Alice Catharine Leary

F, #23161, b. 20 Apr 1860, d. 14 Mar 1923
Father*Joseph Leary b. 7 Oct 1831, d. 20 Oct 1881
Mother*Catherine A Keighran b. 1832, d. 1 Aug 1915
Married NameHaines. 
Birth*20 Apr 1860 Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B#B1278/1860 as Catherine A - also as Alice C #B5203/1860.1 
Birth-Notice*24 Apr 1860On the 20th instant, at her residence, No. 2, West's Cottages, William-street East, Mrs. Joseph Leary, of a daughter.2 
Marriage*20 Jul 1890 Spouse: Hugh Gough Haines. Woollahra, NSW, Australia, #M7785/1890.3
 
Marriage-Notice2 Aug 1890HAINES—LEARY.—On July 20, 1890, at St. Joseph's, Woollahra, Hugh Gough, son of the late Colonel Haines, to Alice, third daughter of the late J. Leary, Esq., M.L.A.4 
Marriage-Notice*11 Aug 1890HAINES—LEARY.—July 20, at St. Joseph's, Woollahra, Hugh Gough Haines to Alice Leary.5,3 
Death*14 Mar 1923 Longford, TAS, Australia. 
Death-Notice*17 Mar 1923HAINES. — On the 14th March, at Longford, Alice Kate, wife of Hugh Gough Haines. R. I. P. (Private interment.)6 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Tue 24 Apr 1860, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13039690
  3. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#M7785/1890 HAINES HUGH G LEARY ALICE WOOLLAHRA."
  4. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 2 Aug 1890, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13775349
  5. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 11 Aug 1890, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13795497
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas.), Sat 17 Mar 1923, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153404732
Last Edited30 Aug 2019

Clare Josephine Leary

F, #23165, b. 1866, d. 10 Sep 1933
Father*Joseph Leary b. 7 Oct 1831, d. 20 Oct 1881
Mother*Catherine A Keighran b. 1832, d. 1 Aug 1915
Birth*1866 Balmain, NSW, Australia, #B2699/1866 as Clara J.1 
Death*10 Sep 1933 Woollahra, NSW, Australia, #D15872/1933.1 
Death-Notice*11 Sep 1933LEARY.—September 10, 1933, at Lynton, 294 Jersey road, Woollahra, Clare, fourth daughter of the late Joseph Leary. Requiescat in pace.
LEARY.—The Funeral of the late CLARE LEARY will leave St Joseph's Church, Albert street, Woollahra, THIS (Monday) MORNING for South Head Cemetery after a Requiem Mass commencing at 9.30 o'clock. Motor Funeral, W N BULL, LTD, Funeral Directors.2 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 11 Sep 1933, p9+p10 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17005921
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17006150
Last Edited19 Oct 2020

Edith Louise 'Lulu' Leary

F, #23167, b. 25 Aug 1871, d. 16 Dec 1969
Father*Joseph Leary b. 7 Oct 1831, d. 20 Oct 1881
Mother*Catherine A Keighran b. 1832, d. 1 Aug 1915
Birth*25 Aug 1871 Paddington, NSW, Australia, #B3926/1872.1 
Birth-Notice*30 Aug 1871On the 25th August, at Engehurst, Glenmore road Mrs Mrs Joseph Leary, of a daughter.2 
Death*16 Dec 1969 Sydney, NSW, Australia, #D167/1970.1 
Death-Notice*17 Dec 1969LEARY, Edith Louise.—December 16, 1969, at Victoria Private Hospital, Potts Point, formerly of Lynton, jersey Road, Woolahra, youngest daughter of the late the Honourable Joseph Leary, M.L.A. and Katherine Leary. Requiescat in pace.
LEARY.—Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of the late Miss Edith Louise LEARY, formerly of Lynton, Jersey Road, Woolahra, will be celebrated at St. Joseph's Church, Albert Street, Edgecliff, Tomorrow (Thursday) Morning, at 9.30 o'clock.
The Funeral will leave the Church after Mass for South Head Cemetery.3 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Evening News (Sydney, NSW), Wed 30 Aug 1871, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129965208
  3. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), 17 Dec 1969, p48.
Last Edited30 Aug 2019

Leila Emily Lindsay Doubleday

F, #23171, b. 6 Jul 1893
Birth*6 Jul 1893 Carlton, VIC, Australia. 
Birth-Notice*15 Jul 1893DOUBLEDAY. — On the 6th inst., at 254 Lygon street, Carlton, the wife of Joseph Doubleday of a daughter.1 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 16 Mar 1901: The Steyne, Feb. 26, 1901.
    My Dear Aunt Patsy,—I was glad to see my letter in the "Advocate" of Februaay 9th. As you asked me to write soon again, I am writing you a letter now. Kingsley and I are spending the day with Reike. I am learning to play the violin, so I brought my violin with me to play to Reike; she can sing a song called "Just One Girl," and I played it for her. Reike has a lovely doll's house, and we have a nice play with it. Thank you dear Aunt Patsy for the collecting card. I will get as much as I can for the little orphans. I hope the photo, reached you. With much love from your loving niece, LEILA DOUBLEDAY.
    Dear Leila I was delighted to get the photo. You all look so nice—such sweet little faces. I am quite proud of them. The photos are now in a nice frame on my mantelpiece. I love the music of the violin, too. Florence Carmel Rieke Parker2
  • 22 Sep 1906: LITTLE LEILA DOUBLEDAY. AN INTERVIEW. [By A. G. R.]
    I met Miss Leila Doubleday at the Lyric Club, and could scarcely believe that this healthy, unaffected little schoolgirl was the who had set Australia marvelling at her wonderful gifts.
    This is the day of the child prodigy, but it is also the day of the specialist in every profession. It has been left to Australia to produce a girl scarcely yet in her teens who plays both violin and piano with such temperament and technique that experts cannot agree which instrument she should choose as her special study.
    The wonder-child invited me to have tea with her, and enquired with interest—'Are you going to interview me this morning? What will you ask me? I was born on July 6, 1893. You want that, don't you?"
    "Yes; and I want you to tell me all about yourself and your music, and when you began."
    "I'll tell you everything I can think of," said little Leila; "and then you can put in what you like. I think I was about seven when I commenced the piano, and when I was eight I won my first gold medal at the A.N.A. competitions. Then I won another the next year, and the next. That year (I was 10 then) I won the piano scholarship at Marshall Hall's Conservatorium, and came second in violin playing. So, after that, the violin was a second study. At the Contervatorium I learned the piano from Herr Scharr, and the violin from Herr Dierich. You won't ask me which I like best, will you, because I don't know a bit, and every one asks me that?" 'Did you practise both equally?' I enquired. "Oh, no. You see, the violin was only a second study. So it only got about half an hour a day. I practise the piano about two hours. "And do you like school?" "No," said Miss Leila, "at least I think I should if there weren't music. But school and lessons and practising made such a rush, so I had a governess for two hours a day, and that was better. Yes; I don't mind lessons. I won a prize for French at the Alliance Francaise the other day; but you musn't put that in, will you? I don't know very much German yet." "Have you ever tried composing?" 'Oh! I'm not clever enough for that, and I haven't learnt any harmony yet. But my teacher says I know enough theory to take me to Germany. You have to know some, don't you, before you can play?" ''Are you fond of reading?" "Oh! I love it, and I love Ethel Turner's books," said the little girl enthusiastically. "When I went to Sydney I spent a day with Ethel Turner, and had such a lovely time. She took our photos in the garden, and she called me her little wonder child. Do you remember her book called that? She wanted to give me a copy of it but she hadn't one, so she asked if I would rather wait until she coold send it to me or have 'Mothers Little Girl.' I chose "Mother's Little Girl," because I wanted to have it right from her own hands. Do you know Mr. Fox, of the Bulletin? I think he is an editor or something. He was very kind to me, and it was really through him we met Miss Palotta, because he introduced us to Mr. Ward and Mr. Willoughby of the dramatic company, and they took us to the theatre. Miss Palotta is lowly, and she has been so good to me. We saw her first in Sydney and then one day, when I went back to Melbourne, I met her in the car. She said. 'Oh! I want to see you again, dear.' But she forgot to ask my address. 'Afterwards she got it, and wrote to mother, and said she wanted us to go and see her and bring a violin. So I played to her, and then she asked us to spend an evening, and all the lights were turned low, and we had lovely, soft dreamy music in the firelight. Miss Palotta wanted to help me, so they had a matinee concert at the Princess Theatre. I'm afraid I'm telling you a long rigmarole, but you know what to put in the paper, don't you?' I said I would do my best, and asked her to tell me about her concerts. 'Isn't it funny?' she said. 'The first time I played in public was on September 29, 1904, and my concert here is to he on September 29.' 'It should be a good omen,' I said. 'In Melbourne,' she continued, 'my concert was in April, and it was crowded. There were over 1,300 seats booked, and people sent me such beautiful flowers. There were seven horseshoes for good luck, and crooks, and staffs, and a Chinese pagoda. Twenty of the P.L.C. girls went—that's the Presbyterian Ladies' College—and afterwards they asked me to afternoon tea, and I had great fun. One girl showed me round, and introduced me to the rest, and I think I met about 30. Every room we went into there were more girls. Then suddenly they all disappeared, and after a little while came back with autograph books, and I had to sign my name.' 'Didn't you play at the leading Melbourne school?'
    'Yes. Two girls started that, and they worked so hard. The head mistress of each school had to guarantee £5 5/ because I wasn't allowed to play under that, but sometimes it was more. I've played at some and I'm going to the others when I go back. Then I went to Sydney for a concert, and I had beautiful flowers sent me there too. In Sydney Lady Northcote commented me to pay for her, and we stayed over two hours. She was so kind, and gave her patronage for my concert. Then, in Melbourne, Lady Talbot sent for me to play to her, and last week I went to Government House to play for Lady Le Hunte. I liked that, although I had not been able to practise for over a week, because I was in bed with a bad cold.'
    We talked a little longer, and I discovered that my small musician was by no means a child of one idea. She can do fancy work, and has once or twice essayed to write a story; and she showed a delightfully childlike interest in the subject of picnics. Also I found her refreshingly grateful to every one who has done her the smallest service. She likes Adelaide, and is beginning to know her way about it now, and she says— 'You know, it is so kind of the Adelaide people to take an interest in me when they don't know me at all.'
    I told her we should all consider we know her very well after September 29, and so tool, my leave of a very unspoiled and charming little girl.3'

Citations

  1. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 15 Jul 1893, p23
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221782852
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 16 Mar 1901, p24
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170604203
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Register (Adelaide, SA), Sat 22 Sep 1906, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56685013
Last Edited3 Sep 2019

Hugh Gough Haines

M, #23172, b. 1853, d. 15 Apr 1936
Birth*1853 
Marriage*20 Jul 1890 Spouse: Alice Catharine Leary. Woollahra, NSW, Australia, #M7785/1890.1
 
Marriage-Notice*2 Aug 1890HAINES—LEARY.—On July 20, 1890, at St. Joseph's, Woollahra, Hugh Gough, son of the late Colonel Haines, to Alice, third daughter of the late J. Leary, Esq., M.L.A.2 
Marriage-Notice11 Aug 1890HAINES—LEARY.—July 20, at St. Joseph's, Woollahra, Hugh Gough Haines to Alice Leary.3,1 
Widower14 Mar 1923Hugh Gough Haines became a widower upon the death of his wife Alice Catharine Leary
Death*15 Apr 1936 Longford, TAS, Australia. 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 16 Apr 1936: OBITUARY. DR. H. G. HAINES
    The death occurred at Longford yesterday morning of Dr. Hugh Gough Haines, a resident of the Longford district for many years.
    Dr. Haines, who was aged 83 years, was born at Mangalore (India), and was the son of the late Col. G. Haines. He was educated at Marlborough, England, and later at the Edinburgh University, where he studied for the medical profession, and won the gold medal for chemistry. He came out from England about 50 years ago and settled at Longford. He acquired a large practice, which in 1929 he gave up. His health has gradually declined in late years, and his death was not unexpected.
    Dr. Haines had been a great athlete. He played rugby football at the university at Edinburgh, was a good boxer, and wrestler in his younger days, and a fine fisherman. After settling in Tasmania, golf was his chief recreation. A vice-president of practically every sporting body at Longford, he was particularly generous in giving these bodies voluntary assistance. He married Miss Alice Parker [sic], a daughter [sic] of the late Mr. Erskine Parker, of the Hopthorp estate, in Longford district. Mrs. Haines died about 16 years ago.
    Dr. Haines' twin brother, Major Gregory Haines, England, has been in the habit of visiting his brother every summer in recent years. He is residing at Longford at present. The funeral is to be private.4
  • 16 Apr 1936: HAINES.—On April 15th, 1936, at Longford, Hugh Gough Haines, F.R.C.S. (Edinburgh), son of the late Colonel Haines and twin brother of Major Gregory Haines, late of Hay-Carr, Lancaster, England, In his 83rd year. Funeral strictly private; no flowers. Hudson, Funeral Director.5

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#M7785/1890 HAINES HUGH G LEARY ALICE WOOLLAHRA."
  2. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 2 Aug 1890, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13775349
  3. [S17] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 11 Aug 1890, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13795497
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Examiner (Launceston, Tas.), Thu 16 Apr 1936, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52006777
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Examiner (Launceston, Tas.), Thu 16 Apr 1936, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52006666
Last Edited30 Aug 2019
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.