Ethel Aspinall

F, #27031, b. 1882, d. 4 May 1948
Married NameChapman. 
Birth*1882 Haywood, England.1 
Marriage*1918 Spouse: William John Chapman. VIC, Australia, #M4580/1918, Ethel ASPINALL & Wm Jno CHAPMAN.2
 
Land-Note*1922 PAK-1A LP2788. 1922. Rated for Shop.House pt l/p 2788 N15
1923. (per 21/3/24) S J Green, Baker N15
1924. Edith Alice Leslie N25 (Lots 62 to 65.)3 
Land-Beac25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 64.65/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.4 
Land-Beac25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 63/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.5 
Land-Beac*25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 62/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.6 
Death*4 May 1948 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D4267/1948 (Age 66) (par Henry ASPENALL & Elizabeth Anne JONES) - as Ethel CHAPMAN.7 
Death-Notice*6 May 1948 CHAPMAN. — The Funeral of the late Mrs. ETHEL CHAPMAN will leave Rayboulds parlors. 6 Cecil-st., Prahran, THIS DAY, at 10 a.m., for the New Cheltenham Cemetery. — RAYBOULDS P./L. LA1017.8 
Death-Notice6 May 1948 CHAPMAN.— On May 4, at Queen Victoria Hospital, Ethel, loved wife of John and loving mother of Elizabeth (deceased), aged 66 years. At rest.9 

Grave

  • 20*403*N, Cheltenham Memorial Park, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia10

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "#M4580/1918, Ethel ASPINALL & Wm Jno CHAPMAN."
  3. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 3892-277 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2466-094 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  7. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4267/1948 (Age 66) (par Henry ASPENALL & Elizabeth Anne JONES) - as Ethel CHAPMAN, born Haywood England. Death registered at Melbourne, Australia."
  8. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 6 May 1948, p4
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/206904564
  9. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 6 May 1948, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/206904618
  10. [S49] Index of burials in the Cheltenham Cemetery.
Last Edited17 Mar 2023

William John Chapman

M, #27032, b. 1877, d. Jun 1950
Birth*1877 Adelaide, SA, Australia. 
Marriage*1918 Spouse: Ethel Aspinall. VIC, Australia, #M4580/1918, Ethel ASPINALL & Wm Jno CHAPMAN.1
 
Land-Note*21 Oct 1921 Debts due to the estate of Marion Smith per 21 Oct 1921 in respect of land at Beaconsfield: William Chapman of Beaconsfield £70.10.2 
Widower4 May 1948William John Chapman became a widower upon the death of his wife Ethel Aspinall.3 
Death*Jun 1950 Melbourne South, VIC, Australia, #D14074/1950 (Age 73) (par James Alfred CHAPMAN & Eliza JEANS) - as John William CHAPMAN, born Adelaide, South Australia. Death registered at Melbourne South, Australia.4 

Grave

  • 20*403*N, Cheltenham Memorial Park, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia5

Citations

  1. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "#M4580/1918, Ethel ASPINALL & Wm Jno CHAPMAN."
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Record Office Victoria).
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4267/1948 (Age 66) (par Henry ASPENALL & Elizabeth Anne JONES) - as Ethel CHAPMAN, born Haywood England. Death registered at Melbourne, Australia."
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D14074/1950 (Age 73) (par James Alfred CHAPMAN & Eliza JEANS) - as John William CHAPMAN, born Adelaide, South Australia. Death registered at Melbourne South, Australia."
  5. [S49] Index of burials in the Cheltenham Cemetery.
Last Edited17 Mar 2023

Edith Alice Deakes

F, #27033, b. 1893, d. 1964
Married NameLeslie. 
Birth*1893 Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 
Marriage* Spouse: Leander Leslie.
 
Land-Note*1924 PAK-1A LP2788 (Lot 62.63.64.65). 1924 Rates: Mrs Edit Alice Leslie, 13 Rotherwood St, Richmond. (Lots 62 to 65) N25.1 
Land-Beac*25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 62/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.2 
Land-Beac25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 63/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.3 
Land-Beac25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A 64.65/LP2788. Transfer from Ethel Chapman to Edith Alice Leslie.4 
Land-Note25 Mar 1926 PAK-1A LP2788 (Lot 62.63.64.65): Mortgagee: Stratton & Co Pty Ltd. Mortgage No 536474. Discharged 23 Jun 1927. Mortgagor was Edith Alice Leslie.5 
Land-Note23 Jun 1927 PAK-1A LP2788 (Lot 62.63.64.65): Mortgagee: Stratton & Co Pty Ltd. Mortgage No 567580. Discharged 23 Jun 1932. Mortgagor was Edith Alice Leslie.6 
Land-Beac25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 64.65/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.7 
Land-Beac25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 63/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.8 
Land-Beac*25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 62/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.9 
Widow1953Edith Alice Deakes became a widow upon the death of her husband Leander Leslie.10 
Death*1964 Bendigo, VIC, Australia, #D12054/1964 (Age 71) (par James DEAKES & Selena Maud MURN) - as Edith Alice LESLIE.11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
191967 Walter Street, Footscray, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Leander Leslie.12
1924Bell Street, Penshurst, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Leander Leslie.13
192513 Rotherwood Street, Richmond, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Leander Leslie.14
bt 1926 - 1927Uneeda Bakery, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Leander Leslie.15,16
1931Bell Street, Penshurst, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: sales. With Leander Leslie.17

Citations

  1. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2466-094 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 3892-277 - Ethel Alice Leslie of Beaconsfield Baker.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 + 2466-094 - Stratton & Co Pty Ltd. Mortgage No 536474. Discharged 23 Jun 1927.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 + 2466-094 - Stratton & Co Pty Ltd. Mortgage No 567580. Discharged 23 Jun 1932.
  7. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 3892-277 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  8. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2466-094 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  10. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D16371/1953 (Age 61) (par LESLIE Robert LESLIE & Mary Ann LESLIE) - as Leander LESLIE, born Ararat. Place: Eaglehawk, Australia."
  11. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D12054/1964 (Age 71) (par James DEAKES & Selena Maud MURN) - as Edith Alice LESLIE, born Melbourne. Place: Bendigo, Australia."
  12. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  13. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  14. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  15. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  16. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  17. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
Last Edited17 Mar 2023

Leander Leslie

M, #27034, b. 1892, d. 1953
Birth*1892 
Marriage* Spouse: Edith Alice Deakes.
 
Death*1953 Eaglehawk, VIC, Australia, #D16371/1953 (Age 61) (par LESLIE Robert LESLIE & Mary Ann LESLIE) - as Leander LESLIE.1 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
191967 Walter Street, Footscray, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Edith Alice Leslie.2
1924Bell Street, Penshurst, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Edith Alice Leslie.3
192513 Rotherwood Street, Richmond, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Edith Alice Leslie.4
bt 1926 - 1927Uneeda Bakery, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Edith Alice Leslie.5,6
1931Bell Street, Penshurst, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Edith Alice Leslie.7

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D16371/1953 (Age 61) (par LESLIE Robert LESLIE & Mary Ann LESLIE) - as Leander LESLIE, born Ararat. Place: Eaglehawk, Australia."
  2. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  3. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  4. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  5. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  6. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  7. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
Last Edited16 Oct 2021

Bernard Kirchner

M, #27035
Marriage* Spouse: Annie Bridger.
 
Land-Beac25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 64.65/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.1 
Land-Beac25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 63/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.2 
Land-Beac*25 Jun 1932 PAK-1A 62/LP2788. Transfer from Edith Alice Leslie to Bernard Kirchner.3 
Land-Beac15 May 1941 PAK-1A 64.65/LP2788. Transfer from Bernard Kirchner to Claude Edgar James Hill.4 
Land-Beac*15 May 1941 PAK-1A 63/LP2788. Transfer from Bernard Kirchner to Claude Edgar James Hill.5 
Land-Beac15 May 1941 PAK-1A 62/LP2788. Transfer from Bernard Kirchner to Claude Edgar James Hill.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1931Wood Street, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Annie Kirchner.7
1936Wood Street, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: baker. With Annie Kirchner.8

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 3892-277 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2466-094 - Bernard Kirchner of Beaconsfield Baker.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 3892-277 - Claude Edgar James Hill of Wood Street Beaconsfield Baker.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2273-429 - Claude Edgar James Hill - C/T 6456-141.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), C/T 2466-094 - Claude Edgar James Hill - C/T 6456-142.
  7. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  8. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
Last Edited17 Mar 2023

Margaret Alice Newbold

F, #27040, b. Jun 1899, d. 1982
Married NameHill. 
Marriage* Spouse: Clarence Juan Hill.
 
Birth*Jun 1899 Ockbrook, Derbyshire, England, Jun Q 1899 (Derby) 07b 606. Mother's maiden surname: Kelly.1 
Widow10 Jun 1958Margaret Alice Newbold became a widow upon the death of her husband Clarence Juan Hill.2 
Death*1982 Dandenong, VIC, Australia, #D11289/1982 (Age 83) (par NEWBOLD William NEWBOLD & Alice KELLY) - as Margaret Alice HILL.3 

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Margaret Alice Newbold. Jun Q 1899 (Derby) 07b 606. Mother's maiden surname: Kelly."
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D6491/1958 (Age 70) (par Edwin HILL & Mary Hannah FODEN) - as Clarence Juan HILL, born Derby, England Place: Caulfield, Australia."
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D11289/1982 (Age 83) (par William NEWBOLD & Alice KELLY) - as Margaret Alice HILL, born Ockbrook Derbyshire England, Death Place: Dandenong, Australia."
Last Edited16 Oct 2021

Veronica Frances Mullane

F, #27050, b. 1903
Father*Timothy Mullane b. 1867, d. 10 Jul 1949
Mother*Bridget Mary Bourke b. 1865, d. 28 Apr 1944
Birth*1903 Pakenham, VIC, Australia, #B27932/1903 (par Timothy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURK) - as Veronica Frances MULLANE.1 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Nov 1915: Letters to Aunt Patsy. Pakenham, Nov. 3rd, '1915.
    Dear Aunt Patsy, — This is the first time I have written to you, and I hope you will accept me as one of your many nieces. It was very wet weather up here during the winter, and there has been water lying in many of the flat paddocks. I go to St. Patrick's Catholic School at Pakenham, and the name of our teacher is Miss Hunt. There are only twenty-one children going to our school now. The inspector came to examine the children on Wednesday, 28th of October, and all of us passed into higher grades. My father has three horses and two drays. We have one little calf, and a milking cow, which we call 'Daisy.' I have one sister (Josephine), and one brother (Patrick). My sister and I are learning the piano. Miss Craven gives us our music lessons. We have Mass here every Sunday. The name of our parish priest is Rev. Fr. Gleeson, and his assistant is Fr. O'Connor ; they both come from Dandenong, which is 18 miles distant from Pakenham. The crops are looking very green up here, and they will be ready to cut in a fortnight if the weather keeps fine. One of my schoolmates, Monica Maher, and I had finished the sewing required for our grades, so our teacher gave us some material to make dresses for two little babies at St. Joseph's Home. We are sending them to you for the Christmas parcel you always send to the home. We did not have a very good pattern, but I hope my little dress (the blue one) will fit one of the babies. Pakenham township is a flat, low-lying place, but there are beautiful hills and gullies about six miles north of our school. That district is called South Gembrook. My father often takes mother and the three of us for a drive, out there.
    —I remain, dear Aunt Patsy, your affectionate niece, VERONICA MULLANE.
    Dear Veronica, the little dresses refleet great credit on you and Monica and your kind teacher. Many grateful thanks for them. , Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven2

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B27932/1903 (par Timothy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURK) - as Veronica Frances MULLANE, Place: Pakenham, Australia."
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 20 Nov 1915, p36
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/151761229
Last Edited17 Oct 2021

Timothy Mullane

M, #27051, b. 1867, d. 10 Jul 1949
Father*Timothy Mullane b. 1828, d. 18 Jun 1898
Mother*Catherine Hayes b. 1836, d. 3 Nov 1873
Birth*1867 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #B13151/1867 (par Timothy MULLANE & Elizabeth HAYES) - as Timothy MULLANE.1 
Marriage*15 Nov 1900 Spouse: Bridget Mary Bourke. St Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M7200/1900, Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE.2
Marriage-Notice*18 Dec 1900 MULLANE—BOURKE.—On the 15th November, at St. Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, by the Rev. J. Murphy, Timothy, the youngest son of the late Timothy Mullane, of Pakenham, to Bridget M., only daughter of the late Patrick Bourke, of Burn's Creek (Tasmania). Tasmanian papers please copy.3 
Widower28 Apr 1944Timothy Mullane became a widower upon the death of his wife Bridget Mary Bourke.4 
Death*10 Jul 1949 Pakenham, VIC, Australia, #D21454/1949 (Age 83) (par Timothy MULLANE & Catherine HAYES) - as Timothy Martin MULLANE.5 

Family

Bridget Mary Bourke b. 1865, d. 28 Apr 1944
Children 1.Josephine Mary Mullane7 b. 1902
 2.Veronica Frances Mullane b. 1903
 3.John Patrick Mullane8 b. 1905

Newspaper-Articles

  • 27 Jul 1949: Obituary Mr. T. M. MULLANE
    After reaching the grand age of 83 Mr. Timothy Martin Mullane, of Mullane’s Rd., Pakenham East, passed away at the Pakenham Hospital on July 10th. A successful farmer who was held in high regard throughout the district, deceased was born at Berwick, and apart from 4 years in West Australia, spent the whole of his life’s span in the district. His wife predeceased him about five years ago, but he leaves a son, John Patrick, and two daughters, Josephine (Mrs. Heaney), and Veronica (Mrs. Lane), to mourn the loss of a loving father. Their sorrow is shared by many district friends. The funeral on Tuesday morning was largely attended. Rev. Fr. D. J. Coakley offered up Mass at St. Patrick’s Church, Pakenham, and also officiated at the graveside.6

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B13151/1867 (par Timothy MULLANE & Elizabeth HAYES) - as Timothy MULLANE, Birth registered at Berwick, Australia."
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "#M7200/1900, Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE."
  3. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 18 Dec 1900, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/188650189
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D3608/1944 (Age 78) (par Patrick BOURKE & Mary KENNEDY) - as Bridget Mary MULLANE, Death registered at Fitzroy, Australia."
  5. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D21454/1949 (Age 83) (par Timothy MULLANE & Catherine HAYES) - as Timothy Martin MULLANE, born Berwick. Death registered at Pakenham, Australia."
  6. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 27 Jul 1949, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222211722
  7. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12526/1902 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Josine Mary MULLANE, Birth registered at Nar Nar Goon, Australia."
  8. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B20718/1905 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Jno Patk MULLANE, Birth registered at Pakenham, Australia."
Last Edited19 May 2023

Bridget Mary Bourke

F, #27052, b. 1865, d. 28 Apr 1944
Married NameMullane. 
Birth*1865 TAS, Australia, (par Patrick BOURKE & Mary KENNEDY.) 
Marriage*15 Nov 1900 Spouse: Timothy Mullane. St Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M7200/1900, Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE.1
Marriage-Notice*18 Dec 1900 MULLANE—BOURKE.—On the 15th November, at St. Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, by the Rev. J. Murphy, Timothy, the youngest son of the late Timothy Mullane, of Pakenham, to Bridget M., only daughter of the late Patrick Bourke, of Burn's Creek (Tasmania). Tasmanian papers please copy.2 
Death*28 Apr 1944 Fitzroy, VIC, Australia, #D3608/1944 (Age 78) (par Patrick BOURKE & Mary KENNEDY) - as Bridget Mary MULLANE.3 

Family

Timothy Mullane b. 1867, d. 10 Jul 1949
Children 1.Josephine Mary Mullane5 b. 1902
 2.Veronica Frances Mullane b. 1903
 3.John Patrick Mullane6 b. 1905

Newspaper-Articles

  • 24 May 1944: MRS. BRIDGET MULLANE
    The many friends of Mrs. Bridget Mullane will regret to hear of her death on April 28.
    The deceosed leaves her widower, Mr. Timothy Mullane, Pakenham East, two daughters—Mrs. J. Heaney (West Brunswick) and Mrs. J. Lane (Drouin) —artd a son, Pat. (Pakenham East), to mourn their loss. Requiem Mass was celebrated at St. Patrick's Church, Pakenham, and the funeral left the church for Pakenham Cemetery. The burial service was conducted by Rev. Fr. Sullivan, Dandenong, assisted by Rev. Fr. Hanrahan, East Malvern.4

Citations

  1. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online) "#M7200/1900, Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE."
  2. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 18 Dec 1900, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/188650189
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D3608/1944 (Age 78) (par Patrick BOURKE & Mary KENNEDY) - as Bridget Mary MULLANE, Death registered at Fitzroy, Australia."
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 24 May 1944, p22
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/172213242
  5. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12526/1902 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Josine Mary MULLANE, Birth registered at Nar Nar Goon, Australia."
  6. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B20718/1905 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Jno Patk MULLANE, Birth registered at Pakenham, Australia."
Last Edited19 May 2023

Josephine Mary Mullane

F, #27053, b. 1902
Father*Timothy Mullane1 b. 1867, d. 10 Jul 1949
Mother*Bridget Mary Bourke1 b. 1865, d. 28 Apr 1944
Birth*1902 Nar Nar Goon, VIC, Australia, #B12526/1902 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Josine Mary MULLANE.1 

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12526/1902 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Josine Mary MULLANE, Birth registered at Nar Nar Goon, Australia."
Last Edited17 Oct 2021

John Patrick Mullane

M, #27054, b. 1905
Father*Timothy Mullane1 b. 1867, d. 10 Jul 1949
Mother*Bridget Mary Bourke1 b. 1865, d. 28 Apr 1944
Birth*1905 Pakenham, VIC, Australia, #B20718/1905 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Jno Patk MULLANE.1 

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B20718/1905 (par Timy MULLANE & Bridt Mary BOURKE) - as Jno Patk MULLANE, Birth registered at Pakenham, Australia."
Last Edited17 Oct 2021

John Craven

M, #27055, b. 1819, d. 6 Apr 1867
Birth*1819 York, England. 
Marriage* Spouse: Anne Whittingham Elston. Not married - on Alice's birth register it says that the father and mother have lived together for 7 or 8 years and are not married.1
 
Death*6 Apr 1867 Darley, VIC, Australia, #D4341/1867 (Age 48) (par John CRAVEN & Mary SWANN) - as John CRAVEN.2 
Death-Notice*13 Apr 1867 CRAVEN.—On the 6th instant, at Darley, near Bacchus Marsh, Mr. John Craven, aged forty-eight years, late of the firm of Craven Brothers, builders, Melbourne.3 

Family

Anne Whittingham Elston d. 9 Jun 1901
Children 1.Elizabeth Whittingham Craven5 b. 18 Feb 1861, d. 21 Sep 1942
 2.Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven b. 2 Sep 1863, d. 1 Apr 1935
 3.Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven6 b. 31 May 1866, d. 21 Mar 1949

Newspaper-Articles

  • 17 Aug 1867: Mr. W. Anderson will offer for sale on Wednesday next a valuable lot of draught horses, the property of the estate of the late John Craven, Esq., of Darley. His monthly sale at Bacchus Marsh takes place on Saturday next.4

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: John Craven, Birth Date: 29 Apr 1819, Death Date: 6 Apr 1867
    Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: Ann Elston, Birth Date: 15 Nov 1824, Death Date: 9 Jun 1901.
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4341/1867 (Age 48) (par John CRAVEN & Mary SWANN) - as John CRAVEN, born York. Death registered at Darley, Australia."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic.), Sat 13 Apr 1867, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88371696
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic.), Sat 17 Aug 1867, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88373426
  5. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D10821/1942 (Age 70) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Elizabeth CRAVEN, Death registered at Box Hill, Australia."
  6. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12486/1866 (par John CRAVEN & Ann Whittingham ELSTON) - as Martha CRAVEN, Birth registered at Bacchus Marsh, Australia."
Last Edited8 May 2022

Anne Whittingham Elston

F, #27056, d. 9 Jun 1901
Note* Complicated family - had more children to Thomas Whittingham. 
Married NameWhittingham. 
Married NameCraven. 
Marriage* Spouse: Thomas Whittingham.
 
Marriage* Spouse: John Craven. Not married - on Alice's birth register it says that the father and mother have lived together for 7 or 8 years and are not married.1
 
Widow6 Apr 1867Anne Whittingham Elston became a widow upon the death of her husband John Craven.2 
Death*9 Jun 1901 Box Hill, VIC, Australia, #D4783/1901 (Age 76) (par Thos ELSTON & Eliza AUBUD) - as Ann WHITTINGHAM.3 
Death-Notice*10 Jun 1901 CRAVEN.—On the 9th June, at her late residence, Barkley-street, Box Hill, Ann, relict of the late John Craven, of Bacchus Marsh, and daughter of the late Thomas Elston, solicitor, Meriden, England.
CRAVEN.—On the 9th June, at her late residence, Barkley-street, Box Hill, relict of the late John Craven, of Bacchus Marsh, daughter of the late Thomas Elston, solicitor, Meriden England, mother of Mrs. J. Jacobson, late of Barnawartha.
CRAVEN.—The Friends of the late Mrs. ANN CRAVEN are respectfully invited to follow her remains to the place of interment, Bucchus Marsh Cemetery.
The funeral will leave Bacchus Marsh Railway Station on 11th of June, at 9.10 a.m.4 

Family

John Craven b. 1819, d. 6 Apr 1867
Children 1.Elizabeth Whittingham Craven5 b. 18 Feb 1861, d. 21 Sep 1942
 2.Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven b. 2 Sep 1863, d. 1 Apr 1935
 3.Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven6 b. 31 May 1866, d. 21 Mar 1949

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: John Craven, Birth Date: 29 Apr 1819, Death Date: 6 Apr 1867
    Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: Ann Elston, Birth Date: 15 Nov 1824, Death Date: 9 Jun 1901.
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4341/1867 (Age 48) (par John CRAVEN & Mary SWANN) - as John CRAVEN, born York. Death registered at Darley, Australia."
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4783/1901 (Age 76) (par Thos ELSTON & Eliza AUBUD) - as Ann WHITTINGHAM, Death registered at Box Hill, Australia."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 10 Jun 1901, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/10554821
  5. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D10821/1942 (Age 70) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Elizabeth CRAVEN, Death registered at Box Hill, Australia."
  6. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12486/1866 (par John CRAVEN & Ann Whittingham ELSTON) - as Martha CRAVEN, Birth registered at Bacchus Marsh, Australia."
Last Edited8 May 2022

Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven

F, #27057, b. 31 May 1866, d. 21 Mar 1949
Father*John Craven1 b. 1819, d. 6 Apr 1867
Mother*Anne Whittingham Elston1 d. 9 Jun 1901
Probate (Will)* 414/807. Martha W Craven; Residence : Box Hill; Occupation: Spinster; Date of grant: 27 Jul 1949; Date of death: 21 Mar 1949
Inventory ALL THAT piece of land being part of Crown Portion Twenty six parish of Nunawading County of Bourke more particularly described in Certificate of Title Volume 2025 Folio 404834. This land has an area of one acre three roods three perches and there is erected thereon the old fashioned brick villa known as number 14 Barkly Street, Box Hill and which has been valued by Yeo Crosthwaite & Co. at £1555
Furniture £232.7.6
Oil Painting by Sir A Streeton valued by Daryl Lindsay at £60
Savings £111.11.7
Debentures £798.10.0
Shares £84
Total Assets £2843.14.7
Dated 20 Jul 1949.2 
Birth*31 May 1866 Bacchus Marsh, VIC, Australia, #B12486/1866 (par John CRAVEN & Ann Whittingham ELSTON) - as Martha CRAVEN.1,3 
Land-Beac*25 Jul 1917 PAK-1A (Application 74113) Lots 16 + 17. Transfer from Marion Jane Smith to Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven, Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven, Elizabeth Whittingham Craven. App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 479 No 357 consideration £425.4 
Land-Beac23 Oct 1936 PAK-1A (Application 74113) Lots 16 + 17, Woods Street. Transfer from Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven Elizabeth Whittingham Craven to Herman 'Mac' Roberts. App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 552 No 629 consideration £500.5 
Will*1 Mar 1944 THIS IS THE LAST WILL of me MARTHA WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN of "Cravenhurst" Barkly Street Box Hill in the State of Victoria Spinster.
1.     I APPOINT JOHN TURNBULL and BERNARD GORE BRETT both of 120 William Street Melbourne Executors and Trustees of this my Will.
2.     I GIVE free of all duties the following specific bequests namely -
(a) To such of them my neighbours Mr. and Misses Brennock as shall survive me my Genoa velvet suite (comprising settee and two chairs) together with the small walnut cabinet situated in the lounge room of "Cravenhurst".
(b) To such of them Ada Bates and Katie Bates as shall survive me such parts as they may select of my silver plate, household linen blankets electrical fittings and furniture (excluding the suite hereinbefore mentioned my piano and the oil paining by Sir Arthur Streeton)
3.     Subject to the foregoing bequests I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH all my real and personal estate of whatsoever kind and wheresoever situate to my Trustees UPON TRUST to sell and convert the same into money and stand possessed of the net proceeds of such sale and conversion UPON TRUST (after payment thereout of all my just debts funeral and testamentary expenses and all duties and expenses connected with my Estate)
to pay to The Melbourne Hospital the sum of Two thousand pounds (to be applied by such Hospital in endowing four cots C. Corrie, M. R. Hood - M. Craven - in the Alice Craven Ward in memory of the following persons namely John Craven Anne Craven Elizabeth Craven and William Craven) and divide the residue of my estate equally between the Children's Hospital Melbourne and St. Peter's Church of England Box Hill.
4. I DECLARE that the receipt of the Treasurer or other responsible officer of the above institutions respectively shall be a sufficient discharge to iny Trustees for the payment of the moneys to which each Institution is respectively entitled.
5. I DIRECT that any Trustee of this my Will who may be a Solicitor and any Firm to which he may belong shall be entitled to charge and be paid all usual professional or other charges for business done by him or his Firm in relation to my Estate including all work or business done and time spent in connection with matters arising in the premises which might or could have been attended to in person by a Trustee not being a Solicitor.
6. I REVOKE all former Wills.
IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto set my hand this First day of March One thousand nine hundred and forty-four.
SIGNED by the Testatrix MARTHA WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN as her last Will in the presence or us both present at the same time who at her request in her presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. C. CORRIE M. R. HOOD
M. CRAVEN.6 
Death*21 Mar 1949 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D2893/1949 (Age 75) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Martha Whittingham CRAVEN.7 
Death-Notice*29 Mar 1949 CRAVEN.—On March 21, at Queen Victoria Hospital, Melbourne, Martha Whittingham Craven, of Cravenhurst, Barkly street, Box Hill, daughter of John and Anne Craven (deceased).8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1909 - 1934Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven and Elizabeth Whittingham Craven.9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24
1936Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Elizabeth Whittingham Craven.25
193714 Barkley Street, Box Hill, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Elizabeth Whittingham Craven.26
bt 1943 - 194914 Barkley Street, Box Hill, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.27,28

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Nov 1912: Miss Craven has been appointed postmistress of the Beaconsfield post office, which is to be removed from the railway station to the township. In due course a telephone service and State savings bank will be established at the new post office. Elizabeth Whittingham Craven29
  • 21 Nov 1936: Misses B. and M. Craven, who had charge of the Beaconsfield Post Office for 24 years, have resigned. They were given gifts by residents on leaving. Elizabeth Whittingham Craven30
  • 23 Nov 1938: Berwick Shire Council Correspondence. From M. Craven, Box Hill, asking for permission to erect a gate at the entrance to the Park near the bridge at Beaconsfield, as the gate there is in need of repair. Permission granted.31
  • 26 Jan 1939: MEMORIAL GATES BEACONSFIELD, Wednesday.
    A pair of brick and iron gates has been erected at the entrance to the Beaconsfield Park in memory of the soldiers who took part In the Great War. The gates were the gift of the Misses Craven, who for many years were in charge of the Beaconsfield Post-office. Elizabeth Whittingham Craven32

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B12486/1866 (par John CRAVEN & Ann Whittingham ELSTON) - as Martha CRAVEN, Birth registered at Bacchus Marsh, Australia."
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0003, 414/807
    VPRS 7591/P0002, 414/807.
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: Martha (Mattie) Whittingham Craven, Birth Date: 31 May 1866, Death Date: 23 Mar 1949.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 479 No 357 consideration £425.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 552 No 629 consideration £500.
  6. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/P0002, 414/807.
  7. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D2893/1949 (Age 75) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Martha Whittingham CRAVEN, born Carlton, Death registered at Melbourne, Australia."
  8. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 29 Mar 1949, p9
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/22719427
  9. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  10. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  11. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  12. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  13. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  14. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  15. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  16. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  17. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  18. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  19. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  20. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  21. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  22. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  23. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  24. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  25. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  26. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  27. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  28. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  29. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), Thu 14 Nov 1912, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66181753
  30. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 21 Nov 1936, p8
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/223872703
  31. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 23 Nov 1938, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/201305066
  32. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 26 Jan 1939, p6
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12090454
Last Edited9 May 2022

Elizabeth Whittingham Craven

F, #27059, b. 18 Feb 1861, d. 21 Sep 1942
Father*John Craven1 b. 1819, d. 6 Apr 1867
Mother*Anne Whittingham Elston1 d. 9 Jun 1901
Probate (Will)* 341/415. Elizabeth W Craven; Residence: Box Hill; Spinster. Date of grant: 11 Mar 1943 ; Date of death: 21 Sep 1942
IN THE WILL of ELIZABETH WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN late of 14 Barkly Street Box Hill in the State of Victoria Spinster deceased.
INVENTORY.
REAL ESTATE
ALL THAT piece of land described in Certificate of Title Volume 2025 Folio 404834, containing 1 acre 3 roods 3 perches or thereabouts, being part of Crown Portion 26 Parish of Nunawading, County of Bourke, having a frontage of 197'8"/197' 11" to Barkly Street by a depth of 388'6"/388'7" on which is erected a 5-roomed brick villa, bathroom, kitchen and pantry, known as No. 14 Barkly Street, Box Hill.
Valued by E. J. Ellingworth, Box Hill at £1189 Deceased's half share thereof     £594 10. 0
PERSONAL ESTATE
Cash in hand - One half proceeds of cheque £1. 1. 0
Money in Bank - Conmonwealth Savings Bank, Melbourne Account No. 84584 £74. 3. 7 Interest thereon to date of death £0.7.3 74. 11. 0
Shares £214.4.6
Furniture and Effects £150.19.0 - Deceased's half share thereof £75.9.6
Total £959.16.0
Dated 23 Feb 1943.2 
Birth*18 Feb 1861 Cardigan Street, Carlton, VIC, Australia, #B1231/1861 (par Thomas WHITTINGHAM & Ann ELSTON) - as Elizabeth WHITTINGHAM.1,3,4 
(Transfer to) Land-Beac25 Jul 1917 PAK-1A (Application 74113) Lots 16 + 17. Transfer from Marion Jane Smith to Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven, Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven, Elizabeth Whittingham Craven. App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 479 No 357 consideration £425.5 
(Transfer from) Land-Beac23 Oct 1936 PAK-1A (Application 74113) Lots 16 + 17, Woods Street. Transfer from Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven Elizabeth Whittingham Craven to Herman 'Mac' Roberts. App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 552 No 629 consideration £500.6 
Will*23 Nov 1938 THIS IS THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT of me ELIZABETH WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN of 14 Barkly Street Box Hill in the State of Victoria Spinster.
1. I HEREBY REVOKE all Wills Codicils and testamentary dispositions heretofore made by me and declare this to be my last Will.
2. I APPOINT THE UNION TRUSTEE COMPANY OF AUSTRALIA LIMITED of 333 Collins Street Melbourne (hereinafter calledtoy Trustee) the executor end Trustee of this my Will
3. After payment of all my just debts funeral and testamentary expenses including State Probate and Federal Estate Duty and any other duties payable in connection with my Estate I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH the whole of my Estate both real and personal of whatsoever nature and wheresoever situate unto my sister MARTHA WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN absolutely
4. In the event of my sister the said Martha Whittingham Craven predeceasing me I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH the following specific legacies namely
(a) To the Trustees of the Melbourne Art Gallery my Oil painting by Sir Arthur Streeton entitled "The Flooded River"
(b) To Father May Roman Catholic Priest of the Clifton Hill Church my Oil painting entitled "Our Saviour"
(c) To the Mental Hospital Mont Park for the use of the patients my Cable Upright Grand Piano Bookcase Lounge Suite Easy chairs Carpets and remaining Oil paintings including two Oil paintings of Holland by Dutch artists.
(d) To the Old Colonists' Homes for Women the residue of my household furniture furnishings and all other articles of personal use or adornment.
5. Subject to the foregoing specific bequests I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH the whole of my Real Estate and the remainder of my Personal Estate to my Trustees UPON TRUST for sale conversion and getting in at such times upon such terms and conditions and generally in such manner as my Trustee shall think fit with full discretionary power to my Trustee to postpone the sale conversion and getting in of the whole or any portion thereof for such period or periods as my trustee shall deem expedient and in the meantime to allow the same to remain in the same state of investment as it may be at the time of my death notwithstanding the hazardous wasting or reversionary nature thereof without being liable for any loss on account thereof
6. I DIRECT my Trustee to stand possessed of the proceeds of such sale conversion and getting in Upon Trust
(a) To pay my debts funeral and testamentary expenses and the duty on my Estate (whether payable under any State or Federal Act and whether Estate Succession Legacy or Probate Duty none of which duties shall be apportioned) and also all costs and expenses of or incidental to the execution or attempted execution of the trusts hereof.
(b) To pay the following legacies:-
(1) To The Royal Melbourne Hospital Melbourne the sum of Five hundred pounds (£500) for the establishment of a cot to be called the "Ann Craven Cot"
(2) To The Royal Melbourne Hospital Melbourne the sum of Five hundred pounds (£500) for the establishment of a cot to be called the "John Craven Cot"
(3) To the Trustees of the Maddingley Cemetery a sum sufficient to keep my family graves in order in perpetuity
(4) To The Mental Hospital Mont Park the sum of Twenty five pounds (£25)
(5) To Father May Roman Catholic Priest of the Clifton Hill Church the sum of Twenty five pounds (£25)
To divide the residue of my Estate then remaining in equal shares between the following Institutions namely:-
The Caulfield Military Hospital
The Children's Hospital Melbourne
St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne
The Young Methodist Mission League for their Dudley
Indian Orphanage Dilkensha Fiji.
7. I DIRECT that the receipt of the Treasurers for the time being of the aforementioned Institutions shall be a sufficient discharge to my Trustee
IN WITNESS whereof I have to this my last Will and Testament set my hand this Twenty-third day of November One thousand nine hundred and thirty eight
SIGNED and ACKNOWLEDGED by the said Elizabeth Whittingham Craven as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us present at the sane time who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses - Gordon C. Andrews 12 Athol St. Moonee Ponds Clerk A. Hoffert, 44 Head St Elwood Clerk
ELIZABETH WHITTINGHAM CRAVEN.7 
Death*21 Sep 1942 Box Hill, VIC, Australia, #D10821/1942 (Age 70) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Elizabeth CRAVEN
Died at 14 Barkly Street, Box Hill, Victoria of a Rupture of her Aorta Haemopericardium. She lived 63 years in Victoria and 7 years in New South Wales. Information from her death certificate. Father listed as John Craven.1,8 
Death-Notice*22 Sep 1942 CRAVEN.—On September 21 (suddenly), at Cravenhurst, Barkly street, Box Hill, Elizabeth, daughter of the late John and Ann Craven, formerly of Woodside, Darley.—So deeply loved, so sadly missed. (Private interment at Maddingley Cemetery.)9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1909 - 1934Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: teacher. With Alice Sarah Whittingham Craven and Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven.10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25
1936Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: teacher. With Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven.26
193714 Barkley Street, Box Hill, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven.27

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Nov 1912: Miss Craven has been appointed postmistress of the Beaconsfield post office, which is to be removed from the railway station to the township. In due course a telephone service and State savings bank will be established at the new post office. Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven28
  • 21 Nov 1936: Misses B. and M. Craven, who had charge of the Beaconsfield Post Office for 24 years, have resigned. They were given gifts by residents on leaving. Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven29
  • 26 Jan 1939: MEMORIAL GATES BEACONSFIELD, Wednesday.
    A pair of brick and iron gates has been erected at the entrance to the Beaconsfield Park in memory of the soldiers who took part In the Great War. The gates were the gift of the Misses Craven, who for many years were in charge of the Beaconsfield Post-office. Martha Whittingham 'Mattie' Craven30

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D10821/1942 (Age 70) (par John CRAVEN & Anne ELSTON) - as Elizabeth CRAVEN, Death registered at Box Hill, Australia."
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0003, 341/415
    VPRS 7591/P0002, 341/415.
  3. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B1231/1861 (par Thomas WHITTINGHAM & Ann ELSTON) - as Elizabeth WHITTINGHAM, Birth registered at Melb, Australia."
  4. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: Elizabeth Whittingham, Birth Date: 18 Feb 1861, Death Date: 21 Sep 1942
    18 February 1861 • Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
    Cardigan Street, North Melbourne according to birth register.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 479 No 357 consideration £425.
  6. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), App 74113 - Conveyance. Book 552 No 629 consideration £500.
  7. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/P0002, 341/415.
  8. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ancestry Tree Name: Julius Jacobsohn Family Tree, Tree ID: 33812628
    Person viewed: Elizabeth Whittingham, Birth Date: 18 Feb 1861, Death Date: 21 Sep 1942.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 22 Sep 1942, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/11996471
  10. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  11. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  12. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  13. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  14. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  15. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  16. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  17. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  18. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  19. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  20. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  21. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  22. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  23. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  24. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  25. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  26. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  27. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  28. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), Thu 14 Nov 1912, p2
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66181753
  29. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 21 Nov 1936, p8
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/223872703
  30. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 26 Jan 1939, p6
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12090454
Last Edited8 May 2022

Ernest Sands Emerson

M, #27060, b. Nov 1870, d. 17 Jan 1919
Land-Note* Owned land in Beaconsfield, probably lot 20 of the original 1880 subdivision of Souter. 
Birth*Nov 1870 Ballarat, VIC, Australia, #B435/1871 (par William EMERSON & Mary Hannah SEARL) - as Ernest Sandoe EMERSON.1 
Land-Notebt 1905 - 1908 PAK-1A (Souter's Sub Lot 20). Paid rates 1905-1908 for a house and Lot of Souther's subdivision NAV 12, it was previously owned by William Hayes and sold to James McGuigan.2 
Marriage*1906 Spouse: Elsie Dry Meredith. VIC, Australia.
 
Land-Note*29 Jun 1908 PAK-1A (Application 37,310). Simon Paternoster Occupants of the land contiguous: On the north west William Paternoster Storekeeper, owner of said land is E Emerson, Journalist, Berwick.3 
Widower18 May 1918Ernest Sands Emerson became a widower upon the death of his wife Elsie Dry Meredith.4 
Death*17 Jan 1919 Brisbane, QLD, Australia, #D1919/B/28697 (par William EMERSON & Anna SEARL) as Ernest Sando EMERSON.5,6 
Death-Notice*18 Jan 1919 EMERSON.—On the 17th January, at 'Glenrowan,' Wickham-terrace, Brisbane, E. S. Emerson, "Owen Blackwood," of Brisbane Courier, "Milky White," Sydney Bulletin, aged 48 years.7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1905 - 1906Glenhuntly Road, Caulfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: journalist. With Hannah Emerson, home duties.8,9
bt 1909 - 1913Kelvin Brae, Belgrave, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: author. With Elsie Dry Emerson.10,11,12

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Dec 1907: THE CONQUERORS OF THE BUSH.
    By E. S. EMERSON, Beaconsfield.
    Hark, the tempered axes ringing
    Down the shady mountain creek.
    Where the Christmas-campers, singing,
    Ridge and pole and tent-peg seek;
    "Tis to them a hymn of leisure
    Echoing, with soft caress,
    Promises of sylvan pleasure—
    Halcyon days of happiness.
    • • • •
    A white gum tow'rs above their tent.
    Magnificent with many years.
    Its limbs like naked arms up-bent,
    Its leaves like keen suspended spears ;
    Brooding, it stands as if the sound
    Of axes, ringing through the glen,
    Had set it dreaming in the ground
    Of other days, of other men.

    Time was when natives camped beneath
    The shelter of its sucker-gums;
    Or crept, like shadows, through the heath,
    To where the wild pittosporums
    Made sheltered nooks below the falls
    For blackfish and for platypi;
    Or danced in dim moon-shadowed halls,
    Through many a wild corrobboree.

    Those were its golden days; it saw
    Primeval beauty everywhere—
    A chaos quickened by God's law
    To bud, to blossom, and to bear,
    Till strong men, pining on the north,
    Dreamed of a far, sun-favoured strand,
    And southward, southward sailing forth,
    Hailed it at last, the Promised Land.

    Oh, they were men, those pioneers!
    With gipsy blood of genius,
    That throbbed to conquer nameless fears
    With deeds that now seem fabulous.
    The rivers smiled as on they came—
    They made strong bondsmen of the flow;
    The forests laughed—with axe and flame
    They laid the giants low.

    The old gum, dreaming in the heat,
    Felt the first blazing of their track,
    And woke to hear their restless feet
    Pressing, in haste, still " further back."
    And, later, when the wand'rers found
    What fortunes by the creek-ways rolled,
    It saw the strong men gather round
    And slake their fevered thirst for gold.

    Yea, down the shady mountain dell
    It watched them hurry to the spoil,
    The ringing axes marking well
    The progress of their daily toil.
    But silence came again ; the rush
    And riot with the gold were gone,
    And in the still, deep forest hush
    The old gum slumbered on.

    Then came a lone man through the years,
    And with his axe made haste to write
    The music of the pioneers
    Across the wooded vale and height;
    And as the rich flat shed its trees
    And bared its bosom to the plough,
    He dreamed of golden argosies,
    That sail into the ports of Now.

    Old tree, your topmost boughs command
    Full vision of the sheltered glen.
    A dozen homesteads, close at hand,
    Make mark between the Now and Then
    A dozen homesteads, with a throng
    Of children on the well-worn tracks—
    Bright living stanzas of the song
    A lone man fashioned with his axe.

    Hark, the tempered axes ringing
    Down the shady mountain creek,
    Where the Christmas-campers, singing,
    Ridge and pole and tent-peg seek;
    "Tis to them a hymn of leisure
    Echoing, with soft caress,
    Promises of sylvan pleasure—
    Halcyon days of happiness.13
  • 8 Dec 1908: HAUNTED GULLY. By E. S. EMERSON.
    In the early days, before Haunted Gully had been mined, Manton's Gully on the other side of the ranges was the farthest eastern outpost of several straggling mining camps. It was not a phenomenal field for the great reefs had not been located then. We depended wholly on the alluvial. Still, the field was rich enough to support scores or adventurers, and, owing to its remoteness and the easy cover afforded by the ranges, it attracted many of the worst characters then in the colony.
    Men who had found Bendigo and Ballarat too hot for them, congregated there; Gascon Jack Malone—who murdered a man at Illabarook in later days—Fenian Ted, and Four-hand Brown were examples : "wanted" men all of them grown savage at being brought so often to bay. They ruled the camp with the bloody hand of fear, but the boss of them all was Brody.
    He was uncrowned king at Manton's, a daring, remorseless, malicious ruffian, whose only charms were his strength of muscle and his grace of limb. It was he who, when the police rode out at last to Grogan's shanty to investigate one of the many fatal fights that had made the camp infamous, gave them two minutes at the muzzle of a revolver to clear out and "mind their own business." He was mad with liquor and would listen to no reason. The young leader, a new chum from the old country, laughed at him.
    "Look here, my man," he said, contemptuously ("my man" to Brody). "I'll stand none of your nonsense. I've come here in the name of the Queen——"
    "One minute gone !" exclaimed Brody.
    "In the name of the Queen. I——"
    "It'll suit you better to say your prayers, if you mean to stay," said Brody.
    The young leader turned his horse quickly and made a whip-stroke at Brody's pistol hand. Brody didn't flinch, though the blood gushed from his wrist beneath the stroke. He stood his ground, shifting his watch so that he could see the leader beyond it.
    "Time's up !" he said, grimly.
    "Are you going, young man ?"
    Grogan's daughter, the only woman on the field, rushed out and hung on his arm, trying to drag the pistol down.
    "Mick ! Mick ! For my sake, dear !" she begged.
    "In the name of the Queen——" the young man started again. Brody shot him dead. In an instant the camp was in an uproar, but no more blood was spilt.
    "When peace was restored—with the constables thoroughly cowed—Brody was missing, and the only woman on Manton's Gully had gone with him.
    For months after that Brody was sought by the authorities keenly, unremittingly, but always unsuccessfully.
    However, the presence of the police in the district cleared the camp of undesirables, and we settled down to a life that was almost quiet and respectable: so quiet, indeed, that eventually the police were removed to Roman's Creek, a newer outbreak, 30 miles away.
    This peaceful serenity was disturbed occasionally by reports of daring robberies by the roadside, and gradually rumour grew into certainty that Brody had taken to the ranges. But although there was a thousand pounds on his head, Brody was "going clean," as they put it in those days. He threatened and robbed, but he took no life. Where he had established his headquarters, and what had become of Kate Grogan, remained a mystery until one night he walked into Grogan's and spoke to the old man. Grogan met him surlily enough, but the words the bushranger said choked back his wrath. Kate was soon to become a mother. Brody had built her a hut—this hut—in the ranges, and had intended sending her to Melbourne during her trouble. For all his murderous nature, he was a faithful lover, it seemed, and for that may be forgiven much.
    And to give him his due, he brought Kate the best horse he could buy or steal, whilst there was still ample time for her to ride away to the big city. But Kate clung to him and her home, just as many a good woman has clung since ever the world began, perhaps the more firmly for that he was so black a ruffian. Day after day she put off her departure, week after week, until at last it was too late. Nature broke down under the cruel excitement of the blood-chase her lover was for ever dodging, and that day Brody had returned after a short absence to find her in a state of nervous exhaustion that bordered on delirium. She was in so bad a way, Brody said, that unless help was given at once she would die.
    For a long time Grogan and he talked earnestly together, and at last Brody rode out into the darkness with the old shantykeeper's hand-clasp warm upon his, and the old man's "Oi'll do me best" ringing in his ears a song of hope. But Brody had given one promise. He was to marry Kate at all hazard.
    There was no doctor to be procured at any price, and the nearest woman was 40 miles away.
    "Will yez go fer her, Cameron ?" the old man pleaded to me. "You're the only man Oi can trust barrin' Logan, and he's away. She's me darter. God forgive me!" he added, wistfully. And so I was drawn into the net—the net that was to be torn from one only at the scaffold. There was a pause as a fearful blast struck the hut, and I shrank closer to the fire, shivering with fear. Ah, my young friend ! You look upon things as wild adventures in these days that in the lives of the old pioneers were items of every-day occurrence. We took them as a matter of course.
    That night I rode out at 10 o'clock for Mrs. Watson, across country that had scarcely known the foot of man or hoof of horse, and at 5 o'clock next evening she was attending to Kate Grogan ! There was no hesitation about her coming—that dear old woman of the bush ; God rest her soul !
    "Oh, it's that way, is it ?" was all she said when I had explained my errand.
    "Well, young man, just you make yersel' free with the tucker there, the whiles I get some thiners together. You can leave your horse to spell here. I'll git Jim to round up two." Jim was her husband, and when she was leaving he kissed her, and there was the spirit of the old days in what he said—
    "Well, good-bye, old girl. Never mind a fall or two by the way. God bless yer! And I'll expect yer when I sees yer !"
    Mrs Watson held out small hope for Kate Grogan.
    "It's black tea and salt junk she's been starvin' on, an' there's no strength in her," she told the anxious Grogan. "Her nerves are all broke to pieces with loneliness an' anxiety. She hears a policeman in every footstep."
    "Brody's promised to make her an honest woman !" said Grogan.
    "It's quick he'll have to be about it, then !" replied the old woman sharply.
    "An' it's not rough I be with you Mr. Grogan," she added, tenderly. "She'll win though if I can help her."
    Grogan and I rode away together that evening, leaving the brave old woman alone with her charge.
    "It's death ! I know it ! It's death!"
    The old fellow cried when we got clear of the hut. "She tried to hide it from me. Hiven bless her ! But I feel it—here !"
    And he clutched his throat to hold back the sob that would force its way out. I kept silent.
    Brody had not been near the hut all day, and Grogan grew fearful that something had happened to him. His fears were well founded. For in the heart of the ranges the bushranger hailed us. He had had an encounter with the police, and blood was still flowing slightly from a wound in his left arm.
    "More blood !" exclaimed Grogan, fearfully. "Not theirs !" replied Brody. "I could have shot the lot of them, and would have but for her."
    He asked of her whilst I dressed his wound with whisky. Then I left them to talk together. When Grogan picked me up he was more alert than I had ever seen him.
    "It's another big favour Oi'm axin ye to do me, Cameron," he said, after a pause.
    "Will yez ride t' The Crush and bring Father Donaghy t' the hut?"
    "Straight away ?" I asked.
    "Oi'll git ye a frish horse at the Gully," he answered.
    "I'm pretty well done up, Grogan"
    "Yis, yis, Oi know. But jist this wance, lad. For the love of God, now !" he pleaded.
    "But what about Logan ?"
    "Logan mayn't be back."
    I thought of Kate.
    "Well, if he isn't I'll go," I said.
    "It's the least I can do under the circumstances."
    Grogan explained at length what was required of me. It was a delicate errand, and I shuddered, thinking of what would occur if it failed. In league with a murderer! A vision of the gallows loomed up before me ; but I was a good Catholic, and Father Donaghy was one of God's white men. And Kate Grogan—she was dying. However, it was with a great sigh of relief that I greeted Logan at the Gully.
    "I'll go away and have a sleep," I said. I was in need of it.
    But Logan, though seeming eager to do the errand at first, raised objections, and finally refused, leaving the old man in anger.
    Heavy-eyed and tired almost to peevishness, I saddled up and again rode into the dense bush. At The Crush I found that Father Donaghy had gone to Thorpedale, forty miles away, and was not expected to return for several days. There was no help for it. Hastily recruiting myself, I secured another mount and set out again. At Thorpedale I found the Father busily engaged in his cherished work of establishing a church. Yet he came willingly enough, and, once on the way, for the devil's spice of Ireland that was in him, made pace through many a stretch I faltered at. Still it was not until the morning of the second day that we left The Crush for the hut.
    There was a saving of many miles by taking the ranges, but there was no track, and the country was wild and dangerous. It was all one to the Father.
    "Do you know the lay of the place, my son?" was all he asked.
    "Yes," I answered. "I prospected the Gully once. Tt's pretty rough, though."
    "Well, lead on," he said ; and he saw to it that we made good time. We rode straight to the hut. Mrs. Watson met us at the door.
    "This is Father Donaghy," I said. The old woman looked astonished. "But," she said, "your friend, Father O'Leary, came here yester e'en !"
    "Father O'Leary! Father O'Leary ! I know no Father O'Leary, my dear lady."
    "Well, he came here saying you sent him, and confessed her," said Mrs. Watson ; "an' he went away with one of his friends to find Brody. She told him where. But they've lingered too long," she added, sorrowfully.
    "It's too late!"
    She led us inside and pointed to the bed. Kate Grogan lay there with a babe at her side, and death was with them both. For a space I was choked with sorrow, and stood by, bewildered, incapable of thought. What kindly office the priest performed for the dead I know not ; but he drew me outside and gave me a nip from his flask that revived me almost instantly.
    "There has been treachery here, I'm afraid, black treachery !" he said, "perhaps the police are at the bottom of it.
    Think well, my son—How do you stand ?" "Clean-handed as the day I was born !" I replied.
    "Well, I think the best thing for you to do is to go down to Manton's Gully at once. I will stop here with Mrs. Watson. It is not right that she should be left alone."
    I rode hot-foot to Grogan's, only to be covered at the door by more than one revolver.
    "Throw up your hands!" was the stern command. I held them up, and an officer stepped forward and handcuffed me.
    "In the name of the Queen !" he said, and I was marched inside and handcuffed to Brody and Grogan. That is part of the story. The Legend of Haunted Gully grew out of it. Brody was hanged ; but when the evidence against Grogan and me was concluded, the judge said there was no need to go further. He directed the jury to find us "Not Guilty," and they did, with ringing cheers, which were taken up by others in the court and continued for many minutes. But that evidence! That shameful evidence! Dragged out of unwilling witnesses bit by bit. There was a thousand pounds on Brody's head, and Logan had leagued with two troopers to secure it. Logan's friends were of the very worst type : one, a glib-tongued scoundrel, vile enough to impersonate a priest : vile enough then, in the full knowledge of Kate Grogan's extremity, and whilst holding out to her the hope of that marriage which would at least legitimatize her unborn babe, to draw from her the secret of Brody's hiding-place : vile enough to use a dying woman's pledge of faith and love to rush her promised husband to the scaffold.
    And for what ? Blood money ! Was it any wonder that he and his companions were kicked from the force"
    Any wonder that Logan, with them, dared not show his face wherever the shameful truth was known?
    Yet, for all the prayers of the good father, Kate slept uneasily ; and year after year, even when the Gully was being worked by dozens of men, pale, wan and wistful just, as she looked when I saw her lying dead, her babe at breast, she came back in spirit to the hut. People said that she had been cheated of her rest. But the wandering soul found rest at last. Amongst the many people drawn, as it were, by fascination to the Gully in those days come a man, a strongly built man, prematurely broken down by drink and dissipation. I and two others were working a claim in the lower valley there, and he came to us. He was ill, penniless, and without substance of any kind save a stained and thread-bare blanket. He asked us of Kate Grogan. and we told him. He laughed at us, a cheerless, hollow laugh ; and when he had gained strength he said that he would go and lay the ghost or bring it back to us for a present. He did not return. Next morning we made search for him. At the bottom of the ravine, beneath the eagle's rock, we found his body. On his face was written a fear that appalled us, and on his breast was Kate Grogan's silver crucifix. The dead man was he who had impersonated the priest.14
  • 9 Nov 1910: THE BULLFINCH. SCENES AND PROSPECTS DAWN OF A GOLDEN CITY. WATER FOURPENCE A GALLON. MEAT AND STORES CHEAP.
    (By E. S. EMERSON).
    The history of the Bullfinch Boom could be written under heading of What happened to Jones ...15
  • 23 Feb 1911: E. S. Emerson is making the "Westralian Worker" a paper of parts. It is now eight news pages in size, with sparkling and varied contents. Not the least important feature of our able contemporary is verse by "Milky White," and good verse, too.16
  • 18 Apr 1912: Gum Leaves on the Fire.
    Dad's just a bent old cripple now;
    Full eighty winters gone have reared
    Their snow-drifts high above his brow
    And spilled their frosts down on hisbeard;
    Blind, too, for in the eyes that blazed
    Defiance unto armed might
    At Ballarat, the years have raised
    A misty monument of Night.
    He speaks not much, but, like an Age
    Within the shadow Time has cast.
    Sleeps in his place—a tattered page
    Touched with the pathos of the Past,
    But sometimes for the old times' sake
    We stir dead embers of desire,
    And bid old memories awake
    By burning gum-leaves on the fire.
    The pungent smoke rolls up and spreads
    Its aromatic fumes around.
    And back through vanished years Dad treads
    Like one who walks on holy ground.
    Till, as his thoughts the decades span,
    He tells us tales of times long gone—
    The "I remembers" of a man
    Who fought and lost and still fought on.
    Again Eureka's voices ring
    From blazing bivouacs of night:
    Again the rifle bullets sing
    Across the palisaded height;
    Again we hear the bugle-call
    And, where Rafaello's ardor led,
    We watch one light, and fighting fall
    Where Lalor fought and Lalor bled.
    Again by mountain-spur and creek
    He sits by many a camp-fire's blaze,
    And bearded mates come back and speak
    Of golden deeds, of golden days;
    With here the riot of the rush.
    The shanty and the gleaming lode.
    And there, ah! there, the mournful hush
    Of comrades wandered from the road.
    Dead comrades! but the gold of Time
    Death washes into History,
    And such as Lalor, Burke and Syme
    Are wealth for all posterity:
    And these the old man worked beside;
    And these, and such as these, come fast
    To show us how the world grew wide
    From scattered camp-fires of the past.
    But not of men, and not of gold.
    And not of bush-ways undefined,
    Are all our father's stories told;
    The burning gum-leaves bring to mind
    One simple tale of love that glows
    With faith and loyalty and truth;
    Then where the swift Campaspe flows
    He sings again his song of youth.
    Oh! she was glorious; her smiles
    Such magnets strong men might not miss;
    He rode at night a hundred miles
    To claim at morn, perchance, one kiss.
    "And she"—the blind eyes seek the light—
    "She was your mother!" proudly said;
    Then with a broken "Boys, good-night"
    The old man gropes his way to bed.
    "Good-night! Good-night!" perchance he dreams,
    When the last link of life shall break,
    Of wooing on, by radiant streams,
    Our mother for her own sweet sake;
    But this we know, who sit alone,
    And watch the blinking coals expire—
    Dad sits upon a kingly throne
    When gum-leaves crackle on the fire.
    E. S. EMERSON in "Bulletin."17
  • 8 Sep 1913: Death of mother: EMERSON. — On the 6th September, at the residence of her son, H. J. Emerson, "Kookaburra", Trevelyn-Street, Elsternwick, Hannah, wife of the late William Emerson, and mother of W. R., H. J., J.W., T.Y., E.E; also Mrs.Donaldson, M.C.E., and Mrs. P. Jacka. Arrived in the ship Statesman, 1851.18
  • 26 Jan 1914: THE CHURCH PARADE. SERMON ON NATIONAL IDEALS "AN AGE OF PLEASURE."
    Headed by the Town Band (whose members were in their smart-looking uniform of white jackets and helmets and dark-blue trousers), fully 68 of the 85 officers and rank and file in camp, marched up High-street yesterday afternoon, and taking the turning at the intersection with Maude street, attended divine service at St. Augustine's Church of England. The chancel, the pulpit and lectern were tastefully decorated with British and Australian flags; the top pews on both sides were reserved for the military; and amongst other prominent citizens attending were the President of the shire (Cr Robinson Roe) and other councillors, for whom seats had also been reserved. The accommodation was taxed to its utmost, and additional chairs had to be placed near the pulpit and down the aisle. National hymns were sung, the first being an "An Australian Anthem," written by the Australian poet, T. Brunton Stephens; followed later on by the National Anthem, in which was included the verse written by Mrs E. D. Emerson, of Beaconsfield, Victoria
    Far from the Empire's heart,
    Make us a worthy part;
    God save the Kipg.
    Keep us forever Thine,
    Our land Thy southern shrine,
    And in Thy grace divine;
    God save the King.
    The choir very ably rendered an anthem, while Miss Laura Trevan (the organist) presided at the instrument.
    [continued]19
  • 20 Feb 1919: The Passing of E. S. Emerson. BIRD LOVER, POET, JOURNALIST.
    The birds of Australia lost a good friend when E. S. Emerson, poet and journalist, died at Brisbane on January 17. Emerson was a big Australian in precisely the way that term fitted his late friend "Jimmie Pannikin" Fraser. One lived in Queensland and the other in New South Wales; but both had a "breadth and largeness of view" that took in the whole of Australia Felix, and made them especially to love its human children and those spoilt children of Nature, the merry birds.
    Ernest Emerson was born at Ballarat in 1870, and received his early education in Melbourne. For a short time after leaving his primary school he worked as a city clerk. But the dull, dun air of the town was not for him at that stage; the wide, free spaces of the Riverina claimed their kin spirit, and Melbourne knew him no more till the tide of journalism gathered him in as a member of the staff of "Table Talk." The expansion of that journalistic career is indicated in several biographies of Australian authors, somewhat in this sequence: Went west with the gold fever, and eventually was appointed sub-editor of "Clare's Weekly" and editor of the "Sunday Chronicle," in Perth. Started contributing verse to the "Bulletin" as "Milky White" in 1898. Married in 1906, and settled down in the Gippsland mountains. Contributed stories, articles and verses to the "Sydney Mail," "Lone Hand," "Bulletin," "Sydney Worker," etc., but was forced by ill-health to go further north. In Queensland he was variously editor of the "Worker," editor of the "National Leader" (a soldiers' paper), and some time writer of leading articles for the "Queenslander" and ''Brisbane Courier," "for which latter paper he conducted a weekly column of "Versions and Diversions", under the nom-de-plume of "Gwen Blackwood."
    It was as a bush-boy in Victoria that I first knew the work of E. S. Emerson. A casual copy of his "Shanty Entertainment" drifted to our little mud-brick cabin, and, seated over a roaring fire, with the curlews screaming riotously in the outer darkness, I revelled in that thoroughly Australian tale. The large-hearted "Sydney," the queer little "Rat," with his distressing fondness for a cracked accordeon, the poor old hatter, and all the rest of those quaint characters of Furthest Out were very real personages to me then. And at this distance I can hear still the marching melody put into the mouths of many of them. Acquaintance with the man himself came later, and in the course of bush rambler adjacent to his little home at Zillmere (near Brisbane), I learned to know how sincere was the love of both Emerson and his sympathetic wife for the Spirit of Australia, latent in its forests and plains, and welling out in the songs of the rain and the birds. More than one pair of the little creatures nested in their garden, and it was charming to hear Mrs. Emerson render their calls phonetically. She had a remarkable talent for this pretty exercise, cultivated to some extent on the birds of Britain, and turned it to practicval account in a dainty "Coo-roo" (pallid cuckoo) song, which appeared post-humously in the last Bird Day issue of the Queensland School Papsr. "Tell me, "she said one day, bustling up in the chief street of Brisbane, "what is the bird that sits up in a high tree and says——". And the ensuing words, uttered with delicate modulation, called up a vision of a black-throated butcher-bird calling to its mate. Mrs Emerson left her flowers and birds for-ever a few months ago, mourned with "melodious pain" by the husband who was so soon to follow her. He was despondent on being left alone. His work in the interests of returned soldiers, whose champion he was both with pen and on the platform, sustaining him for a time, but not sufficiently to enable him to resist the fell disease in defiance of which he had sung so cravely. But even to the end he was buoyant—full of enthusiasm for the working out of ideas which had come to him on the sickbed.
    Emerson's work should some day be collected. Only then will a definite, concrete idea be obtained of Australia Felix as this poet of Nature saw it. His work is clear, fresh and, inspiring, particularly that written during his sojourn in fern-decked Gippsland—a period, by the way, of which he never tired to talk. It was then that he wrote the pretty "Santa Claus and a Sundial" and the "Australian Bird Calendar," which, me thinks, is the nearest approach Australia will have for many years to come to the notable American volume "Through the Year with Birds and Poets." It has always seemed to me that the surest way to popularise the study of birds is to have them singing in verse (even as do the skylark, the thrush, and the black-bird in Britain); and, in this respect alone, Australia owes a very real debt to Ernest Emerson. Nothing finer in its way has been done than his recent poem, "The Spirit of Australia" (quoted in a bird biography in the "Sydney Mail" a short time ago), in which an affinity is established between our Anzac birds and Anzac men. Nor do I, with a knowledge of most Australian bird-writings, recall any better popular article, than the Emersonian sketch, "How the Kookaburra Learns to Laugh," which has found a place in "The Austral Garden of Prose." The school-children of Queensland will miss this vital writer, for in their interests he supplied much inspiriting material to the Bird Day issues of the departmental school papers, notably "The Blood-Bird," a dainty lyric which, (to the music of Mr. S. H. Pittman) is still being sung by children all over the State; and an article entitled "Two Pee-wees and a Prospect." This sketch calls for quotation, pointing as it does to the great value of birds and an opening for future action. Basing his remarks on the eloquent trust of a pair of "pee-wees" (magpie larks) which nested near his verandah, Emerson laid it down that "there is nothing more certain than this: In agricultural and garden areas where bird life is understood, prosperity will abound; in those areas where the defenceless birds are wantonly and continually harassed insects will increase and ruin, partial or complete, will follow. "Therefore," he emphasised, "a healthy rivalry between districts in bird study and protection must possess a material significance. As yet the most learned ornithologist can lay claim to no more than an incomplete knowledge of Australian birds; and in this great State, it is particularly necessary that the habits and uses of our native birds should be closely studied and tabulated. Who are better suited for this love of labor than the boys and girls? It is the hope of every bird lover in Australia that it will be possible soon to do their part by preparing themselves, take a representative census. Let us hope that all young Australians will do their part by preparing themselves both a by reading and observation, participate in this most extensive and necessary work."
    Little remains to be added, for this is not a detailed examination of the work of the late poet; merely the tribute of one bird-lover to another "which canst not see at eve what stars them be." Emerson's work was not finished. He had been engaged, for instance, on a poetic sequence somewhat similar in character (but not in language) to "Digger Smith," of C. J. Dennis. It was an idea that shape itself, without reaching achievement before the "Sentimental Bloke" first made his bow to the Australian public. But, for all he left unfinished, Emerson accomplishd much work of charm and not a little of value. Hear his own "high requiem":—
    So, earth to earth! There is pain to-day
    In the preacher's solemn voice;
    But my thoughts go out and away, away
    Where the wild bush birds rejoice
    And I'm ten years old and a boy again
    And the way, to the creek is green
    And it's oh! for the wattles along the lane
    And the blue-bells in between.
    So, earth to earth in the golden noon
    Or late in the waning day;
    We answered, the dear old mother croon
    As only her bush-kids may;
    And so, when the dusk has blurred our sight,
    And her last low call, we hear,
    We'll sink to sleep in her arms at night,
    Just earth to earth without fear.
    "Sydney Mail."20

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#B435/1871 (par William EMERSON & Mary Hannah SEARL) - as Ernest Sandoe EMERSON, Birth registered at Ball, Australia."
  2. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 House & Lot Souter's Subdivision NAV 12
    1905: #277 William Hayes (crossed out) Ernest Emerson
    1906: #200 Elsie D Emerson, Beaconsfield D.D.
    1907: #190 Ernest S Emerson, Beaconsfield, gentleman
    1908: #203 Edward S Emerson, Beaconsfield, gentleman - arrears
    1909: #755 James McGuigan, Beaconsfield, gentleman - unpaid
    1910: #728 James McGuigan, Beaconsfield, gentleman - paid arrears.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Record Office Victoria), Application 37,310.
  4. [S8] Queensland Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes "#D1918/B/27211 (par John Meredith & Maria Hammond) - as Elsie Dry Emerson, Death date: 18 May 1918."
  5. [S8] Queensland Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes "Ernest Sando Emerson, Registration details: 1919/B/28697 (par William Emerson & Anna Searl , Death date: 17 Jan 1919."
  6. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online) "#B435/1871 (par William EMERSON & Mary Hannah SEARL) - as Ernest Sandoe EMERSON, Birth registered at Ball, Australia."
  7. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 18 Jan 1919, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/155226932
  8. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  9. [S106] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1906.
  10. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909 "as Ernest Sands & Elsie D Emerson."
  11. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912 "as Ernest Sands & Elsie D Emerson."
  12. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913 "as Ernest Sands & Elsie D Emerson."
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 10 Dec 1907, p39
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/175799375
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.), Tue 8 Dec 1908, p21
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/176021183
  15. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 9 Nov 1910, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241980878
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Labor Call (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 23 Feb 1911, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/250029749
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Labor Call (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 18 Apr 1912, p30
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/250034498
  18. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 8 Sep 1913, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/7262237
  19. [S14] Newspaper - Shepparton Advertiser (Vic.), Mon 26 Jan 1914, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/91359814
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 20 Feb 1919, p34
    By A. S. Chisholm.
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/148562063
Last Edited18 Oct 2021
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.