Elizabeth Bennett

F, #20224, b. 1842, d. 1891
Father*Eli Bennett b. 1817, d. 13 Apr 1899
Mother*Elizabeth Barnes b. 1817, d. 1889
Married NameJacob. 
Birth*1842 
Marriage*1860 Spouse: Frederick Jacob. VIC, Australia, #M1346.1
 
Note*bt 1861 - 1882 10 children.1 
Death*1891 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D4122 (Age 49.)2 

Family

Frederick Jacob
Child 1.Elizabeth Emma Jacob+ b. 1861, d. 23 Jul 1940

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
Last Edited30 Jun 2018

Frederick Jacob

M, #20225
Marriage*1860 Spouse: Elizabeth Bennett. VIC, Australia, #M1346.1
 

Family

Elizabeth Bennett b. 1842, d. 1891
Child 1.Elizabeth Emma Jacob+ b. 1861, d. 23 Jul 1940

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
Last Edited30 Jun 2018

Second Australian Starr-Bowkett Building Society of Equitable Buildings

?, #20227
Land-UBeac*23 Apr 1912 GEM-E-4A l/p 1373 (Lots 6-14 + 19-30). Transfer from Leslie Albert Wilson to Second Australian Starr-Bowkett Building Society of Equitable Buildings. 71a 2r 24p.1 
Land-UBeac20 Apr 1921 GEM-E-4A l/p 1373 (Lots 6-14 + 19-30). Transfer from Leslie Albert Wilson to Second Australian Starr-Bowkett Building Society of Equitable Buildings. 71a 2r 24p.2 

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3258-518 - Second Australian Starr-Bowkett Building Society of Equitable Buildings Collins Street Melbourne.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3258-518 - Leslie Albert Wilson of Upper Beaconsfield Boot Finisher.
Last Edited30 Jun 2018

Harriet Hall Hall

F, #20228, b. 1836
Married NameCluff. 
Birth*1836 
Marriage*15 Mar 1858 Spouse: Charles John Cluff. Camberwell, London, England, Jun [Camberwell] 1d 712.1
 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Hae Street, Walthamstow, Essex, England(Head of Household) Charles John Cluff;
Age 25 - born Haversham Kent
Member(s) of Household: Wiliam Charles Cluff Edith Harriet Cluff2

Family

Charles John Cluff b. 1833
Children 1.Edith Harriet Cluff3 b. Sep 1860, d. 8 Jun 1933
 2.Clara Margaret Cluff+ b. Dec 1869, d. 1 Sep 1904

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "as Harriet Hall HALL & Charles John CHUFF."
  2. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 1061; Folio: 65; Page: 3; GSU roll: 542745."
  3. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mothers maiden name HALL."
Last Edited13 Jan 2019

Charles John Cluff

M, #20229, b. 1833
Birth*1833 
Marriage*15 Mar 1858 Spouse: Harriet Hall Hall. Camberwell, London, England, Jun [Camberwell] 1d 712.1
 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Hae Street, Walthamstow, Essex, EnglandHead of Household: Charles John Cluff. Age 28 - Silk Manufacturer
Member(s) of Household: Harriet Hall Cluff, Wiliam Charles Cluff, Edith Harriet Cluff.2

Family

Harriet Hall Hall b. 1836
Children 1.Edith Harriet Cluff3 b. Sep 1860, d. 8 Jun 1933
 2.Clara Margaret Cluff+ b. Dec 1869, d. 1 Sep 1904

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "as Harriet Hall HALL & Charles John CHUFF."
  2. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 1061; Folio: 65; Page: 3; GSU roll: 542745."
  3. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mothers maiden name HALL."
Last Edited13 Jan 2019

Edith Harriet Cluff1

F, #20230, b. Sep 1860, d. 8 Jun 1933
Father*Charles John Cluff1 b. 1833
Mother*Harriet Hall Hall1 b. 1836
Married NameLamarque. 
Birth*Sep 1860 W Ham, Essex, England, Sep Q [W Ham] 4a 47.1 
Marriage*Dec 1882 Spouse: Walter Alvin Lamarque. Hackney, London, England, Dec Q [Hackney] 1b 739.2
 
Widow24 Mar 1916Edith Harriet Cluff became a widow upon the death of her husband Walter Alvin Lamarque.3 
Death*8 Jun 1933 England. 
Probate (Will)*20 Jul 1933 LAMARQUE Edith Harriet of 15c Granville-road Eastbourne widow died 8 June 1933 Probate London 20 July to Walter Charles Lamarque and William Tulloch Macdiarmid brokers. Effects £12878 11s. 5d.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Hae Street, Walthamstow, Essex, England(Head of Household) Charles John Cluff;
Age 8 mo
Member(s) of Household: Harriet Hall Cluff Wiliam Charles Cluff4

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mothers maiden name HALL."
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 1061; Folio: 65; Page: 3; GSU roll: 542745."
Last Edited13 Jan 2019

Walter Alvin Lamarque

M, #20236, d. 24 Mar 1916
Marriage*Dec 1882 Spouse: Edith Harriet Cluff. Hackney, London, England, Dec Q [Hackney] 1b 739.1
 
Death*24 Mar 1916 At Sea.2 
Probate (Will)*13 May 1916 LAMARQUE Walter Alvin of 24 St. Mary Axe London and of Kokine Orpington Kent died 24 March 1916 at sea. Probate London 13 May to William Edgar Nicholls chairman of public companies and Cyril Frederick Bennett and Walter Charles Lamarque corn factors. Effects £47197 6s. 8d.2 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1911Belgrave West, Beachfield Road, Sandown, Isle of Wight, EnglandHead of Household: Walter Alvin Lamarque. Age 55 - Corn Broker (Married 28 years 4 children)
Member(s) of Household: Ada Victoria Harris.3

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Class: RG14; Piece: 5742; Schedule Number: 93.
Last Edited13 Jan 2019

Arthur Charles A'Beckett Chomley

M, #20246, b. 27 Jul 1895, d. 1961
Father*Charles Henry Chomley b. 28 Apr 1868, d. 21 Oct 1942
Mother*Ethel Beatrice Ysobel A'Beckett b. 4 Sep 1866, d. 24 Dec 1940
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT (#1)
Descendants of William A'BECKETT (#2)
Birth*27 Jul 1895 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #B9290/1896.1 
Birth-Notice*7 Aug 1895CHOMLEY.—On the 27th ult., at Sandown, Middle Brighton, the wife of C. H. Chomley, of Kernah, Cheshunt, of a son.2 
Marriage*Sep 1915 Spouse: Cicely Annie Mary Shrimpton. Pancras, London, England, Sep Q [[Pancras] 1b 256.3
 
Marriage* Spouse: May Honington Martin.
 
Death*1961 Heidelberg, VIC, Australia, #D11192 (Age 65) [par Charles Henry CHOMLEY & Ysabel Ethel A'BECKETT].4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 191171 Kingston Lane, Teddington, London, England(Head of Household) Charles Henry Chomley;
Age 15 - School
Member(s) of Household: Ethel Beatrice Ysobel Chomley, Isla A'Beckett Chomley, Ethel Frances A'Beckett Chomley, Betty A'Beckett Chomley5
bt 1934 - 193792 Caroline Street, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil.6,7,8
19438 Ashe Grove, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: journalist. With May Honington Martin.9
bt 1949 - 1954Sanderling, Shoreham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: sawmiller. With May Honington Chomley.10,11

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 7 Aug 1895, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9369352
  3. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D11192/1961 Place of birth BRIGHTON."
  5. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG14; Piece: 3571; Schedule Number: 412."
  6. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  7. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  8. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  9. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  10. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  11. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
Last Edited11 Aug 2018

Charles Henry Chomley

M, #20247, b. 28 Apr 1868, d. 21 Oct 1942
Father*Henry Baker Chomley b. 1836, d. 28 Apr 1903
Mother*Eliza A'Beckett b. Jun 1842, d. 1933
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT (#1)
Descendants of William A'BECKETT (#2)
Descendants of Rev John ELMES
Birth*28 Apr 1868 Sale, VIC, Australia, #B11845.1 
Marriage*16 Jun 1891 Spouse: Ethel Beatrice Ysobel A'Beckett. All Saints' Church, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M2699 (they were 2nd cousins as well as 3rd cousins.)1
 
Marriage-Notice*29 Jun 1891CHOMLEY—A'BECKETT.—On the 16th inst., at All Saints', St. Kilda, by the Rev. Canon Gregory, Charles Henry Chomley, barrister-at-law, elder son of H. B. Chomley, Warrnambool, to Ethel Beatrice Ysobel, youngest daughter of the Hon. W. A. C. A'Beckett, of Penleigh-house, Wilts, England, and The Grange, Berwick, Victoria, and granddaughter of the late Sir William A'Beckett, first Chief Justice of Victoria.2 
Widower24 Dec 1940Charles Henry Chomley became a widower upon the death of his wife Ethel Beatrice Ysobel A'Beckett
Death*21 Oct 1942 Kensington, London, England, Dec Q [Kensington] 1a 102 (Age 74.)3 
Death-Notice*23 Oct 1942CHOMLEY.—On Oct. 21, 1942, suddenly, CHARLES HENRY CHOMLEY, of 5, Ladbroke Gardens, London, W.11, formerly of Melbourne, Australia, in his 75th year. Editor of The British Australasian and New Zealander (formerly The Bristish Australasian) since 1908. Cremation, Golden Green, Monday, Oct. 26, at 3 p.m. Flowers to Kenyon, 81, Westbourne Grove.4 
Probate (Will)*6 Mar 1943 CHOMLEY Charles Henry of 6 Ladbroke-gardens Kensington London died 21 October 1942 at St. Charles Hospital Kensington; Probate Llandudno 6 March to Ethel Frances a'Beckett Knight (wife of Cecil Roberts Knight). Effects £1912 18s. 11d.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 191171 Kingston Lane, Teddington, London, EnglandHead of Household: Charles Henry Chomley. Age 42 - Newspaper Editor
Member(s) of Household: Ethel Beatrice Ysobel Chomley, Isla A'Beckett Chomley, Ethel Frances A'Beckett Chomley, Arthur Charles A'Beckett Chomley, Betty A'Beckett Chomley.6
19395 Ladbroke Gardens, Kensington, London, EnglandHead of Household: Charles Henry Chomley. Born 28 Apr 1868 - married - Newspaper Editor - living on 2nd Floor
Member(s) of Household: Cecil Roberts Knight Ethel Frances A'Beckett Knight.7

Family

Ethel Beatrice Ysobel A'Beckett b. 4 Sep 1866, d. 24 Dec 1940
Children 1.Isla A'Beckett Chomley1 b. 1892
 2.Ethel Frances A'Beckett Chomley+1 b. 29 May 1893
 3.Arthur Charles A'Beckett Chomley+ b. 27 Jul 1895, d. 1961
 4.Betty A'Beckett Chomley1 b. 1900

Newspaper-Articles

  • 19 Jun 1891, CHOMLEY—A'BECKETT.—The marriage of Miss Ethel B. Y. a'Beckett, youngest daughter of the Hon. W. A. C. a'Beckett, "Penleigh House," Wiltshire, and "The Grange," Victoria, grand-daughter to the late Sir William a'Beckett, first Chief Justice of Victoria, to Mr. C. H. Chomley, eldest son of Mr. H. B. Chomley, of Warrnambool, and grandson of the Hon. T. T. a'Beckett, of Brighton, was solemnised at All Saints' Church, St. Kilda, on Tuesday, June 16. The marriage ceremony was performed by the Rev. Canon Gregory. The bride's gown was composed of ivory duchesse brocade, trimmed with point d'Aleneon. She wore a topaz brooch set with rare pearls, an heirloom, the gift of the bridegroom, and carried a beautiful bouquet. The bridesmaids were the Misses Alice, Edith and Emily a'Beckett, Miss Elms, and the Misses Nellie Beecher and Isabel Backhouse, who wore pretty frocks of cream cashmere, garnished with feather trimming, and gold passementerie, felt hat trimmed with feathers. They each wore gold bar brooches, the gift of the bridegroom. About 100 guests were present, chiefly members of the family and connections. The bride has a very handsome and complete trousseau from Paris. The presents were numerous and costly, the following being a complete list :
    Mrs. W. A. C. A'Beckett, Limoge dinner service, French china tea, English china dessert services, pair of terra cotta figures and house linen. Mr. W. A. C. a'Beckett, upright grand piano. Hon. T. T. a'Beckett, cheque. Mrs. T. T. A'Beckett, cheque, Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Chomley, silver serviette rings. Mrs. Weigall, dining-room clock. Mr. Justice and Mrs. A'Beckett, chest of plate. Mr. and Mrs. Theyre A'B. Weigall, case of carvers. Dr. and Mrs. Weigall, Royal Devon jardineres. Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Godfrey, crystal and silver fruit stand. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Higgins, vase of Doulton ware. Mr. Edward a'Beckett, silver egg boiler. Mr. T. a' Beckett, Hungarian fruit basket. Miss Palmer, rose fairy lamps. Miss V. Loveling, silver fish slice and fork (old French). Madame Moussempes, chocolate cups and saucers, The Misses a'Beckett, cheese and butter stand, Mrs. S. Backhouse, occasional table. Mr. E. W. Outtwaite, egg boiler. Dr. and Mrs. Springthorpe, egg stand. Mrs. and Miss Boyd, urns and spirit stand. Mr. and Mrs. Bowes Kelly, oak and silver tray. Mrs. H. Robinson, Japanese bowl. Mr. S. P. Thompson, bronze ornament. Dr. and Mrs. Inglis, case of carvers. Mr. and Mrs. H. Jennings, cake and flower basket. Miss Blanche Beecher, card receiver. Miss J. S. McKessar, silver table lamp. Messrs. W. L. and G. Weigall, silver salt cellars. Mrs. M. a'Beckett' shaded candlestick. Mr. and Mrs. John Inglis, pair of bronze urns. Mr. W. D. Chomley, vase of Doulton ware. Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Hamilton, silver tea tray. Dr. and Mrs. Kenny, sugar and cream stand. Mrs. Reginald a'Beckett, glove and handkerchief sachets. Masters G. G. a'Beckett, photo frame. Mrs. H. F. Chomley, preserve stand. Mr. H. A. Chomley, engraving. Mr. E. L. Millar, breakfast cruet. Mr. Albert a'Beckett, parasol with gold mount. Miss Morris, case of serviette rings. Mr. and Miss Robinson, butter dish. Mr. C. H. Beecher, Bonares ash trays. Miss Hawley, jacket, Miss Pitcairn, flower basket. Miss Alice Yencken, Indian table cloth. Mrs. T. Burder Backhouse, ruby salt cellars. Miss Isabel Backhouse, ruby jugs.8
  • 6 Feb 1897, "NEW TOORAK," OR SOCIETY IN THE BACK BLOCKS. A BUSH IDYLL. By J.F.E.
    In the Valley of the Upper King, shut in on both sides by high, timber-covered hills, there lies a tract of fertile country, partly cleared, partly covered wilth bush. Within a radius of five miles there is a cluster of homesteads) each surrounded by a fairly extensive area under cultivation. The energy of the settlers appears to have outrun the enterprise of the shire council, for the roads are mere tracks, and, to the casual traveller rattled over them in a light spring-cart for the first time, are strangely at variance with the evidences of progress put forward by those who have made their homes here. The cultivations are well tended-like a Chinese vegetable garden in a Melbourne suburb—the houses have been built with a view to comfort, wilth flower-beds about them, and the fences have been constructed with a regard for permanency which is not always a characteristic of fences in such parts. The settlement might, from its ad-vanced appearance, be on the out-skirts of the metropolis, with direct road and rail communication with the city, but it is'a long way from the city, and is forty miles from a railway station. It is situated in the heart of what has come to be known as The Kelly Country, right under the nose of Power's Lookout, and goes by the name of Cheshunt in the postal guide. To call a spot so ideally Australian by such a name as Cheshunt, when, in the beginning, it must have had some unspell able aboriginal title, is an offence that can-not lightly be regared. Cheshunt! Think of it. A more unpardonable violation of the fitness of things could not be conceived.
    This bright little settlement in the Valley of the King has yet another name—a nick-name. By the older settlers in the district it is dubbed New Toorak, and in many respects the name is not unsuitable, for the place has been largely settled from Toorak, and by people of a class commonly identi-fied with the fashionable suburb. There are the Andersons, the Chomleys, the Grey-Smiths, the Howards, and the Outhwaites, names well known in city legal and finan-cial circles. There is an English army officer and a Hungarian Hussar, and one or two globe-trotters who, weary of travel, came to an anchorage here, bought land, and took to farming. Among themselves these people constitute a sort of society, collectively as exclusive, perhaps, as any in Melbourne, though individually a more advanced and democratic community is not to be found anywhere in Victoria.
    A few years ago, when things looked vcrv blue in Melbourne—much bluer than they are to-day—many young men of professional training found it necessary to seek an open-ing for their talents in other lines of life than those to which they had been brought up. Many went on the land, attracted by the possibilities of moderate holdings and in-tense culture, and as rich soil was a de-sideratum the fertile region of the Upper King offered inducements second to none. Here a man who combined the scientific with the practical could do much with 100 acres, for the pastures were rich for butter making, and the deep chocolate soil of the river bed grew tobacco, hops, fruit, lucerne, and almost anything else that an enter-prising farmer might care to plant. For a while the older farmers of the Valley de-spised their dilettante neighbours as enthu-siastic young prigs who, for the lack of anything better to do, had come up there to play at farming till their money became ex-hausted and they longed for city life again, but as time went on they began to discover that the gilded youth of the city is now and then made of good material, and, when he does take life seriously, is a being to be re-spected.
    That the city-bred man, with a college training, has capabilities which fit him for the most trying pursuits is strikingly de-monstrated in the evidences of success which one meets with on every hand here. An ex-chairman of the Stock Exchange has taken up his home in the Valley with his two sons, who forsook office life for agricultural pursuits. One, a mere lad, has about five acres in tobacco this year, and Mr. Bondurant says it is one of the finest crops he has ever seen. This same youth got the highest market price for his last year's crop, and talks of increasing his area under leaf when growers have a better outlet for their tobacco. Another successful farmer is a young lawyer by profession. After a highly successful career at the Mel-bourne University, he was called to the bar, but got sick of waiting for briefs. He has got his land well cleared and the greater portion of it under cultivation. He began by putting in an orchard, which promises to be a valuable asset very soon, and his to-bacco and other crops are among the first in the district. Another youth has a small butter-making plant on his farm, and his produce is among the very best in the market. Two elderly gentlemen, for many years prominent bank managers in Vic toria, have comfortably large holdings, every available acre being under crop; and among the latest arrivals in the district is an ex-journalist, who saw his way to aban-don the pen for the plough, and, from all appearances, with the very best results.
    The most interesting personality in New Toorak is a young English military man, who came here two or three years ago and settled down. He and his wife travelled all over the colonies in a small caravan, as much for health and pleasure as to look for a suitable home. Fate directed their steps along this fertile valley, and so impressed were they with its surroundings and pros-pects that they decided to remain. They erected a bark hut to start with, cleared and fenced their holding, cut and dried the timber for their homestead, built a snug house with their own hands, made out of the raw material of the bush every article of furniture they required, laid out a very nice vegetable garden, planted an orchard, and put the greater portion of their land under cultivation, growing some excellent tobacco and hops. Every utensil used in this unique bush home is home-made, abun-dant material being available in the shape of old kerosene, salmon, and meat tins— the common refuse of the unskilled house-holder. On a neatly-made little sideboard in the diningroom of this bijou establishment stands what many a visitor mistakes for a silver tea and coffee service. It is not that, however. It is a very pretty tin service, constructed by the owner out of a few old meat tins picked up casually in the scrap-heap. The walls are decorated with pictures of valley scenery done in water colours and all neatly framed—all done in their spare hours by this cultured and industrious Englishman and his accomplished wife.
    The young Hungarian hussar has not been long enough on his farm to make much impression on the exports of the district, nor has he had time yet to form an alliance with any of the "first families," but he promises well.
    New Toorak is rich in feminine loveliness, but the male article is woefully scarce. There are heaps of sisters, but few brothers. At an afternoon picnic held during my visit I counted about twenty young women of that class best described as combining the fashionable with the useful; and to look after these—to carry the provender and boil the billy—there were but three young men, two of whom were outsiders and engaged. The settlement dines at 7 o'clock, and for this function the bulk of the in-habitants dress. This may give the impression that living is high at New Toorak, but such is not the case, plain living and high thinking being the order of existence.
    Apart from its industry and social formalaties there is no community in Victoria where the people take a keener interest in politics. New Toorak claims to be advanced—and is very much advanced. The women take as keen an interest in public questions as do their husbands and brothers. The majority are ardent single-taxers and freetraders, a condition of things largely due, no doubt, to the fact that Mr. Max Hirsch spends his holiday here every year, when he studies the land question in the practical capacity of farm labourer.
    There is no hotel at New Toorak, no store, no shop of any kind, neither is there a church, and one must travel 40 miles for a doctor. Private enterprise, however, makes good many wants. The men make their own tobacco, and the women make wine, and the girls are adepts at preserves, and the young men know something of ambulance work, and the more elderly can write to the impers und hold divine service in their tobacco-sheds if need be. It is a delightful existence altogether, pleasant if not profitable; and when the railway goes out that way, as it will some day, it should do both.9
  • 8 Jun 1899, was employed at Chomleys:
    SUSPECTED POISONING. NORTH-EASTERN SENSATION. A REMARKABLE CASE. DEATH OF A WORKING MAN. HIS BODY EXHUMED.
    A man named John M Manus died at Cheshunt on May 26 last. A certificate of death was given stating that the man had died from gastritis, and the body was conveyed to Melbourne and buried in the family grave in the General Cemetery. Since that date, however, circumstances have come to light which impelled Dr M'Cardel, who had prescribed for the deceased to communicate with the detectives, and the result was that yesterday morning the body of M'Manus was exhumed. ....10
  • 25 Aug 1900, Melbourne is to have a new social weekly in the Arena, which the Chomley boys are bringing out. It is to have a University backing. The organiser is Mr. C. H. Chomley, a writer of rather smart stories, and who had a serial running in the Argus. But he is voted slow, and will have to transform himself into a hustler if he wants to catch the public.11
  • 2 Apr 1903, C. H. Chomley (editor of the 'Arena-Sun') is going on a tour through Europe.
    Rumour credited Chomley with severing his connection with that paper ; but rumour was a little too previous.12
  • 19 Feb 1910, It seems to me that the real centres of Australian life and interest in London—social, if not commercial—are the offices of the two London-Australian papers. They do not seem to be much heard of in Melbourne, nor, perhaps, in the other capitals, but immediately you find yourself in London, you appreciate at once the value of these papers.
    The "British-Australasian" has its office in Holborn, and the "Australasian World" has its headquarters in King William-street. Both are in central London—in the very heart of the city.
    I found my way very easily one day to the office of the "British-Australasian." continued - see Trove13
  • 16 Jan 1919, With the death of Mr John ("Jack") Samuell, which occurred at Toorak last week-end, passes a former well-known figure in the Melbourne journalistic world. One of Mr Samuell's earliest' press associations was with the "Arena," a free-trade-cum-society weekly, which subsequently coalesced with another weekly, the "Sun," and became the "Arena-Sun." Early in 1905 Mr Samuel became editor of the ill-starred "Sport and Dramatic News," and continued to be the guiding spirit of that weekly under several proprietors until a few months before its demise in Ma? 1912. As a theatrical critic he was well-known throughout the profession and, combining a genial personality with a facile pen and decided application to hard work, there were few theatrical happenings on or off boards that he failed to record in his columns. When the cycling boom was on he also wrote largely on that sport. For many years Mr Samuell found time in his strenuous life to take an interest in volunteer military matters and up to the time of his death he was associated with the AAMC, and held the rank of warrant-officer. Of later years he had practically retired from active journalism, and held the position of publicity representative of the Richmond Furnishing Company.14
  • 13 Jan 1943, Veteran Writer. ALMOST unnoticed on this side of the globe was the passing of Charles Henry Chomley, M.A., LL.B., editor of the British Australian and New Zealander, the journal published in London for the benefit of Australians. He was born at Sale, Victoria, in 1868.
    He studied law at Trinity College, Melbourne University, and was captain of the University Rowing Club. After practising his profession in this city for a few years, he took up land at Cheshunt in the King River valley in north eastern Victoria and spent his odd moments from farming at writing.
    At Cheshunt he went into local politics.
    Returning to Melbourne he was on the staff of Table Talk and later founded the Arena, a weekly. On a visit to London he took over the editorship of what was then the British Australasian, the name being changed later. A son, Lieut Arthur Chomley, is a gunnery instructor in the Australian forces.15

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Jun 1891, p1.
  3. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - England, Andrews Newspaper Index Cards, 1790-1976, 23 Oct 1942.
  5. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  6. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG14; Piece: 3571; Schedule Number: 412."
  7. [S83] Online index to the UK census "The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/326B."
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Fri 19 Jun 1891, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147285070
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 6 Feb 1897, p14.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 8 Jun 1899, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9511903
  11. [S14] Newspaper - Critic (Adelaide, SA : 1897-1924), Sat 25 Aug 1900, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212144987
  12. [S14] Newspaper - The Tocsin (Melbourne, Vic. : 1897 - 1906), Thu 2 Apr 1903, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201768145
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), Sat 19 Feb 1910, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170030311
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thu 16 Jan 1919, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148561394
  15. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Wed 13 Jan 1943, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245956284
Last Edited26 Oct 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.