Olive Emily Paget

F, #188, b. 1885, d. Sep 1969
Father*Joseph Henry Paget b. 1862, d. 20 Feb 1939
Mother*Harriet Emily Cox b. Dec 1860, d. 28 Aug 1924
Married NameSykes. 
Birth*1885 Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand, #B17191 (NZ.)1 
Marriage*1904 Spouse: Albert Stanley Sykes. VIC, Australia, #M8172.2
 
Land-UBeac*26 May 1939 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part), 110 Telegraph Road. Transfer from Joseph Henry Paget to Olive Emily Sykes. 2a 1r 27p.3 
Widow9 Jul 1954She became a widow upon the death of her husband Albert Stanley Sykes.4 
Land-UBeac*10 Aug 1964 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part), 110 Telegraph Road. Transfer from Olive Emily Sykes to Valerie Joyce Bliss. 2a 1r 27p (Caveat Lodged 1 May 1959.)5 
Death*Sep 1969 Lakes Entrance, VIC, Australia, #D20463 (Age 85.)4,6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1918 - 1924Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Albert Stanley Sykes.7,8,9,10,11
bt 1931 - 1942Sandown Road, Springvale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Albert Stanley Sykes.12,13
bt 1949 - 1954Telegraph Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Albert Stanley Sykes.14,15

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, Agonis, Bed 1, Shrub 1916

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D20463 age 85 - as Olive Emily SYKES."
  2. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4008-457 - Olive Emily Sykes of Roda Park Sandown Road Springvale Married Woman.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4008-457 - Valerie Joyce Bliss of Rose Street Highett Married Woman.
  6. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  7. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  8. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  9. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  10. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  11. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  12. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  13. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  14. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  15. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  16. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
Last Edited9 Jan 2021

Albert Stanley Sykes

M, #189, b. 17 Jan 1883, d. 9 Jul 1954
Father*Jessey Sykes b. 16 Jul 1836, d. 10 May 1915
Mother*Isabella Craig b. 1844, d. 28 Feb 1915
Birth*17 Jan 1883 Hotham, VIC, Australia, #B3378.1 
Birth-Notice*20 Jan 1883SYKES.—On the 17th January, at her residence, 10 Haines-street, Hotham, the wife of Jessey Sykes of a son.2 
Marriage*1904 Spouse: Olive Emily Paget. VIC, Australia, #M8172.3
 
Note*1907 Albert Stanley Sykes was an Australian rules footballer who played for the Essendon Football Club in the Victorian Football League (VFL).4 
Land-UBeac*24 Nov 1916 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part). Transfer from Jessey Sykes to Albert Stanley Sykes. 2a 1r 35p - transfer 815563.5 
Land-UBeac4 Mar 1920 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part). Transfer from Jessey Sykes to Albert Stanley Sykes. 4a 3r 3p - transfer 926930.6 
Land-UBeac*13 Nov 1925 PAK-64. Transfer from The Bank of Victoria to Albert Stanley Sykes. 20a more or less.7 
Land-UBeac31 May 1932 PAK-64. Transfer from Albert Stanley Sykes to Maude Florence Philpot. 20a more or less.8 
Land-UBeac*31 May 1932 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part). Transfer from Albert Stanley Sykes to Maude Florence Philpot. 4a 3r 3p.9 
Land-UBeac*29 Sep 1939 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part). Transfer from Albert Stanley Sykes to Harry John Dixon Percival William Dixon. 2a 1r 35p (Caveat 29 Apr 1925.)10 
Death*9 Jul 1954 Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D20463 (Age 71.)11 
Death-Notice*10 Jul 1954SYKES, Albert Stanley. -- On July 9, at Beaconsfield, beloved husband of Olive, and loving father of Emily (Mrs. Gray) and Isabel (Mrs. Bagley), aged 71 years.
SYKES. - The Friends of the late Mr. ALBERT STANLEY SYKES, of Quamby road, Beaconsfield, are notified that his Funeral will leave our parlors. Walker st., Dandenong, on MONDAY, after a service to commence at 1.5 p.m., for the Spring Vale Crematorium.12 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1918 - 1924Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: labourer. With Olive Emily Sykes.13,14,15,16,17
bt 1931 - 1942Sandown Road, Springvale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: caretaker. With Olive Emily Sykes.18,19
bt 1949 - 1954Telegraph Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Olive Emily Sykes.20,21

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, Agonis, Bed 1, Shrub 1922

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Jul 1954: Death of Beaconsfield Upper Resident
    Mr. Albert Stanley Sykes, of Telegraph Rd., Upper Beaconsfield, who passed away on July 9th at the age of 71 years, was widely esteemed in the district and will be sadly missed by his friends. He is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Emily Gray and Mrs. Isabel Grey, and in their sorrow they have the sympathy of the whole community.23

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B3378."
  2. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 20 Jan 1883, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/190597896
  3. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, from Wikipedia: Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim (2014). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers: every AFL/VFL player since 1897 (10th ed.). Seaford, Victoria: BAS Publishing. p. 863. ISBN 978-1-921496-32-5.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3323-453 - Albert Stanley Sykes of 43 Canning Street North Melbourne Laborer - C/T 4019-764.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3323-453 - Albert Stanley Sykes of Beaconsfield Farmer- C/T 4353-440.
  7. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1403-542 - Albert Stanley Sykes of Racecourse Road Spring Vale, Farmer.
  8. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1403-542 - Maud Florence Philpot of Beaconsfield, Married Woman.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4353-440 - Maude Florence Philpot of Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  10. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4019-764 - Harry John Dixon of Omara Road Murrumbeena and Percival William Dixon of Rigby Avenue Caulfield Contractors - joint proprietors.
  11. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 10 Jul 1954 p19.
  13. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  14. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  15. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  16. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  17. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  18. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  19. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  20. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  21. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  22. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  23. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.) The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 14 Jul 1954, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/218510846
Last Edited10 Jan 2021

Frederick Sheard

M, #191, b. 29 Feb 1848, d. 12 Jun 1921
Frederick SHEARD
(1846-1921)
Father*Samuel Sheard b. 1815
Mother*Mary Chippendale b. 1817
Probate (Will)* 177/136. Frederick SHEARD Date of grant: 23 Jun 1921; Date of death: 12 Jun 1921; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Beaconsfield
Money in the State Savings Bank, Dandenong.....£224: 7: 6
Freehold land, with house thereon, at
Beaconsfield, containing 65 acres.....£1300: 0: 0
Cattle valued at.....£95: 0: 0
Fowls valued at.....£5: 0: 0
Farming implements, Jinker, Spring-Cart,
Waggonette, etc. of the estimated value of.....£6: 10: 0
Cream separator and utensils valued at.....£6: 0:0
Furniture, Crockery, and Cutlery valued at.....£6: 0: 0
Harness, Saddlery, etc. estimated at.....£10: 0: 0
Jewellery valued at.....£2: 0: 0
Cash.....£6: 7: 6
£1661: 5: 0.1 
Related* Arthur Ellis Arthur Ellis was a nephew of Frederick Sheard Arthur Ellis
Birth*29 Feb 1848 Rawdon, Yorkshire, England, Frederic Sheard. Mar Q 1848 (Otley) 23 483. Mother's maiden surname: Chippendale
baptised 27 Mar 1853 at St John, Yeadon, Yorkshire. Parents: Samuel Sheard & Mary Sheard. Baptised on the same day as his sister Ann.2,3
Marriage*24 Mar 1877 Spouse: Annie Cocking. E Retford, Nottinghamshire, England, Mar Q [E Retford] 7b 22.4,5
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelAug 1879 Sailing with Annie Cocking. Ship Cyphrenes England.6
 
Land-UBeac*28 Mar 1885 PAK-59B, Quamby Road. Transfer from Patrick Kennedy to Frederick Sheard. 64a 0r 37p.7 
Land-Note*9 Feb 1887 PAK-59B: Mortgagee: Richard Morton. Discharged 10 Feb 1890. Mortgagor was Frederick Sheard.8 
Land-Note2 Sep 1893 PAK-59B: Mortgagee: Catherine Barr. Discharged 30 Nov 1900. Mortgagor was Frederick Sheard.9 
Land-Note30 Nov 1900 PAK-59B: Mortgagee: The Commissioners of Savings Banks in the Colony of Victoria. Discharged 15 Apr 1918. Mortgagor was Frederick Sheard.10 
Residence* "Quamby", Quamby Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia. 
Widower12 Jun 1921He became a widower upon the death of his wife Annie Cocking.4 
Death*12 Jun 1921 Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D10990 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E.11 
Death-Notice*16 Jun 1921SHEARD. - The Friends of the late Mr. FRED and Mrs. SHEARD are respectfully informed that their remains will be interred in Berwick Cemetery. Funeral to leave J. Grant's Mortuary THIS DAY (Thursday, June 10), at 1.30 p.m.
JOHN GRANT, Undertaker. 'Phone 25 Berwick.12 
Land-Note22 Jul 1921 PAK-59B. Red Ink No 2175983. Fred Sheard (in Office Copy of Rule to Administer called Frederick Sheard) died on or about the 12th or 13th day of June 1921. A Rule to Administer his estate has been granted to the Curator.13 
Land-UBeac*27 Apr 1923 PAK-59B, Quamby Road. Transfer from Frederick Sheard to Henry Ferguson. 64a 0r 37p.14 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
30 Mar 1851Little Moor, Rawden, Yorkshire, England(Head of Household) Samuel Sheard;
Age 3
Member(s) of Household: Mary Sheard, Emma Sheard, Martha Sheard15
7 Apr 1861Canada, Rawdon, Yorkshire, England(Head of Household) Samuel Sheard;
Age 13 - Errand Boy (born Burley)
Member(s) of Household: Mary Sheard, Emma Sheard, Ann Sheard, Martha Sheard16
2 Apr 1871Thomas Edward YORK - Farmer of 180 acres, Halton Place, Halton West, Nottinghamshire, EnglandAge 23 - Groom and Domestic With Annie Cocking17
bt 1903 - 1919Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Annie Sheard.18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30

Grave

  • Plot 4-111-B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia31

Newspaper-Articles

  • 19 Aug 1879: The s.s. Cyphrenes arived this morning from London, via canal, with a large number of passengers for Melbourne and Sydney. The following is her Melbourne passenger list:—Fred Sheard, Anna Sheard Annie Sheard32
  • 25 Oct 1893: Berwick Shire Council. Correspondence. From F. Sheard, stating that a culvert on Beaconsfield road requires cleaning out, as the flood waters from same had damaged his crop.—Clerk of works to have matter attended to.33
  • 8 Apr 1899: Beaconsfield show. (By Our Agricultural Reporter.) The Upper Beaconsfield Fruitgrowers' Association held their fourth annual show on the 3rd inst. DAIRY PRODUCE. Hen Eggs: Mrs Sheard, 1; Mrs P. C. Gardiner, 2. Jar of Honey: Mrs Stone, 1; P. C. Gardiner. 2; F. Sheard, 3. Annie Sheard34
  • 5 Apr 1902: HORTICULTURAL SHOWS. BEACONSFIELD
    The seventh annual show of the Beaconsfield and Pakenham Fruit Growers' Associations was held at Upper Beaconsfield on the 23th ult. The area under fruit at Beaconsfield is gradually extending, and owing to the suitability of the land for this purpose it will no doubt become the centre of a large fruit growing area.
    Farm Produces. —Best bottle or jar of pickled onions : F. Sheard, 1: Mrs Galsworthy, 2.35
  • 9 Mar 1916: STRAYED dark brown mare, 14.2 near fore and off hind white, branded bar inside circle near shoulder, F. Sheard, Beaconsfield, reward.36
  • 19 Jul 1917: FOR Sale—Fawn Jersey Bull, 2½ years old, quiet, and good. Apply F. Sheard, Beaconsfield.37
  • 28 Jun 1918: Berwick Shire Council. Correspondence. From E. Hay, Upper Beaconsfield, drawing attention to the dangerous state of the bridge near Sheard's, and the bad condition of the road from Walnut Grove up telegraph hill. Held over.38
  • 14 Jun 1921: AGED COUPLE VICTIMS IN BEACONSFIELD MURDER. Mr W. F. Storry, Photo.
    The Top Picture Shows Mr and Mrs Frederick Sheard standing outside their home. Underneath is a View of the Farmyard.
    [Illustrated] Annie Sheard39
  • 14 Jun 1921: Shocking tragedy AT BEACONSFIELD. OLD COUPLE FOUND MURDERED. Their Home Ransacked. ROBBERY THE SUPPOSED MOTIVE. BLACK TRACKERS AT WORK.
    [From our special reporters]
    A tragedy of a most cold-blooded description was yesterday brought to light, in the quiet district of Beaconsfield, when two well-known residents of the neighborhood were found dead in their lonely little home amid the scrub-covered slopes of Quamby Hill. All the circumstances pointed to the fact that a murder of the most atrocious character had been committed, the probable motive of the crime being robbery.
    he names of the victims were Frederick Sheard, farmer, aged 75; and Annie Sheard, his wife, aged 75. They had been respected residents of the neighborhood for 35 years, living on their little farm of about 80 acres, and dairying there in a small way. There was no resident of Beaconsfield who did not know the grey-haired man, whom they dubbed "Old Cock Robin," because he whistled so cheerfully and happily at his work; and Mrs. Sheard was an equally familiar figure, tramping every week, as she used to do, to Beaconsfield railway station some three and a half miles away, to fetch the newspapers.
    The scene of the tragedy was the little cottage in which the old couple lived. It stands on Quamby Hill Road, just off the Upper Beaconsfield-road, which it faces, and a little over half way between Lower and Upper Beaconsfield, a poor little shanty, but homely in its way. A rough structure of adobe and wood, with a weather-beaten shingle roof, riddled here and there with holes, it is surrounded on the one side by the open clearing of the farm, with a large barn not far away. On the other side rise rolling hills, covered with thick bush and scrub, offering an ideal place for a marauder. Appropriately enough, one of the hills is named Mount Misery. A little orchard grows round the cottage, and at the front there is a ramshackle trellis work, with a vine. And at the rear, near the kitchen, thick bushes cling to the walls of the house. Here Mr. and Mrs. Sheard used to live entirely by themselves, and it was there that the tragedy was discovered yesterday morning.
    The first intimation that anything was wrong was received by a young man named John Larkin, a laborer, of Beaconsfield. Some time after 11 a.m. he visited the farm, as was his daily custom, to call for the milk that was usually waiting.
    There was no one about, and he walked round the cottage, noticing, with some surprise, that the fowls were still locked up. Thinking that there was something wrong he went to a neighboring house, occupied by a Mrs. Warmbrunn, some distance away, and mentioned the fact that nobody was moving about over at Sheard's place. A little later another neighbor, Mrs. Barnes, whose custom it was now and again to look in and see how the old couple were, decided to try and ascertain what was the matter. Visiting the house, she knocked at the back door. There was no reply, and she pushed open the door. Immediately a black cattle dog, owned by the Sheards, which was inside the room, flew at her. The dog barked furiously, but she managed, after a time to pacify the animal, which ultimately permitted her to enter the house. There she was amazed to see drawers and boxes lying in confusion on the floor of the living room. She became frightened, and running out into the paddock, called to Mr. Larkin and Mr. Warmbrunn. The two men hurried over to her and, peering through the window of the bedroom, they were horrified to see blood upon the floor, clothing strewn here and there, and all the contents of the house in wild confusion. A telephone message was thereupon sent to the police station at Berwick from the Cardinia Hotel, not far away, and shortly afterwards Constable John Lombard, of Berwick, arrived upon the scene in a motor car.
    On opening the front door of the cottage the constable was savagely and persistently attacked by the Sheep dog, which was still keeping faithful guard. In the end he was forced to shoot the animal, in order that he might enter the building and open the bedroom door. Once this was done the tragedy was revealed. Lying upon the floor near the little iron bed was the dead body of Mrs. Sheard, half naked, with her grey head smothered in blood, while pools of blood lay upon the wooden floor around her. On the bed itself, huddled up under the disordered blankets, and half out of the clothes, lay the body of Mr. Sheard. The pillow was drenched in blood, which had been spread from a deep wound on the right side of the head near the ear, and from other wounds, on the back of the hands and on the feet. On investigating, Constable Lombard found a similar deep wound on the right side of Mrs Sheard's head. Both bodies were cold, and had apparently been dead for some considerable time. The attitude in which they were found suggested that the dead man had put his hands up to defend himself from a blow, while his wife had leaped from the bed and apparently made for the door, in an endeavor to escape. The bedroom was in a state of confusion. Clothes, and blankets were piled in untidy, tangled heaps upon the bed, a small mirror near by was splashed with blood, and a tin trunk near the bedside had been flung open and its contents disturbed.
    Even worse, however, was the disorder in the living room, opening out of the bedroom. This bore every sign of a violent and hurried search — for money, it is suggested, since the couple were reputedly to be comfortably off. A chest of drawers, standing at one side of the room against the smoke-girned wooden wall, which was papered with old newspapers, had been partly ransacked. Some of the drawers were open and others had been pulled, out and upon the floor lay clothes in untidy heaps, papers and old letters, and a number of metal spoons. Here and there, too, were pillows and bolsters and boxes. Ragged sockings hung in strips from the ceiling, but whether torn down recently
    or not it was impossible to tell. Two old shot gnus were also in the room. After a preliminary search Constable Lombard lost no time in informing the Criminal Investigation department at Russell-street of the circumstances and Superintendent M. J. Bannon at once detailed Detective-Sergeant D. Commons, Detective F. Milne and Detective. A. M'Arthur, finger print expert, to investigate the case. They left Russell-street barracks at 3 p.m. in the police motor car with Constable Gogoll, and were joined at Dandenong by Senior Constable Downs, with two black trackers, Peter and Charlie.
    On arrival at the scene of the tragedy, the detectives at once set to work in the gathering dusk to make what investigations were possible before darkness fell. The scene was grimly impressive. Daylight was fading over the dark, bush covered hills and the open paddocks. From the windows of the dead couple's cottage a yellow glow of light shone like a beacon as the police worked with hurricane lamps, a candle and an electric globe, lit from the car. The light shone upon the shtolid faces of the black trackers, waiting patiently under the trellis work of the old vine. Inside the sorry little bedroom, where the tattered sacking hung from the draughty roof and poor little colored prints decorated the walls, the detectives began a careful scrutiny of bloodstained bed
    clothes, of the floors and the open tin trunk. The bodies of the dead man and his wife lay where they had been found — the latter just behind the door. Little fresh light upon the tragedy was thrown by an examination of these. The wounds that had caused death were easily seen, but whether they were due to heavy calibre bullet or to blows from some blunt instrument, such as a pickaxe, was not certain last night, post-mortem examination is expected to help in arriving at a decision.
    In the tin trunk the detectives found a large number of letters and receipts, and a Savings Bank book showing a sum of £224 11/4 to the credit of Frederick Sheard. There was also a man's straw hat of recent date, to which some importance may be attached by the police, and a pathetic touch was supplied by the discovery of some old photographs, apparently of the dead couple, taken many years ago.
    Two sovereigns and a silver coin piece were also found; and further search reversed a little hoard of small silver in a linen bag, totalling some £5 in all, a bottle of whisky and some revolver cartridges. Eerie shadows flickered across the battered plaster walls as the detectives moved to and fro round the untidy bed. The search was continued in the living room, where a close investigation was made of the bris upon the floor, and of papers and documents that were visible, and that have been ransacked. No signs of the weapon or implement which had caused the wound were discovered, however, last night, and there were no visible indications that entry had been forced into the lonely cottage, though the bolt of the kitchen door at the back was loose. While the search was still progressing the family clock upon the mantelpiece cheerily pounded the hour of 7 p.m., and the everyday sound was a startling contrast to the grim silence of the neighboring bedroom.
    Darkness rendered it useless to continue the search further. Out into the moonlit orchard the shrouded bodies of the old couple were at length borne, and placed in a motor car for conveyance to the Morgue at Melbourne. The black trackers and a constable were left in charge of the cottage for the night, and the detectives departed. The search will be resumed at daybreak this morning, when it is hoped that some further clue may be discovered that will point more directly to the motive and manner of the murder. At present the detectives prefer to have more facts to go upon before expressing a definite opinion.
    Partly because the Sheards were among the oldest residents of the neighborhood, and partly because of the fact that they were universally respected, the news of a tragedy caused a sensation in the district, On all sides residents were anxiously discussing the rumors and the details of the happening, and were recalling stories of the old couple, whose untimely end was universally deplored. The late Mr. Sheard was a man of big frame, an Englishman, who came to Australia about 40 years ago. He was occupied for a time in kangaroo hunting in New South Wales, and as a stockman in Queensland. Subsequently he came to Beaconsfield and settled there, building his home some 35 years ago. He worked his farm by himself, keeping a a few cows and raising calves for market. Mrs. Sheard, incidentally, was a typical kindly housewife, and made her own wine. Lately it was stated her husband had been trying to sell his property, with a view to making a trip to the old country, where his only relations and those of his wife are living, but no purchaser had as yet come forward to put down cash for the whole amount. Mr. Sheard was last seen alive on Sunday afternoon by a neighbor in his yard. It was suggested in some quarters that the crime may have been committed by a thief, who hoped to obtain money brought back by the dead man from the local market, but this theory discounted by the fact that the market day is to-day. Nevertheless, it was always believed in the district that the couple were comfortably off, and the fact would doubtless be easily ascertained, even by a stranger to the neighborhood. Lately some of the residents have, it is stated, noticed a stranger in the district, apparently a swagman, and rumor in the neighborhood is already connecting the presence of the unknown man with the tragedy. One or two footprints were actually noted in the neighborhood of the Sheards cottage before darkness fell, but whether or not these will prove to be clues will not be known till this morning, when the black trackers are enabled to get to work.
    About 8 p.m. last night, Detective-Sergeant Commons, with Detectives M'Arthur and Milne, and Senior Constable Downes, went again in the police motor to the vicinity of the tragedy, and made sundry inquiries regarding the habits of the dead couple among the local residents. Arriving with the bodies of the two deceased at the Morgue last night, Constable Lombard communicated with police head quarters at Russell-street, and the murder was reported to the Coroner. A post-mortem examination will be made on the bodies this morning. Until this is done it cannot be ascertained whether the wounds were caused by a revolver or by another weapon. Annie Sheard40
  • 15 Jun 1921: Persistent rumors in the district had reference to a nephew of the Sheards, who it was stated, had come from England four or five years ago and stayed with the old people at Quamby Hill-road. It was said that this man's lackadaisical manner and intemparate habits had caused Mr. Sheard to expel him from the house about three years ago, and that he had afterwards been confined in a lunativ asylum. He was known in the Beaconsfield district as "Arthur" or "Fred," but no one seems to have learned his surname. Even to Mrs. A. Barnes, a close friend of the Sheard's, he was introduced merely as "Arthur." He was about 40 years of age, and had only one eye.
    The following undated letter which was found among the property of the dead couple may possibly throw some light on the identity of this mysterious relative, and it seems to indicate the mentality of the writer:—
    Dear Uncle and Aunt.—Just, over three months ago I was in Sydney, staying at 5 Kellett-street, Darlinghurst; J. Moroney, J.P., proprietor.
    Whilst there I took a child's money box in retaliation for someone purloining my pants, the contents of which were 6/5½. I returned the pound P.O. registered letter to —, —, ———, of —— ———, who has offered £50 for my eye.
    The above Mr. Moroney will bear witness to this testimony I have here. I have been followed day and night for the past three months, and have lost business prospects in consequence of same.
    If I am found dead or injured, blame —, —, — — for hiring men. A. Ellis.
    Together with this extraordinary letter were found a family photograph taken in England, and a letter dated 15th October, 1904, from Grove-street Retford, Notts, signed "Your loving niece, Lizzie," informing Mrs. Sheard that the photograph was being sent. An accompanying chart indicated that one of the members of the group, a fair-complexioned man of about 22 years, was "Arthur."
    Detective-Sergeant Commons ascertained from Mr. J. T. Gilpin, a resident of Beaconsfield, that the nephew of the Sheards when he lived with them was about 40 years of age, with red hair and moustache, and was known as "Fred." He had only one eye. He afterwards was employed as a clerk by Mr. Nobelius, nurseryman, of Narre Warren. Arthur Ellis41
  • 16 Jun 1921: THE BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. DISCOVERY AT BERWICK. Murdered Man's Wallet Found. (BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    BERWICK.—All the circumstances connected with the brutal murder of Mr. and Mrs. Sheard, whose mutilated bodies were found on Monday afternoon in the bedroom of their simple home on Quamby Hill-road, Beaconsfield, seem to indicate that the dastardly deed was perpetrated by someone whose mind was not normal. It is improbable that such revolting acts as the driving of a pick or other weapon of the kind into the grey heads of the two old people, sleeping peacefully in their bed, was committed by anyone whose presence at the house was due, primarily, to the desire for robbery. That desire the murderer possibly did have; but, in the light of all the peculiar circumstances connected with the case, some other motive must be ascribed.
    In an old shed attached to the dilapidated dwelling on Quamby Hill-road, the detectives yesterday morning found a collection of articles that possibly may have belonged to the nephew of the ill-fated pair, Arthur Ellis and were perhaps left by him in the care of his uncle and aunt. The collection included a wooden box, with the letters "A.E." painted on it. Inside were found several letters, a quantity of men's wear, such as collars, tacs, trousers and shirts, and a Bible, which had evidently been presented to Ellis's sister many years ago by Donald A. Milligan, vicar of Armley Hill Church of England. A letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, sen., of Retford, England, dated November, 1908, referred to a maritime mishap, and expressed thankfulness at Arthur's escape.
    In view of the result of the post mortem examination, the detectives yesterday instituted a search for the pick with which the deed was done. There is a well twenty yards north of the Sheards' cottage. It is about 12 feet deep, and is covered with heavy logs. In the different parts of the undulating flat lands which surround the house are several waterholes, and it was thought that in one of these places the pick would be found. Under the direction of Detective F. Milne and Senior Constable M. J. E. Downes, the two blackfellows, Peter and Charlie, searched carefully in the vicinity of the waterholes. Peter waded through several of these patches of water—some of them are much more extensive than mere waterholes—and dragged the mud with an improvised rake, but nothing was found. Another hole was drained by Plain Clothes Constable F. Gunther, who dug a drain in the side, but the result here also amounted to nothing. Hope were, however, centred on the old well, which by reason of its proximity to the dwelling seemed a likely place for a murderer to get rid of his fiendish weapon. There was about 6 feet of water in the well, and as it would have been long and arduous work to empty it with the aid of buckets it was decided to instal a pumping engine. Shortly after 10 a.m. Mr. F. H. Grant, of Beaconsfield, and two assistants arrived the scene with a three-horse power oil engine, which was soon fitted up. After two hours' pumping the water was drained, and the eager spectators who peered into the bottom of the well were disappointed to find, instead of the expected pick, only two croaking frogs. Immediately after lunch yesterday a mild sensation was caused by the arrival at Sheard's house of a man on horseback. He informed the detectives that his name was E. Gardner, and that he was a grazier residing at Berwick. He stated that at 1.30 pm. yesterday , while proceeding on horseback along the main Gippsland road, about half a mile on the Melbourne side of Berwick, he noticed lying on the clay on the side of the road a dark leather wallet. He was amazed to find that the contents comprised State taxation papers, rate notices, receipts and other papers addressed to "Mr. F. Sheard, Beaconsfield." He immediately galloped to the Cardinia Hotel, Beaconsfield, three miles away, and reported his discovery. Soon afterwards Detective Milne, Senior Constable Downes, Plain Clothes Constable Gunther and the two black trackers set off in a motor car, accompanied on horseback by Mr. Gardner, who directed the motor. At the spot where the wallet was found, which is on the side of the road not far from Wilson's quarry, several business papers addressed to Mr. Sheard, which had evidently blown out of the wallet, were found scattered about in the vicimty. It was then 3 o'clock.
    The sun was shining brightly when the two small black trackers cast about for clues to guide them. With their heads bent forward, and their eyes directed to the clay and grass beneath, they walked quickly about, urged on by Senior Constable Downes, who is himself a footprint expert. In a few minutes Charlie shouted, and pointed to a mark on the ground which, in spite of the heavy rain that had fallen, proved to the experienced trackers to be a footmark. Another was found a few minutes later, then another. It was soon established that these footprints were of the same man, that they were made some days ago, and that the boot marks pointed in the direction of Dandenong, in the opposite direction to the scene of the tragedy. Annie Sheard Arthur Ellis42
  • 16 Jun 1921: The Shooting of "Laddie." INDIGNATION AMONGST RESIDENTS.
    According to visitors who returned from Beaconsfield last night, people of the district are extremely indignant at the shooting of the dog "Laddie," which stood on guard at the door of his old master's house when the police arrived there on Monday. It was said that a neighbor offered to take charge of the dog until definite arrangements were made in regard to the care of the animal, but that he declined to undertake to keep it, and the constable decided to shoot the dog. A shotgun was obtained, and two shots were fired, the dog being badly wounded in one leg, but not killed. In great pain, it as said, "Laddie" ran away into the bush and stayed there all night. On Tuesday morning, which was usually the day on which the butcher called with the meat for the old couple, the dog limped back to the hut, evidently looking for his old master and expecting some food. Again the gun was produced, and this time, it is alleged, three shots were fired at the dog, which was then killed. "The place is seething with indignation over the matter," said one visitor. Frequently it has been asked why the dog did not attack the murderers of his old master and mistress. Had it done so its barking would surely have aroused the old people and put them on their guard, but from the attitude of their dead bodies it was evident that the intruders had burst in upon Sheard and his wife while they were lying in bed and probably asleep. Apparently the dog had not attacked the intruder, or intruders, and the explanation is that the dog was quite deaf and that he probably did not see anyone coming to the house. Annie Sheard43
  • 16 Jun 1921: Arthur Ellis Believed to be at Piangil.
    From inquiries made yesterday it is believed that the supposed nephew of the murdered couple, Arthur Ellis, whose whereabouts the police were anxious to trace, will be wholly unable to throw any light whatever on the shocking affair. For months past he has been at work in the Mallee district, his last known address being Piangil, a town about 30 miles beyond Swan Hill, and nearly 2.. miles from Melbourne. Detectives E. F. Downes called yesterday upon Mrs Jane Gunton of the Post Office Club Hotel, High-street, St. Kilda, who informed him that a man named Arthur Ellis, who answered to the description of the man sought by the police, was well known to her, and that he had stayed at the hotel for about ten days last Easter. He was at that time residing at Surrey Camp, Nowinga, via Mildura, but her husband had lately received a letter from him from the vicinity of Swan Hill. Later in the day Mr. Gunton was able to furnish the address, which was care Mr. J. L. Poole, Surrey Camp, via Piangil." Moreover, he was able to supply a photograph of Ellis, from which the detectives are satisfied that the Ellis mentioned is the man from whom they considered they might be able to gather important information in regard to his ill-fated relatives. Surrey Camp is situated a few miles from Piangil, and it is conceivable that news of his whereabouts being wanted had not reached Ellis yesterday, hence his reason for not communicating at once with the Criminal Investigation department. Further evidence of Ellis's whereabouts was forthcoming from Mr. H. Marks, draper, of 326 High-street, St. Kilda, who told Detective Brennan that Ellis was also well known to him, and as recently as Friday last he (Marks) had received from him a cheque for goods purchased. His address was then in the vicinity of Swan Hill. It was ascertained yesterday that Mrs. J. Poole, of Canterbury, received a letter from Ellis as recently as Saturday last. It had been forwarded from Piangil. Annie Sheard Arthur Ellis44
  • 16 Jun 1921: SEEKING A MURDERER. POLICE AT BEAC0NSFIELD. MANY LINES OF INQUIRY. (From Our Special Reporter) BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.
    Who murdered Frederick Sheard and his wife at Beaconsfield?
    That is the question which the detectives and the police on the scene cannot answer, and it is the one subject of conversation for miles around. In every hotel and store in the district and on every corner there are men with theories and clues. Faced with a difficult problem the detectives cannot afford to miss a point, and the winnowing of the mass of details is a heavy task. To the eyes of suspicion every stranger behaves in a suspicious manner, and the number of hints and suggestions which are pouring into tho Cardinia Park Hotel, the police headquarters, is bewildering.
    Detective-Sergeant Commons and Detective Etholl went out last night to investigate a report which suggested a clue. Mr John Lang, a farmer, owns a house in Pound road, about three miles, from the spot on the main Gippsland road, where Sheard's wallet was found yesterday afternoon. Mr Lang stays with a neighbor, and his house is unoccupied. He was walking along Pound road last night with Mr Geoffrey Turner, when he noticed, a light in the empty house. The two men shouted, cooeed and whistled, but received no response. They then went to the house of Mr John Bell about a quarter of a mile along the road and returned with him. They entered the hut, and found it unoccupied, but a piece of candle about an inch in length was burning in the room, and a fire was alight in the grate. Bags had been arranged as if for a bed. The men put out the light, and notified Constable Lombard, of Berwick, who telephoned to the Cardinia Hotel.
    Nothing Discovered
    The detectives left by motor-car, and a constable joined them with a hurricane lamp. When they reached the house there was nothing to be found. Whoever the temporary occupant was and he might have been only a vagrant — he had made off, and warned by the disappearance of the light, had not returned. A search of the bush in the darkness revealed nothing save the fact that the man had made a supper on two bananas. It was after 12 o'clock when the detectives returned to the hotel. They were dispirited, as they believed that a mischance had robbed them of a valuable opportunity.
    This morning Senior - Constable Downes and the black-trackers, Peter and Charlie, were on the scene early in quest of footprints which coincided with the print in blood in the murdered couple's bedroom, or of tracks leading from the spot on the road where the wallet was found. A definite discovery on either point would establish the fact that the man who was being sought is still in the district. This would be of the greatest value to the police.
    Detective Milne accompanied the trackers in a police car. On the completion of their task, the party went to the shed in the vicinity of Clyde, where the shivering man who called at the house of Mr A. T. M'Kay, near Clyde, said he had spent Tuesday night. The detectives yesterday could see little trace of this shed having been occupied, but it is hoped that the trackers may find something.
    The discovery of the blood-stained axe proves to have no bearing on the case. It was found on Sunday afternoon, when the old couple was still alive.
    Reasonable Explanation
    Little importance is attached to the report that a man was behaving in a mysterious manner at Narre Warren, and when approached rushed into a culvert. It is understood that a reason able explanation has been found for his conduct.
    The stranger who slept beneath the platform of the Narre Warren platform did not behave in the manner of a hunted man. He was spoken to by the assistant station master and said that it looked as if it were going to rain, and he would do no harm by sleeping there. This interview took place at about 7 p.m.. and the man promised he would leave at 7 a.m. He did so quite openly.
    So the hunt goes on. The promising clue of today is the exploded story of tomorrow. The countryside seems to he dotted with casual way farers, the tracing of whose movements entails much labor. Meanwhile the detectives wish to hear from Arthur Ellis, whom they still believe to be a nephew of the old couple; from the occupants of the yellow motor car which was in the vicinity of the hut on Saturday morning, and from the two men who were seen in the yard at Oakleigh, and are believed to be identical with the men who made purchases in Beaconsfield. The men who were stopped at Frankston yesterday easily established that they were not at either of the places. The detectives are anxious that any of the parties referred to should communicate with them as it may save time in investigation.
    A Letter from England
    This morning a letter in a black-edged envelope addressed to Mr Frederick Sheard was received at the Beaconsfield post office. It was opened by the detectives. It had been written by Martha Newman, of Great Yarmouth, England, who was a sister of either Mr or Mrs Sheard. It told of the death of her husband, owing to a sudden seizure, and concluded with a hope that they were both well, and an expression of gratification at the news of their "good harvest." Two crosses followed the signature.
    This afternoon the bodies of the old couple are to be buried in the same grave in the Beaconsfield Cemetery.
    Despite reports appearing in a section of the press, the dog Laddie, which was shot by the police, appears to have been little known among local residents. However, Constable John Lombard, of Berwick, who shot the animal, has received an amusingly heated anonymous letter from Melbourne dealing with the matter. When seen today, Constable Lombard said that it had been necessary to shoot the dog. "I would do the same thing again in the same circumstances," he declared. "The dog was snapping and trying to bite. It was a nuisance. If I am asked for a report by the proper authorities I shall give it. Beyond that I have nothing to say." Annie Sheard45
  • 18 Jun 1921: OLD COUPLE'S LAND. Offered for Soldier's Farm. DECLINED BY THE BOARD
    in 1917 the 64 acres of land held by the late Mr and Mrs Sheard was offered to the Closer Settlement Board as a farm for a soldier, but was declined by that body. The price asked was £20 an acre.
    A returned soldier desired to take up the land, and made an application under Section 20 of the Closer Settlement Act, as amended by the Discharged Soldiers' Settlement Act, that the Closer Settlement Board should acquire the farm for him, and give him the benefit of the liberal terms obtainable by men who served in the war. The land was described as suitable for dairying, cultivation for cereal crops, and for fruit growing.
    Mr G. Moore, a member of the board, said today that he inspected the land when it was offered four years ago. He had never seen a more miserable hovel in his life than that in which Mr and Mrs Sheard lived. The outbuildings matched the home, and the fences were in a bad state of repair. The dairy stock were only in fair condition, but the large number of fowls looked healthy. As a going concern the place was no good to a returned soldier.
    In conversation with him Mr Sheard said that he desired to sell the property if he could find a buyer, as he and Mrs Sheard desired "to leave for the Old Country." Mr Sheard mentioned that in the days of his young manhood he had worked on Riverina stations. There was an air of great poverty about the farm, but Mr. Sheard seemed to be a sturdy independent, friendly man who took things philosophically and did not want anybody's sympathy.46
  • 18 Jun 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. SHEARDS' NEPHEW TRACED. MANY REPORTS INVESTIGATED. (BY OUR SPECIAL. REPORTER.)
    BERWICK. Friday,—A message received from, Melbourne by Detective Milne to-day indcated that Arthur Ellis, the nephew of Mr and Mrs. Sheard, who were murdered at Upper Beaconsfield on Sunday night, had been traced to a survey Camp north of Piangil, near Swan Hill but that until informed by the police to-day he was not aware of the murder. Ellis who was traced as a result of the discovery of a swag belonging to him at Spencer street railway station has not left Piangil since April 1 last. The Police have now to direct the investigation to other clues and rumours, and of these there is a variety.
    A dramatic incident was furnished by the mystery of a bloodstained half crown which came into the possession of a business man in one of the neighbouring townships. The business man told the police that the coin, had been handed to him by a driver, who, in the course of business, went to Quamby road, where the Sheards had been found murdered. On being interviewed, the driver said that he had received the coin from a woman customer on his rounds. This the woman hotly denied. She called in her mother to prove that she had given the driver only 1/1, which amount was paid in small coins. Both protested strongly, and for about a day the detectives were puzzled. The woman ultimately explained the position to the satisfaction of the police and it was proved that the bloodstains had nothing to do with the crime. Such comparatively trivial matters occupy much of the time of detectives.
    To-day Detective Milne and Senior constable Gutther are inquiring into the statement, which originated in Melbourne, that a swagman camped near the house of the Sheards on Sunday. The movements of two travelling tinsmiths who were in the district on Friday of last week are also being inquired into. They called at the home of Mr W. J. Harvey Smith, and one of the men said that his mother had died in Adelaide. He added that his brother had recently died in the Caulfield Military Hospital, and that he was anxious to raise some money to pay the funeral expenses. Mr Smith offered the man a cup of tea, and the visitor asked for permission to go and bring his mate in. This Mr Smith refused and the man walked away. He is described as from 45 to 50 years of age, clean-shaved of Jewish appearance, and wearing a light grey or brown suit. His companion was about 5ft 10in high, and wore a navy blue suit and black hat. The men mended an enamel tea kettle for a woman, and were later seen at the Sheards' house.
    On the day following the discovery of the murder four cartridge shells were found on the bed in which the murdered couple lay. No shots were heard, and no bullet marks were found. These facts led one of the neighbours to the conclusion that the fatal wounds were probably inflicted with a certain brand of cattle killer which is worked by the point being driven into the beast by a percussion cap. The wounds, however, were much larger than would have been inflicted by the killer. The only fact to support the theory is that the two wounds travelled the same way, and entered the head at the same point.
    Between Beaconsfield and Gembrook, which is about five miles away, the country is thickly timbered, and a fugitive from justice might keep under cover for several days. The point at which Mr Sheard's wallet was found however indicates that the men travelled beyond Berwick on the road to Melbourne. If he is now hiding in the timber country he must have turned back. This is improbable.
    WORKING ON NEW CLUE. Developments Expected.
    The detectives dealing with the case believe that they have now found a clue which will lead to important developments, though at present particulars are not available. As the result of several conferences with Superintendent M. J. Bannon, Detective-Seargent Commons and Detective Ethell are concentrating their inquiries on the city.
    Detective Milne has been left in charge of the investigation at Beaconsfield. A strange man was detained by the Malvern police yesterday, but was able to give a satisfactory, explanation of his movements. Annie Sheard47
  • 1 Jul 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. Men Still Sought by Police.
    Detective-sergeant Commons, Detectives Ethell and Milne continued their search yesterday for the two men whom they desire to question in regard to the Beaconsfield murder. Every day fresh evidence is being collected to clear up the mystery.
    John King, who is charged with having murdered Frederick Sheard and Annie Sheard, will appear at the City Court on Thursday, and another remand will probably be asked for. Annie Sheard48
  • 30 Jul 1921: THURSDAY. AUGUST 4, 1921. At Half-past One O'Clock Sharp.
    On the Property, (Prior to Clearing Sale), UPPER BEACONSFIELD ROAD, BEACONSFIELD,
    Two and a half Miles by Splendid Road from Beaconsfield Railway Station, 28 Miles Melbourne.
    In the Estate of Frederick Sheard, Deceased,
    Whose Lamentable Death and that of His Wife Occurred in June Last, 65 ACRES WELL-IMPROVED AND GOOD QUALITY LAND.
    FRANK J. BOILEAU and Co., under instructions from W. B House, Esq., curator of the estates of deceased persons, will SUBMIT to PUBLIC AUCTION, through their auctioneer, Frank J. Boileau, as above.
    65 acres of good quality land, mostly reclaimed ti-tree flats; all splendidly cleared. Every acre can and has been ploughed, well drained and grassed. Boundary fencing, post, four wires, and barb; partly netted. Old house, cart shed, cow shed, fowl runs, good hay shed, small orchard, well, watered. Grows good cereal and root crops. Splendid horticultural land. Is in good heart.
    The late Mr. Sheard resided on the property since 1885, cultivated little, if any, during the past few years, having devoted his time of late to dairying, with excellent results.
    The curator is anxious to wind up the estate, and to those who during the lifetime of the late Mr. Sheard were anxious to purchase, and others who desire to buy this splendidly situated and good quality little property, now have the opportunity of doing so.
    Title certificate, vol. 1675, folio 334,886. Terms: One-third cash, balance payable within three years. Interest, 6½ per cent , payable half-yearly, and:
    Following the property sale, the following stock, farm implements, furniture, and sundries will be submitted.
    STOCK:
    9 good dairy cows, close up to calving.
    2 three-year-old springing heifers (tip top).
    2 poddy heifers, 1 good dairy bull.
    1 delivery or spring-cart mare.
    FARM IMPLEMENTS. &c.:
    2 S.F. ploughs, harrows, roller sledge, jinker, waggonette (shafts and pole), Alfa Laval separator, grindstone, and numerous farm tools and dairy utensils.
    HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE and numerous sundries, useful and varied.
    N.B.-The cows are a good lot, mostly young, sound, in good condition, and coming in early.
    The machinery, jinker, and waggonette have all been well cared for, and every lot will be sold to the highest bidder.
    Terms-Cash.
    Further particulars from:
    Frank J. Boileau end Co., auctioneer, stock and land salesmen. Commercial Bank Chambers, op- posite Kirk's Bazaar, 421 Bourke street, Melbourne. Tel. 1791 Central. Annie Sheard49
  • 5 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. Sheard’s Homestead Sold. UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Thursday. The sale took place to-day of the land and effects of the old man and wife, the late Mr and Mrs Sheard who were murdered in their cottage on June 13. There was spirited bidding for the farm area of 64 acres which was purchased by a buyer from Mordialloc for £18/10/ an acre. A condition of the sale was that the homestead should not be demolished until the inquest had been completed. The dairy cattle, comprising a bull, nine dairy cows, four heifers and a horse realised good prices, and satisfactory amounts were obtained for the various articles of household furniture and farm implements. The sale was conducted under instructions from the curator of the estates of deceased persons. Annie Sheard50
  • 15 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. John King, who is charged with having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on July 12, made his seventh appearance at the City Court on Saturday morning. Sergeant T. J. Montague said that another remand would be necessary because the inquest had not been completed. King said that he had no objection, and Mr. T. O'Callaghan, J.P., remanded him to appear on August 20. Annie Sheard51
  • 18 Aug 1921: RETFORD FOR AUSTRALIA 42 YEARS AGO.
    The reported murder of Mr. Frederick K Sheard and his wife in their farmhouse, near Beaconsfield, New South Wales, has created much interest in Retford and district. Mr. Sheard, who came from the neighbourhood of Leeds, married Miss Annie Cocking, of Laxton, near Retford, sister to the wife of Mr. Edwin Swannack, of Grove Street, an Alderman and ex-Mayor of the borough. The murdered couple stayed with these relatives at Retford just before they sailed for Australia 42 years ago.
    The "Melbourne Age" states that a family photograph, taken in England, and a letter dated October 15, 1904, from Grove Street, Retford, Notts, was found by the detectives among the aged couple's effects. A Stock Exchange handbook is said to have been taken away by the murderers, and it is believed this book contained valuable documents. Annie Sheard52
  • 29 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. When John King appeared in the City Court on Saturday, charged with having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on June 12, Sergeant T J Montague asked permission to withdraw the charges. He explained that the coroner (Dr Cole) had committed him for trial. Mr T O'Callaghan, J P, gave the necessary permission. Annie Sheard53
  • 14 Sep 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. No Presentment Against King.
    John King who since June has been in prison awaiting trial on charges of having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on June 12, was discharged from the Melbourne Gaol yesterday. King, with Herbert Jenkins, was committed for trial by the coroner (Dr. Cole), but the Crown Law department advised the Criminal Investigation department yesterday that it had decided not to file a presentment against King, and he was released. Jenkins is on bail, but no announcement regarding his case was made yesterday. Annie Sheard54
  • 14 Sep 1921: THE BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. CROWN ABANDONS CASE. John King Released from Gaol.
    In connection with the charges of having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield, on which John King and Edward Jenkins were recently committed by trial by the Coroner's court, the Crown Law department has decided not to file a presentment against either man, and the charges will be, therefore, definitely abandoned.
    The trial was to have taken place on Thursday at the Criminal Court. King was yesterday released from the Melbourne Gaol, where he has been lodged since his arrest, and official notification of the decision has been communicated to Jenkins, who was admitted to bail.
    The action of the authorities in thus abandoning the charges has been prompted by the realisation that the cases for the prosecution were not sufficiently strong to secure convictions. Annie Sheard55
  • 25 Oct 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDERS. Victims' English Relatives.
    Letters received by the Rev. James Wilson, of Beaconsfield Upper, from relatives in England of Mr. and Mrs. Sheard, victims of the Beaconsfield murders, show that they were greatly distressed when news of the murders reached them. "It was a terrible blow," says one, "to all the brothers and sisters to read the dreadful news, as reported in the 'Daily Mail' on August 12; but it was a great comfort to us to learn that you, who had known them for so many years should have been present to officiate at the funeral. Just before setting sail for Australia Mr. and Mrs. Sheard were staying with us at Retford, and left our home 42 years ago. A friend who was visiting Australia on business called to see them, and told us how delighted they were to hear all about their friends at home; We sincerely hope that the police will be able to trace the murderers; and that they will be brought to justice."
    It was evident to all who knew the old people that they were well connected, and this is borne out by the fact that the writer of the letter to Mr. Wilson. (Mr. Swannack), head of the firm of E. Swannack and Sons, builders, cabinet-makers, &c., of Retford, England, is an ex-mayor of the town, and in his official capacity had the honour of entertaining His Majesty the King just before the war. Annie Sheard Rev James Wilson56
  • 31 Jul 1923: MURDERED MAN'S ESTATE. Sister Seeks Interest. WHO DIED FIRST ?
    The aid of the Supreme Court has been invoked for the settlement of an interesting point in the administration of the intestate estate of Fredric Sheard, the elderly settler who, with his wife, Annie Sheard, was murdered at his homestead, Beaconsfield, in June 1921.
    In an application before Mr. Justice Weigall today, Mr E. C. W. Kelly mentioned that Fredric Sheard, who left no will, had three sisters, only one of whom was now living. In an originating summons, brought to determine who could become beneficiaries in the estate, one sister, Mrs Emma West, had been a party, but she was now dead. Counsel applied to have the name of Mrs Martha Newman, the surviving sister, substituted for that of Mrs West.
    His Honor declined to grant an order until fuller information was forthcoming by way of affidavit.
    The issues in the summons involve the curious point as to who died first — Mr Sheard or his wife. If it can be proved that Mrs Sheard died after her husband, her relatives might become interested parties.57
  • 1 Aug 1923: MURDERED COUPLE'S ESTATE. WHICH DIED FIRST? Litigation Pending.
    An application to Mr. Justice Weigall in the Practice Court yesterday recalled the tragedy which occurred in June, 1921, when Frederick and Annie Sheard, an aged couple, were murdered in their cottage, at Beaconsfield. As both the victims died intestate, it is a matter of consequence, so far as the distribution of the estate is concerned, which of the victims died first. One of Frederick Sheard's sisters, Mrs Emma West, had been named as the defendant in an originating summons, but as she has since died it was considered advisable to ask the Court to substitute for her name in the summons the name of Mrs Martha Newman, the surviving sister of Frederick Sheard.
    Mr Kelly (instructed by Messrs Henderson and Ball) made the application on behalf of the curator of intestate estates. Mr. Martin (instructed by Mr. E. H Serle) for the representatives of Frederick Sheard, and Mr Richardson (instructed by Messrs Moule, Hamilton, and Kiddle) for the representatives of Annie Sheard appeared, and consented to the application.
    Mr. Justice Weigall, in the absence of affidavits, declined to grant the application. Annie Sheard58

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P3 unit 1132, item 177/136
    That there was no issue of the marriage, and after careful enquiries I have been unable to discover who are the relatives or next of kin of the said deceased, but it is stated that the said Annie Sheard had a brother and sister named H. Cocking of 15 Victoria Road, East Retford, England and R. Cocking of 28 Bigwood Avenue, Hove, Sussex, England, respectively.
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Yorkshire Parish Records
    Frederick Sheard, born Feb 1848, baptised 27 Mar 1853 at Yeadon, St John, Yorkshire, England
    Parents: Samuel Sheard & Mary Sheard.
  3. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Frederic Sheard. Mar Q 1848 (Otley) 23 483. Mother's maiden surname: Chippendale."
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10989 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E."
  5. [S204] Find My Past, online unknown url, Nottinghamshire Marriages Index 1528-1929
    Annie Cocking & Fred Sheard, 24 Mar 1877 St Swithun (Anglican), East Retford, Nottinghamshire.
  6. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B371/006 both aged 32.
  7. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1572-250 - Fred Sheard of Beaconsfield Farmer - C/T 1675-886.
  8. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1675-886 - Mortgage No 79282 to Richard Morton. Discharged 10 Feb 1890.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1675-886 - Mortgage No 150312 to Catherine Barr. Discharged 30 Nov 1900.
  10. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1675-886 - Mortgage No 200809 to The Commissioners of Savings Banks in the Colony of Victoria. Discharged 15 Apr 1918.
  11. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10990 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E."
  12. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 16 Jun 1921, p1.
  13. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1675-886 - Red Ink No 2175983. Fred Sheard (in Office Copy of Rule to Administer called Frederick Sheard) died on or about the 12th or 13th day of June 1921. A Rule to Administer his estate has been granted to the Curator.
  14. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1675-886 - Henry Ferguson of Woori Yallock Farmer.
  15. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1851 England Census. HO107/2285/216/11
    Enummerated at Rawdon, Yorkshire.
    Household Members: Samuel Sheard (Age 36, Clothier), Mary Sheard (Age 33), Emma Sheard (Age 5), Frederick Sheard (Age 3), Ann Sheard (Age 7 months)."
  16. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1861 England Census. RG 9/3215/78/22
    Enummerated at Rawdon, Yorkshire.
    Household Members: Saml Sheard (46, born Mirfield, Woolen Weaver), Mary Sheard (44, born Yeadon), Emma Sheard (15, born Yeadon, Scholar), Fredrick Sheard (Age 13, born Burley, Errand Boy), Ann Sheard (10, born Burley), Martha Sheard (Age 5, born Rawden), Abram Sheard (80, born Mirfield, formerly Wool Cloth Manufacturer)."
  17. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1871 England Census. RG10/4256/33/6
    Enummerated at West Halton, Yorkshire.
    Household Members: Thomas Edward York, Augusta Margart York, Mary Augusta York, John Cecil York, Helen Margaret York, Louisa Caroline York, Agnes Rae, Hannah Beedham, Mary Rodwell, Hannah Bowman, Emma Marshall Robinson, Fred Sherod."
  18. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  19. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  20. [S106] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1906.
  21. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  22. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  23. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  24. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  25. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  26. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  27. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  28. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  29. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  30. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  31. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-111-B     Sheard     Frederick     M     76     16/06/1921     664
    4-111-B     Sheard     Annie     F     75     16/06/1921     665.
  32. [S14] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star (Vic.), Tue 19 Aug 1879, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/200129676
  33. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), Wed 25 Oct 1893, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/70016138
  34. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 8 Apr 1899, p41
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221146230
  35. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 5 Apr 1902, p42
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221226801
  36. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic.) Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic.), Thu 9 Mar 1916, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88664023
  37. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic.) Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic.), Thu 19 Jul 1917, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88660841
  38. [S18] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic.), Fri 28 Jun 1918, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/92153772
  39. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 14 Jun 1921, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242495728
  40. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 14 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203966344
  41. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 15 Jun 1921, p9
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203972598
  42. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974824
  43. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974822
  44. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974828
  45. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242497293
  46. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 18 Jun 1921, p8
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242502014
  47. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 18 Jun 1921, p21
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/1767553
  48. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 1 Jul 1921, p7.
  49. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 30 Jul 1921, p2.
  50. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 5 Aug 1921, p6.
  51. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 15 Aug 1921, p7.
  52. [S333] Newspaper (England) - Sheffield Daily Telegraph (Yorkshire), 18 Aug 1921, p6.
  53. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 29 Aug 1921, p10.
  54. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 14 Sep 1921, p11.
  55. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 14 Sep 1921, p8
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/206701585
  56. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 25 Oct 1921, p6.
  57. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 31 Jul 1923, p13
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/243814138
  58. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 1 Aug 1923, p17.
Last Edited27 Apr 2021

Annie Cocking

F, #192, b. abt 1847, d. 12 Jun 1921
Annie SHEARD
(1846-1921)
Father*George Cocking b. 1815, d. 16 Mar 1878
Mother*Mary Lambert b. 1822, d. Mar 1902
Probate (Will)* 191/750. Annie SHEARD Date of grant: 23 Nov 1923; Date of death: 12 Jun 1921; Occupation: Married; Residence: Beaconsfield.1 
Married NameSheard. 
Birth*abt 1847 Weston, Nottinghamshire, England.2,3 
Marriage*24 Mar 1877 Spouse: Frederick Sheard. E Retford, Nottinghamshire, England, Mar Q [E Retford] 7b 22.2,4
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelAug 1879 Sailing with Frederick Sheard. Ship Cyphrenes England.5
 
Residence "Quamby", Quamby Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia. 
Death*12 Jun 1921 Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D10989 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E.2 
Widow12 Jun 1921Annie Cocking became a widow upon the death of her husband Frederick Sheard.6 
Death-Notice16 Jun 1921SHEARD. - The Friends of the late Mr. FRED and Mrs. SHEARD are respectfully informed that their remains will be interred in Berwick Cemetery. Funeral to leave J. Grant's Mortuary THIS DAY (Thursday, June 10), at 1.30 p.m.
JOHN GRANT, Undertaker. 'Phone 25 Berwick.7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1871Thomas Edward YORK - Farmer of 180 acres, Halton Place, Halton West, Nottinghamshire, EnglandAge 24 - Laundry Maid Domestic With Frederick Sheard; Age 23 - Groom and Domestic8
bt 1903 - 1919Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick Sheard.9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21

Grave

  • Plot 4-111-B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia22

Newspaper-Articles

  • 19 Aug 1879: The s.s. Cyphrenes arived this morning from London, via canal, with a large number of passengers for Melbourne and Sydney. The following is her Melbourne passenger list:—Fred Sheard, Anna Sheard Frederick Sheard23
  • 8 Apr 1899: Beaconsfield show. (By Our Agricultural Reporter.) The Upper Beaconsfield Fruitgrowers' Association held their fourth annual show on the 3rd inst. DAIRY PRODUCE. Hen Eggs: Mrs Sheard, 1; Mrs P. C. Gardiner, 2. Jar of Honey: Mrs Stone, 1; P. C. Gardiner. 2; F. Sheard, 3. Frederick Sheard24
  • 14 Jun 1921: Shocking tragedy AT BEACONSFIELD. OLD COUPLE FOUND MURDERED. Their Home Ransacked. ROBBERY THE SUPPOSED MOTIVE. BLACK TRACKERS AT WORK.
    [From our special reporters]
    A tragedy of a most cold-blooded description was yesterday brought to light, in the quiet district of Beaconsfield, when two well-known residents of the neighborhood were found dead in their lonely little home amid the scrub-covered slopes of Quamby Hill. All the circumstances pointed to the fact that a murder of the most atrocious character had been committed, the probable motive of the crime being robbery.
    he names of the victims were Frederick Sheard, farmer, aged 75; and Annie Sheard, his wife, aged 75. They had been respected residents of the neighborhood for 35 years, living on their little farm of about 80 acres, and dairying there in a small way. There was no resident of Beaconsfield who did not know the grey-haired man, whom they dubbed "Old Cock Robin," because he whistled so cheerfully and happily at his work; and Mrs. Sheard was an equally familiar figure, tramping every week, as she used to do, to Beaconsfield railway station some three and a half miles away, to fetch the newspapers.
    The scene of the tragedy was the little cottage in which the old couple lived. It stands on Quamby Hill Road, just off the Upper Beaconsfield-road, which it faces, and a little over half way between Lower and Upper Beaconsfield, a poor little shanty, but homely in its way. A rough structure of adobe and wood, with a weather-beaten shingle roof, riddled here and there with holes, it is surrounded on the one side by the open clearing of the farm, with a large barn not far away. On the other side rise rolling hills, covered with thick bush and scrub, offering an ideal place for a marauder. Appropriately enough, one of the hills is named Mount Misery. A little orchard grows round the cottage, and at the front there is a ramshackle trellis work, with a vine. And at the rear, near the kitchen, thick bushes cling to the walls of the house. Here Mr. and Mrs. Sheard used to live entirely by themselves, and it was there that the tragedy was discovered yesterday morning.
    The first intimation that anything was wrong was received by a young man named John Larkin, a laborer, of Beaconsfield. Some time after 11 a.m. he visited the farm, as was his daily custom, to call for the milk that was usually waiting.
    There was no one about, and he walked round the cottage, noticing, with some surprise, that the fowls were still locked up. Thinking that there was something wrong he went to a neighboring house, occupied by a Mrs. Warmbrunn, some distance away, and mentioned the fact that nobody was moving about over at Sheard's place. A little later another neighbor, Mrs. Barnes, whose custom it was now and again to look in and see how the old couple were, decided to try and ascertain what was the matter. Visiting the house, she knocked at the back door. There was no reply, and she pushed open the door. Immediately a black cattle dog, owned by the Sheards, which was inside the room, flew at her. The dog barked furiously, but she managed, after a time to pacify the animal, which ultimately permitted her to enter the house. There she was amazed to see drawers and boxes lying in confusion on the floor of the living room. She became frightened, and running out into the paddock, called to Mr. Larkin and Mr. Warmbrunn. The two men hurried over to her and, peering through the window of the bedroom, they were horrified to see blood upon the floor, clothing strewn here and there, and all the contents of the house in wild confusion. A telephone message was thereupon sent to the police station at Berwick from the Cardinia Hotel, not far away, and shortly afterwards Constable John Lombard, of Berwick, arrived upon the scene in a motor car.
    On opening the front door of the cottage the constable was savagely and persistently attacked by the Sheep dog, which was still keeping faithful guard. In the end he was forced to shoot the animal, in order that he might enter the building and open the bedroom door. Once this was done the tragedy was revealed. Lying upon the floor near the little iron bed was the dead body of Mrs. Sheard, half naked, with her grey head smothered in blood, while pools of blood lay upon the wooden floor around her. On the bed itself, huddled up under the disordered blankets, and half out of the clothes, lay the body of Mr. Sheard. The pillow was drenched in blood, which had been spread from a deep wound on the right side of the head near the ear, and from other wounds, on the back of the hands and on the feet. On investigating, Constable Lombard found a similar deep wound on the right side of Mrs Sheard's head. Both bodies were cold, and had apparently been dead for some considerable time. The attitude in which they were found suggested that the dead man had put his hands up to defend himself from a blow, while his wife had leaped from the bed and apparently made for the door, in an endeavor to escape. The bedroom was in a state of confusion. Clothes, and blankets were piled in untidy, tangled heaps upon the bed, a small mirror near by was splashed with blood, and a tin trunk near the bedside had been flung open and its contents disturbed.
    Even worse, however, was the disorder in the living room, opening out of the bedroom. This bore every sign of a violent and hurried search — for money, it is suggested, since the couple were reputedly to be comfortably off. A chest of drawers, standing at one side of the room against the smoke-girned wooden wall, which was papered with old newspapers, had been partly ransacked. Some of the drawers were open and others had been pulled, out and upon the floor lay clothes in untidy heaps, papers and old letters, and a number of metal spoons. Here and there, too, were pillows and bolsters and boxes. Ragged sockings hung in strips from the ceiling, but whether torn down recently
    or not it was impossible to tell. Two old shot gnus were also in the room. After a preliminary search Constable Lombard lost no time in informing the Criminal Investigation department at Russell-street of the circumstances and Superintendent M. J. Bannon at once detailed Detective-Sergeant D. Commons, Detective F. Milne and Detective. A. M'Arthur, finger print expert, to investigate the case. They left Russell-street barracks at 3 p.m. in the police motor car with Constable Gogoll, and were joined at Dandenong by Senior Constable Downs, with two black trackers, Peter and Charlie.
    On arrival at the scene of the tragedy, the detectives at once set to work in the gathering dusk to make what investigations were possible before darkness fell. The scene was grimly impressive. Daylight was fading over the dark, bush covered hills and the open paddocks. From the windows of the dead couple's cottage a yellow glow of light shone like a beacon as the police worked with hurricane lamps, a candle and an electric globe, lit from the car. The light shone upon the shtolid faces of the black trackers, waiting patiently under the trellis work of the old vine. Inside the sorry little bedroom, where the tattered sacking hung from the draughty roof and poor little colored prints decorated the walls, the detectives began a careful scrutiny of bloodstained bed
    clothes, of the floors and the open tin trunk. The bodies of the dead man and his wife lay where they had been found — the latter just behind the door. Little fresh light upon the tragedy was thrown by an examination of these. The wounds that had caused death were easily seen, but whether they were due to heavy calibre bullet or to blows from some blunt instrument, such as a pickaxe, was not certain last night, post-mortem examination is expected to help in arriving at a decision.
    In the tin trunk the detectives found a large number of letters and receipts, and a Savings Bank book showing a sum of £224 11/4 to the credit of Frederick Sheard. There was also a man's straw hat of recent date, to which some importance may be attached by the police, and a pathetic touch was supplied by the discovery of some old photographs, apparently of the dead couple, taken many years ago.
    Two sovereigns and a silver coin piece were also found; and further search reversed a little hoard of small silver in a linen bag, totalling some £5 in all, a bottle of whisky and some revolver cartridges. Eerie shadows flickered across the battered plaster walls as the detectives moved to and fro round the untidy bed. The search was continued in the living room, where a close investigation was made of the bris upon the floor, and of papers and documents that were visible, and that have been ransacked. No signs of the weapon or implement which had caused the wound were discovered, however, last night, and there were no visible indications that entry had been forced into the lonely cottage, though the bolt of the kitchen door at the back was loose. While the search was still progressing the family clock upon the mantelpiece cheerily pounded the hour of 7 p.m., and the everyday sound was a startling contrast to the grim silence of the neighboring bedroom.
    Darkness rendered it useless to continue the search further. Out into the moonlit orchard the shrouded bodies of the old couple were at length borne, and placed in a motor car for conveyance to the Morgue at Melbourne. The black trackers and a constable were left in charge of the cottage for the night, and the detectives departed. The search will be resumed at daybreak this morning, when it is hoped that some further clue may be discovered that will point more directly to the motive and manner of the murder. At present the detectives prefer to have more facts to go upon before expressing a definite opinion.
    Partly because the Sheards were among the oldest residents of the neighborhood, and partly because of the fact that they were universally respected, the news of a tragedy caused a sensation in the district, On all sides residents were anxiously discussing the rumors and the details of the happening, and were recalling stories of the old couple, whose untimely end was universally deplored. The late Mr. Sheard was a man of big frame, an Englishman, who came to Australia about 40 years ago. He was occupied for a time in kangaroo hunting in New South Wales, and as a stockman in Queensland. Subsequently he came to Beaconsfield and settled there, building his home some 35 years ago. He worked his farm by himself, keeping a a few cows and raising calves for market. Mrs. Sheard, incidentally, was a typical kindly housewife, and made her own wine. Lately it was stated her husband had been trying to sell his property, with a view to making a trip to the old country, where his only relations and those of his wife are living, but no purchaser had as yet come forward to put down cash for the whole amount. Mr. Sheard was last seen alive on Sunday afternoon by a neighbor in his yard. It was suggested in some quarters that the crime may have been committed by a thief, who hoped to obtain money brought back by the dead man from the local market, but this theory discounted by the fact that the market day is to-day. Nevertheless, it was always believed in the district that the couple were comfortably off, and the fact would doubtless be easily ascertained, even by a stranger to the neighborhood. Lately some of the residents have, it is stated, noticed a stranger in the district, apparently a swagman, and rumor in the neighborhood is already connecting the presence of the unknown man with the tragedy. One or two footprints were actually noted in the neighborhood of the Sheards cottage before darkness fell, but whether or not these will prove to be clues will not be known till this morning, when the black trackers are enabled to get to work.
    About 8 p.m. last night, Detective-Sergeant Commons, with Detectives M'Arthur and Milne, and Senior Constable Downes, went again in the police motor to the vicinity of the tragedy, and made sundry inquiries regarding the habits of the dead couple among the local residents. Arriving with the bodies of the two deceased at the Morgue last night, Constable Lombard communicated with police head quarters at Russell-street, and the murder was reported to the Coroner. A post-mortem examination will be made on the bodies this morning. Until this is done it cannot be ascertained whether the wounds were caused by a revolver or by another weapon. Frederick Sheard25
  • 14 Jun 1921: AGED COUPLE VICTIMS IN BEACONSFIELD MURDER. Mr W. F. Storry, Photo.
    The Top Picture Shows Mr and Mrs Frederick Sheard standing outside their home. Underneath is a View of the Farmyard.
    [Illustrated] Frederick Sheard26
  • 16 Jun 1921: SEEKING A MURDERER. POLICE AT BEAC0NSFIELD. MANY LINES OF INQUIRY. (From Our Special Reporter) BEACONSFIELD, Thursday.
    Who murdered Frederick Sheard and his wife at Beaconsfield?
    That is the question which the detectives and the police on the scene cannot answer, and it is the one subject of conversation for miles around. In every hotel and store in the district and on every corner there are men with theories and clues. Faced with a difficult problem the detectives cannot afford to miss a point, and the winnowing of the mass of details is a heavy task. To the eyes of suspicion every stranger behaves in a suspicious manner, and the number of hints and suggestions which are pouring into tho Cardinia Park Hotel, the police headquarters, is bewildering.
    Detective-Sergeant Commons and Detective Etholl went out last night to investigate a report which suggested a clue. Mr John Lang, a farmer, owns a house in Pound road, about three miles, from the spot on the main Gippsland road, where Sheard's wallet was found yesterday afternoon. Mr Lang stays with a neighbor, and his house is unoccupied. He was walking along Pound road last night with Mr Geoffrey Turner, when he noticed, a light in the empty house. The two men shouted, cooeed and whistled, but received no response. They then went to the house of Mr John Bell about a quarter of a mile along the road and returned with him. They entered the hut, and found it unoccupied, but a piece of candle about an inch in length was burning in the room, and a fire was alight in the grate. Bags had been arranged as if for a bed. The men put out the light, and notified Constable Lombard, of Berwick, who telephoned to the Cardinia Hotel.
    Nothing Discovered
    The detectives left by motor-car, and a constable joined them with a hurricane lamp. When they reached the house there was nothing to be found. Whoever the temporary occupant was and he might have been only a vagrant — he had made off, and warned by the disappearance of the light, had not returned. A search of the bush in the darkness revealed nothing save the fact that the man had made a supper on two bananas. It was after 12 o'clock when the detectives returned to the hotel. They were dispirited, as they believed that a mischance had robbed them of a valuable opportunity.
    This morning Senior - Constable Downes and the black-trackers, Peter and Charlie, were on the scene early in quest of footprints which coincided with the print in blood in the murdered couple's bedroom, or of tracks leading from the spot on the road where the wallet was found. A definite discovery on either point would establish the fact that the man who was being sought is still in the district. This would be of the greatest value to the police.
    Detective Milne accompanied the trackers in a police car. On the completion of their task, the party went to the shed in the vicinity of Clyde, where the shivering man who called at the house of Mr A. T. M'Kay, near Clyde, said he had spent Tuesday night. The detectives yesterday could see little trace of this shed having been occupied, but it is hoped that the trackers may find something.
    The discovery of the blood-stained axe proves to have no bearing on the case. It was found on Sunday afternoon, when the old couple was still alive.
    Reasonable Explanation
    Little importance is attached to the report that a man was behaving in a mysterious manner at Narre Warren, and when approached rushed into a culvert. It is understood that a reason able explanation has been found for his conduct.
    The stranger who slept beneath the platform of the Narre Warren platform did not behave in the manner of a hunted man. He was spoken to by the assistant station master and said that it looked as if it were going to rain, and he would do no harm by sleeping there. This interview took place at about 7 p.m.. and the man promised he would leave at 7 a.m. He did so quite openly.
    So the hunt goes on. The promising clue of today is the exploded story of tomorrow. The countryside seems to he dotted with casual way farers, the tracing of whose movements entails much labor. Meanwhile the detectives wish to hear from Arthur Ellis, whom they still believe to be a nephew of the old couple; from the occupants of the yellow motor car which was in the vicinity of the hut on Saturday morning, and from the two men who were seen in the yard at Oakleigh, and are believed to be identical with the men who made purchases in Beaconsfield. The men who were stopped at Frankston yesterday easily established that they were not at either of the places. The detectives are anxious that any of the parties referred to should communicate with them as it may save time in investigation.
    A Letter from England
    This morning a letter in a black-edged envelope addressed to Mr Frederick Sheard was received at the Beaconsfield post office. It was opened by the detectives. It had been written by Martha Newman, of Great Yarmouth, England, who was a sister of either Mr or Mrs Sheard. It told of the death of her husband, owing to a sudden seizure, and concluded with a hope that they were both well, and an expression of gratification at the news of their "good harvest." Two crosses followed the signature.
    This afternoon the bodies of the old couple are to be buried in the same grave in the Beaconsfield Cemetery.
    Despite reports appearing in a section of the press, the dog Laddie, which was shot by the police, appears to have been little known among local residents. However, Constable John Lombard, of Berwick, who shot the animal, has received an amusingly heated anonymous letter from Melbourne dealing with the matter. When seen today, Constable Lombard said that it had been necessary to shoot the dog. "I would do the same thing again in the same circumstances," he declared. "The dog was snapping and trying to bite. It was a nuisance. If I am asked for a report by the proper authorities I shall give it. Beyond that I have nothing to say." Frederick Sheard27
  • 16 Jun 1921: The Shooting of "Laddie." INDIGNATION AMONGST RESIDENTS.
    According to visitors who returned from Beaconsfield last night, people of the district are extremely indignant at the shooting of the dog "Laddie," which stood on guard at the door of his old master's house when the police arrived there on Monday. It was said that a neighbor offered to take charge of the dog until definite arrangements were made in regard to the care of the animal, but that he declined to undertake to keep it, and the constable decided to shoot the dog. A shotgun was obtained, and two shots were fired, the dog being badly wounded in one leg, but not killed. In great pain, it as said, "Laddie" ran away into the bush and stayed there all night. On Tuesday morning, which was usually the day on which the butcher called with the meat for the old couple, the dog limped back to the hut, evidently looking for his old master and expecting some food. Again the gun was produced, and this time, it is alleged, three shots were fired at the dog, which was then killed. "The place is seething with indignation over the matter," said one visitor. Frequently it has been asked why the dog did not attack the murderers of his old master and mistress. Had it done so its barking would surely have aroused the old people and put them on their guard, but from the attitude of their dead bodies it was evident that the intruders had burst in upon Sheard and his wife while they were lying in bed and probably asleep. Apparently the dog had not attacked the intruder, or intruders, and the explanation is that the dog was quite deaf and that he probably did not see anyone coming to the house. Frederick Sheard28
  • 16 Jun 1921: Arthur Ellis Believed to be at Piangil.
    From inquiries made yesterday it is believed that the supposed nephew of the murdered couple, Arthur Ellis, whose whereabouts the police were anxious to trace, will be wholly unable to throw any light whatever on the shocking affair. For months past he has been at work in the Mallee district, his last known address being Piangil, a town about 30 miles beyond Swan Hill, and nearly 2.. miles from Melbourne. Detectives E. F. Downes called yesterday upon Mrs Jane Gunton of the Post Office Club Hotel, High-street, St. Kilda, who informed him that a man named Arthur Ellis, who answered to the description of the man sought by the police, was well known to her, and that he had stayed at the hotel for about ten days last Easter. He was at that time residing at Surrey Camp, Nowinga, via Mildura, but her husband had lately received a letter from him from the vicinity of Swan Hill. Later in the day Mr. Gunton was able to furnish the address, which was care Mr. J. L. Poole, Surrey Camp, via Piangil." Moreover, he was able to supply a photograph of Ellis, from which the detectives are satisfied that the Ellis mentioned is the man from whom they considered they might be able to gather important information in regard to his ill-fated relatives. Surrey Camp is situated a few miles from Piangil, and it is conceivable that news of his whereabouts being wanted had not reached Ellis yesterday, hence his reason for not communicating at once with the Criminal Investigation department. Further evidence of Ellis's whereabouts was forthcoming from Mr. H. Marks, draper, of 326 High-street, St. Kilda, who told Detective Brennan that Ellis was also well known to him, and as recently as Friday last he (Marks) had received from him a cheque for goods purchased. His address was then in the vicinity of Swan Hill. It was ascertained yesterday that Mrs. J. Poole, of Canterbury, received a letter from Ellis as recently as Saturday last. It had been forwarded from Piangil. Frederick Sheard Arthur Ellis29
  • 16 Jun 1921: THE BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. DISCOVERY AT BERWICK. Murdered Man's Wallet Found. (BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    BERWICK.—All the circumstances connected with the brutal murder of Mr. and Mrs. Sheard, whose mutilated bodies were found on Monday afternoon in the bedroom of their simple home on Quamby Hill-road, Beaconsfield, seem to indicate that the dastardly deed was perpetrated by someone whose mind was not normal. It is improbable that such revolting acts as the driving of a pick or other weapon of the kind into the grey heads of the two old people, sleeping peacefully in their bed, was committed by anyone whose presence at the house was due, primarily, to the desire for robbery. That desire the murderer possibly did have; but, in the light of all the peculiar circumstances connected with the case, some other motive must be ascribed.
    In an old shed attached to the dilapidated dwelling on Quamby Hill-road, the detectives yesterday morning found a collection of articles that possibly may have belonged to the nephew of the ill-fated pair, Arthur Ellis and were perhaps left by him in the care of his uncle and aunt. The collection included a wooden box, with the letters "A.E." painted on it. Inside were found several letters, a quantity of men's wear, such as collars, tacs, trousers and shirts, and a Bible, which had evidently been presented to Ellis's sister many years ago by Donald A. Milligan, vicar of Armley Hill Church of England. A letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, sen., of Retford, England, dated November, 1908, referred to a maritime mishap, and expressed thankfulness at Arthur's escape.
    In view of the result of the post mortem examination, the detectives yesterday instituted a search for the pick with which the deed was done. There is a well twenty yards north of the Sheards' cottage. It is about 12 feet deep, and is covered with heavy logs. In the different parts of the undulating flat lands which surround the house are several waterholes, and it was thought that in one of these places the pick would be found. Under the direction of Detective F. Milne and Senior Constable M. J. E. Downes, the two blackfellows, Peter and Charlie, searched carefully in the vicinity of the waterholes. Peter waded through several of these patches of water—some of them are much more extensive than mere waterholes—and dragged the mud with an improvised rake, but nothing was found. Another hole was drained by Plain Clothes Constable F. Gunther, who dug a drain in the side, but the result here also amounted to nothing. Hope were, however, centred on the old well, which by reason of its proximity to the dwelling seemed a likely place for a murderer to get rid of his fiendish weapon. There was about 6 feet of water in the well, and as it would have been long and arduous work to empty it with the aid of buckets it was decided to instal a pumping engine. Shortly after 10 a.m. Mr. F. H. Grant, of Beaconsfield, and two assistants arrived the scene with a three-horse power oil engine, which was soon fitted up. After two hours' pumping the water was drained, and the eager spectators who peered into the bottom of the well were disappointed to find, instead of the expected pick, only two croaking frogs. Immediately after lunch yesterday a mild sensation was caused by the arrival at Sheard's house of a man on horseback. He informed the detectives that his name was E. Gardner, and that he was a grazier residing at Berwick. He stated that at 1.30 pm. yesterday , while proceeding on horseback along the main Gippsland road, about half a mile on the Melbourne side of Berwick, he noticed lying on the clay on the side of the road a dark leather wallet. He was amazed to find that the contents comprised State taxation papers, rate notices, receipts and other papers addressed to "Mr. F. Sheard, Beaconsfield." He immediately galloped to the Cardinia Hotel, Beaconsfield, three miles away, and reported his discovery. Soon afterwards Detective Milne, Senior Constable Downes, Plain Clothes Constable Gunther and the two black trackers set off in a motor car, accompanied on horseback by Mr. Gardner, who directed the motor. At the spot where the wallet was found, which is on the side of the road not far from Wilson's quarry, several business papers addressed to Mr. Sheard, which had evidently blown out of the wallet, were found scattered about in the vicimty. It was then 3 o'clock.
    The sun was shining brightly when the two small black trackers cast about for clues to guide them. With their heads bent forward, and their eyes directed to the clay and grass beneath, they walked quickly about, urged on by Senior Constable Downes, who is himself a footprint expert. In a few minutes Charlie shouted, and pointed to a mark on the ground which, in spite of the heavy rain that had fallen, proved to the experienced trackers to be a footmark. Another was found a few minutes later, then another. It was soon established that these footprints were of the same man, that they were made some days ago, and that the boot marks pointed in the direction of Dandenong, in the opposite direction to the scene of the tragedy. Frederick Sheard Arthur Ellis30
  • 18 Jun 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. SHEARDS' NEPHEW TRACED. MANY REPORTS INVESTIGATED. (BY OUR SPECIAL. REPORTER.)
    BERWICK. Friday,—A message received from, Melbourne by Detective Milne to-day indcated that Arthur Ellis, the nephew of Mr and Mrs. Sheard, who were murdered at Upper Beaconsfield on Sunday night, had been traced to a survey Camp north of Piangil, near Swan Hill but that until informed by the police to-day he was not aware of the murder. Ellis who was traced as a result of the discovery of a swag belonging to him at Spencer street railway station has not left Piangil since April 1 last. The Police have now to direct the investigation to other clues and rumours, and of these there is a variety.
    A dramatic incident was furnished by the mystery of a bloodstained half crown which came into the possession of a business man in one of the neighbouring townships. The business man told the police that the coin, had been handed to him by a driver, who, in the course of business, went to Quamby road, where the Sheards had been found murdered. On being interviewed, the driver said that he had received the coin from a woman customer on his rounds. This the woman hotly denied. She called in her mother to prove that she had given the driver only 1/1, which amount was paid in small coins. Both protested strongly, and for about a day the detectives were puzzled. The woman ultimately explained the position to the satisfaction of the police and it was proved that the bloodstains had nothing to do with the crime. Such comparatively trivial matters occupy much of the time of detectives.
    To-day Detective Milne and Senior constable Gutther are inquiring into the statement, which originated in Melbourne, that a swagman camped near the house of the Sheards on Sunday. The movements of two travelling tinsmiths who were in the district on Friday of last week are also being inquired into. They called at the home of Mr W. J. Harvey Smith, and one of the men said that his mother had died in Adelaide. He added that his brother had recently died in the Caulfield Military Hospital, and that he was anxious to raise some money to pay the funeral expenses. Mr Smith offered the man a cup of tea, and the visitor asked for permission to go and bring his mate in. This Mr Smith refused and the man walked away. He is described as from 45 to 50 years of age, clean-shaved of Jewish appearance, and wearing a light grey or brown suit. His companion was about 5ft 10in high, and wore a navy blue suit and black hat. The men mended an enamel tea kettle for a woman, and were later seen at the Sheards' house.
    On the day following the discovery of the murder four cartridge shells were found on the bed in which the murdered couple lay. No shots were heard, and no bullet marks were found. These facts led one of the neighbours to the conclusion that the fatal wounds were probably inflicted with a certain brand of cattle killer which is worked by the point being driven into the beast by a percussion cap. The wounds, however, were much larger than would have been inflicted by the killer. The only fact to support the theory is that the two wounds travelled the same way, and entered the head at the same point.
    Between Beaconsfield and Gembrook, which is about five miles away, the country is thickly timbered, and a fugitive from justice might keep under cover for several days. The point at which Mr Sheard's wallet was found however indicates that the men travelled beyond Berwick on the road to Melbourne. If he is now hiding in the timber country he must have turned back. This is improbable.
    WORKING ON NEW CLUE. Developments Expected.
    The detectives dealing with the case believe that they have now found a clue which will lead to important developments, though at present particulars are not available. As the result of several conferences with Superintendent M. J. Bannon, Detective-Seargent Commons and Detective Ethell are concentrating their inquiries on the city.
    Detective Milne has been left in charge of the investigation at Beaconsfield. A strange man was detained by the Malvern police yesterday, but was able to give a satisfactory, explanation of his movements. Frederick Sheard31
  • 1 Jul 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. Men Still Sought by Police.
    Detective-sergeant Commons, Detectives Ethell and Milne continued their search yesterday for the two men whom they desire to question in regard to the Beaconsfield murder. Every day fresh evidence is being collected to clear up the mystery.
    John King, who is charged with having murdered Frederick Sheard and Annie Sheard, will appear at the City Court on Thursday, and another remand will probably be asked for. Frederick Sheard32
  • 30 Jul 1921: THURSDAY. AUGUST 4, 1921. At Half-past One O'Clock Sharp.
    On the Property, (Prior to Clearing Sale), UPPER BEACONSFIELD ROAD, BEACONSFIELD,
    Two and a half Miles by Splendid Road from Beaconsfield Railway Station, 28 Miles Melbourne.
    In the Estate of Frederick Sheard, Deceased,
    Whose Lamentable Death and that of His Wife Occurred in June Last, 65 ACRES WELL-IMPROVED AND GOOD QUALITY LAND.
    FRANK J. BOILEAU and Co., under instructions from W. B House, Esq., curator of the estates of deceased persons, will SUBMIT to PUBLIC AUCTION, through their auctioneer, Frank J. Boileau, as above.
    65 acres of good quality land, mostly reclaimed ti-tree flats; all splendidly cleared. Every acre can and has been ploughed, well drained and grassed. Boundary fencing, post, four wires, and barb; partly netted. Old house, cart shed, cow shed, fowl runs, good hay shed, small orchard, well, watered. Grows good cereal and root crops. Splendid horticultural land. Is in good heart.
    The late Mr. Sheard resided on the property since 1885, cultivated little, if any, during the past few years, having devoted his time of late to dairying, with excellent results.
    The curator is anxious to wind up the estate, and to those who during the lifetime of the late Mr. Sheard were anxious to purchase, and others who desire to buy this splendidly situated and good quality little property, now have the opportunity of doing so.
    Title certificate, vol. 1675, folio 334,886. Terms: One-third cash, balance payable within three years. Interest, 6½ per cent , payable half-yearly, and:
    Following the property sale, the following stock, farm implements, furniture, and sundries will be submitted.
    STOCK:
    9 good dairy cows, close up to calving.
    2 three-year-old springing heifers (tip top).
    2 poddy heifers, 1 good dairy bull.
    1 delivery or spring-cart mare.
    FARM IMPLEMENTS. &c.:
    2 S.F. ploughs, harrows, roller sledge, jinker, waggonette (shafts and pole), Alfa Laval separator, grindstone, and numerous farm tools and dairy utensils.
    HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE and numerous sundries, useful and varied.
    N.B.-The cows are a good lot, mostly young, sound, in good condition, and coming in early.
    The machinery, jinker, and waggonette have all been well cared for, and every lot will be sold to the highest bidder.
    Terms-Cash.
    Further particulars from:
    Frank J. Boileau end Co., auctioneer, stock and land salesmen. Commercial Bank Chambers, op- posite Kirk's Bazaar, 421 Bourke street, Melbourne. Tel. 1791 Central. Frederick Sheard33
  • 5 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. Sheard’s Homestead Sold. UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Thursday. The sale took place to-day of the land and effects of the old man and wife, the late Mr and Mrs Sheard who were murdered in their cottage on June 13. There was spirited bidding for the farm area of 64 acres which was purchased by a buyer from Mordialloc for £18/10/ an acre. A condition of the sale was that the homestead should not be demolished until the inquest had been completed. The dairy cattle, comprising a bull, nine dairy cows, four heifers and a horse realised good prices, and satisfactory amounts were obtained for the various articles of household furniture and farm implements. The sale was conducted under instructions from the curator of the estates of deceased persons. Frederick Sheard34
  • 15 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. John King, who is charged with having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on July 12, made his seventh appearance at the City Court on Saturday morning. Sergeant T. J. Montague said that another remand would be necessary because the inquest had not been completed. King said that he had no objection, and Mr. T. O'Callaghan, J.P., remanded him to appear on August 20. Frederick Sheard35
  • 18 Aug 1921: RETFORD FOR AUSTRALIA 42 YEARS AGO.
    The reported murder of Mr. Frederick K Sheard and his wife in their farmhouse, near Beaconsfield, New South Wales, has created much interest in Retford and district. Mr. Sheard, who came from the neighbourhood of Leeds, married Miss Annie Cocking, of Laxton, near Retford, sister to the wife of Mr. Edwin Swannack, of Grove Street, an Alderman and ex-Mayor of the borough. The murdered couple stayed with these relatives at Retford just before they sailed for Australia 42 years ago.
    The "Melbourne Age" states that a family photograph, taken in England, and a letter dated October 15, 1904, from Grove Street, Retford, Notts, was found by the detectives among the aged couple's effects. A Stock Exchange handbook is said to have been taken away by the murderers, and it is believed this book contained valuable documents. Frederick Sheard36
  • 29 Aug 1921: BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. When John King appeared in the City Court on Saturday, charged with having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on June 12, Sergeant T J Montague asked permission to withdraw the charges. He explained that the coroner (Dr Cole) had committed him for trial. Mr T O'Callaghan, J P, gave the necessary permission. Frederick Sheard37
  • 14 Sep 1921: THE BEACONSFIELD TRAGEDY. CROWN ABANDONS CASE. John King Released from Gaol.
    In connection with the charges of having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield, on which John King and Edward Jenkins were recently committed by trial by the Coroner's court, the Crown Law department has decided not to file a presentment against either man, and the charges will be, therefore, definitely abandoned.
    The trial was to have taken place on Thursday at the Criminal Court. King was yesterday released from the Melbourne Gaol, where he has been lodged since his arrest, and official notification of the decision has been communicated to Jenkins, who was admitted to bail.
    The action of the authorities in thus abandoning the charges has been prompted by the realisation that the cases for the prosecution were not sufficiently strong to secure convictions. Frederick Sheard38
  • 14 Sep 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDER. No Presentment Against King.
    John King who since June has been in prison awaiting trial on charges of having murdered Frederick and Annie Sheard at Beaconsfield on June 12, was discharged from the Melbourne Gaol yesterday. King, with Herbert Jenkins, was committed for trial by the coroner (Dr. Cole), but the Crown Law department advised the Criminal Investigation department yesterday that it had decided not to file a presentment against King, and he was released. Jenkins is on bail, but no announcement regarding his case was made yesterday. Frederick Sheard39
  • 25 Oct 1921: BEACONSFIELD MURDERS. Victims' English Relatives.
    Letters received by the Rev. James Wilson, of Beaconsfield Upper, from relatives in England of Mr. and Mrs. Sheard, victims of the Beaconsfield murders, show that they were greatly distressed when news of the murders reached them. "It was a terrible blow," says one, "to all the brothers and sisters to read the dreadful news, as reported in the 'Daily Mail' on August 12; but it was a great comfort to us to learn that you, who had known them for so many years should have been present to officiate at the funeral. Just before setting sail for Australia Mr. and Mrs. Sheard were staying with us at Retford, and left our home 42 years ago. A friend who was visiting Australia on business called to see them, and told us how delighted they were to hear all about their friends at home; We sincerely hope that the police will be able to trace the murderers; and that they will be brought to justice."
    It was evident to all who knew the old people that they were well connected, and this is borne out by the fact that the writer of the letter to Mr. Wilson. (Mr. Swannack), head of the firm of E. Swannack and Sons, builders, cabinet-makers, &c., of Retford, England, is an ex-mayor of the town, and in his official capacity had the honour of entertaining His Majesty the King just before the war. Frederick Sheard Rev James Wilson40
  • 1 Aug 1923: MURDERED COUPLE'S ESTATE. WHICH DIED FIRST? Litigation Pending.
    An application to Mr. Justice Weigall in the Practice Court yesterday recalled the tragedy which occurred in June, 1921, when Frederick and Annie Sheard, an aged couple, were murdered in their cottage, at Beaconsfield. As both the victims died intestate, it is a matter of consequence, so far as the distribution of the estate is concerned, which of the victims died first. One of Frederick Sheard's sisters, Mrs Emma West, had been named as the defendant in an originating summons, but as she has since died it was considered advisable to ask the Court to substitute for her name in the summons the name of Mrs Martha Newman, the surviving sister of Frederick Sheard.
    Mr Kelly (instructed by Messrs Henderson and Ball) made the application on behalf of the curator of intestate estates. Mr. Martin (instructed by Mr. E. H Serle) for the representatives of Frederick Sheard, and Mr Richardson (instructed by Messrs Moule, Hamilton, and Kiddle) for the representatives of Annie Sheard appeared, and consented to the application.
    Mr. Justice Weigall, in the absence of affidavits, declined to grant the application. Frederick Sheard41

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P3 unit 1370, item 191/750
    That there was no issue of the marriage, and after careful enquiries I have been informed and believe that the said deceased left the following named persons, her next of kin, her surviving:—her brothers and sister, namely William Cocking, Burton on Trent, England; Henry Cocking, 15 Victoria Road, Retford, England; Matthew Cocking, Moorhouse, Carlton-on-Tent, England; Sarah Swanqack, 23 Grove Street, Retford, England; Rebecca Cocking, 28 Bigwood Avenue, Hove, Sussex, England; Jane Cocking, Moorhouse, Carlton-on-Trent, England, and Fanny White, Sutton on Trent, England, and her said husband Frederick Sheard, if he survived her.
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10989 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E."
  3. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Not sure if registered: Ann Cocking. Mar Q 1847 (Of The Newark Union) 15 556. Mother's maiden surname: Gilbert."
  4. [S204] Find My Past, online unknown url, Nottinghamshire Marriages Index 1528-1929
    Annie Cocking & Fred Sheard, 24 Mar 1877 St Swithun (Anglican), East Retford, Nottinghamshire.
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B371/006 both aged 32.
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10990 age 75 [par unknown] registered at Melb E."
  7. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 16 Jun 1921, p1.
  8. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1871 England Census. RG10/4256/33/6
    Enummerated at West Halton, Yorkshire.
    Household Members: Thomas Edward York, Augusta Margart York, Mary Augusta York, John Cecil York, Helen Margaret York, Louisa Caroline York, Agnes Rae, Hannah Beedham, Mary Rodwell, Hannah Bowman, Emma Marshall Robinson, Fred Sherod."
  9. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  10. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  11. [S106] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1906.
  12. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  13. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  14. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  15. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  16. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  17. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  18. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  19. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  20. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  21. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  22. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-111-B     Sheard     Frederick     M     76     16/06/1921     664
    4-111-B     Sheard     Annie     F     75     16/06/1921     665.
  23. [S14] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star (Vic.), Tue 19 Aug 1879, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/200129676
  24. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 8 Apr 1899, p41
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221146230
  25. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 14 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203966344
  26. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 14 Jun 1921, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242495728
  27. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242497293
  28. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974822
  29. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974828
  30. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 16 Jun 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203974824
  31. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 18 Jun 1921, p21
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/1767553
  32. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 1 Jul 1921, p7.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 30 Jul 1921, p2.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 5 Aug 1921, p6.
  35. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 15 Aug 1921, p7.
  36. [S333] Newspaper (England) - Sheffield Daily Telegraph (Yorkshire), 18 Aug 1921, p6.
  37. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 29 Aug 1921, p10.
  38. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 14 Sep 1921, p8
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/206701585
  39. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 14 Sep 1921, p11.
  40. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 25 Oct 1921, p6.
  41. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 1 Aug 1923, p17.
Last Edited27 Apr 2021

Hubert Lenné

M, #193, b. 24 May 1843, d. 14 May 1926
Hubert LENNE (1843-1926)

Upper Beaconsfield

Selector of land, and builder of the Pine Grove Hotel. First Publican. Hubert Lenne had Lenne Road named after him.
Father*Joseph Clement Lenné
Mother*Elizabeth Lieberz
Place in Upper Beac* Lenne Street. Was named after Hubert Lenné, the publican who built the first Pine Grove Hotel. 
Name Variation Hubert Lenné was also known as Lenne. 
Birth*24 May 1843 Cologne, Rheinland, Germany.1 
(Witness) Migration/Travel15 Jul 1867 SS Atalanta.2 
Marriage*20 Dec 1869 Spouse: Charlotte Elizabeth Downing. VIC, Australia, #M4704.3
 
Residence18 Nov 1874 Foresters' Arms Hotel, Emerald Hill, VIC, Australia.4 
Land-UBeac*27 May 1878Hubert Lenné selected land from the Crown. GEM-D-11. 19a 3r 39p - Land File 2005/19.4
Crown Grant to H. LENNE on 14 Jan 1881.5,6 
Residence*bt Dec 1883 - Feb 1894 Pine Grove Hotel, Stoney Creek Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, Hubert tried many ventures in Australia but his most frequent and apparently most successful was as a publican. In South Melbourne he had the license of the Forester's Arms Hotel on the corner of Clarendon and Napier Street from 1874 to 1883. By December of 1883 he had the license of the original Pine Grove Hotel in Upper Beaconsfield. He ran this until February of 1894. Later in his life he worked as a Poulterer and as a Gardener. He seems to have worked hard most of his life.7 
Land-Note*21 Jul 1886 GEM-D-11: Mortgagee: Henry Launcelot Beeson - transferred mortgage to Albert George Major and Welham Harkness McLorinan - discharged 20 Jul 1889. Mortgagor was Hubert Lenné.8 
Land-UBeac*17 May 1887 GEM-D-8. Transfer from Carl August Ferdinand Wilhelm Juckert to Hubert Lenné. 19a 3r 37p.9 
Land-Note*11 Jul 1887 GEM-D-8: Mortgagee: Australian Alliance Assurance Company. Mortgagor was Hubert Lenné.10 
(Witness) Education1889He witnessed the education of Alice Maud Bennet in 1889; attended State School 2560 Upper Beaconsfield - admitted age 5y 3m.11 
(Witness) Educationfr Jan 1889 - Apr 1890Hubert Lenné witnessed the education of George Hubert Bennet fr Jan 1889 - Apr 1890; attended State School 2560 Upper Beaconsfield - admitted age 7y 1m - guardian Hubert Lenne.12 
Land-Note20 Jul 1889 GEM-D-11: Mortgagee: John Fortescue Cockburn Anderson - discharged 11 Feb 1891. Mortgagor was Hubert Lenné.8 
Land-Note11 Feb 1891 GEM-D-11: Mortgagee: Ephraim Lamen Zox. Ephraim Lamen Zox - (not discharged - Lenne transferred the property with the mortgage). Mortgagor was Hubert Lenné.13 
Land-UBeac*13 Mar 1894 GEM-D-11. Transfer from Hubert Lenné to Isabella Sykes. 19a 3r 39p.14 
Widower23 Jul 1905Hubert Lenné became a widower upon the death of his wife Charlotte Elizabeth Downing
Land-UBeac*21 Dec 1907 GEM-D-8. Transfer from Hubert Lenné to Australian Alliance Assurance Company. Mortgagee foreclosed.15 
Marriage*30 Sep 1914 Spouse: Annie Maria Andrews. Bendigo, VIC, Australia, #M6473 - as Herbert LENNE.16
 
Death*14 May 1926 Bendigo, VIC, Australia, #D4080 (Age 82) [par Joseph & Elizabeth LIEBERZ].1 
Village Bell*Feb 1996 WHO WAS LENNE?
Hubert Lenne after whom Lenne Road was named, was born in Cologne, Germany. Migrating to Australia, he selected 75 acres of land at Benalla in 1868, but soon forfeited this selection. The following year he married Charlotte Downing and became a licensed victualler at 181 Clarendon Street Emerald Hill (South Melbourne). Whilst living there they had two children both boys.
On 7th February 1876, Lenne applied for a license to occupy 20 acres of land he had selected in Upper Beaconsfield. Lenne listed his occupation as licensed victualler of Emerald Hill. His request was granted.
The 20 acres he selected was bounded to the south by what was to become Lenne Road. Emerald Road (then called the Main Gembrook Road) was the eastern boundary, and Albers Road defined the northern side, an excellent choice for a hotel.
On 26th July 1881, Lenne applied to purchase the land, which had been surveyed and shown to be 19 acres 3 roods 39 perches. He stated in this application that he had commenced residing on the land on the 1st October 1878, and had built a four roomed weatherboard house.
He had also planted an orchard of three and a half acres, and three acres of crops, obviously a very energetic man. He was given a Grant and purchased his selection.
Lenne must also have planted a grove of pine trees, as The Vagabond (John James), a journalist writing in "The Argus" of 26/11/1885, describes "the pleasant Pinegrove Hotel, (sic) a great stopping place kept by a worthy German settler", and tells of visitors imbibing colonial beer. It was apparently as popular then as it is now.
The Vagabond was staying at Beaconsfield House later called the Beaconsfield Hotel in Salisbury Road, and he states that he could not find a bar there. Although not certain, it would appear that the Pine Grove was our first hotel and Lenne the first hotel keeper. Mrs Somner did later obtain a license for Beaconsfield House and changed the name.17 

Family

Charlotte Elizabeth Downing b. 1840, d. 23 Jul 1905
Children 1.Hubert Clemens Lenné+ b. 31 Oct 1874, d. 1945
 2.Edward George Lenné+ b. 25 Dec 1877, d. 20 Jul 1910

Newspaper-Articles

  • 28 Nov 1883: NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR A PUBLICAN'S LICENSE. I, H. LENNE, of Beaconsfield, do hereby give notice that I desire to obtain and will at the next Licensing Meeting to be holden at Berwick on the seventh day of December, 1883, apply for Certificate authorising the issue of a Publican's License for a house situate on the main Gembrook road six miles from the Berwick and Beaconsfield railway stations, containing six rooms exclusive of those required for the use of the family. Dated the twenty-first day of November 1883. H. LENNE.18
  • 12 Dec 1883: H. Lenne, new license for a house on the Gembrook road. That of A. G. Shorthouse for a wine license was refused as an hotel license had been granted for adjacent premises. Alfred George Shorthouse19
  • 27 Jun 1884: VISITORS TO BEACONSFIELD RANGES GIPPSLAND.
    HUBERT LENNE (founder of the Foresters Arms Clarendon Street, South Melbourne).
    While thanking his numerous friends and customers for their past favors, begs to intimate that he has opened the
    PINE GROVE HOTEL, BEACONSFIELD,
    Whereon their visiting Gippsland be will be glad to receive a continuance of their patronage.
    Good accommodation for families and gentlemen, Wines and spirits of best quality. Good shooting and fishing. Terms per week—Adults 30s; children under twelve, 15s. Distance from Melbourne by rail, 28 miles; from the Beaconsfield railway station, 6 miles.20
  • 10 Dec 1884: BERWICK LICENSING COURT. DECMBER 5, 1884. .... Applications for the renewal of publican's licenses were granted to the following persons:-Robert Bain, Border hotel; Mary A. Kay, Gippsland hotel; Anne Milne, Bush inn; Catherine Bourke, Bourke's hotel; Arthur H. Somner, Beaconsfield hotel; Hubert Lenne, Pine Grove hotel. A billiard table license was granted to Mary A. Kay. Robert Bain, Arthur Hay Somner, Ann Milne21
  • 28 Jan 1885: Publican's Licence: Lenne, H., Beaconsfield22
  • 28 Dec 1892: BOXING DAY AT LENNE'S. The annual Boxing Day picnic at Lenne's is always an enjoyable affair, and Monday last was no exception to the general rule. The present depression has a good deal to answer for, and its effects were evident at the gathering referred to, where the attendance was not nearly so large as we have seen it in former years, though by no means sparse. This picnic in former years always attracted a large contingent of Melbourne friends, but the times are changed—not for the better—and on Monday this festive place was only attended by a couple of hundred people, and the sports were of a very mild description. These who were present however, thoroughly enjoyed themselves, for whet was lacking in one way was made up by Host Lenne, who was kept busy all day looking after the comfort of his guests, while his good lady had prepared a sumptuous dinner, enough for half the country side. A good string band was provided, and there was dancing on green, swings, quoits, American bowling alley, jumping, running, etc, which kept the people animated during the afternoon, while after tea there was singing and dancing. Nor was the singing all German either, for we had "The Marsellaise," sung by a patriotic Frenchman; "John Barleycorn," by an antiquated Englishman; "Annie Laurie," by a jolly Scotchman, who afterwards danced a Scotch reel to "A Bonnie lassie," while a Salvation Army man gave some very good advice in his song "Don't." Of course the lager suffered considerably, and pro bably the host did more singing, dancing and drinking lager than any one else in the crowd. During the afternoon impromptu sports were held in their garden, the lawn being in excellent order. Worthington won the Hop, Step and Jump, clearing 30 feet, with W. Wilson 2nd, and H. Lenne 3rd; Cutting off the Rooster's Head was won by A. Moat; Putting the Stone was won by Hollingham (18ft), W. Wilson second. The snap race caused some amusement. A rope is stretched from two staked driven into the ground, and from this rope are suspended various articles of value from half-a-dozen clay pipes to a bottle of Usher's pure and undefiled. Competitors are given a large pair of shears, are blindfolded at the rope, led back 20 paces, turned round twice and then have to try and discover the rope and make a 'snap' with the shears, and whatever they succeed in cutting off is their property. Each competitor is only allowed one "snap," and must not be led or guided in any way by onlookers. Great fun was caused by the vain attempts of the competitors to reach the coveted whisky and wine bottles, and the lads Jack and Sam Mason eventually succeeded in gaining first and second prizes, and were, also successful in winning both the boys' races; young Sykes, off scratch, being placed both times. Altogether, the pic-nic was a happy, go-as-you-please affair, and the only regret was that there was not a larger attendance to enjoy the amusement instituted by Host Lenne, and the splendid dishes provided by his good wife. It is to be hoped that next year Mr. Lenne will take the matter in hand earlier, provide a good programme of sports and have an open-air promenade garden concert in the evening, when he is sure to be well patronised. Indeed he might be induced to try something of the kind on Easter Monday, which is an off day, and a great day with the German people; and no doubt a large number would come up from the city for the occasion, and a real good time could be enjoyed.23
  • 4 Jan 1893: A petition was received from a number of ratepayers in Upper Beaconsfield protesting against the futher expenditure of money on St Georges road, as proposed by the council.-Cr. Goff argued that the proposed work was necessary, and should be carried out. With regard to the work asked for on the main road from Short house's to Lennie's, it would not benefit Lennie, and was not as important as that on St. Ceorge's road.-The president said that the people had been misled with regard to the proposed deviation of St. George's road through the late Mrs. Lowe's [Lawes'?] property, as it was provided for in the loan and would have to be carried out.-Several letters from ratepayers were read, asking the council to proceed with the work, and Cr. Goff remarked that the writers of these letters represented about £20 per annum rates.-Cr. Gibb said the road was wanted, and those people who would benefit by it were fully entitled to it. The object of the opponents was to keep the traffic their way, no matter what inconvenience they caused others.-Cr. Goff : Yes, they are acting with a dog in the manager spirit. He (Cr. Goff) moved a that the engineer prepare plans and that the Beaconsfield members be empowered to accept tenders for the work that day fortnight ; also for work on road leading to Bittingham's.-Seconded by the president and carried.
    From John Beattie, protesting against proposed road through Mrs. Lowe's land, and asking for improvements to main road from Stony Creek.--Cr. Goff moved and the president seeonded that the Beaconsfield members and the engineer inspect main road to ascertain what work was really necessary.-Carried. Eliza Emily Lawes William Henry Goff, John Beatty, Samuel Charles Brittingham24
  • 16 Jan 1894: HOTEL for DISPOSAL -In the ASSIGNED ESTATE of HUBERT LENNE of the Pine-Grove Hotel, Upper Beaconsfield, Licensed Victualler.-TENDERS are invited up to the 18th instant, by the undersigned, for the Purchase of the Freehold, furniture, and Business of the Pine grove Hotel, Upper Beaconsfield; also, 20 acres Land, Orchard, Stabling, &c.
    Particulars and inventory and all information can be obtained from Mr HAYWARD at Montgomerie's Brewery; or EDWIN PICKERSGILL, 21 Elizabeth-street, the trustees appointed under the assignment.25
  • 8 Feb 1894: SATURDAY, 10th FEBRUARY.
    At 12 o'Clock. On the Premises, PINE GROVE HOTEL, Beaconsfield.
    In the Assigned Estate of Hubert Lenne.
    Harry W. PERRY will sell by auction,
    Household furniture and effects of the above hotel,
    Consisting of
    Dining and bed room furniture
    Bar and kitchen utensils
    Two well bred buggy horses, buggy and harness
    Together with cows, pigs, horses and farm produce
    Also,
    30,000 bricks ready for delivery.
    Without the slightest reserve.
    All particulars of the auctioneer,
    Harry W. Perry, Fink's-buildings, Melbourne.26
  • 17 Jul 1894: WEDNESDAY, JULY 18. At the Rooms. At Twelve O'Clock. By Order of the Mortgagees.
    VALUABLE FREEHOLD PROPERTIES .... FAMILY RESIDENCE ST KILDA. BRICK VILLA SOUTH YARRA. BEECH TREE HOTEL and 57 1/2 Acres TULLAMARINE. ACRES BERWICK. And Interests Under Will and Life Assurance Policy. To Investors, Speculators, Hotelkeepers, Private Buyers, and Others. M'CLURE, VALANTINE, and Co , auctioneers, have received instructions from the mortgagées, to SELL by AUCTION, as above ...
    5 BERWICK.—All that piece of land, containing 19a. 3r. 37p., being Allotment 8, Section D, parish of Gembrook, county of Mornington, contained in Crown grant dated 8th December, 1886, reg. book, vol. 1883, folio 376,560. This block is well situated, and fronts the main road.
    As all the above properties are being sold under instructions from the mortgagees to close accounts, an opportunity is offered of securing a first class investment.
    Terms, Easy, Declared at Sale.27
  • 17 Jul 1894: WEDNESDAY, JULY 18. At the Rooms. At Twelve O'Clock. By Order of the Mortgagees. VALUABLE FREEHOLD PROPERTIES - ACRES BERWICK And Interests Under Will and Life Assurance Policy.
    To Investors, Speculators, Hotelkeepers, Private Buyers, and Others M'CLURE, VALANTINE, and Co , auctioneers, have received instructions from the mortgagées, to SELL by AUCTION, as above,
    BERWICK.—All that piece of land, containing 19a. 3r. 37p., being Allotment 8, Section D, parish of Gembrook, county of Mornington, contained in Crown grant dated 8th December, 1886, reg. book, vol. 1883, folio 376,560. This block is well situated, and fronts the main road.
    As all the above properties are being sold under instructions from the mortgagees to close accounts, an opportunity is offered of securing a first class investment.
    Terms, Easy, Declared at Sale. Australian Alliance Assurance Company28

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D4080 age 82 [par Joseph & Elizabeth]."
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://members.ozemail.com.au/~slenne/Images/…
  3. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "married as Charlotte Downing."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 18 Nov 1874, p1.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1317-222 - Hubert Lenne of Emerald Hill.
  6. [S81] Land Records & Parish Maps ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria). Land File 2005/19.4 - Hubert Lenne, Licensed Victualler Emerald Hill. Selected 75 acres in 1868 at Major Plains Benalla District, and forfeited same voluntarily. Application to purchase 26 Jul 1880 with details of improvements.
  7. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://members.ozemail.com.au/~slenne/
  8. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1317-222.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1883-560 - Carl Juckert to Hubert Lenne of Beaconsfield Hotelkeeper.
  10. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1883-560 - Australian Alliance Assurance Company (John Halfpenny Chairman) - foreclosed 21 Dec 1907 - C/T 3253-482.
  11. [S25] School Records - Beaconsfield North 2560: guardian Hubert Lenne, hotel keeper, previous schooling private.
  12. [S25] School Records - Beaconsfield North 2560: guardian Hubert Lenne, hotel keeper, previous schooling Adelaide.
  13. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1317-222 - transferred to Sykes with mortgage.
  14. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1317-222 - transferred to Isabella Sykes of Haines Street Hotham near Mealbourne Married Woman - with mortgage.
  15. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3253-482 - Australian Alliance Assurance Company (George Shaw, Chairman) of No 402 Collins Street Melbourne.
  16. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D7204 age 70 reg Parkville."
  17. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell Issue 108 - Feb 1996, p14+18 by Charles Wilson.
  18. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 28 Nov 1883, p2.
  19. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 12 Dec 1883, p3.
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Record (Emerald Hill, Vic.), 27 Jun 1884, p6.
  21. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 10 Dec 1884, p3.
  22. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette (Melbourne, Vic.), 28 Jan 1885, p26.
  23. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 28 Dec 1892, p2.
  24. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 4 Jan 1893, p3.
  25. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 16 Jan 1894, p3.
  26. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 8 Feb 1894, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/192192054
  27. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 17 Jul 1894, p2 - further properties outlined in advertisement.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 17 Jul 1894, p2.
Last Edited29 Jan 2021

Charlotte Elizabeth Downing

F, #194, b. 1840, d. 23 Jul 1905
Married NameBennett. 
Married NameLenné. 
Related* George Hubert Bennet Charlotte Lenne is Alice and Hubert's grandmother. 
Related* Alice Maud Bennet Charlotte Lenne is Alice and Hubert's grandmother. 
Birth*1840 Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. 
Marriage*1855 Spouse: Peter Bennet. VIC, Australia, #M2153 - as BENNET.1
 
Widow1862Charlotte Elizabeth Downing became a widow upon the death of her husband Peter Bennet.2 
Marriage*20 Dec 1869 Spouse: Hubert Lenné. VIC, Australia, #M4704.3
 
Death*23 Jul 1905 Adelaide, SA, Australia. 
Death-Notice*24 Jul 1905LENNE.—On the 23rd July, at the Home for Incurables, Charlotte Elizabeth, beloved wife of the late Hubert Lenne, aged 65 years.4 
Death-Notice25 Jul 1905THE FRIENDS of the late Mrs. CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH LENNE are respectfully informed that her remains will be removed from the residence of her Son-in-law (Mr. J. T. Gray), Mary-street, Unley, on TUESDAY, at 3 p.m., for interment in the West-terrace Cemetery.
WILLIAM JARVIS, Undertaker, Telephone 1,332. King William-road, Unley.5 

Family 1

Peter Bennet b. abt 1824, d. 1862
Children 1.George Alexander Bennet+ b. 1856, d. 16 Dec 1937
 2.Charlotte Elizabeth Bennet+ b. 1858, d. 1941
 3.Annie Bennet b. 1860

Family 2

Hubert Lenné b. 24 May 1843, d. 14 May 1926
Children 1.Hubert Clemens Lenné+ b. 31 Oct 1874, d. 1945
 2.Edward George Lenné+ b. 25 Dec 1877, d. 20 Jul 1910

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "no birthplace given."
  2. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes "as BENNETT."
  3. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "married as Charlotte Downing."
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), 24 Jul 1905, p4.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), 25 Jul 1905, p2.
Last Edited8 Feb 2019

Hubert Clemens Lenné

M, #195, b. 31 Oct 1874, d. 1945
Father*Hubert Lenné b. 24 May 1843, d. 14 May 1926
Mother*Charlotte Elizabeth Downing b. 1840, d. 23 Jul 1905
Marriage* Spouse: Edith.1
 
Birth*31 Oct 1874 Emerald Hill, VIC, Australia, #B22613.2 
Birth-Notice*18 Nov 1874LENNE.—On the 31st ult., at the Foresters' Arms Hotel, Emerald hill, the wife of H. Lenne of a son.3 
Education*1884 On attendance register of the first Upper Beaconsfield School. 
Death*1945 New Zealand #D26314 (Age 70.)4,1 

Citations

  1. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B22613."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 18 Nov 1874, p1.
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://members.ozemail.com.au/~slenne/
Last Edited21 Jun 2017

Edward George Lenné

M, #196, b. 25 Dec 1877, d. 20 Jul 1910
Father*Hubert Lenné b. 24 May 1843, d. 14 May 1926
Mother*Charlotte Elizabeth Downing b. 1840, d. 23 Jul 1905
Birth*25 Dec 1877 Emerald Hill, VIC, Australia, #B2338.1 
Education*1884 On attendance register of the first Upper Beaconsfield School. 
Marriage*1909 Spouse: Minnie McCarthy. New Zealand #M1909/463.2
 
Death*20 Jul 1910 Westport, New Zealand, #D1910/7921 (Age 32) as LENNIE Edward G
killed in mining accident.3 
Death-Notice*26 Jul 1910LENNE.—On July 20, 1910, at the Westport Hospital through injuries accidentally received, Edward George, the dearly-beloved husband of Minnie Lenne and only brother of Hubert Lenne, Kiripuka; aged 33 years.
The funeral will leave the residence of deceased's mother-in-law (Mrs. McCarthy), 21, Nelson-street, at 2 p.m. to-morrow (Wednesday) for Wai... Cemetery. Friends please accept this intimation.3 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Feb 1910: Births. LENNE. — On February 10th, at 21, Nelson st, the wife of E. G. Lenne, of Huntly, of a son.4
  • 22 Jul 1910: WESTPORT, July, 21. A miner named Lenne, while working in the Coalbrookdale mine, was struck by a fall of coal and jammed against a tub. His arm was broken, and he received internal injuries. He was conveyed to the hospital, where he died. Lenne came from the Auckland district.5
  • 9 Aug 1910: The Widow and relatives of the late EDWARD LENNE wish to thank all kind friends who sympathised with them in their sudden sad bereavement also for letters, telegrams, cards, floral emblems received.6

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B2338."
  2. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  3. [S336] Newspaper (New Zealand) - New Zealand Herald (Auckland), 26 Jul 1910, p1.
  4. [S336] Newspaper (New Zealand) - Auckland Star (Auckland), 14 Feb 1910, p10.
  5. [S336] Newspaper (New Zealand) - Otago Daily Times (Otago), 22 Jul 1910, p5.
  6. [S336] Newspaper (New Zealand) - Auckland Star (Auckland), 9 Aug 1910, p10.
Last Edited21 Jun 2017

Claus Albers

M, #203, b. 1845, d. 28 Mar 1892

Upper Beaconsfield

The Albers family had Albers Road named after them.
Place in Upper Beac* Albers Road. 
Birth*1845 Hannover, Germany, 1844 • Konigreich, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelMar 1864 To VIC, Australia. Ship Tony. Age 20. 093/001. Listed as merchant, travelling from Hamburg.3
 
Marriage*1875 Spouse: Pauline Johanna Weist. VIC, Australia, #M2405.4
 
Note*22 Jun 1875 Claus Albers (of Narre Warren) witnessed the will of Henry Weist (his brother-in-law.)5 
Land-UBeac*Mar 1877Claus Albers selected land from the Crown. GEM-D-49.53. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p - together with GEM-D-49) - Selected by C ALBERS, crown grant to P ALBERS Adx of C ALBERS on 22 Oct 1897.6,7 
Death*28 Mar 1892 Beaconsfield North, VIC, Australia, #D437 age 47 [par Henry ALBERS & Jessie MELLONS].8 
Inquest29 Mar 1892Inquest held 1892/403, Albers, Claus, Congestion of the lungs.
Inquest by James Gibb J.P. Died from "congestion of lungs, the result of epidemic influenza." Deposition from neighbour Johann Glismann. Dep Const Richard Roberts described Claus as a hardworking sober man. Glismann said Claus never complained about anything. Had never been treated by Dr Elmes.9,10 
Probate (Will)*12 Sep 1892 49/780 & 81/172. Died intestate. Letters of Administration. Property contained an old broomed wattle and daub cottage + old outbuildings.11 
Land-UBeac*22 Oct 1897 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from Claus Albers to Pauline Johanna Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p) - Crown grant issued to P ALBERS Adx of C ALBERS on 22 Oct 1897.12 

Grave

  • Plot 4-378-B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia13

Family

Pauline Johanna Weist b. 1853, d. 16 Jun 1901
Children 1.Anna Pauline Albers+ b. 15 Apr 1876, d. Nov 1960
 2.Henry August Albers+ b. 1883, d. 15 Jan 1956

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Oct 1880: From Mr Albers, as to bridge over Cardinia Creek, at Narree Warren road, which was not passable. Councillor Souter supported the application, but there was no funds. It was resolved that Mr Albers be informed that his request would be attended to when the Council were in funds.14
  • 23 Dec 1885: From C. Abbors [Albers], Beaconsfield, offering to give land adjoining Mr. Slipalias' [Schlipalius'] to make a road on condition the Council fence west side of proposed road.-Postponed for future consideration. Charles Leopold Schlipalius15
  • 3 Aug 1892: I HEREBY APOLOGISE for any statement I may have made to the effect that Annie, daughter of the late Claus Albers, of Beaconsfield, had said to me that she was glad her father was dead, and wished her mother was also. Signed. CATHERINE FLANNAGAN Narre Warren. Anna Pauline Albers16
  • 18 Dec 1901: FRIDAY, 20th DECEMBER, 1901.
    In the matter of Clause Albers deceased.
    Sale by auction of 320 acres of land in the PARISH OF GEMBBOOK. At SCOTT'S HOTEL, MELBOURNE. By order of the Administrators. J T. BROWN & CO., Auctioneers, 430 a Collins street, Melbourne, Seymour, Euros, Wangaratta, and Chiltern, are instructed by The Equity Trustee Company, as Administrators to the Estate of the late Clause Albers, deceased, to sell by public auction at Scot's Hotel, Melbourne, on above date at 3 o'clock.
    All that piece of land, containing 320 acres more or less, being allotments 49 and 53 of section D, in the parish of Gembrook, county of Mornington, more particularly described in Crown Grant vol. 2670 fol. 533807, well fenced and subdivided into 4 paddocks, permanently watered by creek. Comfortable dwelling, outbuild ings, stabling, piggeries, and all convencies for working the property. Good garden and 5 acres orchard in full bearing. The auctioneers direct the attention of buyers to this sale. The property is situated within 6 miles of Berwick Railway Station and is admirably adapted for dairying and fruit growing.
    Title Crown Grant. Terms at Sale.
    For further particulars apply to the auctioneers; Messrs. Rogers & Rogers, solicitors, 408 Collins street, Melbourne; or The Equity Trustee Company Limited, 85 Queens street, Melbourne. Pauline Johanna Weist17

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#D437 age 47 [par Henry & Jessie MELLONS]."
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Sharp Family Tree - BSharp1295.
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), ALBERS     CLAUS     20     MAR     1864     TONY     F     093     001.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M2405."
  5. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 13/427. Henry WEIST Date of grant: 17 Aug 1875; Date of death: 24 Jun 1875; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Dandenong
    VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 20, item 13/427
    VPRS 28/ P0 unit 157, item 13/427
    VPRS 28/ P2 unit 38, item 13/427.
  6. [S81] Land Records & Parish Maps ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria). Land File 4021/19.20.
  7. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Lease 417-356.
  8. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  9. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive ,"in Charles Wilson's notes. Also deposition by daughter Anna."
  10. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 1892/403. Claus ALBERS, Upper Beaconsfield, Influenza.
    VPRS 24/P0000 unit 594, item 1892/403
    Male, Albers, Claus, Congestion of the lungs, Upper Beaconsfield, 1892/403, 29 Mar 1892,.
  11. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0, unit 630; VPRS 28/P2, unit 344
    VPRS 28/P0, unit 1037; VPRS 28/P2, unit 598.
  12. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807 - Pauline Albers of Beaconsfield Widow as Administratrix to the estate and effects of Claus Albers late of Narree Worran deceased.
  13. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-378-B: Albers Claus; M; 47; 30/03/1892; 249 & 4-378-B Albers; F; 48; 18/06/1901; 350.
  14. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 20 Oct 1880, p2.
  15. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 23 Dec 1885, p3.
  16. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 3 Aug 1892, p2.
  17. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 18 Dec 1901, p2.
Last Edited2 Jul 2020

Pauline Johanna Weist

F, #204, b. 1853, d. 16 Jun 1901
Married NameAlbers. 
Land-UBeac* GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from Pauline Johanna Albers to The Equity Trustees Executors + Agency Company Limited. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p.)1 
Birth*1853 Germany July 1852 • Buchwald, Kreis Hirschburg, Schlesien, Germany.2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelNov 1854 To VIC, Australia. Ship Victoria. With parents and brother Heinrich. 027/003 & 004.3
 
Marriage*1875 Spouse: Claus Albers. VIC, Australia, #M2405.4
 
Widow28 Mar 1892Pauline Johanna Weist became a widow upon the death of her husband Claus Albers.5 
Land-UBeac*22 Oct 1897 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from Claus Albers to Pauline Johanna Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p) - Crown grant issued to P ALBERS Adx of C ALBERS on 22 Oct 1897.6 
Death*16 Jun 1901 Langhorne Street, Dandenong, VIC, Australia, #D5395 (Age 48) [par Gottlieb WEIST & Monica KLEINERT].5 
Death-Notice*17 Jun 1901ALBERS.-On the 16th June, at her mother's residence, Langhorne-street, Dandenong, Pauline Albers, relict of the late Claus Albers, aged 48 years.
THE Funeral of PAULINE ALBERS, relict of the late Claus Albers, will leave her mother's residence, Langhorne-street, Dandenong, at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, the 18th inst., for the Berwick cemetery.7 
Probate (Will)*19 Sep 1901 80/118. Died intestate. See Claus ALBERS probate.8 
Land-Note*17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53. Memo No 32839: The Equity Trustees Executors & Agency Company Limited of 85 Queen Street Melbourne is registered proprietor of the within described land as Administrator to whom administration de bonis non of the estate of Claus Albers who died on the 28th March 1892 was granted on the 22 November 1901.9 

Grave

  • Plot 4-378-B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia10

Family

Claus Albers b. 1845, d. 28 Mar 1892
Children 1.Anna Pauline Albers+ b. 15 Apr 1876, d. Nov 1960
 2.Henry August Albers+ b. 1883, d. 15 Jan 1956

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Nov 1897: FRIDAY, 26th NOVEMBER. KIRK'S BAZAAR. SALE of FARM, near BEACONSFIELD. CAMPBELL and SONS are instructed by Mrs. Albers, to sell by auction, at Kirk's Bazaar; on Friday, 26th November, at 12 o'clock, 320 ACRES FARM LAND. Situate in the parish of Gembrook, about 8 miles from Berwick railway station. The property is well watered by three running streams, and is subdivided into 7 paddocks. There are about 40 a under crop and English grass, and about 5 a orchard. The house consists of a comfortable 4-roomed dwelling. The soil consists of block, chocolate and grey, and is well situated for agriculture or grazing. This property is well suited for dairying. Title Crown grant. Terms—One-third cash, balance 6, 12 and 18 months.11
  • 18 Dec 1901: FRIDAY, 20th DECEMBER, 1901.
    In the matter of Clause Albers deceased.
    Sale by auction of 320 acres of land in the PARISH OF GEMBBOOK. At SCOTT'S HOTEL, MELBOURNE. By order of the Administrators. J T. BROWN & CO., Auctioneers, 430 a Collins street, Melbourne, Seymour, Euros, Wangaratta, and Chiltern, are instructed by The Equity Trustee Company, as Administrators to the Estate of the late Clause Albers, deceased, to sell by public auction at Scot's Hotel, Melbourne, on above date at 3 o'clock.
    All that piece of land, containing 320 acres more or less, being allotments 49 and 53 of section D, in the parish of Gembrook, county of Mornington, more particularly described in Crown Grant vol. 2670 fol. 533807, well fenced and subdivided into 4 paddocks, permanently watered by creek. Comfortable dwelling, outbuild ings, stabling, piggeries, and all convencies for working the property. Good garden and 5 acres orchard in full bearing. The auctioneers direct the attention of buyers to this sale. The property is situated within 6 miles of Berwick Railway Station and is admirably adapted for dairying and fruit growing.
    Title Crown Grant. Terms at Sale.
    For further particulars apply to the auctioneers; Messrs. Rogers & Rogers, solicitors, 408 Collins street, Melbourne; or The Equity Trustee Company Limited, 85 Queens street, Melbourne. Claus Albers12

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Sharp Family Tree - BSharp1295.
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), WEIST     GATTLIEB A     NOV     1854     VICTORIA     F     027     003
    WEIST     HEINRICH C     NOV     1854     VICTORIA     F     027     004
    WEIST     MONIKA     A     NOV     1854     VICTORIA     F     027     003
    WEIST     PAULINE     C     NOV     1854     VICTORIA     F     027     004.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M2405."
  5. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807 - Pauline Albers of Beaconsfield Widow as Administratrix to the estate and effects of Claus Albers late of Narree Worran deceased.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 17 Jun 1901, p1.
  8. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0, unit 1022; VPRS 28/P2, unit 589.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807 - Memo No 32839: The Equity Trustees Executors & Agency Company Limited of 85 Queen Street Melbourne is registered proprietor of the within described land as Administrator to whom administration de bonis non of the estate of Claus Albers who died on the 28th March 1892 was granted on the 22 November 1901.
  10. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-378-B: Albers Claus; M; 47; 30/03/1892; 249 & 4-378-B Albers; F; 48; 18/06/1901; 350.
  11. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), 20 Nov 1897, p2.
  12. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 18 Dec 1901, p2.
Last Edited2 Jul 2020

Anna Pauline Albers

F, #205, b. 15 Apr 1876, d. Nov 1960
Father*Claus Albers b. 1845, d. 28 Mar 1892
Mother*Pauline Johanna Weist b. 1853, d. 16 Jun 1901
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Married NameHamilton. 
Birth*15 Apr 1876 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #B10731.1 
Education*1884 On attendance register of the first Upper Beaconsfield School. 
Land-UBeac*17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from The Equity Trustees Executors + Agency Company Limited to Anna Pauline Albers Henry August Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p.)2 
(Mortgagor) Land-Note17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: Arthur Norman McArthur. Discharged 8 July 1907. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.3 
Land-Note3 Oct 1905 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: William Henry Sherrard - discharged 17 Oct 1906. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.4 
Land-Note16 Jul 1907 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 7 Sep 1910. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.5 
Land-Note24 Dec 1907 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 24 Nov 1908. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.5 
Land-Note*24 Nov 1908 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 7 Sep 1910. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.5 
Land-UBeac*23 Sep 1910 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from Anna Pauline Albers to Henry August Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p) - Anna transferred her share to her brother.6 
Marriage*1915 Spouse: Frederick George Hamilton. VIC, Australia, #M10928.7
 
Widow6 Sep 1933Anna Pauline Albers became a widow upon the death of her husband Frederick George Hamilton.8 
Death*Nov 1960 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D32676 (Age 83.)9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1903Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.10
bt 1908 - 1915Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.11,12,13,14,15,16
bt 1919 - 1927254 Riversdale Road, Auburn, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick George Hamilton.17,18,19,20,21
bt 1928 - 1931254 Riversdale Road, Auburn, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick George Hamilton.22,23
bt 1934 - 193628 Arthur Street, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.24,25
193730 McKinley Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.26
bt 1943 - 194934 Garden Street, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Jean Annie Hamilton.27,28
195434 Garden Street, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.29

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, JOSHUA JORDAN LAWN, LAWN/LAWN BEAM, ROW K GRAVE 3130

Family

Frederick George Hamilton b. 14 Dec 1875, d. 6 Sep 1933
Child 1.Jean Annie Hamilton b. 1917, d. Oct 1955

Newspaper-Articles

  • 3 Aug 1892: I HEREBY APOLOGISE for any statement I may have made to the effect that Annie, daughter of the late Claus Albers, of Beaconsfield, had said to me that she was glad her father was dead, and wished her mother was also. Signed. CATHERINE FLANNAGAN Narre Warren. Claus Albers31

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B10731."
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807 - The Equity Trustees Executors + Agency Company Limited to Anna Paulina Albers of Upper Beaconsfield Spinster and August Henry Albers of the same place farmer - tenants in common - C/T 3005-940.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to Arthur Norman McArthur.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to William Henry Sherrard.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to John Innerarity Buchan.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - August Henry Albers of Upper Beaconsfield Farmer - C/T 3447-303.
  7. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#M10928."
  8. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  9. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D32676 age 83."
  10. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  11. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  12. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  13. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  14. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  15. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  16. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  17. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  18. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  19. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  20. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  21. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  22. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  23. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  24. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  25. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  26. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  27. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  28. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  29. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  30. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  31. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 3 Aug 1892, p2.
Last Edited2 Jul 2020

Henry August Albers

M, #206, b. 1883, d. 15 Jan 1956
Father*Claus Albers b. 1845, d. 28 Mar 1892
Mother*Pauline Johanna Weist b. 1853, d. 16 Jun 1901
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Birth*1883 Dandenong, VIC, Australia, #B1878.1 
Education*May 1889 Attended State School 2560 Upper Beaconsfield - admitted age 5y 11m.2 
(Transfer to) Land-UBeac17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from The Equity Trustees Executors + Agency Company Limited to Anna Pauline Albers Henry August Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p.)3 
Land-Note*17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: Arthur Norman McArthur. Discharged 8 July 1907. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.4 
Land-Note3 Oct 1905 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: William Henry Sherrard - discharged 17 Oct 1906. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.5 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelMar 1906 To Bluff via Hobart, New Zealand. Ship Maheno BLUFF VIA HOBART
Also HAMILTON, R, 34
Age 23 - Mr Albers.6 
Marriage*18 Apr 1906 Spouse: Florence Ethel Hamilton. Methodist Church, Christchurch, New Zealand, #M3698 (NZ.)7
 
Marriage-Notice*9 Jun 1906ALBERS-HAMILTON.-On the 18th April, at the Methodist Church, Christchurch, New Zealand, by the Rev. T. N. Griffin, Henry, only son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Claus Albers, of Beaconsfield, to Florence Ethel, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hamilton, late of Lara, Victoria. Geelong papers please copy.8 
Land-Note16 Jul 1907 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 7 Sep 1910. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.9 
Land-Note24 Dec 1907 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 24 Nov 1908. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.9 
Land-Note*24 Nov 1908 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: John Innerarity Buchan - discharged 7 Sep 1910. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.9 
Land-UBeac*23 Sep 1910 GEM-D-49.53. Transfer from Anna Pauline Albers to Henry August Albers. 162a 1r 18p (GEM-D-49) & 157a 2r 22p (GEM-D-53) (320a 0r 0p) - Anna transferred her share to her brother.10 
Land-UBeac*29 May 1922 GEM-D-49.53 (part). Transfer from Henry August Albers to Shire of Berwick. For road.11 
Land-UBeac*5 Feb 1924 GEM-D-49.53 (part). Transfer from Henry August Albers to Robert Albrecht Finger. 1a 2r 7p.12 
Land-UBeac*3 Aug 1939 GEM-D-49.53 (part). Transfer from Henry August Albers to Colonial Mutual Life Assurance. 16a 2r 11p.13 
Land-UBeac*7 May 1948 GEM-D-49.53 (part). Transfer from Henry August Albers to Percy Mansfield Hamilton. 300a 3r 35p.14 
Death*15 Jan 1956 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D840 (Age 72.)15 
Death-Notice*16 Jan 1956ALBERS.—On January 15, Harry, of No. 2 Oak grove, East Malvern, dearly beloved husband of Florence, and loved father of Gertrude (Mrs. Hamilton).
ALBERS. — The Funeral of the late Mr. HARRY ALBERS will leave his residence, No. 2 Oak grove, East Malvern, TOMORROW (Tuesday), after a service commencing at 1.30 p.m., for the Spring Vale Crematorium.16 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1905 - 1908Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer.17,18
bt 1909 - 1928Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Florence Ethel Albers.19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33
bt 1931 - 1937"Belle Vue", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Florence Ethel Albers. With Gertrude Florence Albers.34,35,36,37
bt 1942 - 19492 Oak Grove, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Florence Ethel Albers. With Gertrude Florence Albers.38,39

Grave

  • Dodonaea, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia40

Family

Florence Ethel Hamilton b. 9 Jul 1883, d. 1 Sep 1965
Child 1.Gertrude Florence Albers b. 8 Jul 1910, d. 13 Feb 1967

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Oct 1920: From B. Morris, Upper Beaconsfield, re bad state of roads about Stoney and Cardinia creeks -On motion of Crs Anderson and James, that the council discuss matter with C.R.B., when deputation is in Melbourne, and that Engineer attend to bridge.
    From H. Albers, Beaconsfield, drawing attention to bridge over Stoney creek. Received. . - Basil Moorhouse Morris41
  • 30 Apr 1921: FRUITGROWING ORCHARDING AT BEACONSFIELD.
    ORCHARDS IN THE HILLS.
    Apple trees have the reputation that they will thrive and yield remunerative returns in almost any kind of soil in which they may be planted. This somewhat common belief is not without reasons to justify its acceptance. Yet while the apple tree can be made to yield profitable returns in nearly every part of the State, numerous southern districts provide fruit of distinctive type. When grown in rich flat land the tendency of the tree is often towards great size and enormous cropping propensities; on land of a more clayey nature, and undulating, a harder and usually better keeping type of apple is grown, whilst the main characteristic of the granite country is the remarkably high coloured fruit that commands attention wherever exposed for sale. The Upper Beaconsfield country varies a good deal, for in parts it is not unlike the shaley formation often found about the Diamond Creek. In other parts areas of an easily worked clay formation are met with, but the greater part of the fruit area of the district is of a granitic, sandy nature, which overlies a mellow clay that is fairly retentive of moisture. At the western end of the district the greater number of orchards are set out in granite land, and this certainly is ideally suited to the cultivation of the apple, whilst most other fruits grow fairly well. The altitude of the district is also a factor that must contribute largely to the success of many deciduous kinds of fruit, for the longer period of dormancy allows the trees a greater resting period in which to build up the buds for the succeeding season's crops. If the district does possess disadvantages, the main objection is that of cartage to and from the railway, for six miles of uphill country means slow travelling, and a consequent increased expenditure in cartage and labour. The average orchardist, however, does not consider this disability, provided the orchard trees will yield fruit of high quality; and in sufficient quantities to make the undertaking remunerative. In the more exposed positions orchardists have suffered loss in this season's crops, owing to damage caused by hail, but despite this visitation the season has been by no means unsatisfactory.
    SATISFACTORY YIELDS OBTAINED.
    A moderately large-orchard, containing about ten acres of old trees, and a young plantation owned by Mr. H. Albers, is probably one of the oldest orchards established at the west end of the district. This grower, apart from the careful management of his trees, has devoted a good deal of attention to the grading and packing of his fruit for market. The extra care given to the preparation of the fruit for market has been well repaid by the higher prices obtained for the produce when forwarded to market. Although there are varieties such as the Jonathan, King David, Cox's Orange Pippin, Gravenstein, Rome Beauty, and other apple varieties growing in the orchard, the Jonathan and King David find more favour with the owner of the property. The yield this year has not been an exceptionally heavy one, but it has been thoroughly remunerative. Three trees of King David yielded 39 cases of fruit, this being the only feature of note in a fairly uniform yield of average dimensions. Nevertheless there is a block of well-grown Jonathan trees that has not finished growing that is quite capable of carrying an average yield of ten cases of fruit to the tree, and probably will do so in the ensuing season. Mr. Albers, however, is inclined to prefer the King David variety to that of the Jonathan, for the reason that he finds it hangs better, and in the granitic soil, develops so rich and dark a colour that it is in particular demand. Contrary to the usual order of harvesting, the Jonathan crop is completed before the King David variety is gathered.
    When this last-mentioned variety was introduced some ten or twelve years ago, one of the claims urged in its favour was that it was ready for market about a fortnight before Jonathans were ready for picking. The variety has certainly done better in this orchard than in others where it has been seen, but its early maturity is nowhere noticeable. One other important feature of this orchard is the development shown by different kinds of cherry trees. Here, as in neighbouring orchards, the trees have furnished up particularly well. No doubt the cooler winter tempera tures have had much to do with the growth of the trees compared with those grown nearer to Melbourne. With the gradual disappearance of cherry trees from the orchards about Doncaster, it would not be surprising if the cherry ultimately becomes one of the most profitable fruits to grow in portions of the Upper Beaconsfield district. Their success will, no doubt, be most noticeable when grown on the sandy
    granitic class of country.
    UP-TO-DATE GRADING.
    This season the whole of the apple crop harvested by Mr. Albers has been passed over a grading machine before being packed into cases. The grader, as seen in operation, and reported upon by those in charge of the packing, has been a complete success. The rack over which the fruit passes is of the expanding type, the opening over the bins from which the fruit is packed gradually widens out as the different bins are reached by the fruit. As the conveyor carrying the fruit reaches these points the apples or other produce drop a few inches on to a canvas table and roll down within reach of those engaged im packing. The machine separates the fruit into five grades, including rejects or fruit that is unduly small in size. During an ordinary working day approximately 400 cases of apples can be graded with the machine, though this output is in excess of the requirements of the average orchardist. One important factor in the economy of labour that is directly due to the use of the machine, is that, in place of 80 and 40 cases of fruit that used to be packed in a day when eye grading was carried ot, packers are now able to pack from 70 to 80 cases of fruit a day without extra exertion. This difference in output would of itself amount to a saving of about 5/ a day on each packer employed, but there is the additional advantage of having the fruit far more evenly graded than is the case when ordinary eye-grading is resorted to. When fruit is graded by the machine, the packer gives no attention to the fruit other than that of keeping a watchful eye over the surface of the apples for injury caused either by codlin moth or black spot. Injury from these causes has not been appreciable this season, for although the codlin has been far more prevalent than usual throughout the State, it was found possible to reduce the losses to a minimum by the careful application of three sprayings with arsenate of lead. An advantage possessed by the grading machine in use on this orchard is that, by changing the carrier, it can be adapted to the grading of plums and other fruits.
    IT PAYS TO WRAP.
    Although the packing shed is not a particularly large one, it is well equipped for the needs of the small orchardist. On one side of the room stands the grader, the bins of which may be opened by sliding up a panel, whilst on the other side are a number of bins, each marked with the size of fruit to be placed in them, and each is well lighted by glass windows from the outer wall. Between the machine and the extra packing bins is space sufficient for packers to work either direct from the grader or from the larger fruit receptacles. Thus, during a busy, period, the grader may be fully availed of, and as the bins are filled the fruit may be transferred to the other side of the room so as to provide ample produce for packers to work from either group of graded fruits. Convenient packing stands, designed by Mr. Albers, are also in use, a sketch of which will appear in these columns on a future occasion. The cost of wrapping-paper, like all other orchardists' requirements, has increased considerably of recent years; but, despite this, it is considered highly profitable to wrap each apple in paper before packing it in the case. Mrs. Albers, who is an expert packer, and supervises the grading and casing of large quantities of fruit that leaves for the market, expressed the opinion that it not only pays to wrap fruit for export markets, but also for the requirements of the local trade. Experience gained in this packing-shed suggested that apples wrapped for the local market commanded 1/ a case more than that for warded in an unwrapped condition. Obviously this advantage is contingent on the proper grading of none other than high quality fruit of good colour, for if wrapping-paper was used to cover fruit of inferior quality the attempt at deceit would speedily recoil upon the fortunes of the orchardist. Preference is given to the numerical system of packing, for, apart from the ease with which toe contents of a case may be ascertained, the wrapped fruit, when the case is opened, presents a far more attractive appearance than when any of the square packs are adopted.
    Furthermore, by packing fruit on the interstices of the lower row, in place of directly over one another, the fruit settles down better into position without any risk of bruising the fruit when the padded lid is used to give the case a preliminary shaking before nailing on the lid.
    CITRUS PLANTINGS.
    Throughout the district are numerous young orchards; ranging in age from those just coming into bearing down-to the yearling trees. There are also a number of newcomers to the district, one of whom is Mr. R. Finger, a member of that well known family of Doncaster orchardists. So impressed was he with the possibilities of the district that he disposed of his orchard at Balwyn to purchase a property known as Heathcote, comprising 116 acres of land, 15 acres of wkich is planted with fruit trees. A number of changes are contemplated, and some are being given effect to. An area has been set out with orange seedlings, and has since been budded with lemon buds. In view of Doncaster experience, this grower believes the orange stock will result in the growth of longer-lived trees than if either the lemon or sour orange stock (Seville orange) had been used. Although lemon trees are growing fairly well in this district, further evidence of the value of the orange stock will need to be forthcoming before it can be said that the stock is more suitable than the lemon or sour orange. With liberal top dressings of soil or stable manure good results will probably be obtained. A good deal of useful work has already been done on the orchard, for limbs of Jonathan trees have been cut back and Yates's have been grafted on to provide ample cross pollination, and some grafts of Yates and Democrat, or Tasma, have been inserted into limbs of old Filbasket trees. Both the black spot and the codlin moth have caused heavy losses this season, the fungoid disease doing more damage to the States man variety of apple than to any other. The trees were sprayed twice during the season with arsenate of lead at a strength of 4lb. to 80gal. of water, but without appreciably diminishing the numbers of the moth. Mr. Finger proposes next year to use an imported brand of poison for the spraying of his trees, believing that better results will be secured than have been obtained during the season just closing. Under new management this orchard should improve considerably, and the fact that the new owner is well satisfied with results already obtained indicates his impression of the fruitgrowing possibilities of the district.
    by Penang Robert Albrecht Finger42
  • 12 Mar 1936: FLAMES RISE 60 FEET. Homes Were in Danger.
    UPPER BEACONSFIELD, Wednesday. A roaring inferno of fire, in which flames readied a height of 60ft., confronted fire-fighters at a break between the properties of Mrs. I. S. Norbury and the Rev. T. Howard Smith at Upper Beaconsfield to-day.
    The whole Upper Beaconsfield ridge was ablaze, but, after an exhausting fight, 60 members of the Upper Beaconsfield bush fire brigade saved the properties which were in danger.
    Fanned by a northerly wind, the fire, which had been under control on Tuesday night, broke out afresh this morning, and within a few hours huge clouds of smoke reduced the range of visibility in some parts of the district to 10 yards.
    The properties which were in the greatest danger were those of Mrs. Norbury, Messrs. C. A. Berglund, E. Wintle, H. Albers, and Vickers. Messrs. Wintle and Vickers lost a considerable area of grass, but all the properties were safe late this afternoon. Walter Leonard Vickers John Edwin Wintle, Isabella Frances Norbury, Charles Alexander Berglund43
  • 16 May 1936: Several Fruits Grown in Beaconsfield Upper Orchard. AN ENTERPRISING GROWER
    By "TILLAGE"
    Variety of production is a sound policy in orcharding, as in most other enterprises on the land. No one realises this more than Mr H. Albers, of "Bell View," Beaconsfield Upper. While apple growing is his principal activity, the cultivation of cherries, citrus, peaches, apricots, passion fruit and grapes also receive attention.
    Some of these are grown only on a small scale, but the cherry trees compare favorably with any in the State.
    MR ALBERS has been in the dis trict for about 40 years, and his orchard is in two sections, one of which was planted by his father, the other by himself. There are about 20 acres under fruit, and the balance of the property (100 acres) is devoted to dairying. In its virgin state parts of the land carried messmate, and others grey box.
    The orchard is on rising land, consisting mostly of chocolate loam, to 60 feet deep, and interspersed with gravel. Where the fall is not sufficient to pro vide good natural drainage, agricultural pipes, have been put down, and no trouble is experienced from root rot or other drawbacks associated with an excess of water.
    On the 15 ½ acres devoted to apples are Jonathan, Granny Smith, Delicious, Rome Beauty, Rokewood and Yates varieties. Most apple growers are fully alive to the advantages of cross-fertili sation, but few take the precaution to insert grafts of two other varieties in their Jonathans, as has been done on this property.
    Both the Rokewood and Yates have been used for that purpose, and each is considered to have an equally strong influence upon the fruit setting of the Jonathan.
    The benefits of cross-fertilisation were demonstrated very conclusively in the orchard during a severe infestation of thrips several years ago. Jonathan trees carrying Rokewood grafts, and others close by, produced a good crop, while self-fertilised Jonathans were a failure.
    By the insertion of the double graft and the planting of pollenizers, there has not been a repetition of this trouble. Mr Albers asserts that the grower who hopes to have fruit in a thrips year from Jonathans not cross-fertilised is a super-optimist.
    This, too, he says, applies to other varieties but early-blossoming kinds such as Gravenstein are likely to escape. Jonathans of excellent quality are produced around Beaconsfield, and there is a preponderance of this apple in "Bell View," but the owner has a high regard also for Yates.
    Consistently good yields are its chief virtue. Although thinning out could not be performed during the past season owing to the pressure of other work, the fruit was of a good size, and an average yield of three cases was obtained from 400 trees. Other varieties, apart from Rome Beauty, also yielded well.
    A complete manure furnishes the best results in the district, and the 2:2:1 mix ture (two parts each of super and sul phate of ammonia and one of potash) is applied in spring at the rate of 3lb. to the tree. It is the practice to lime por tion of the orchard every year, about the end of May.
    The material sweetens the soil, and, it is considered, helps to impart color to the apples. The allowance is half a ton to the acre. For cherries almost double that quantity is applied. The lime is broadcast and remains on the surface until the first spring cultivation.
    Black spot usually is controlled with two Bordeaux sprays, one of 6-4-40, and the other at half that strength. Mr Albers shared the experience of most district orchardists last season in connection with the codlin moth, which was more troublesome than for many years.
    Spraying for this pest begins at the calyx stage, and is continued to the end of February. White oil takes the place of arsenate of lead for the two final sprays, to prevent an excess of arsenical residue, and avoid the necessity for wiping the fruit.
    This grower and others have doubts about the quality of arsenate of lead which has been supplied recently. The sight of grubs eating their way through the fruit a couple of days after the lead has been applied, he says, would make anyone question its efficiency. This happened in March.
    He assured me that it was not due to lack of pressure or carelessness in any other direction in the spraying. About 250 lb. to the square inch is employed, and so strong is the pressure that the hose often bursts.
    Mr Albers refers to the cherry crop as "the most payable proposition of the lot," although he has only a couple of acres under this fruit. His varieties are Early Purple Guigne, Burgsdorf Seedling, Early Lyons, Eagle's Seedling, Bed ford Prolific, and St. Margaret.
    That gives a picking season extending over two months, beginning with Early Purple Guigne and Burgsdorf Seedling in the first half of November, and fin ishing with St Margaret at the end of December.
    Some of the cherry trees were planted 25 years ago, and others are 12 years old. They are on Kentish stock. Mazzard Seedling stock produces a larger tree but takes longer to come into bearing, and does not produce so continuously as Kentish.
    For Brown Rot
    The trees leave nothing to be desired in growth and fruitfulness. Burgsdorf Seedling, Eagle's Seedling and Bedford Prolific are the heaviest yielders. Some variation is shown by St. Margaret, but the fruit usually brings good prices. Generally the most profitable varieties are the early and the late. The trees are inter-planted for cross-pollination.
    A complete manure is used for cherries but the proportion of potash is higher than in the case of the apples. The cherry requires less pruning than most fruit trees. For the first five years the object is to shape the tree and secure as many low-branched leaders as pos sible. After that only superfluous limbs are cut off.
    For brown rot the trees are sprayed with Bordeaux mixture in the early part of the season, and this is followed by applications of lime sulphur. Under wet conditions while the fruit is ripening, however, control is found very difficult. Last season the disease did not present itself and a fairly heavy crop was marketed.
    Starlings do not give the same trouble as in many other districts where cherries are grown. The birds are always present during harvesting; but the pickers frighten them off. Mr Albers asserts that cherry growing is more attractive in every respect than apple culture. The former crop, he points out, does not call for so much spraying or such care in the preparation of the fruit for market, although the actual picking is more laborious.
    The cherries are supplied to the Victoria Market in half-cases, and the principal essential, apart from supplying good-quality fruit, is to have the cher ries firmly packed. Consignments leave Beaconsfield by train at 5 p.m., and are sold before daylight the next morning.
    I was agreeably surprised at the vigor and heavy producing qualities of the lemons which figure prominently among the two acres of citrus in the orchard. They are of the Lisbon thornless variety, and were raised on sweet orange stock.
    A special advantage offered by the trees is that the roots are well down below the surface, which allows of fairly liberal and deep cultivation with out injuring them. The use of the im plements is regarded as more necessary for lemons than for other fruits.
    The trees are 12 years old, and carry a crop throughout the greater part of the year. This is attributed largely to the use of stable manure. If sufficient is not available for treating the whole of the grove annually, it is given a heavy application at least every second year.
    In addition sulphate of ammonia is applied in the spring at the rate of 3lb. a tree. One white oil spray a year is found sufficient to deal with black scale. Pruning of lemon trees is limited to the removal of any branches near the ground, or wafer shoots in the centre.
    The 25 apricot trees on "Bell View" comprise the Moorpark and Campbellfield Seedling varieties, both of which give good results. Among the peaches Anzac, Wiggins and High's Early Canada are represented. Anzac, which is an early peach, also is the most consist ent bearer. High's Early Canada has a drawback in that the buds are in clined to drop.
    The area under passion fruit is only small, but the vines do very well, and fruit is available for market at the end of January. Some grape vines, trained up against the wall of an outbuilding, bear heavily. They are of the Black Prince variety, and the bunches are very large.
    Mr Albers has a packing shed, and this is fitted with a grader which takes apples of five sizes, ranging from 2¼ to three inches. It is driven by an oil engine.
    Although dairying is secondary to orcharding, 100 acres are available for the cattle, and the greater part of this area has been sown down with cocks foot and clovers. It is found that Eng lish rye grass does not hold out long on this country, but cocksfoot, once established, provides a lot of feed in con-junction with clovers.
    Some of the land has been top-dressed with highly beneficial results. Up to 16 cows are milked, and cream is supplied to a Melbourne firm.
    Illustration:
    A COSY ORCHARD HOME. The owner, Mr H. Albers, has a liking for trees and shrubs.44

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B1878."
  2. [S25] School Records - Beaconsfield North 2560: father Claus Albers (Gardener) Farmer, no previous schooling.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2670-807 - The Equity Trustees Executors + Agency Company Limited to Anna Paulina Albers of Upper Beaconsfield Spinster and August Henry Albers of the same place farmer - tenants in common - C/T 3005-940.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to Arthur Norman McArthur.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to William Henry Sherrard.
  6. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), https://prov.vic.gov.au/explore-collection/explore-topic/…
  7. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes "NZ BDM #M3698 (NZ)."
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 9 Jun 1906, p60.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to John Innerarity Buchan.
  10. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - August Henry Albers of Upper Beaconsfield Farmer - C/T 3447-303.
  11. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3447-303 - Shire of Berwick - C/T 4625-886.
  12. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3447-303 - Robert Finger of Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist - C/T 4810-805.
  13. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3447-303 - The Colonial Mutual Life Assurance Society Limited of 316 Collins Street Melbourne - C/T 6329-677.
  14. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3447-303 - Percy Mansfield Hamilton of Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist - C/T 7174-751.
  15. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D840 age 72."
  16. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 16 Jan 1956, p9.
  17. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  18. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  19. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  20. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  21. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  22. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  23. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  24. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  25. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  26. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  27. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  28. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  29. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  30. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  31. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  32. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  33. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  34. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931 ""Belle Vue" only mentioned in Gertrude's registration."
  35. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  36. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  37. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  38. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  39. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  40. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  41. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), 14 Oct 1920, p5.
  42. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 30 Apr 1921, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140258293
  43. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 12 Mar 1936, p11.
  44. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), 16 May 1936, p24.
Last Edited17 Oct 2020

Frederick George Hamilton

M, #207, b. 14 Dec 1875, d. 6 Sep 1933
Father*George Hamilton b. 15 Oct 1838, d. 15 Nov 1919
Mother*Ann Rebecca Worland b. 14 Jul 1851, d. 30 Dec 1907
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Birth*14 Dec 1875 Inverleigh, VIC, Australia, #B23550.1,2 
Marriage*1915 Spouse: Anna Pauline Albers. VIC, Australia, #M10928.3
 
Death*6 Sep 1933 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D7345 (Age 57.)4 
Death-Notice*7 Sep 1933HAMILTON—On the 6th September, Frederick George, the dearly beloved husband of Annie Pauline Hamilton, of 48 Cawkwell street, Malvern, and loving father of Jean, aged 57 years.
HAMILTON—On the 6th September, Frederick George, the dearly beloved brother of Herbert, William, Florence (Mrs Albers), Horace (deceased), Edwin, Percy, Stanley, Hilda (Mrs Field), and Frank (deceased), aged 57 years. (Geelong papers please copy.)
HAMILTON.—The Friends of the late FREDERICK GEORGE HAMILTON are informed that his funeral will leave his residence, No. 48 Cawkwell street, Malvern, To-morrow (Friday), at 2 o'clock, for interment in the Necropolis, Springvale, arriving at 2.40.
RAYBOULDS, Funeral Directors, Station street, Malvern.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1919 - 1927254 Riversdale Road, Auburn, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: elec lineman. With Anna Pauline Hamilton.6,7,8,9,10
bt 1928 - 1931254 Riversdale Road, Auburn, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: electrician. With Anna Pauline Hamilton.11,12

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, JOSHUA JORDAN LAWN, LAWN/LAWN BEAM, ROW K GRAVE 3113

Family

Anna Pauline Albers b. 15 Apr 1876, d. Nov 1960
Child 1.Jean Annie Hamilton b. 1917, d. Oct 1955

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S181] Information supplied by Beryl & Stan HAMILTON.
  3. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#M10928."
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 7 Sep 1933, p1.
  6. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  7. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  8. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  9. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  10. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  11. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  12. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  13. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
Last Edited2 Jul 2020

Jean Annie Hamilton

F, #208, b. 1917, d. Oct 1955
Father*Frederick George Hamilton b. 14 Dec 1875, d. 6 Sep 1933
Mother*Anna Pauline Albers b. 15 Apr 1876, d. Nov 1960
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Birth*1917 Malvern East, VIC, Australia, #B22339.1 
Death*Oct 1955 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D12316 (Age 39) - as HAMILTON.2,3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1943 - 194934 Garden Street, South Yarra, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Anna Pauline Hamilton.4,5

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, JOSHUA JORDAN LAWN, LAWN/LAWN BEAM, ROW K GRAVE 316

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D12316 age 39 - as HAMILTON."
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), no death notice found 22 - 25 Oct 1955.
  4. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  5. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  6. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
Last Edited2 Jul 2020

Ann Rebecca Worland

F, #209, b. 14 Jul 1851, d. 30 Dec 1907
Father*Frederick Worland
Mother*Elizabeth Mansfield b. 1830, d. 18 Oct 1891
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Married NameHamilton. 
Birth*14 Jul 1851 Chesterton, Cambridgeshire, England, Sep Q 1851 (Chesterton Union) 14 43. Mother's maiden surname: Mansfield.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJul 1854 To Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Maria Hay. With parents Fred & Elizabeth and sister Elizabeth aged 1
aged 2.3 
Marriage*3 Jun 1874 Spouse: George Hamilton. Leigh Stud Farm, VIC, Australia, #M2141.4
 
Marriage-Notice*4 Jun 1874Hamilton—Worland—At the Leigh Stud Farm, on the 3rd June, by the Rev. Archibald Simpson, Mr George Hamilton, Farmer, to Anne Rebecca, eldest daughter of Mr Frederick Worland, late of Barrabool Hills, formerly of Cambridgeshire, England.5 
Death*30 Dec 1907 Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand, NZ#D1650/1908 (Age 57.)6 
Death-Notice*1 Jan 1908HAMILTON.—On December 30th, at the Christchurch Hospital, Ann Rebecca, beloved wife of George Hamilton, of Yaldhurst, and late of Geelong, Victoria; aged 57 years. So loved, so mourned.7 

Family

George Hamilton b. 15 Oct 1838, d. 15 Nov 1919
Children 1.Frederick George Hamilton+ b. 14 Dec 1875, d. 6 Sep 1933
 2.Alfred Ernest Hamilton b. 12 Apr 1877, d. 30 Sep 1877
 3.Herbert Henry Hamilton+ b. 12 Aug 1878, d. 1956
 4.William Amos Hamilton+ b. 15 Dec 1879, d. 16 Nov 1938
 5.Elizabeth Annie Hamilton b. 30 Oct 1881, d. 1883
 6.Florence Ethel Hamilton+ b. 9 Jul 1883, d. 1 Sep 1965
 7.Horace Gerald Hamilton+ b. 31 Jul 1885, d. 23 Feb 1909
 8.Edwin Cecil Hamilton+ b. 12 May 1887, d. 19 May 1961
 9.Percy Mansfield Hamilton+ b. 1 May 1889, d. 21 Mar 1973
 10.Stanley Hamilton b. 27 Feb 1891, d. 3 Oct 1960
 11.Hilda Grace Hamilton+ b. 31 Aug 1892, d. 21 May 1974
 12.Frank Gordon Hamilton b. 19 Jun 1894, d. 5 Dec 1915
 13.Victor Worland Hamilton b. 31 Oct 1897, d. Mar 1898

Newspaper-Articles

  • 12 Oct 1934: Death of sister-in-law: WORLAND - On the 11th October, 1934, at her residence, "Kinross", Winchelsea, Jessie, the dearly loved wife of George Henry Worland. Dear mother of Colin F., John H., and James A.8
  • 21 Nov 1946: Death of brother: WORLAND. — On November 20, at his home, "Kinross," Winchelsea, George Henry, beloved husband of the late Annie Jessie Worland, and loving father of Colin, John Henry, and James Allen, aged 79 years.9

Citations

  1. [S181] Information supplied by Beryl & Stan HAMILTON.
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Ann Rebecca Worland. Sep Q 1851 (Chesterton Union) 14 43. Mother's maiden surname: Mansfield."
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 10/296.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M2141."
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Thu 4 Jun 1874, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147368959
  6. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  7. [S336] Newspaper (New Zealand) - Press (Canterbury), 1 Jan 1908, p1.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 12 Oct 1934, p1.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 21 Nov 1946, p2.
Last Edited19 Jul 2021

George Hamilton

M, #210, b. 15 Oct 1838, d. 15 Nov 1919
ChartsDescendants of George HAMILTON
Birth*15 Oct 1838 Milnathort, Kinrosshire, Scotland.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel21 Jan 1855 To Portland, VIC, Australia. Ship Derry Castle sailing from Liverpool
- on own accord to Portland with brother David aged 17 ; (his father, mother and four other siblings were on the same ship going on own accord to Warrnambool)
Age 15 - Ag Labourer.3
Marriage*3 Jun 1874 Spouse: Ann Rebecca Worland. Leigh Stud Farm, VIC, Australia, #M2141.4
 
Marriage-Notice*4 Jun 1874Hamilton—Worland—At the Leigh Stud Farm, on the 3rd June, by the Rev. Archibald Simpson, Mr George Hamilton, Farmer, to Anne Rebecca, eldest daughter of Mr Frederick Worland, late of Barrabool Hills, formerly of Cambridgeshire, England.5 
Widower30 Dec 1907George Hamilton became a widower upon the death of his wife Ann Rebecca Worland.6 
Death*15 Nov 1919 Geelong, VIC, Australia, #D17343 age 81 [par David HAMILTON & Helen RENTOUL].7 
Death-Notice*17 Nov 1919HAMILTON.—On the 15th November, 1919, at Geelong, George, the beloved husband of the late Ann Rebecca Hamilton of Inverleigh and Shelford, and loving father of Frederick, Herbert, William, Florence (Mrs. Albers), Edward, Percy Stanley, Hilda, and the late Horace and Frank, aged 81 years.
HAMILTON.— The Friends of the late Mr. GEORGE HAMILTON (of Inverleigh and Shelford) are respectfully informed that his remains will be interred in the Eastern Cemetery. His funeral is appointed to leave the residence of Mr. A Hutchison, 121 Garden Street, East Geelong, this day (Monday), the 17th November, 1919, at 3 p.m.
ALEX. MONRO, Undertaker, 24 Ryrie street. 'Phone 1386.8 
Probate (Will)*20 Dec 1919 168/489. Leaves his estate valued at £113 to his daughter Hilda Grace Hamilton, spinster, Geelong absolutely. See: Hilda Grace Hamilton.9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
30 Mar 1851David HAMILTON - Farm Servant, Campbesmiell, Cambusmichael, Perthshire, ScotlandAge 12 - Scholar10
1914Middle Creek, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Herbert Henry Hamilton and Lilley Agnes Hamilton and Percy Mansfield Hamilton.11
1916Middle Creek, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Herbert Henry Hamilton and Lilley Agnes Hamilton and Hilda Grace Hamilton.12

Grave

  • PRS 5/151, Geelong Eastern Cemetery, Geelong, VIC, Australia13

Family

Ann Rebecca Worland b. 14 Jul 1851, d. 30 Dec 1907
Children 1.Frederick George Hamilton+ b. 14 Dec 1875, d. 6 Sep 1933
 2.Alfred Ernest Hamilton b. 12 Apr 1877, d. 30 Sep 1877
 3.Herbert Henry Hamilton+ b. 12 Aug 1878, d. 1956
 4.William Amos Hamilton+ b. 15 Dec 1879, d. 16 Nov 1938
 5.Elizabeth Annie Hamilton b. 30 Oct 1881, d. 1883
 6.Florence Ethel Hamilton+ b. 9 Jul 1883, d. 1 Sep 1965
 7.Horace Gerald Hamilton+ b. 31 Jul 1885, d. 23 Feb 1909
 8.Edwin Cecil Hamilton+ b. 12 May 1887, d. 19 May 1961
 9.Percy Mansfield Hamilton+ b. 1 May 1889, d. 21 Mar 1973
 10.Stanley Hamilton b. 27 Feb 1891, d. 3 Oct 1960
 11.Hilda Grace Hamilton+ b. 31 Aug 1892, d. 21 May 1974
 12.Frank Gordon Hamilton b. 19 Jun 1894, d. 5 Dec 1915
 13.Victor Worland Hamilton b. 31 Oct 1897, d. Mar 1898

Newspaper-Articles

  • 7 Sep 1876: Death of father: Hamilton.—On 6th September, at his residence, Valley Farm, near Inverleigh, David Hamilton, aged 73 years.
    The funeral will leave on Friday, the 8th instant, at half-past 2, for the Inverleigh Cemetery. iends are respectfully invited.14
  • 14 Jun 1888: Death of mother: Hamilton—On the 11th inst., at Vaila Farm, Inverleigh, Ellen Hamilton, relict of the late David Hamilton, in her 80th year.
    The funeral will leave her late residence for the Inverleigh Cemetery on Thursday, the 14th inst., at 2 o'clock p.m.
    Friends please accept this invitation.15

Citations

  1. [S181] Information supplied by Beryl & Stan HAMILTON.
  2. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1851 Scotland Census. 1/5/14. Born Orwell Parish."
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839-1923
    Euphemia Hamilton, Age 7, arrived 21 Jan 1855 on "Derry Castle."
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#M2141."
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Thu 4 Jun 1874, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147368959
  6. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  7. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#D17343 age 81 [par David HAMILTON & Helen RENTOUL]."
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Mon 17 Nov 1919, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165412575
  9. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 168/489. Hilda Grace Hamilton, spinster, Geelong is executrix.
  10. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1851 Scotland Census. 1/5/14
    Enummerated at Campbesmiell Cambusmichael St Martins Parish
    Household Members: David Hamilton, Healen Hamilton, David Hamilton, George Hamilton, Peter Hamilton, Healen Hamilton, Upkey Hamilton, Ann Hamilton."
  11. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914 "Division of Corangamite, Subdivision of Buangor."
  12. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  13. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.gct.net.au
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Thu 7 Sep 1876, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/150634654
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Thu 14 Jun 1888, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/150305073
Last Edited26 Jun 2021
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.