police Court on Friday last, before Messrs E. L. Vieusseux (chairman), W. G. a'Beckett, T. McLennan, Geo. L. Wilson, Harvey Smith and A. R. Henty, Js.P.,
    Bertha Backus and Isabella Fraser were charged on the information of Constable Lombard with stealing certain articles valued at £12 from a week-end residence at Beaconsfield.
    Inspector Jones prosecuted, the accused being undefended. Ethel Caldwell Cadell stated on oath—I reside at South Yarra. I visit a week-end place at Beaconsfield. I was there early in February, but did not miss anything. Was there again on the 4th instant and found the place had been dismantled. The canvas had been taken off of the back of the house. I missed a long golf coat, linen, blankets, an oil painting, tea and sugar. The golf coat produced is mine. I also identify the linen, china, and a box. I value my total loss at £10. I gave no person authority to take the articles.
    Annie P. Vagg stated—I reside in Northcote. My daughter had certain property stolen. I identify some of the property produced as that owned by my daughter—crockery, clothing, a box, and some linen. I value them at about 30s. No person had authrity to remove the goods from the house.
    L. Barnes, a laborer residing at Beaconsfield, said he knew the house owned by Mrs Latham. On the 13th May he saw a woman and two children there. He could not identify them. He afterwards went to the house and found it had been broken into, some bags being torn away.
    Nellie Barnes, a little girl, also gave evidence.
    Arthur William Shorthouse, cab proprietor, stated that he drove Mrs Fraser from Quamby cottage to Beaconsfield railway station on the 1st June. She had the box produced with her.
    Constabe Lombard stated—On the 4th instant Mrs Cadell reported to me that Mrs Latham's house had been broken into. On the following Tuesday I went to the house of Mrs Backus, at Beaconsfield. She and her husband were there. I said "I am a constable from Berwick, and I am making enquiries about Mrs Latham's robbery." Mrs Backus said they had heard nothing about it. I said, "Is it true as I have been informed, that you were up there on Tuesday, and carrying a bag? "She replied, "I was up there, and we had some bushes in a bag." Her husband said "Is there any suspicion on us?" I said, "Yes ; your wife can tell you all about it." He replied, "You can search the house if you like." I searched the house, and in the bedroom I pointed to a tin box and asked what was in it. Mrs Backus replied. "Some of my old clothes." Her husband then opened the box. I found the cups and saucers produced, also table cloth, quilt, knife forks and spoons. I said, "This is some of the stolen property." The husbard said. "I did not know it was here." Mrs Backus said, " Whatever me and my sister are, this is an innocent man. My sister put those things there and was to take them away next Saturday. I begged of my sister not to take these things, and even on the Thursday morning before she went away, when she had them spread on the table. I asked her to take them back."
    The nightdress produced was also found in the room. Mrs Backus said her sister gave her that. I then arrested her and charged her with larceny. On the 7th instant, in company with Plain-clothes Constable Grant, I went to Buckhurst street, Montague, and saw Mrs Fraser. I asked her when she was at her sister's place at Beaconsfield last and she said she had not been there for a month. I said to her, "What about the property you left there?" and she replied, "I left no property there. I do not know what you are talking about." I then told her I had a warrant for her arrest for larceny at Beaconsfield, and was going to search her room. She said "Everything in that room belongs to me except the bed, chest of drawers and washstand." We found the box produced packed with crockery and some clothes. We also found the golf coat produced, which she claimed as her property. She was then arrested.
    Constable Grant gave corroborative evidence as to what had taken place at Montague. This was the case for the prosecution.
    In answer to the usual question the accused said they wished the Bench to deal with the case. They pleaded guilty, but said they had not taken some of the articles with which they were charged. Mrs Fraser asked for leniency. She said she was highly respected, and it was her first trouble of the kind. She did not know why she took the things, as she did not require them. She asked to be dealt with as a first offender.
    Mrs Backus said she regretted what had happened.
    After some deliberation the Bench sentenced each of the accused to a month's imprisonment, the chairman remarking that it was necessary that weekend residences should be protected.
    An order was made for return of the goods to the owers. Bertha Mary Jane Backus Hazel Isobel Sandberg Annie Priscilla Vagg22
  • 19 Feb 1920: FURNISHED, 4-rd. Cottage, Quamby, Beaconsfield. Letter E.C., 32 Davis avenue, S. Yarra.23
  • 6 Dec 1921: Beaconsfield. FURNISHED Cottage, all convs., Quamby Hill, Beaconsfield. Apply 34 Hawksburn rd., Hawksburn.24
  • 5 Apr 1922: FURNISHED. 4-rd. Cottage, Quamby Hills, Beaconsfield. Letter, E.C., 34 Hawksburn rd., Hawksburn.25

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P4, unit 195; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 1539.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "birthplaces Somerset (Alfred) & Liverpool (Elizabeth)."
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3640-970 - Elizabeth Cadell of 18 Yarra Street South Yarra Widow.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3640-970 - Elizabeth Cadell of "The Humptie" Beaconsfield Widow and Noel Ernestine Walkenden of 19 William Street South Yarra Spinster - now joint proprietors.
  6. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "Place of birth LIVERPOOL NEW SOUTH WALES
    Place of Death Harrisfield."
  7. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "Place of Death reg Springvale."
  8. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 13 Oct 1949, p28.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3640-970 - Noel Ernestine Walkenden the survivor of the proprietors is now the sole proprietor.
  10. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  11. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  12. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  13. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  14. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  15. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  16. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  17. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  18. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  19. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949 "crossed out - dead."
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette (Melbourne, Vic.), 8 Jun 1916, p349.
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette (Melbourne, Vic.), 15 Jun 1916, p363.
  22. [S19] Newspaper - Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette (Berwick, Vic.), Wed 21 Jun 1916, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92092209
  23. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 19 Feb 1920, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1677927
  24. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 6 Dec 1921, p14
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4615545
  25. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 5 Apr 1922, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4671709
Last Edited26 May 2018
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.