Frederick Petterson

M, #23075, b. 16 Oct 1838, d. 23 May 1926
Birth*16 Oct 1838 Söderåkra Påboda, Sweden.1 
Marriage*26 Nov 1859 Spouse: Frederika Larsson / Larsdotter. Söderåkra, Kalmar, Sweden.2
 
Widower8 Jul 1925Frederick Petterson became a widower upon the death of his wife Frederika Larsson / Larsdotter.1 
Death*23 May 1926 Kalmar, Sweden.1 

Family

Frederika Larsson / Larsdotter b. 15 Mar 1836, d. 8 Jul 1925
Children 1.Victor Hilarius Petterson+ b. 3 Mar 1864, d. 4 Jun 1942
 2.Oscar Frederick Peterson+ b. 9 Sep 1865, d. 16 Oct 1953

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ipetterson214.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, JennyBath.
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Frederika Larsson / Larsdotter

F, #23076, b. 15 Mar 1836, d. 8 Jul 1925
Married NamePetterson. 
Birth*15 Mar 1836 Söderåkra, Sweden.1 
Marriage*26 Nov 1859 Spouse: Frederick Petterson. Söderåkra, Kalmar, Sweden.2
 
Death*8 Jul 1925 Kalmar, Sweden.1 

Family

Frederick Petterson b. 16 Oct 1838, d. 23 May 1926
Children 1.Victor Hilarius Petterson+ b. 3 Mar 1864, d. 4 Jun 1942
 2.Oscar Frederick Peterson+ b. 9 Sep 1865, d. 16 Oct 1953

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ipetterson214.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, JennyBath.
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Frederick Andrews Mawson

M, #23082, b. Dec 1858, d. 1 May 1916
Father*Henry Ogle Mawson b. 1820, d. Jun 1890
Mother*Emma Andrews b. 1831, d. Sep 1889
Birth*Dec 1858 Bradford, Yorkshire, England, Dec Q [Bradford] 9b 117.1 
Marriage*1893 Spouse: Florence Mary Kellett. VIC, Australia, #M3072/1893.2
 
Land-Note*1899 PAK-52: Francis Edward Stewart. All that piece of land containing 59 acres and 25 perches being Allotment 181 Parish of Pakenham County of Mornington particularly described in Crown Grant Vol 1433 Fol 286408
This land which forms part of a property called "The Wilderness" is vacant and unimproved and is valued at £120
All that piece of land containing 305 acres 3 roods and 15 perches being allotment 52 of Section D Parish of Pakenham County of Mornington particularly described in Crown Grant Vol 619 Fol 123772
This property is known as the "Wilderness" and on it is erected two weatherboard cottages, one containing 5 rooms and the other 4 rooms. There is also an orchard in fair order with man's cottage.
The whole property is at present let at £52 per annum to F. A. Mawson .... Valued at £1004.3 
Death*1 May 1916 Drouin, VIC, Australia, #D5585/1916 (Age 56) [par Henry Ogle MAWSON & Emma Andrews].4 
Death-Notice*5 May 1916MAWSON.—On the 1st May, at residence, Drouin South, F. A., dearly beloved husband of F. M. Mawson, from pneumonia and heart failure, aged 57 years.5 

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  3. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Probate of William Fraser STEPHENS as Mortgagee: VPRS 28/ P0 unit 894, item 70/209 ; VPRS 28/ P2 unit 502, item 70/209 ; VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 285, item 70/209.
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 5 May 1916, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2098841
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Florence Mary Kellett

F, #23083, b. 1869, d. 1 May 1952
Married NameMawson. 
Birth*1869 Collingwood, VIC, Australia. 
Marriage*1893 Spouse: Frederick Andrews Mawson. VIC, Australia, #M3072/1893.1
 
Widow1 May 1916Florence Mary Kellett became a widow upon the death of her husband Frederick Andrews Mawson.2 
Death*1 May 1952 Bairnsdale, VIC, Australia, #D17914/1952 (Age 83) [par Edward KELLETT & Selma WELLS].3 
Death-Notice*3 May 1952MAWSON.—On May 1 (suddenly) at Bairnsdale District Hospital, Florence Mary, loving wife of the late Frederick Andrews, and loving mother of Frederick William and grandmother of Yvonne (deceased) and Valerie, aged 83 years.4 

Citations

  1. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born COLLINGWOOD."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 3 May 1952, p15
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23195791
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Henry Ogle Mawson

M, #23085, b. 1820, d. Jun 1890
Birth*1820 
Marriage*Dec 1849 Spouse: Emma Andrews. Ripon, Yorkshire, England, Dec Q [Ripon] 23 639.1
 
WidowerSep 1889Henry Ogle Mawson became a widower upon the death of his wife Emma Andrews.1 
Death*Jun 1890 Lancaster, Lancashire, England, Jun Q [Lancaster] (Age 70) 8e 465.1 

Family

Emma Andrews b. 1831, d. Sep 1889
Children 1.Richard Ogle Mawson b. 14 Jul 1853, d. 2 Apr 1894
 2.Frederick Andrews Mawson+ b. Dec 1858, d. 1 May 1916

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Emma Andrews

F, #23086, b. 1831, d. Sep 1889
Married NameMawson. 
Birth*1831 
Marriage*Dec 1849 Spouse: Henry Ogle Mawson. Ripon, Yorkshire, England, Dec Q [Ripon] 23 639.1
 
Death*Sep 1889 Bradford, Yorkshire, England, probable death: Sep Q [Bradford] 9b 1 (Age 58.)1 

Family

Henry Ogle Mawson b. 1820, d. Jun 1890
Children 1.Richard Ogle Mawson b. 14 Jul 1853, d. 2 Apr 1894
 2.Frederick Andrews Mawson+ b. Dec 1858, d. 1 May 1916

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
Last Edited29 Jul 2019

Robert Ernest McArthur

M, #23087, b. 30 Oct 1867, d. 29 Aug 1929
Father*Peter Graham McArthur b. 4 Jul 1819, d. 1 Jul 1897
Mother*Margaret McLean b. 15 Sep 1834, d. 23 Mar 1883
Birth*30 Oct 1867 Camperdown, VIC, Australia. 
Marriage*7 Dec 1898 Spouse: Alice Edith Kirkpatrick. St Peter's Church, Mount Victoria, NSW, Australia.
 
Death*29 Aug 1929 Noorat, VIC, Australia. 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Dec 1898, A DISTRICT WEDDING. M'ARTHUR-KIRKPATRICK.
    The marriage of Mr. Ernest M'Arthur, fourth son of the late Mr, Peter M'Arthur, and Miss Edith Kirkpatrick, eldest daughter of Mr. Alfred Kirkpatrick, of "Closeburn," Mount Victoria, New South Wales, took place on Wednesday last at St. Peter's Church, Mount Victoria.
    The bride was given away by her father. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Mr. Heffernan, and the best man Dr. A. Norman M'Arthur. The bridesmaids were Misses Birdie and Kathleen Kirkpatrick, sisters of bride, Miss Currie, and Miss Jean M'Arthur. The bride's dress was of white satin, bodice trimmed with white chiffon and lace, skirt embroidered with true lover's knots, embroidered veil, and coronet of orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of white flowers, and wore a pearl and turquoise shamrock brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. Her going-away dress was of white muslin, black and pink hat. The happy couple drove to Katoomba, on their way to Sydney on Thursday, and left for Melbourne by boat on Saturday. They will at once take up their residence at Warwarick. The three elder bridesmaids wore white muslin dresses and black velvet hats, trimmed with black and white ; the younger bridesmaid wore
    white muslin and white leg-horn hat, trimmed with white chiffon and ribbon, and each carried bouquet a of pink carnations. The bridegroom's presents to bridesmaids were silver heart-shaped brooches. A reception was held afterwards at "Closeburn."
    The wedding cake was home-made, being beautifully made by Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick. Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, mother of bride, wore a handsome black merveilleux dress, black and pink bonnet, and carried a bouquet of pink roses. Mrs. Hooper, green coat and skirt, pink vest, pink and black hat. Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, heliotrope flowered muslin, white and heliotrope hat. Miss Connie Kirkpatrick, pink muslin and white hat. Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, white muslin, purple sash, black and white hat. The following is a list of some of the presents:—Bridegroom to best man, opossum skin rug ; Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, silver salver; Mr. Alfred Kirkpatrick, rug ; Messrs. Ottie and Hedley Kirkpatrick, silver and glass fruit stand; Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick, silver candle sticks; Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, cut glass and silver powder box; Miss Constance Kirkpatrick, silver backed hat brush ; Mr. and Mrs. Hooper, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Quin, cheque ; Miss Quin, silver kettle ; the Misses Quin, case afternoon teaspoons ; Miss Kathleen Kirkpatrick, silver manicure set; Mr. and Mrs. Hunter and Mr. Williams, silver backed brushes and comb ; Miss M. Kirkpatrick, table cloth ; Miss L. Kirkpatrick, frame ; Misses Kirkpatrick, silver bon bon dish and purse ; Mrs. and the Misses Cornish, silver bon bon dish; Miss H. Cornish, worked blotter; Mr. C. Lang, cheque; Miss Scott, worked tea cloth ; Miss Bessie
    Selfe, lace table centre; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Rostron, brass and oak clock ; Mrs. Anthony M'Kenzie, silver teapot, sugar basin and cream jug, and silver egg stand; Mr. and Mrs. Chester Manifold, table lamp ; Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Black, crystal and silver jam dishes and butter dish; Mr. and Mrs. W. Lindsay, silver cake stand and d'oyleys ; Mrs. J. L. Currie, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. C. M'Arthur, cheque ; Mr. and Mrs. L. G. M'Arthur, luncheon basket; Dr. A. Norman M'Arthur, cheque ; Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, silver pin box ; Miss Currie, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Currie, cheques; Mr. and Mrs. Keats, cheque;
    Mrs. Langloh Parker, cheque ; old employees Beemery station, cheque ; Mister W. Lindsay, toast rack and butter dish ; Mr. and, Mrs. K. Rich, silver centre dishes Doulton and silver cake stand ; Mr. and Mrs. M'Cowan, silver photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. Vandaleen, silver tea pot, sugar basin and cream jug ; Miss Wilkinson, case of afternoon tea spoons ; Mr. and Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, cheque; Miss M'Arthur, cheque ; Mr. Walter J. Curle, pair silver butter dishes ; Mr. T. Lennon, Japanese vases.1
  • 17 Dec 1898, WEDDING AT MOUNT VICTORIA.
    A very pretty wedding took place in St. Peter's Church of England on Wednesday afternoon (says the Lithgow Mercury) when Miss Alice Edith Kirkpatrick, eldest daughtor of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick of ''Closeburn," Eltham Park, and late of Beemery station, was united to Mr. Robert Ernest McArthur, fourth son of the late Mr. Peter McArthur, of "Meningoort," Campordown, Victoria, by the Rev. T. J. Heffernan. The church, which was well filled, was very prettily decorated with ferns and ivy, also the porch, in which was hung a large ivy bell. The wedding party arrived in a four-in-hand, and the bride, and parents in a sociable (both suitably decorated), and provided by the Imperial Hotel. On the arrival of the bride and bridegroom, a choir organised for the occasion by Miss Rienits (who also officiated at the organ), sang "The Voice that Breathed O'er Eden," and, during the service, "Deus Miseratur," while at the conclusion Miss Rienits played the "Wedding March."
    The bride, who entered on her father's arm, looked charming, dressed in white satin bodice trimmed with white chiffon, skirt embroidered with true lover's knots, veil, and orange blossom. She wore a pearl and torquoise shamrock brooch and carried a white bouquet, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Misses Birdie and Kathleen Kirkpatrick, sisters of the bride, and Miss Jean McArthur, sister of the bridegroom. They were dressed—the two eldest, in white muslin and black velvet hats trimmed black and white; the younger, in white and hat to match. Bouquets: pink carnations. Their presents from the bridegroom ; silver heart-shapen boxes. Mrs. Kirkpatrick was attired in a superb black silk dress, black bonnet, pink flowers, and carried a bouquet of blush roses. (The bouquets came from Searle's).
    After the ceremony the company adjourned to "Closeburn," where light refreshments were provided. The cake was made entirely by Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick. Those present included the bride's family, together with Mrs. C. McArthur, Mrs. Hooper, and Misses McArthur and Rienits, Dr. McArthur, Rev. T. J. Heffernan and Messrs. Williams aud T. B. Lonon. The health of the bride and bridegroom was proposed by Mr. Kirkpatrick (the father) ; that of the bridesmaids by Dr. McArthur, aud responded to by Rev. T. J. Heffernan. Afterwards, Mr. and Mrs. McArthur left by coach for Katoomba, en route to Sydney, and on to Melbourne by boat on Saturday ; thence straight on to Warwarick, their future home. Tho bride's travelling dress was white muslin and black and white hat.2
  • 30 Aug 1929, DEATH OF MR. R. E. McARTHUR. Well-known Sportsman.
    The death occurred yesterday of Mr. Robert Ernest McArthur, of Camperdown, member of a well-known Western district family and a leading figure in racing and hunting circles.
    Mr. McArthur was born in 1867. His father was Mr. Peter McArthur, of Meningoort, Camperdown, one of the early pioneers of that district. He was educated at Geelong College, where he became captain of the football and cricket teams. He completed his education at Ormond College, Melbourne University, and was articled to Messrs. Highett and McLaughlin, solicitors, of Melbourne. He was a keen huntsman, and became recognised as one of the best and most versatile amateur riders in Australia. In 1897, at the Warrnambool amateur races he rode the winners of three events—a flat race, the hurdle race, and the steeplechase, and repeated the performance in the following year. For many years he was president of the Camperdown Turf Club and master of the Terang District Hunt Club.
    He was in the winning four in the inter-schools race for the Grice shield, when Judge Woinarski was another member of the crew.
    Mr. McArthur also a noted polo player.
    Mr. McArthur leaves a widow and two sons. The funeral will take place at Camperdown to-morrow.3
  • 7 Sep 1929, MR E. McARTHUR DEAD
    Mr Ernest McArthur, of Camperdown. who died on August 29, belonged to a family which has been identified with sport in the Western district for many years.
    The late Mr Peter McArthur established the Meningoort estate in 1839. He had six sons, namely, John, Stewart, Campbell, Earnest, Norman and Leslie. Mr J. N. McArthur, the eldest, died some years ago. He succeeded to the old homestead, and bequeathed it to the eldest remaining brother, Mr Justice Stewart McArthur. Mr J. N. McArthur bred and raced thorough breds extensively, winning the Grand National Hurdle, Australian Hurdle, and Australian Cup with Marmont, a horse of his own breeding. Mr A. Norman McArthur took up the profession of medicine, and is a Collins Street practitioner.
    Noted Rider
    Messrs Ernest and Leslie McArthur became pastoralists on portion of the Koortnong estate, while Mr Campbell McArthur settled on Puunyart estate, originally included in the boundaries of Meningoort. Puunyart is the native name for eel, and Koortnong, the aboriginal expression for black swan.
    In early manhood Mr Ernest McArthur was a noted amateur rider. In 1897 he won three events at Warrnambool, namely, Flying Stakes on Table Talk, Steeplechase on Scout, and Hurdle Race on Soult. Twelve months later he repeated the feat, on Ashton, Clare and Timboon, respectively. On Mr Everard Browne's Trumpeter he captured a Melbourne Hunt Club Cup at Flemington, beating the favorite. Mr Gordan Lyon's Recluse, with Mr Godfrey Watson up. He was honorary starter at Terang for 20 years. Mr Campbell McArthur, now resident in Melbourne, has been judge at Camperdown for 29 years, and officiated at Warrnambool for 12 years. Dr. Norman McArthur held the position of president of the Amateur Boxing and Wrestling Association of Victoria for 17 years.4
  • 7 Sep 1929, MR. ERNEST McARTHUR. LEADING SPORTSMAN DEAD.
    MUCH regret is has been expressed at the passing of Mr. Robert Ernest McArthur, of Camperdown, who died on August 29. Born in 1867 Mr. McArthur was educated at Geelong College, where he became captain of the football and cricket teams. Fair many years he was president of the Camperdown Turf Club and master of the Terang Hunt Club. A member of one of the best known sporting families in the Western district of Victoria, his brothers being Mr. Justice Stewart McArthur, Dr. N. McArthur, Messrs. L. G. and Campbell McArthur, and the late J. N. McArthur, Mr. Ernest McArthur took an active interest in polo, and 20 to 35 years ago was one of the most dashing amateur riders of the day. Among his contemporaries at Warrnambool Amateur Turf Club meetings were Messrs. T. P. Manifold, J. C. Manifold, E. Manifold, J. J. Allan, R. A. Affleck, C. N. McArthur, J. N. McArthur. R. A. D. Hood, George Russell, George J. Officer, J. H. Hindhaugh, C. B. Palmer, C. Tozer, A. J. Staughton, and D. Slattery.
    In his first race at Warrnambool (April, 1891), Ernest McArthur rode J. N. McArthur's Canoona, and was beaten by Apsley, owned and ridden by T. P. Manifold. Two months later Apsley won the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race. In those days a steeplechase figured on the programme of Warrnambool amateur meetings, and at his first start over the fences there Ernest McArthur was second. At the April, 1897, meeting he won a treble. He won the Amateur Hurdle on Soult. His next mount was Scout, on whom he won the Steeplechase, three miles, and he finished the day by taking the half-mile Flying Stakes in a strong field. The same season Mr. McArthur won the Melbourne Hunt Club Steeplechase, three miles, at Flemington, on Trumpeter, defeating the even-money favourite, Recluse (Mr. Godfrey Watson), by half a head. Earlier in the day Mr. McArthur had been second in the Amateur Hurdle Race to Mr. W. C. Knight, with Godfrey Watson on the third horse. The following year (1898) Mr. McArthur again was the principal winning rider at Warrnambool, taking the Trial Stakes on Ashton, Hurdle Race on Timboon, and Steeplechase on Clare. His only other mount that day was on Ashton in the Flying Stakes, which was won by J. N. McArthur on Alva. Probably the best horse Ernest McArthur rode was Marmont, on whom he won the Warrnambool Amateur Turf Club Plate in April, 1901. His only other mount that day was in the Flying Stakes, which be won on Landlady. He continued to ride until about 1910.
    The burial took place at Camperdown Cemetery, the funeral being one of the largest ever seen in the district.
    By Snowden.5

Citations

  1. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Tue 13 Dec 1898, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35714048
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 17 Dec 1898, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article104115122
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 30 Aug 1929, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4033734
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 7 Sep 1929, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224402492
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 7 Sep 1929, p19
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141385068
Last Edited31 Jul 2019

Alfred Kirkpatrick

M, #23088, b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Probate (Will)* 163/947. Alfred KIRKPATRICK Date of grant: 15 May 1919; Date of death: 13 Apr 1919; Occupation: Pastoralist; Residence: Malvern.1 
Birth*1846 
Marriage*2 Dec 1869 Spouse: Mary Theresa Alice Quin. Wilcannia, NSW, Australia.
 
Marriage-Notice*4 Jan 1870KIRKPATRICK—QUIN.—On the 2nd December, at Wilcannia, N.S.W., by the Rev. S. Hamilton, Alfred Kirkpatrick, of Mount Murchison Station, River Darling, N.S.W., to Mary Theresa Alice Quin, of Wilcannia, N.S.W.2 
Death*13 Apr 1919 Malvern, VIC, Australia, #D7772/1919 (Age 73) [par John KIRKPATRICK & Ann ALLOTT].3 
Death-Notice*14 Apr 1919KIRKPATRICK.—On the 13th April, at his residense, 206 Wattletree road, East Malvern, Alfred Kirkpatrick, of Buckaube Station, River Darling, N.S.W., in his 74th year.4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1903 - 1904Buckanbe, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: pastoralist. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick. With Florence Kirkpatrick.5
1913Buckambie, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick, Florence Kirkpatrick, Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.6
191410 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick.7
191510 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.8
191710 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick, Florence Kirkpatrick, Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.9
191910 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.10

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Caulfield South, VIC, Australia11

Family

Mary Theresa Alice Quin b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Children 1.Alice Edith Kirkpatrick b. 1870, d. 22 Sep 1952
 2.Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick b. 7 Mar 1872, d. 6 Aug 1962
 3.Hedley John Kirkpatrick+ b. 12 Nov 1873, d. b 1969
 4.Frances Mabel Kirkpatrick+ b. 29 Mar 1875, d. 20 Oct 1955
 5.Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick3 b. 28 Apr 1878, d. 15 Mar 1969
 6.Florence Kirkpatrick3 b. 1879, d. 27 Jun 1972
 7.Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick3 b. 1882, d. 7 Feb 1966
 8.Kathleen Muriel Kirkpatrick b. 14 Dec 1886, d. 1972

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 May 1919, WILLS AND ESTATES.
    Alfred Kirkpatrick, formerly of Staniland-avenue, Malvern, and late of "Ercildoune," Wattle Tree-road, East Malvern, pastoralist, who died on 13th April, by his will of 26th January, 1915, left £11,054 personalty to his widow and children.12

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 601, item 163/947
    VPRS 28/ P3 unit 918, item 163/947.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Tue 4 Jan 1870, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39196787
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 14 Apr 1919, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1457133
  5. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  6. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  7. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914 "only Mary Theresa has the street number 10."
  8. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  9. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  10. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  11. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials Billion Graves "https://billiongraves.com/grave/Alfred-Kirkpatrick/12231382."
  12. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wed 14 May 1919, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article155203255
Last Edited2 Aug 2019

Mary Theresa Alice Quin

F, #23089, b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Married NameKirkpatrick. 
Birth*1849 
Marriage*2 Dec 1869 Spouse: Alfred Kirkpatrick. Wilcannia, NSW, Australia.
 
Marriage-Notice*4 Jan 1870KIRKPATRICK—QUIN.—On the 2nd December, at Wilcannia, N.S.W., by the Rev. S. Hamilton, Alfred Kirkpatrick, of Mount Murchison Station, River Darling, N.S.W., to Mary Theresa Alice Quin, of Wilcannia, N.S.W.1 
Widow13 Apr 1919Mary Theresa Alice Quin became a widow upon the death of her husband Alfred Kirkpatrick.2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1921 Sailing with Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick to South Africa. Ship Ceramic II sailing from Melbourne.3
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJan 1922 Sailing with Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Themistocles sailing from Cape Town
Age 73 - Mrs M T Kirkpatrick.3 
Death*7 Jul 1941 Vermont, VIC, Australia, #D19809/1941 (Age 94) [par Edward QUIN].4 
Death-Notice*8 Jul 1941KIRKPATRICK.—On July 7 at her residence, Buckanbe, Vermont, Mary Theresa, widow of the late Alfred Kirkpatrick, formerly of Buckanbe Station NSW aged 94 years.5 
Probate (Will)*1941 NSW A32989.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1903 - 1904Buckanbe, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick. With Florence Kirkpatrick.7
1913Buckambie, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick, Florence Kirkpatrick, Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.8
191410 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick.9
191510 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.10
191710 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick, Florence Kirkpatrick, Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.11
1919206 Wattletree Road, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.12
1924206 Wattletree Road, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.13
bt 1924 - 1926Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick, Florence Kirkpatrick, Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.13,14
bt 1927 - 1937Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.15,16,17,18,19,20

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Caulfield South, VIC, Australia21

Family

Alfred Kirkpatrick b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Children 1.Alice Edith Kirkpatrick b. 1870, d. 22 Sep 1952
 2.Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick b. 7 Mar 1872, d. 6 Aug 1962
 3.Hedley John Kirkpatrick+ b. 12 Nov 1873, d. b 1969
 4.Frances Mabel Kirkpatrick+ b. 29 Mar 1875, d. 20 Oct 1955
 5.Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick2 b. 28 Apr 1878, d. 15 Mar 1969
 6.Florence Kirkpatrick2 b. 1879, d. 27 Jun 1972
 7.Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick2 b. 1882, d. 7 Feb 1966
 8.Kathleen Muriel Kirkpatrick b. 14 Dec 1886, d. 1972

Newspaper-Articles

  • 12 Jun 1855, Death of mother: At her residence, 25, King-street East, on the 11th instant, Frances, the wife of Mr. James A. Quin, after a severe illness, in the 32nd year of her age.22
  • 10 Jul 1939, 90th BIRTHDAY
    Mrs. M. T. Kirkpatrick's 90th birthday was celebrated at her home Buckanbe, Vermont, with a family gathering at which she received many telegrams and messages of congratulation.
    Mrs Kirkpatrick has six daughters, five of whom were present at the party. Her two sons are Colonel Hedley Kirkpatrick who has made his home in the Seychelles Islands and Mr Ottie Kirkpatrick whose home is in New South Wales.
    Mrs. Kirkpatrick is wonderfully alert for her years, and has good eyesight and hearing. She takes a keen interest in international affairs, reads many of the latest books, and enjoys discussing them with her friends.
    She and her late husband were pioneer station owners in the outback of New South Wales when Cobb and Co.'s coaches were the only means of transport for passengers and Mrs Kirkpatrick can relate many thrilling episodes of the early days of the colony.23
  • 8 Jul 1941, MRS. M. T. KIRKPATRICK
    Mrs. M. T. Kirkpatrick, 94, of Buchanbe, Vermont, died yesterday. She is survived by 6 daughters, and 2 sons, Mr. O. Kirkpatrick, of Wilgamere Station, NSW, and Colonel Hedley Kirkpatrick, of Seychelles Islands, who is at present at Durban. The funeral will take place at Brighton Cemetery today.24

Citations

  1. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Tue 4 Jan 1870, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39196787
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Chester England."
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 8 Jul 1941, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8190678
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New South Wales, Australia, Index to Deceased Estate Files.
  7. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  8. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  9. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914 "only Mary Theresa has the street number 10."
  10. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  11. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  12. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  13. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  14. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926 "Street addresses not consistent, but appear to be spelling errors: Florence: Jesmondene, Orion Street ; Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Street."
  15. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927 "Addresses not consitent, but appear to be spelling errors: Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Streetdene; Madeline as 'Queen St' (possibly typo)."
  16. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928 "as in 1927."
  17. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931 "as in 1927."
  18. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "as in 1927."
  19. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936 "as in 1927."
  20. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937 "as in 1927."
  21. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials Billion Graves "https://billiongraves.com/grave/Alfred-Kirkpatrick/12231382."
  22. [S14] Newspaper - Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), Tue 12 Jun 1855, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60176475
  23. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 10 Jul 1939, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11241582
  24. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 8 Jul 1941, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8190854
Last Edited21 Jan 2020

Alice Edith Kirkpatrick

F, #23090, b. 1870, d. 22 Sep 1952
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Married NameMcArthur. 
Birth*1870 Glenelg, SA, Australia. 
Marriage*7 Dec 1898 Spouse: Robert Ernest McArthur. St Peter's Church, Mount Victoria, NSW, Australia.
 
Widow29 Aug 1929Alice Edith Kirkpatrick became a widow upon the death of her husband Robert Ernest McArthur
Death*22 Sep 1952 Preston, VIC, Australia, #D11474/1952 (Age 82) [par Alfred KIRKPATRICK & Madeleine Teresa QUINN].1 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Dec 1898, A DISTRICT WEDDING. M'ARTHUR-KIRKPATRICK.
    The marriage of Mr. Ernest M'Arthur, fourth son of the late Mr, Peter M'Arthur, and Miss Edith Kirkpatrick, eldest daughter of Mr. Alfred Kirkpatrick, of "Closeburn," Mount Victoria, New South Wales, took place on Wednesday last at St. Peter's Church, Mount Victoria.
    The bride was given away by her father. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Mr. Heffernan, and the best man Dr. A. Norman M'Arthur. The bridesmaids were Misses Birdie and Kathleen Kirkpatrick, sisters of bride, Miss Currie, and Miss Jean M'Arthur. The bride's dress was of white satin, bodice trimmed with white chiffon and lace, skirt embroidered with true lover's knots, embroidered veil, and coronet of orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of white flowers, and wore a pearl and turquoise shamrock brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. Her going-away dress was of white muslin, black and pink hat. The happy couple drove to Katoomba, on their way to Sydney on Thursday, and left for Melbourne by boat on Saturday. They will at once take up their residence at Warwarick. The three elder bridesmaids wore white muslin dresses and black velvet hats, trimmed with black and white ; the younger bridesmaid wore
    white muslin and white leg-horn hat, trimmed with white chiffon and ribbon, and each carried bouquet a of pink carnations. The bridegroom's presents to bridesmaids were silver heart-shaped brooches. A reception was held afterwards at "Closeburn."
    The wedding cake was home-made, being beautifully made by Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick. Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, mother of bride, wore a handsome black merveilleux dress, black and pink bonnet, and carried a bouquet of pink roses. Mrs. Hooper, green coat and skirt, pink vest, pink and black hat. Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, heliotrope flowered muslin, white and heliotrope hat. Miss Connie Kirkpatrick, pink muslin and white hat. Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, white muslin, purple sash, black and white hat. The following is a list of some of the presents:—Bridegroom to best man, opossum skin rug ; Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, silver salver; Mr. Alfred Kirkpatrick, rug ; Messrs. Ottie and Hedley Kirkpatrick, silver and glass fruit stand; Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick, silver candle sticks; Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, cut glass and silver powder box; Miss Constance Kirkpatrick, silver backed hat brush ; Mr. and Mrs. Hooper, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Quin, cheque ; Miss Quin, silver kettle ; the Misses Quin, case afternoon teaspoons ; Miss Kathleen Kirkpatrick, silver manicure set; Mr. and Mrs. Hunter and Mr. Williams, silver backed brushes and comb ; Miss M. Kirkpatrick, table cloth ; Miss L. Kirkpatrick, frame ; Misses Kirkpatrick, silver bon bon dish and purse ; Mrs. and the Misses Cornish, silver bon bon dish; Miss H. Cornish, worked blotter; Mr. C. Lang, cheque; Miss Scott, worked tea cloth ; Miss Bessie
    Selfe, lace table centre; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Rostron, brass and oak clock ; Mrs. Anthony M'Kenzie, silver teapot, sugar basin and cream jug, and silver egg stand; Mr. and Mrs. Chester Manifold, table lamp ; Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Black, crystal and silver jam dishes and butter dish; Mr. and Mrs. W. Lindsay, silver cake stand and d'oyleys ; Mrs. J. L. Currie, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. C. M'Arthur, cheque ; Mr. and Mrs. L. G. M'Arthur, luncheon basket; Dr. A. Norman M'Arthur, cheque ; Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, silver pin box ; Miss Currie, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Currie, cheques; Mr. and Mrs. Keats, cheque;
    Mrs. Langloh Parker, cheque ; old employees Beemery station, cheque ; Mister W. Lindsay, toast rack and butter dish ; Mr. and, Mrs. K. Rich, silver centre dishes Doulton and silver cake stand ; Mr. and Mrs. M'Cowan, silver photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. Vandaleen, silver tea pot, sugar basin and cream jug ; Miss Wilkinson, case of afternoon tea spoons ; Mr. and Mrs. Stewart M'Arthur, cheque; Miss M'Arthur, cheque ; Mr. Walter J. Curle, pair silver butter dishes ; Mr. T. Lennon, Japanese vases.2
  • 17 Dec 1898, WEDDING AT MOUNT VICTORIA.
    A very pretty wedding took place in St. Peter's Church of England on Wednesday afternoon (says the Lithgow Mercury) when Miss Alice Edith Kirkpatrick, eldest daughtor of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick of ''Closeburn," Eltham Park, and late of Beemery station, was united to Mr. Robert Ernest McArthur, fourth son of the late Mr. Peter McArthur, of "Meningoort," Campordown, Victoria, by the Rev. T. J. Heffernan. The church, which was well filled, was very prettily decorated with ferns and ivy, also the porch, in which was hung a large ivy bell. The wedding party arrived in a four-in-hand, and the bride, and parents in a sociable (both suitably decorated), and provided by the Imperial Hotel. On the arrival of the bride and bridegroom, a choir organised for the occasion by Miss Rienits (who also officiated at the organ), sang "The Voice that Breathed O'er Eden," and, during the service, "Deus Miseratur," while at the conclusion Miss Rienits played the "Wedding March."
    The bride, who entered on her father's arm, looked charming, dressed in white satin bodice trimmed with white chiffon, skirt embroidered with true lover's knots, veil, and orange blossom. She wore a pearl and torquoise shamrock brooch and carried a white bouquet, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Misses Birdie and Kathleen Kirkpatrick, sisters of the bride, and Miss Jean McArthur, sister of the bridegroom. They were dressed—the two eldest, in white muslin and black velvet hats trimmed black and white; the younger, in white and hat to match. Bouquets: pink carnations. Their presents from the bridegroom ; silver heart-shapen boxes. Mrs. Kirkpatrick was attired in a superb black silk dress, black bonnet, pink flowers, and carried a bouquet of blush roses. (The bouquets came from Searle's).
    After the ceremony the company adjourned to "Closeburn," where light refreshments were provided. The cake was made entirely by Miss Birdie Kirkpatrick. Those present included the bride's family, together with Mrs. C. McArthur, Mrs. Hooper, and Misses McArthur and Rienits, Dr. McArthur, Rev. T. J. Heffernan and Messrs. Williams aud T. B. Lonon. The health of the bride and bridegroom was proposed by Mr. Kirkpatrick (the father) ; that of the bridesmaids by Dr. McArthur, aud responded to by Rev. T. J. Heffernan. Afterwards, Mr. and Mrs. McArthur left by coach for Katoomba, en route to Sydney, and on to Melbourne by boat on Saturday ; thence straight on to Warwarick, their future home. Tho bride's travelling dress was white muslin and black and white hat.3
  • 26 Sep 1952, MRS. A. E. McARTHUR
    THE death occurred in Melbourne, on September 22, of Mrs Alice Edith McArthur, widow of Mr. R. E. McArthur, at the age of 82 years.
    Born at Beemery Station, Bourke. N.S.W.. in 1870. the late Mrs. McArthur was the oldest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. A. Kirkpatrick, and was one of a family of eight.
    The late Mrs. McArthur married in 1898 and lived at Koort Koortnong, Camperdown, with her husband. In 1928 they left to reside at Princetown, where Mr. McArthur died in 1929.
    The late Mrs. McArthur was a life member of Camperdown Turf Club and Terang Racing Club and was secretary of Camperdown Red Cross Society during the first World War. She also acted as secretary of Camperdown Associates' Golf.
    Following the death of her husband in 1929 the late Mrs. McArthur remained at Princetown until seven years ago, when she left for Melbourne. She leaves two sons, Mr. R. K. McArthur, Murrnong, Albury, N.S.W.. and Mr C. E. McArthur, Buchan, Gippsland. She was an aunt of Mr. G. S. McArthur, M.L.C., of "Meningoort, and Mr. M. McArthur, of Camperdown. The funeral, which was of a private nature, took place to the Camperdown cemetery on Wednesday. The service was conducted by the Rev. D Dronnan. Mr. J. Louroy was the funeral director.4

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Glenelg SA."
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Tue 13 Dec 1898, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35714048
  3. [S14] Newspaper - Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 17 Dec 1898, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article104115122
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Fri 26 Sep 1952, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24004602
Last Edited31 Jul 2019

Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick1

F, #23091, b. 28 Apr 1878, d. 15 Mar 1969
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick1 b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin1 b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Probate (Will)* 690/911. Madeline T KIRKPATRICK Date of grant: 08 Aug 1969; Date of death: 15 Mar 1969; Occupation: Spinster; Residence: Vermont.2 
Birth*28 Apr 1878 Brighton, SA, Australia, #B 200/262 Adelaide.3 
Birth-Notice*4 May 1878KIRKPATRICK.—On the 28th April, at Dunrobin, Brighton, Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, of a daughter.4 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelApr 1914. Ship Malwa sailing from Melbourne
Possible? Age 27 - Miss Kirkpatrick [note: she does not disembark in England, so may have gone to Egypt, also too young?].5 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel20 Feb 1915 To Sydney, NSW, Australia. Ship Afric sailing from Liverpool to Cape & Australia
Age 35 - Hospital Nurse (Miss Madeline Kirkpatrick.) 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1921 Sailing with Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick to South Africa. Ship Ceramic II sailing from Melbourne.5
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJan 1922 Sailing with Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Themistocles sailing from Cape Town
Age 42 - Miss M T Kirkpatrick.5 
Death*15 Mar 1969 Vermont, VIC, Australia, #D5647/1969 (Age 91.)1 
Death-Notice17 Mar 1969KIRKPATRICK. Madeline Theresa (Birdie).—92 years at 10 Orion Street, Vermont, March 15th, loving sister of Florence and Mrs K. Perkins, and the deceased Ottie, Edith, Hedley, Mable and Connie.6 
Death-Notice*19 Mar 1969KIRKPATRICK. Madeline Theresa. A service in memory of the late Miss BIRDIE KIRKPATRICK will be held at St. Luke's Church of England, Vermont, on SATURDAY (March 22nd), at 11 a.m. no flowers, by request.7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1912 - 191485 Rose Street, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nurse. With Kathleen Muriel Kirkpatrick.8,9,10
1913Buckambie, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: nurse. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.9
191710 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nurse. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.11
1919206 Wattletree Road, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nurse. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick.12
1924206 Wattletree Road, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nurse. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick.13
bt 1924 - 1926Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.13,14
bt 1927 - 1937Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.15,16,17,18,19,20
bt 1949 - 195420 Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick.21,22
196310 Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.23

Grave

  • FA-COE*T***7442 (Public Grave), Fawkner Cemetery, Fawkner, VIC, Australia24

Newspaper-Articles

  • 25 Feb 1915, "SISTER AUSTRALIA" WORKS AS SHELLS ARE FALLING
    Sister Madeline Kirkpatrick, formerly of Dr W. H. Brown's Hospital, Colac, writes to her father, Mr Alfred Kirkpatrick. of Buckanbe Station, New South Wales, now living in Malvern, from the Field Hospital, Dunkirk, where she is nursing the wounded. She describes her experiences in tending the French wounded, while shells were bursting all round the hospital. Her patients and the staff call her "Sister Australia."
    She is a sister of Lieutenant-Colonel Headlcy Kirkpatrick, D.S.O., in command of the Second South African Regiment, now fighting in German South Africa. In the Boer war he was several times mentioned in despatches, and received his D.S.O. for work done while serving in Colonel Allenby's Scouts. The family is related to the Empress Eugenie.25
  • 26 Feb 1915, GERMAN TAUBES. Bomb-Dropping in Dunkirk.
    Nurse Kirkpatrick, daughter of Mr A. Kirkpatrick of Malvern, who has been in the Red Cross Hospital at Dunkirk, in France, writing to her home, says "Dunkirk seems so sad and different from England—full of soldiers and ambulances all over the place: aeroplances flying backwards and forwards; gunboats passing north to bombard Osstend and Nieuport; nothing but war. There was great excitement one day lately. It was a glorious day. I was in the town, being off duty, and had been sent shopping, when suddenly a man yelled out 'A Taube, a Taube' and two were calmly flying overhead. I gazed at them fascinated, when crash came a bomb, then the cannons roared, and thousands of rifle shots and every now and again a bomb. It was most uncanny to feel that perhaps one's last hour had come. The Taubes dropped 16 bombs, and took no more notice of the shooting than of so many dogs barking. They must have wasted thousands of bullets. I expected my head to be blown off any minute. I asked a Belgian officer where were the English and French aeroplanes, and he said, "Ah, that's what I'd like to know. In two hours time they will awake and will chase them," and sure enough in two hours I saw two aeroplanes but the Taubes had departed. They killed 15 people that day, six soldiers and the rest women and children, I was lucky to escape. Their calm audacity amazed me, just floating along droping bombs while we stood gazing at them. They flew quite low enough to distinguish without doubt that they were Taubes. The people were wild with fright, women and children screaming. They said a spy had signalled to the Germans that the coast was clear. They found him, a French signalman, a traitor. I think that is the worst thing of all. He was shot at once. Wing Commander Samson, who dropped all those bombs over German airsheds landed from his airship right in front of our hospital at Dunkirk. There were three little bonfires lighted on the bench to show him the way, and he came in in the pitch dark. The sentry said he had done a wonderful thing crossing in the dark and dropping eight bombs."26

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P4 unit 67, item 690/911
    VPRS 28/ P5 unit 464, item 690/911.
  3. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Sat 4 May 1878, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article159441632
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  6. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 17 Mar 1969, p18.
  7. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 19 Mar 1969, p27.
  8. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  9. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  10. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  11. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  12. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  13. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  14. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926 "Street addresses not consistent, but appear to be spelling errors: Florence: Jesmondene, Orion Street ; Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Street."
  15. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927 "Addresses not consitent, but appear to be spelling errors: Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Streetdene; Madeline as 'Queen St' (possibly typo)."
  16. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928 "as in 1927."
  17. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931 "as in 1927."
  18. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "as in 1927."
  19. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936 "as in 1927."
  20. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937 "as in 1927."
  21. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949 "Alfred as 20 Orion Street; Madeline as Queen Street."
  22. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954 "Alfred as 20 Orion Street; Madeline as Queen Street."
  23. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963.
  24. [S39] Index of burials in the cemetery of Fawkner Memorial Park, online @ http://www.gmct.com.au/deceased-search/.
  25. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 25 Feb 1915, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242270038
  26. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 26 Feb 1915, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1499060
Last Edited21 Jan 2020

Florence Kirkpatrick1

F, #23092, b. 1879, d. 27 Jun 1972
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick1 b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin1 b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Probate (Will)* 745/693. Florence KIRKPATRICK Date of grant: 22 Nov 1972; Date of death: 27 Jun 1972; Occupation: Spinster; Residence: Kilsyth.2 
Birth*1879 Wilcannia, NSW, Australia, #B17167/1879.3 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelNov 1916 Sailing with Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick. Ship Arabia sailing from Sydney via Fremantle - torpedoed.
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJul 1919 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Orsova sailing from France to Victoria.4
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelFeb 1922 To London, England. Ship Themistocles sailing from Melbourne
Miss F Kirkpatrick - arrival 3 Apr 1922 - c/- NZLM Agency, 1 Coleman St E.C.5 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel24 Jul 1922 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Ceramic sailing from England 16 Jun 1922
Age 39 - occupation none.6,7 
Land-Berwick*3 Jun 1927 BER-33 (part). Transfer from Ciril Nelson Davy to Florence Kirkpatrick. 104a, House.8 
Land-Berwick*5 Feb 1937 BER-33 (part). Transfer from Florence Kirkpatrick to Robert Gordon Douglas Mary Beatrice Douglas. 104a.9 
Death*27 Jun 1972 Mount Evelyn, VIC, Australia, #D14595/1972 (Age 93) [par Alfred KIRKPATRICK & Madeline].10,11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1903 - 1904Buckanbe, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick.12
1913Buckambie, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.13
191510 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.14
191710 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.15
191910 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.16
1924206 Wattletree Road, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.17
bt 1924 - 1926Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick.17,18
bt 1928 - 1931Mootanara, Off Clyde Road, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier.19,20
1934Woodtarn, Pt Nepean Road, Seaford, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties (possible match).21
bt 1943 - 1949Hobart Street, Ringwood, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.22,23
bt 1954 - 1963Mt Dandenong Road, Kilsyth, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.24,25

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 Jan 1917, THE ARABIA. HOW SHE WAS SUNK. MELBOURNE GIRL'S EXPERIENCE
    Amongst the passengers on the P. and O. liner Arabia when she was torpedoed in the Mediterraanean, on November 6, were the Misses Constance and Florence Kirkpatrick, of Melbourne, who were on their way to England to do war work. In a letter to her mother, written from Malta, Miss Constance Kirkpatrick gives a graphic account of the occurrence. She says:—"It was all very terrible, but really everyone behaved simply wonderfully. Not the slightest panic. She was torpedoed in the calmest of seas, and did not sink for 1½ hours. In no time there were three armed trawlers and a tramp steemer on the scene, and we were all picked up. I was down in my cabin at the time, with my life waistcoat up on deck. The water was pouring down the hatchway at our door, and I thought the first thing to do was to go up and get the waistcoat. Once on deck we none of us liked to risk going back. There was heaps of time, really, but it was not worth while risking one's life for mere money and clothes. So we came off in what we stood up in, which was not much. Florence had no hat on, and no coat, just her brown pinafore dress and silk blouse. I was more fortunate, and had my sweater, but only a vest and grey skirt and hat. I lost my dear little watch."
    GETTING OFF THE BOATS.
    "We had all been told which boat to go in, but in the explosion two boats were smasheld up. One upset when lowered and one smashed, and therefore our boats were full before the turn of Florence and myself came. They got the children and women on first of course. Mr Broome, of our party, deserved the V.C. for the way he helped. By the time I got up the companion way through the awful crush, and found my waistcoat, the chances of getting down the gangway to the other deck where my boat was were small, the crowd. was so great. But Mr Broome came along and helped me from one deck to the other across the tarpaulin. In fact, he helped everybody, and then took photographs as the boats went off.
    "A message came to us to go to the other side to get a boat, so off we went—to find that it had gone. Back again to our own boat, to see if it could take us, and it had gone! There did not seem to be another boat, and we were the only two women left. The doctor was just telling us not to be afraid to jump into the water when she began to sink, but to get on to a raft or float about till a boat picked us up, when we were told to hurry, as there was just room for three more in a boat that was just going. So we slid down a rope into her, and were off."
    THE CATASTROPHE.
    'The explosion was not so great as I had thought it would have been, but I knew at once what had happened. I seemed to be shot up in the air, and then a crash and noise and the steamer kind of shuddered. The engines thumped, thumped, and then stopped. Somehow I did not feel afraid all the time once I found Florence.
    THE SUBMARINE COMES UP.
    "But I will admit that I felt sick as we rowed away from the little old Arabia—boat loads and rafts full all round, and then, hardly 100 yards away, up came the periscope of the submarine. Then down it went and up again three times. I quite thought they would send a torpedo into us, and we seemed to be quite at their mercy ; but by this time all the trawlers (they have guns) were up to us and she vanished. They say that had the trawlers not been there the submarine would probably have come up and fired on us but that she was afraid of the trawlers.
    ON THE TRAWLER
    "Over our two days and nights on the trawler we might draw a veil. We ran into a storm, and talk about rough! The dear little craft tossed up and down like a cork. Really, they were kind to us, just did all they could to help us; but of course there was no accommodation, and we all had to lie packed like sardines, just everywhere and we shipped seas the whole night and it teemed with rain. The poor little babies and their mothers !—it was pitiful. We cuddled and huddled up to each other all night, regardless of the fact that we had never seen each other before. Really, we all nearly had hysterics before the night was over. We would be wet, and then the heat of each other would warm us up, and we would be as if in a steam bath. All next day the sea raged, but the sun came out and it was warm. Florence and I were about the only two not sick. We sat on the top of the engine room and surveyed the scene below, and, really, we laughed. Altogether we got some fun out of life. Some sat on the edge in abject misery, looking as if they would like to go over and be done with it. It was not a bit safe to walk along, as there is no rail on these trawlers, and one is almost level with the sea, and the funnels at times seemed to dip nearly into the water. But I went along a good many times to help one or two with babies and give them their milk. Every time I went I had to be passed along by each sea-sick form protracted on the deck, and a Mr Thompon said at last, 'I wish you would not be so beastly cheerful when we are all feeling so ill.' Everyone was so cold and wet.
    The second mate complimented Florence and myself on being such good sailors. He said we were wonderful; so many of the sea-faring men were ill. The officers and stewards of the Arabia just looked pictures of misery. They fed us on bread and butter and ship's biscuit (otherwise dog), and one a dinner of corned beef, haricot beans, and potatoes, which I thought the lowliest thing I'd tasted. I could have eaten tons of it. They brought around tea in flat enamel basins, and we all took sips and passed it along.
    "But it was the saddest thing to see the dear old Arabia going down. We were only 100 yards away when she began to sink, and it as all over in a minute or two. Some people just cried.
    AT MALTA.
    "We got in here at half-past 1 on Thursday morning, and were put straight on a hospital ship, where they were most awfully good to us. We all ached from hard boards and want of sleep. Next day we were sent to this hotel in Malta by the P. and O.
    NO PANIC.
    Miss Florence Kirkpatrick says: "We were not given a moment's warning. I was in the dining-room talking, when suddenly there was a terrific crash and then a loud report as of our gun going off. I grabbed up my lifebelt and put it on as I ran upstairs to look for Connie. There was a bit of a scramble in the music saloon as I ran through, but otherwise everyone was awfully calm, and there was no panic whatever. Some of the men were bricks, really, and so good thinking of the women and children. Really I think it was wonderful the way people behaved. When in the boats we sang and waved to each other. It was sad to see the poor old Arabia stand on end and then go with a rush and disappear, and all our earthly belongings with her. I was fortunate, as I did have some of my money. We did not even have on any of our nice things."
    BEFORE THE DISASTER.
    In a letter Miss Constance Kirkpatrick refers to Mrs Miller, of Melbourne who was also on the Arabia. On the morning of the disaster she went to see Mrs Miller. She did not take her lifebelt, and Mrs Miller sent her back for it. They then talked about the chances of being sunk, and about a quarter of an hour later the torpedo struck the Arabia.
    When the last letter was written the Misses Kirkpatrick were still at Malta waiting to be sent to England via Marseilles.
    [The Misses Kirkpatrick are sisters of Mrs R. E. M'Arthur of Koort Koortnong.—Ed. "Chronicle."]26
  • 20 Jan 1917, THE ARABIA. HOW SHE WAS SUNK. RESCUE BY TRAWLERS. BOURKE GIRLS' EXPERIENCE.
    Amongst the passengers on the P. and O. liner Arabia when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean, on November 6, were the Misses Constance and Florence Kirkpatrick, of Melbourne, and late of Bourke, who were on their way to England to do munition work.
    The Misses Kirkpatrick are the daughters of A. Kirkpatrick Esq., late of Bourke and Beemery, and owner of Buckanbe, below Tilpa, and are well known here. Both of their brothers are soldiers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hedley Kirkpatrick enlisted as a private in the Boer war, fought through to the finish,
    married a Boer girl, and remained in South Africa, where he has done great work, both against the rebels and the Germans. He met Driver Keith Robertson and Gunner Stuart Hales at Durban when they landed at that place a few days ago, and gave them a good time.
    The elder brother, who is well-known throughout this district as ' Ottie' Kirkpatrick, was manager of Buckanbe until he enlisted last year. He is now either in England or France. All of his dunnage was on the Arabia at the time she went down, but he had gone by another boat.
    In a letter to her mother, written from Malta, Miss Constance Kirkpatrick gives a graphic account of the sinking of the vessel. She says : — "It was all very terrible, but really everyone behaved simply wonderfully. Not the slightest panic. She was torpedoed in the calmest of seas, and did not sink for one and a half hours. In no time there were three armed trawlers and a tramp steamer on the scene, and we were all picked up. I was down in my cabin at the time, with my life waistcoat up on deck. The water was pouring down the hatchway at our door, and I thought the first thing to do was to go up and get the waistcoat. Once on deck we none of us liked to risk going back. There was heaps of time really, but it was not worth risking one's life for mere money and clothes. So we came off in what we stood up in, which was not much. Florence had no hat on and no coat, just her brown pinafore dress and silk blouse. I was more fortunate and had my sweater, but only a vest and grey skirt and hat. I lost my dear little watch."
    GETTING OFF THE BOATS.
    "We had all been told which boats to go in, but in the explosion two boats were smashed up. One upset when lowered, and one was smashed, and therefore our boat was full before the turn of Florence and myself came. They got the women and children on first, of course. Mr. Broome, of our party, deserved the V. C. for the way he helped. By the time I got up the companion way through the awful crush, and found my waistcoat, the chances of getting down the gangway to the other deck where my boat was were small, the crowd was so great. But Mr. Broome came along, and helped me from one deck to the other across the tarpaulin. In fact, he helped everybody, and then took photographs as the boats went off.
    "A message came to us to go to the other side to get a boat, so off we went — to find that it Had gone. Back again to our own boat, to see if they could take us, and it had gone ! There did not seem to be another boat, and we were the only two women left. The doctor was just telling us not to be afraid to jump into the water when she began to sink,
    but to get on a raft or float about till a boat picked us up, when we were told to hurry, as there was just room for three more in a boat just going. So we slid down a rope into her, and were off.
    THE CATASTROPHE.
    "The explosion was not so great as I had thought it would have been, but I knew at once what had happened. I seemed to be shot up in the air, and then a crash aud noise, and the steamer kind of shuddered. The engines thumped, thumped, and then stopped. Somehow, I did not feel afraid all the time once I found Florence.
    THE SUBMARINE COMES UP.
    "But I will admit that I felt sick as we rowed away from the little old Arabia — boatloads and rafts full up all round, and then, hardly 100 yards away, up came the periscope of the submarine. Then down it went and up again three times. I quite thought they would send a torpedo into us, and we seemed to be quite at their mercy ; but by this time all the trawlers (they have guns) were up to us, and she vanished. They say that had the trawlers not been there the submarine would probably have come up and fired on us, but that she was afraid of the trawlers.
    ON THE TRAWLER.
    "Over our two days and nights on the trawler we might draw a veil. We ran into a storm, and talk about rough ! The dear little craft tossed up and down like a cork. Really, they were kind to us, just did all they could to help us ; but of course there was no accommodation, and we all had to lie, packed like sardines, just every- where, and we shipped seas the whole night, and it teemed with rain. The poor little babies and the mothers! — it was pitiful, We cuddled and huddled up to each other all night, regardless of the fact that we had never seen each other before. Really, we all nearly had hysterics before the night was over. We would be wet, and then the heat of each other would warm us up, and we would be as if in a steam bath. All next day the sea raged, but the sun came out, and it was warm. Florence and I were about the only two not sick. We sat on the top of the engine-room and surveyed the scene below, and, really, we laughed. Altogether, we got some fun out of life. Some sat on the edge in utter abject misery, looking as if they would like to go over and be done with it. It was not a bit safe to walk along, as there is no rail on these trawlers, and one is almost level with the sea, and the funnels at times seem to dip nearly into the water. But I went along a good many times to help one or two with babies and give them their milk. Every time I went I had to be passed along by each sea sick form prostrated on the deck, and a Mrs. Thompson said at last, 'I wish you would not be so beastly cheerful when we are all feeling so ill.' Everyone was so cold and wet. The second mate complimented Florence and myself on being such good sailors. He said we were wonderful, so many of the sea-faring men were ill. The officers and stewards of the Arabia just looked pictures of misery.
    "They fed us on bread and butter and ship's biscuit (otherwise dog), and once a dinner of corned beef, haricot beans and potatoes, which I thought the loveliest thing I'd tasted. I could have eaten tons of it. They brought round tea in flat enamel basins, and we all took sips and passed it along. "But it was the saddest thing to see the dear old Arabia going down.
    We were only 100 yards away when she began to sink, and it was all over in a minute or two. Some people just cried.
    AT MALTA.
    "We got in here at half past 1 on Thursday morning, and were put straight on a hospital ship, where they were most awfully good to us. We all ached from hard boards and want of sleep. Next day we were sent to this hotel in Malta by the P. and O.
    NO PANIC.
    Miss Florence Kirkpatrick says "We were not given a moment's warning. I was in the dining-room talking, when suddenly there was a terrific crash and then a loud report as of our going off. I grabbed up my lifebelt and put it on as I ran upstairs to look for Connie. There was a bit of a scramble in the music saloon as I ran through, but otherwise everyone was awfully calm, and there was no panic whatever. Some of the men were bricks, really, and so good thinking of the women and children. Really, I think it was wonderful the way people behaved. When in the boats we sang and waved to each other. It was sad to see the poor old Arabia stand on end and then go with crash and disappear, and all our earthly belongings with her. I was was fortunate, as I did have some of my money. We did not even have on any of our nice things.'
    BEFORE THE DISASTER.
    In a letter Miss Constance Fitzpatrick refers to Mrs. Miller, of Melbourne, who was also on the Arabia. On the morning of the disaster she went to see Mrs. Miller. She did not take her lifebelt, and Mrs. Miller sent her back for it. They then talked about the chances of being sunk, and about a quarter of an hour later the torpedo struck the Arabia. When the last letter was written the Misses Kirkpatrick were still at Malta waiting, to be sent to England via Marseilles.27
  • 14 Aug 1919, OFFICERS ON S.S. ORSOVA. LEFT ENGLAND JULY 18. NON-MEMBERS OF A.I.F. Miss F. Kirkpatrick28
  • 10 Jun 1924, Misses Florence and Constance Kirkpatrick have returned to their home at Vermont after a most interesting 1600-mile motor trip in their little Fiat car. Via Mildura and Renmark, they travelled down the Murray to Adelaide, then through the desert and home via Hamilton and the Western District.29
  • 21 Nov 1929, Berwick Agricultural Show. SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL DISPLAY. STATE GOVERNOR ATTENDS.
    Keen rivalry for the various awards was manifest at the 71st annual show, held by the Berwick A. & P. Society on the local show grounds last Thursday.
    DOGS. Sheep Dog: G. Warmbrunn 1, Miss F. Kirkpatrick 2.30
  • 5 Nov 1937, Country Land Sales. Country land sales, comprising 23,812 acres, for a total of £181,371, have been completed in the last nine months by MACARTHUR & MACLEOD PTY. LTD., direct, and in conjunction with other agents. The properties sold were as follows:
    Miss F. Kirkpatrick, 104 acres, Berwick, to R. G. Douglas;31
  • 11 Dec 1943, ST JOHN HALL APPEAL REACHES £5,664.
    Additional donations in the last few days have brought the appeal to double the capacity of the St John recreation hall in the Heidelberg Military Hospital to £5,664/16/8.
    Miss F. Kirkpatrick, of Hobart st, Ringwood, who was a member of St John's VAD in the last war, sent a cheque for £5.32

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P4 unit 300, item 745/693
    VPRS 28/ P6 unit 174, item 745/693.
  3. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  5. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK Incoming Passenger List.
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK Outward Passenger List - Address 23 Edgware Road London.
  7. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Victoria Passenger List: Arrival 24 Jul 1922 - address Wattletree Road Malvern.
  8. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 in rates 1926/27 Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, (Orion St Vermont = crossed out), per 21.5.1927 Berwick NAV 94 - House
    1932 - 100 ac House - NAV 90
    1925/26 as Cyril Nelson DAVEY 185 acres, house NAV 125.
  9. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1937/38 Berwick Shire Rates.
  10. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Bourke New South Wales."
  11. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    Ashes scattered at Springvale.
  12. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  13. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  14. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  15. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  16. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  17. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  18. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926 "Street addresses not consistent, but appear to be spelling errors: Florence: Jesmondene, Orion Street ; Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Street."
  19. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  20. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  21. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  22. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  23. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  24. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  25. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Sat 6 Jan 1917, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65015510
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65015508
  27. [S14] Newspaper - Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 20 Jan 1917, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142387935
    Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 20 Jan 1917, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142387969
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 14 Aug 1919, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4705463
  29. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 10 Jun 1924, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article246167722
  30. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Thu 21 Nov 1929, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201029377."
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Alexandra and Yea Standard and Yarck, Gobur, Thornton and Acheron Express (Vic. : 1908 - 1949), Fri 5 Nov 1937, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64736379
  32. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 11 Dec 1943, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11790067
Last Edited21 Jan 2020

Constance Hilda Kirkpatrick1

F, #23093, b. 1882, d. 7 Feb 1966
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick1 b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin1 b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Birth*1882 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B5667/1882.2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelNov 1916 Sailing with Florence Kirkpatrick. Ship Arabia sailing from Sydney via Fremantle - torpedoed.
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel24 Feb 1919 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Osterley sailing from Liverpool - quarantined on arrival
Age 34.3 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1921 Sailing with Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick to South Africa. Ship Ceramic II sailing from Melbourne.3
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel18 Feb 1923 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Suevic sailing from Cape Town
occupation NIL - Address 206 Wattletree Rd Malvern. 
Death*7 Feb 1966 Croydon, VIC, Australia, #D2545/1966 (Age 84) [par Alfred KIRKPATRICK & Mary Theresa QUINN].4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1913Buckambie, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.5
191510 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties (address as Kirk Ingle). With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick.6
191710 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties (address as Kirk Ingle). With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.7
191910 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties (address as Kirk Ingle). With Alfred Kirkpatrick and Florence Kirkpatrick.8
bt 1924 - 1926Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick Florence Kirkpatrick.9,10
bt 1927 - 1937Jesmondene, Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick and Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.11,12,13,14,15,16
bt 1942 - 1954Second Avenue, Cockatoo, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.17,18
195810 Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.19
196310 Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.20

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Caulfield South, VIC, Australia21

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 Jan 1917, THE ARABIA. HOW SHE WAS SUNK. MELBOURNE GIRL'S EXPERIENCE
    Amongst the passengers on the P. and O. liner Arabia when she was torpedoed in the Mediterraanean, on November 6, were the Misses Constance and Florence Kirkpatrick, of Melbourne, who were on their way to England to do war work. In a letter to her mother, written from Malta, Miss Constance Kirkpatrick gives a graphic account of the occurrence. She says:—"It was all very terrible, but really everyone behaved simply wonderfully. Not the slightest panic. She was torpedoed in the calmest of seas, and did not sink for 1½ hours. In no time there were three armed trawlers and a tramp steemer on the scene, and we were all picked up. I was down in my cabin at the time, with my life waistcoat up on deck. The water was pouring down the hatchway at our door, and I thought the first thing to do was to go up and get the waistcoat. Once on deck we none of us liked to risk going back. There was heaps of time, really, but it was not worth while risking one's life for mere money and clothes. So we came off in what we stood up in, which was not much. Florence had no hat on, and no coat, just her brown pinafore dress and silk blouse. I was more fortunate, and had my sweater, but only a vest and grey skirt and hat. I lost my dear little watch."
    GETTING OFF THE BOATS.
    "We had all been told which boat to go in, but in the explosion two boats were smasheld up. One upset when lowered and one smashed, and therefore our boats were full before the turn of Florence and myself came. They got the children and women on first of course. Mr Broome, of our party, deserved the V.C. for the way he helped. By the time I got up the companion way through the awful crush, and found my waistcoat, the chances of getting down the gangway to the other deck where my boat was were small, the crowd. was so great. But Mr Broome came along and helped me from one deck to the other across the tarpaulin. In fact, he helped everybody, and then took photographs as the boats went off.
    "A message came to us to go to the other side to get a boat, so off we went—to find that it had gone. Back again to our own boat, to see if it could take us, and it had gone! There did not seem to be another boat, and we were the only two women left. The doctor was just telling us not to be afraid to jump into the water when she began to sink, but to get on to a raft or float about till a boat picked us up, when we were told to hurry, as there was just room for three more in a boat that was just going. So we slid down a rope into her, and were off."
    THE CATASTROPHE.
    'The explosion was not so great as I had thought it would have been, but I knew at once what had happened. I seemed to be shot up in the air, and then a crash and noise and the steamer kind of shuddered. The engines thumped, thumped, and then stopped. Somehow I did not feel afraid all the time once I found Florence.
    THE SUBMARINE COMES UP.
    "But I will admit that I felt sick as we rowed away from the little old Arabia—boat loads and rafts full all round, and then, hardly 100 yards away, up came the periscope of the submarine. Then down it went and up again three times. I quite thought they would send a torpedo into us, and we seemed to be quite at their mercy ; but by this time all the trawlers (they have guns) were up to us and she vanished. They say that had the trawlers not been there the submarine would probably have come up and fired on us but that she was afraid of the trawlers.
    ON THE TRAWLER
    "Over our two days and nights on the trawler we might draw a veil. We ran into a storm, and talk about rough! The dear little craft tossed up and down like a cork. Really, they were kind to us, just did all they could to help us; but of course there was no accommodation, and we all had to lie packed like sardines, just everywhere and we shipped seas the whole night and it teemed with rain. The poor little babies and their mothers !—it was pitiful. We cuddled and huddled up to each other all night, regardless of the fact that we had never seen each other before. Really, we all nearly had hysterics before the night was over. We would be wet, and then the heat of each other would warm us up, and we would be as if in a steam bath. All next day the sea raged, but the sun came out and it was warm. Florence and I were about the only two not sick. We sat on the top of the engine room and surveyed the scene below, and, really, we laughed. Altogether we got some fun out of life. Some sat on the edge in abject misery, looking as if they would like to go over and be done with it. It was not a bit safe to walk along, as there is no rail on these trawlers, and one is almost level with the sea, and the funnels at times seemed to dip nearly into the water. But I went along a good many times to help one or two with babies and give them their milk. Every time I went I had to be passed along by each sea-sick form protracted on the deck, and a Mr Thompon said at last, 'I wish you would not be so beastly cheerful when we are all feeling so ill.' Everyone was so cold and wet.
    The second mate complimented Florence and myself on being such good sailors. He said we were wonderful; so many of the sea-faring men were ill. The officers and stewards of the Arabia just looked pictures of misery. They fed us on bread and butter and ship's biscuit (otherwise dog), and one a dinner of corned beef, haricot beans, and potatoes, which I thought the lowliest thing I'd tasted. I could have eaten tons of it. They brought around tea in flat enamel basins, and we all took sips and passed it along.
    "But it was the saddest thing to see the dear old Arabia going down. We were only 100 yards away when she began to sink, and it as all over in a minute or two. Some people just cried.
    AT MALTA.
    "We got in here at half-past 1 on Thursday morning, and were put straight on a hospital ship, where they were most awfully good to us. We all ached from hard boards and want of sleep. Next day we were sent to this hotel in Malta by the P. and O.
    NO PANIC.
    Miss Florence Kirkpatrick says: "We were not given a moment's warning. I was in the dining-room talking, when suddenly there was a terrific crash and then a loud report as of our gun going off. I grabbed up my lifebelt and put it on as I ran upstairs to look for Connie. There was a bit of a scramble in the music saloon as I ran through, but otherwise everyone was awfully calm, and there was no panic whatever. Some of the men were bricks, really, and so good thinking of the women and children. Really I think it was wonderful the way people behaved. When in the boats we sang and waved to each other. It was sad to see the poor old Arabia stand on end and then go with a rush and disappear, and all our earthly belongings with her. I was fortunate, as I did have some of my money. We did not even have on any of our nice things."
    BEFORE THE DISASTER.
    In a letter Miss Constance Kirkpatrick refers to Mrs Miller, of Melbourne who was also on the Arabia. On the morning of the disaster she went to see Mrs Miller. She did not take her lifebelt, and Mrs Miller sent her back for it. They then talked about the chances of being sunk, and about a quarter of an hour later the torpedo struck the Arabia.
    When the last letter was written the Misses Kirkpatrick were still at Malta waiting to be sent to England via Marseilles.
    [The Misses Kirkpatrick are sisters of Mrs R. E. M'Arthur of Koort Koortnong.—Ed. "Chronicle."]22
  • 20 Jan 1917, THE ARABIA. HOW SHE WAS SUNK. RESCUE BY TRAWLERS. BOURKE GIRLS' EXPERIENCE.
    Amongst the passengers on the P. and O. liner Arabia when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean, on November 6, were the Misses Constance and Florence Kirkpatrick, of Melbourne, and late of Bourke, who were on their way to England to do munition work.
    The Misses Kirkpatrick are the daughters of A. Kirkpatrick Esq., late of Bourke and Beemery, and owner of Buckanbe, below Tilpa, and are well known here. Both of their brothers are soldiers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hedley Kirkpatrick enlisted as a private in the Boer war, fought through to the finish,
    married a Boer girl, and remained in South Africa, where he has done great work, both against the rebels and the Germans. He met Driver Keith Robertson and Gunner Stuart Hales at Durban when they landed at that place a few days ago, and gave them a good time.
    The elder brother, who is well-known throughout this district as ' Ottie' Kirkpatrick, was manager of Buckanbe until he enlisted last year. He is now either in England or France. All of his dunnage was on the Arabia at the time she went down, but he had gone by another boat.
    In a letter to her mother, written from Malta, Miss Constance Kirkpatrick gives a graphic account of the sinking of the vessel. She says : — "It was all very terrible, but really everyone behaved simply wonderfully. Not the slightest panic. She was torpedoed in the calmest of seas, and did not sink for one and a half hours. In no time there were three armed trawlers and a tramp steamer on the scene, and we were all picked up. I was down in my cabin at the time, with my life waistcoat up on deck. The water was pouring down the hatchway at our door, and I thought the first thing to do was to go up and get the waistcoat. Once on deck we none of us liked to risk going back. There was heaps of time really, but it was not worth risking one's life for mere money and clothes. So we came off in what we stood up in, which was not much. Florence had no hat on and no coat, just her brown pinafore dress and silk blouse. I was more fortunate and had my sweater, but only a vest and grey skirt and hat. I lost my dear little watch."
    GETTING OFF THE BOATS.
    "We had all been told which boats to go in, but in the explosion two boats were smashed up. One upset when lowered, and one was smashed, and therefore our boat was full before the turn of Florence and myself came. They got the women and children on first, of course. Mr. Broome, of our party, deserved the V. C. for the way he helped. By the time I got up the companion way through the awful crush, and found my waistcoat, the chances of getting down the gangway to the other deck where my boat was were small, the crowd was so great. But Mr. Broome came along, and helped me from one deck to the other across the tarpaulin. In fact, he helped everybody, and then took photographs as the boats went off.
    "A message came to us to go to the other side to get a boat, so off we went — to find that it Had gone. Back again to our own boat, to see if they could take us, and it had gone ! There did not seem to be another boat, and we were the only two women left. The doctor was just telling us not to be afraid to jump into the water when she began to sink,
    but to get on a raft or float about till a boat picked us up, when we were told to hurry, as there was just room for three more in a boat just going. So we slid down a rope into her, and were off.
    THE CATASTROPHE.
    "The explosion was not so great as I had thought it would have been, but I knew at once what had happened. I seemed to be shot up in the air, and then a crash aud noise, and the steamer kind of shuddered. The engines thumped, thumped, and then stopped. Somehow, I did not feel afraid all the time once I found Florence.
    THE SUBMARINE COMES UP.
    "But I will admit that I felt sick as we rowed away from the little old Arabia — boatloads and rafts full up all round, and then, hardly 100 yards away, up came the periscope of the submarine. Then down it went and up again three times. I quite thought they would send a torpedo into us, and we seemed to be quite at their mercy ; but by this time all the trawlers (they have guns) were up to us, and she vanished. They say that had the trawlers not been there the submarine would probably have come up and fired on us, but that she was afraid of the trawlers.
    ON THE TRAWLER.
    "Over our two days and nights on the trawler we might draw a veil. We ran into a storm, and talk about rough ! The dear little craft tossed up and down like a cork. Really, they were kind to us, just did all they could to help us ; but of course there was no accommodation, and we all had to lie, packed like sardines, just every- where, and we shipped seas the whole night, and it teemed with rain. The poor little babies and the mothers! — it was pitiful, We cuddled and huddled up to each other all night, regardless of the fact that we had never seen each other before. Really, we all nearly had hysterics before the night was over. We would be wet, and then the heat of each other would warm us up, and we would be as if in a steam bath. All next day the sea raged, but the sun came out, and it was warm. Florence and I were about the only two not sick. We sat on the top of the engine-room and surveyed the scene below, and, really, we laughed. Altogether, we got some fun out of life. Some sat on the edge in utter abject misery, looking as if they would like to go over and be done with it. It was not a bit safe to walk along, as there is no rail on these trawlers, and one is almost level with the sea, and the funnels at times seem to dip nearly into the water. But I went along a good many times to help one or two with babies and give them their milk. Every time I went I had to be passed along by each sea sick form prostrated on the deck, and a Mrs. Thompson said at last, 'I wish you would not be so beastly cheerful when we are all feeling so ill.' Everyone was so cold and wet. The second mate complimented Florence and myself on being such good sailors. He said we were wonderful, so many of the sea-faring men were ill. The officers and stewards of the Arabia just looked pictures of misery.
    "They fed us on bread and butter and ship's biscuit (otherwise dog), and once a dinner of corned beef, haricot beans and potatoes, which I thought the loveliest thing I'd tasted. I could have eaten tons of it. They brought round tea in flat enamel basins, and we all took sips and passed it along. "But it was the saddest thing to see the dear old Arabia going down.
    We were only 100 yards away when she began to sink, and it was all over in a minute or two. Some people just cried.
    AT MALTA.
    "We got in here at half past 1 on Thursday morning, and were put straight on a hospital ship, where they were most awfully good to us. We all ached from hard boards and want of sleep. Next day we were sent to this hotel in Malta by the P. and O.
    NO PANIC.
    Miss Florence Kirkpatrick says "We were not given a moment's warning. I was in the dining-room talking, when suddenly there was a terrific crash and then a loud report as of our going off. I grabbed up my lifebelt and put it on as I ran upstairs to look for Connie. There was a bit of a scramble in the music saloon as I ran through, but otherwise everyone was awfully calm, and there was no panic whatever. Some of the men were bricks, really, and so good thinking of the women and children. Really, I think it was wonderful the way people behaved. When in the boats we sang and waved to each other. It was sad to see the poor old Arabia stand on end and then go with crash and disappear, and all our earthly belongings with her. I was was fortunate, as I did have some of my money. We did not even have on any of our nice things.'
    BEFORE THE DISASTER.
    In a letter Miss Constance Fitzpatrick refers to Mrs. Miller, of Melbourne, who was also on the Arabia. On the morning of the disaster she went to see Mrs. Miller. She did not take her lifebelt, and Mrs. Miller sent her back for it. They then talked about the chances of being sunk, and about a quarter of an hour later the torpedo struck the Arabia. When the last letter was written the Misses Kirkpatrick were still at Malta waiting, to be sent to England via Marseilles.23
  • 10 Jun 1924, Misses Florence and Constance Kirkpatrick have returned to their home at Vermont after a most interesting 1600-mile motor trip in their little Fiat car. Via Mildura and Renmark, they travelled down the Murray to Adelaide, then through the desert and home via Hamilton and the Western District.24
  • 24 Apr 1937, Lady McArthur, of Camperdown, and Miss C. Kirkpatrick, of Vermont, are motoring to Queensland, where they will be the guests of Miss Kirkpatrick's sister, Mrs. T. Perkins, Cashel Vale, Bollon.25

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  2. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online).
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Adelaide South Australia."
  5. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  6. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  7. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  8. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  9. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  10. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926 "Street addresses not consistent, but appear to be spelling errors: Florence: Jesmondene, Orion Street ; Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Street."
  11. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927 "Addresses not consitent, but appear to be spelling errors: Mary T: Jesmondene, Orient Street ; Madeline: Queen Street ; Constance: Orion Streetdene; Madeline as 'Queen St' (possibly typo)."
  12. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928 "as in 1927."
  13. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931 "as in 1927."
  14. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "as in 1927."
  15. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936 "as in 1927."
  16. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937 "as in 1927."
  17. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  18. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  19. [S158] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1958.
  20. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963.
  21. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials Billion Graves "https://billiongraves.com/grave/Alfred-Kirkpatrick/12231382."
  22. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Sat 6 Jan 1917, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65015510
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65015508
  23. [S14] Newspaper - Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 20 Jan 1917, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142387935
    Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Sat 20 Jan 1917, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142387969
  24. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 10 Jun 1924, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article246167722
  25. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 24 Apr 1937, p22
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11059236
Last Edited21 Jan 2020

Kathleen Muriel Kirkpatrick

F, #23094, b. 14 Dec 1886, d. 1972
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Married NamePerkins. 
Birth*14 Dec 1886 Brewarrina, NSW, Australia, #B16688/1887.1 
Birth-Notice*22 Dec 1886KIRKPATRICK.—On the 14th inst., at Beemery station, the wife of Alfred Kirkpatrick—a daughter.2 
Marriage*22 Oct 1912 Spouse: Thomas Perkins. NSW, Australia.
 
Death*1972 Toowoomba, QLD, Australia. 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1912 - 191485 Rose Street, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.3,4,5

Newspaper-Articles

  • 24 Apr 1937, Lady McArthur, of Camperdown, and Miss C. Kirkpatrick, of Vermont, are motoring to Queensland, where they will be the guests of Miss Kirkpatrick's sister, Mrs. T. Perkins, Cashel Vale, Bollon.6

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 22 Dec 1886, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11583751
  3. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  4. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  5. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 24 Apr 1937, p22
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11059236
Last Edited21 Jan 2020

Alfred Allott Kirkpatrick

M, #23095, b. 7 Mar 1872, d. 6 Aug 1962
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941

World War I

Alfred Allott KIRKPATRICK
Regimental number     563
Place of birth     Glenelg South Australia
Religion     Church of England
Occupation     Grazier
Address     10 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, Victoria
Marital status     Single
Age at embarkation     44
Next of kin     Father, A Kirkpatrick, 10 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, Victoria
Enlistment date     16 August 1916
Rank on enlistment     Private
Unit name     Australian Flying Corps, No 2 Squadron, Head-Quarters
AWM Embarkation Roll number     8/5/1
Embarkation details     Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 25 October 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll     Corporal
Unit from Nominal Roll     No 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps
Fate     Returned to Australia 25 September 1919.1 2nd listing: Alfred Allott * KIRKPATRICK
Regimental number     563
Religion     Church of England
Occupation     Grazier
Address     10 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, Victoria
Marital status     Single
Age at embarkation     44
Next of kin     Father, A Kirkpatrick, 10 Staniland Avenue, Malvern, Victoria
Enlistment date     16 August 1916
Rank on enlistment     2nd Air Mechanic
Unit name     Australian Flying Corps, No 2 Squadron, Head-Quarters
AWM Embarkation Roll number     8/5/1
Embarkation details     Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 25 October 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll     Corporal
Unit from Nominal Roll     No 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps
Fate     Returned to Australia 25 September 1919.1
Probate (Will)* 587/412. Alfred Allott KIRKPATRICK Date of grant: 11 Oct 1962; Date of death: 06 Aug 1962; Occupation: Gentleman; Residence: Vermont.2 
Birth*7 Mar 1872 Glenelg, SA, Australia, #B 107/10 Adelaide.3 
Birth-Notice*18 Mar 1872KIRKPATRICK.—On the 7th March, at Glenelg, Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, of Mount Murchison, River Darling, of a son.4 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJan 1922 Sailing with Mary Theresa Alice Kirkpatrick Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Themistocles sailing from Cape Town
Age 49 - Mr A A Kirkpatrick.5 
Death*6 Aug 1962 Croydon, VIC, Australia, #D15102/1962 (Age 90) [par Alfred KIRKPATRICK & Mary Theresa Alice QUINN].6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1903Murweh Station, Charlesville, QLD, AustraliaOccupation: station manager.7
bt 1917 - 1919Military Camp, Royal Park, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: soldier.8,9
1930Long View, via Narrabri, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: grazier.10
bt 1949 - 195420 Orion Street, Vermont, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil. With Madeline Theresa Kirkpatrick.11,12

Grave

  • Brighton Cemetery, Caulfield South, VIC, Australia13

Newspaper-Articles

  • 29 May 1891, Wilcannia, NSW, Australia, Notice of Approval of Homestead Leases at Wilcannia of 10240 acres each: Hedley John at Tankarook; Alfred Allott at Tankrook and Buckinbe14

Citations

  1. [S29] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWI.
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P3 unit 446, item 587/412
    VPRS 28/ P4 unit 2690, item 587/412.
  3. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Mon 18 Mar 1872, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208374980
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  6. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Adelaide South Australia."
  7. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  8. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  9. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  10. [S130] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1930.
  11. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949 "Alfred as 20 Orion Street; Madeline as Queen Street."
  12. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954 "Alfred as 20 Orion Street; Madeline as Queen Street."
  13. [S337] Index of monumental inscriptions/burials Billion Graves "https://billiongraves.com/grave/Alfred-Kirkpatrick/12231382."
  14. [S14] Newspaper - New South Wales, Australia, Government Gazettes, 1853-1899, undated, p3998.
Last Edited1 Aug 2019

Hedley John Kirkpatrick

M, #23096, b. 12 Nov 1873, d. b 1969
Father*Alfred Kirkpatrick b. 1846, d. 13 Apr 1919
Mother*Mary Theresa Alice Quin b. 1849, d. 7 Jul 1941
Birth*12 Nov 1873 Menindie, NSW, Australia, #B13880/1874.1 
Birth-Notice*20 Nov 1873KIRKPATRICK.-On the 12th November, at Wilcannia, River Darling, Mrs. Alfred Kirkpatrick, of a son.2 
Marriage*16 Aug 1902 Spouse: Johanna Margaretha Koevort. Pretoria, South Africa.3
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel22 May 1935 To Fremantle, WA, Australia. Ship Bullareen sailing from Port Elizabeth (South Africa)
Age 61 - Retired Official.4 
Marriage*13 Feb 1948 Spouse: Rosa Bella Olga Mein. Pietermartizburg, Natal, South Africa, Rosa is a spinster from the Seychelles, Hedley a widower.5
 
Death*b 1969 Seychelles.6 

Family

Johanna Margaretha Koevort b. 1874, d. 19 Dec 1932
Child 1.Elsa Kirkpatrick b. 14 Nov 1907

Newspaper-Articles

  • 29 May 1891, Wilcannia, NSW, Australia, Notice of Approval of Homestead Leases at Wilcannia of 10240 acres each: Hedley John at Tankarook; Alfred Allott at Tankrook and Buckinbe7
  • 30 Jun 1902, THE CORONATION. CORONATION HONORS. LONDON, 27th Jume.
    The following additional honor is announced:—Lieutenant Hedley Kirkpatrick, of the 6th Dragoon Guards, to be a Companion of the Bath.8
  • 28 Nov 1902, Captain Hedley Kirkpatrick, who is coming to Australia with a party of Boers, at the desire of Lord Milner, is a good sample of Australian, bushman. His father, Mr. Alfred Kirkpatrick, is a well-known and popular New South Wales grazier, who used to own Beemery Station, near Bourke, and after suffering years of prolonged drought which compelled him to leave his residence on the St. Kilda Esplanade, he moved to Buckanbe Station, lower down the Darling. There, his eldest son, Hedley, was for years his manager and right-hand, and was always to the fore in introducing modern improvements on the run, especially schemes for water conservation, for drought has been seriously felt at Buckanbe. Mr. Kirkpatrick is a blood relative of the Empress Eugenie, and their beautiful country house on Mount Victoria, in the Blue Mountains, is called "Closeburn," after a residence of the Empress. While in the Transvaal Captain Kirkpatrick married a Boer girl, who accompanies him on his tour. His eldest sister is married to Mr. Ernest Macarthur, of Camperdown, a brother of Mr. Stewart Macarthur, barrister, of Melbourne.9
  • 3 Jan 1903, CAPTAIN HEDLEY KIRKPATRICK. HIS RAPID PROMOTION.
    On Saturday last, Captain H. J. Kirkpatrick, younger son of Mr. A. Kirkpatrick of Buckanbie Station, Darling River, arrived from Sydney, and was accompanied by his wife.
    From a short conversation with the Captain we learnt that his present visit to the Darling was, of course, to visit his home and relatives after an absence of over three years in South Africa, during which time he fought, for the British Empire. The business he is engaged upon, howevee, is to pilot the Commission of Boer landed proprietors, which was formed under a scheme of Lord Milner's, for the purpose of travelling over different parts of the British Empire to gain knowledge of pastoral and farming pursuits.
    "I am very pleased," said Captain Kirk., "that I was the one chosen to see the Commission through. I have enjoyed the trips immensely."
    In which direction did you go first? "Oh, to England, where we spent three weeks going over all the best farms. The Commission were astonished with what they saw, especially the great population in London and other places. They remarked "No wonder we were beaten in the war," We then went to Canada, arriving there on the 3rd of October, 1902. We spent seven weeks there. It is a magnificent country, and famous for its timber, and wheat growing. Manitoba, where the best wheat in the world is grown, is a marvellous place. It could support a population of 50 millions, and it will not be long before there will be a vast population there. There has been a great influx of Americans there lately." "Yes, we saw any amount of snow, and did a deal of sleighing. It was glorious."
    The Captain said that when they came to Australia Brisbane was the first stopping place which they reached about the middle of December. They came on to Sydney immediately, and have made that city their headquarters since. The Commiaiion travelled all over the South Coast districts, and had also visited the Hawkesbury Agricultural College. "This," said the Captain, "is the finest agricultural college the Commission have seen, and I might also add here that the Coolangatta Stud is the finest we have seen in all our travels." Captain Kirkpatrick also remarked that the Boers take great interest in well bred stock, and it was his opinion that unless Australia soon got to business, the States would lose a very large portion of their stock trade with South Africa, as The Argentine and Canada were straining every nerve to cater for the trade.
    In reply to a question, Captain Kirk said the Commission was composed of Messrs. Jooste, Lane and Rood, the two former being accompanied by their wives.
    Having asked the Captain to give a brief account of his career as a soldier, he said he left Bourke a little over three years ago.
    Joined the First Australian Horse as a private. They landed at Capetown and went straight to Modder River, arriving the day after the battle of Paardeburg. His squadron was then attached to the Scots' Grey under General French. They went to Bloemfontein, being the first to get into town. They were at the relief of Sanna's Post, and went after Botha to Karee Siding ; and then marched to Kroonstadt, Pretoria and Johan nesburg. After leaving Pretoria they went to Diamond Hill and Barberton on the Portuguese Border. All this time he had done fairly good work, and was then given a Second Lieutenancy in the Sixth Dragoon Guards. This occurred on the 25th September, 1900. He was still with General French. They marched from Berberton to Ermelo, Carolina Bethel and Heidelberg.
    Lieutenant Kirkpatrick was then given a company of pickod scouts, whom he had under his own command. General Gordon was the Brigadier, and shortly after he (Kirk) and his men were able to do some good work, and the General mentioned him in dispatches. The columus were then broken up into small forces of from 1000 to 1500 men each. Colonel Allenby then had charge of his column, and a fortnight afterwards, Kirk was made 1st Lieutenant. On November 19, he was again placed in charge of a company of scouts, and remained so until after the relief of Italia. For five months Lieutenant Kirkpatrick took every prisoner that Colonel Allenby's column had, and he was also lucky enough to retake one of the lost Colonso guns, and two pompoms. He took 120 prisoners, and 800 others surrendered to him. He found 25,000 rounds of ammunition, and secured 3000 head of cattle; 500 horses and 250 waggons with their contents. Colonel Allenby again mentioned him in despatches, and his reward was the Distinguished Service Order. In March 1902, Lieutenant Kirkpatrick was given a Commission as Captain in the South African Constabulary, under Major-General Baden Powell, and shortly afterwards was again recommended for the D.S.O.
    "Yes; I was in lots of tight places," said the Captain, "but luck stood to me, and I was never hit by a bullet. On one occasion my whole company of scouts were with me having a bathe in the river, when all at once the Boers fired a volley into us. Of course there was a general scatter for cover. Luckily only one man was hit. We rushed for our rifles and soon shifted the beggars. The work of Intelligence Officers and Scouts is very dangerous, as one never knows when he will be fired upon."
    The Captain also informed us that he was lucky enough to take a prisoner named Keith who was carrying despatches from Botha to Oppermann. These despatches gave much information, and through them the British were enabled to frustrate the landing of aims and ammunition, and also surprise the Boers in many different situations. This capture took place on the 17th January, 1901, and in this way. Captain Kirk rode up to a Boer-house, and Keith, thinking they were Boers, rode quickly past taking no notice of them. The Captain fired twice in front of him to make him halt, but Keith swore loudly back in Dutch, asking what was meant by that funny business. Captain Kirk then galloped after him, and when he got close, put on his helmet which he had previously hanging by his side. He fired his pistol and the moment the Boer saw the helmet he was paralysed with fear and fell off his horse.
    Afterwards Captain Kirk was stationed in the Magaliesberg Valley, west of Pretoria, and remained there until the conclusion of the war.
    As soon as the work of the Commission is concluded in Australia, Captain Kirkpatrick returns with them to South Africa.10
  • 25 Feb 1927, SOCIAL GOSSIP. In the News
    Colonel H. J. Kirkpatrick, D.S.O., Deputy Commissioner of Police, South Africa, who has been spending six months' furlough here, leaves tomorrow on his return journey to South Africa. During his stay here he, together with his wife and daughter, has been living with his mother, Mrs Kirkpatrick, at Vermont. Miss Elsa Kirkpatrick sailed for England on Monday by the Orvieto.11
  • 23 May 1935, SERVED IN BOER WAR. Lt.-Col. H. J. Kirkpatrick. Back From S. Africa
    Lieut.-Col. H. J. Kirkpatrick, who has been away from Australia for 35 years, with the exception of a visit made eight years ago, is travelling to Melbourne on the Bullaren, which passed through Fremantle today. He left Australia in 1900 as a member of the First Australian Horse going to the Boer War, and retired from the South African Constabulary seven years ago, when he was Deputy Commissioner. After having served with the First Australian Horse he was given a commission with the Sixth Dragoon Guards in South Africa and later joined the Constabulary as captain. He commanded a regiment in the East and West Africa campaign in the Great War.
    South Africa, he said, was an excellent country to live in, but its curse was racial antagonism. It was the most prosperous country in the British Empire, a condition for which gold was largely responsible, premiums from the industry giving the Treasury from £10.000.000 to £14.000,000 each year. Government Aid to Farmers
    The farmers in South Africa were the best treated in the world, he added. In four years the Government had written off £24,000,000 of farmers' debts and was now beginning to take over farm mortgages. It would not see farmers walking off the land. As a pastoral country South Africa could not be compared with Auatralia, he said. The poor quality of the meat was the main trouble. Natives did most of the manual work in the country, about 250.000 being employed on the mines, alone. On the farms they were paid on the average 8/ or 10/ a month, with a certain amount of food.
    Lieut.-Col. Kirkpatrick intends to settle in Melbourne, where his mother lives. He was born in South Australia.12
  • 30 May 1935, LIEUTENANT-COLONEL H. J. KIRKPATRICK. D.S.O., is a passenger in the motor ship Bullaren, which is due in Melbourne tomorrow, Lieutenant-Colonel Kirkpatrick served with distinction in the Boer War and also in the European War. He is the second son of the late Mr Alfred Kirkpatrick, for many years owner of pastoral stations on the Darling River. He has come to visit his mother, who is living at Vermont.13
  • 3 Jul 1935, Lieut-Colonel Hedley J Kirkpatrick who returned from South Africa recently will be entertained at luncheon by the Old Melburnians to-day at the Hotel Australia. He served with distinction in the South African war as captain in the Sixth Dragoon Guards and was awarded the DSO. At the conclusion of that war he joined the South African constabulary and was selected by Lord Milner to convoy the Boer delegates throughout the British Empire, in a tour of inspection of British rule. He became captain of the Transvaal Imperial police stationed at Petersburg. He had reached the rank of major when the Great War broke out and on December 1, 1914, he was appointed lieutenant-colonel commanding the 2nd
    Transvaal Scottish Regiment serving in the campaign in German South West Africa. He was subsequently appointed lieutenant-colonel commander the 9th South African Infantry ("Sportsmens") and served in the German East Africa campaign. After the Great War Lieut Colonel Kirkpatrick was appointed commissioner of South-west African police stationed at Windhoek. Lieut-Colonel Kirkpatrick became a student at the Melbourne Grammar School in 1886.14

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Thu 20 Nov 1873, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39300251
  3. [S187] Familysearch "Transvaal, South Africa, Civil Marriages 1870-1930."
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, National Archives of Australia; Inward passenger manifests for ships and aircraft arriving at Fremantle, Perth Airport and Western Australian outports from 1897-1963; Series Number: K 269; Reel Number: 77
    22 May 1935 is arrival date.
  5. [S187] Familysearch "Natal Province, South Africa, Civil Marriages 1845-1955."
  6. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 17 Mar 1969, p18 - mentioned in Birdie's death notice as deceased.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - New South Wales, Australia, Government Gazettes, 1853-1899, undated, p3998.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Mon 30 Jun 1902, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88567355
  9. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Fri 28 Nov 1902, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article187623577
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Western Herald (Bourke, NSW), Sat 3 Jan 1903, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article103957197
  11. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 25 Feb 1927, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article243615728
  12. [S14] Newspaper - The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Thu 23 May 1935, p19
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74126382
  13. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 30 May 1935, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244828632
  14. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 3 Jul 1935, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11744684
Last Edited3 Aug 2019

Johanna Margaretha Koevort1

F, #23097, b. 1874, d. 19 Dec 1932
Married NameKirkpatrick.1 
Birth*18741 
Marriage*16 Aug 1902 Spouse: Hedley John Kirkpatrick. Pretoria, South Africa.1
 
Death*19 Dec 1932 Honeham Nursing Home, Port Elizabeth, Cape Province, South Africa, Age 58 - died of chronic cholecystitis, colecystectomy and heart failure. Usual residence Grahamstown.2 
Death-Notice*22 Dec 1932KIRKPATRICK -On the 19th December, at Grahamstown, South Africa, Jo, wife of Hedley John Kirkpatrick.3 

Family

Hedley John Kirkpatrick b. 12 Nov 1873, d. b 1969
Child 1.Elsa Kirkpatrick b. 14 Nov 1907

Citations

  1. [S187] Familysearch "Transvaal, South Africa, Civil Marriages 1870-1930."
  2. [S230] International Genealogical Index - IGI ("South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895-1972
    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPRB-634Y").
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 22 Dec 1932, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4515590
Last Edited3 Aug 2019

Rosa Bella Olga Mein1

F, #23098, b. 1915
Married NameKirkpatrick.1 
Birth*19151 
Marriage*13 Feb 1948 Spouse: Hedley John Kirkpatrick. Pietermartizburg, Natal, South Africa, Rosa is a spinster from the Seychelles, Hedley a widower.1
 

Citations

  1. [S187] Familysearch "Natal Province, South Africa, Civil Marriages 1845-1955."
Last Edited31 Jul 2019
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.