Elsa Mary Grice

F, #992, b. 1885, d. 3 Aug 1972
Father*Sir John Grice b. 6 Oct 1850, d. 27 Feb 1935
Mother*Lady Mary Ann Power b. 1858, d. 5 Mar 1931
Note Gwynneth Clara Morris friend of Elsa GRICE [id992]. 
Birth*1885 Toorak, VIC, Australia, #B14140.1 
Note*c 1927 Friend of Gwynneth COLLES, lived in UB at some time? 
Death*3 Aug 1972 Donvale, VIC, Australia, #D18011 (Age 87.)2 

Grave

  • Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, BANKSIA, POSITION IN ROSE BED, GARDEN 4 BED 31 POSITION 473

Newspaper-Articles

  • 11 Aug 1928, MISS ELSA GRICE.
    Women's Institutes in England.
    In view of the incorporation of the Women's Institutes in Victoria with the newly formed Country Women's Association, special interest attaches to what Miss Elsa Grice has to tell of the development of the movement in England. Miss Grice who returned recently after more than a year's absence abroad, visited a number of the individual institutes of which there are now 4,000 while she was in England, and just before she left was present at the annual meeting of the National Federation of Institutes at the Queen's Hall London. Already she has been drawn back into active work in connection with the institutes here, and on Thursday visited the Beaconsfield institute with Lady Mitchell, who spoke to the members about the C W A.
    It will be remembered that the insti tutes came into being in Great Britain during the war and were considered of sufficient national importance to receive a grant of £5,000 from the Government, to be continued until they became self supporting. Each institute now has its own funds, and there is a central fund at headquarters in London so the Government grant will be withdrawn next year. The success of the movement in England may be traced very largely to this financial backing in the early stages. A good deal has already been written here of the various activities which concern the institutes, the aspect most familiar probably being the development of handicrafts and rural industries. Also a tremendous amount of health work is being done through the institutes, Miss Grice found, such for instance, as the teaching of mothercraft, health and domestic hygiene, proper medical and dental attention for children, the support of nursing associations in the different villages and so on. The members are also expected to concern themselves in all matters of interest to the community generally, such matters for in stance as sewerage and water supply in vil lages that are sadly lacking in this respect. They are encouraged too, to take an intelligent interest in local government and many of them have become members of local councils. Miss Grice was very im pressed by the fact that at the annual meeting in London, where women from all over the country spoke, only one of them was obviously nervous. The majority spoke admirably, and always to the point. Those vague generalities which betray inexperience and an untrained mind were conspicuous by their absence. Referring to that meeting Miss Grice said that special emphasis had been laid by one of the speakers on the part women could play in preserving the beauty of the countryside. Here seems a particular direction in which our CWA might follow their lead. There is sad evidence in many of our country and seaside resorts that the public is in need of education in this direction.
    One important feature in the development of the movement has been the assistance given by honorary organisers in the different counties, of whom there are about 350 in addition to the paid worker from the National Federation. Then there are of course, the experts in handicrafts who visit the various centres to give lectures and demonstrations. In Scotland Miss Grice was interested in the development of such home industries as hand woven woollen garments, cardigans, stockings, socks and so on, in many cases made from wool the women had spun themselves. The usual custom is for the institute to keep one penny or twopence in the shilling of the prices paid for these goods, the rest going to the worker.4
  • 17 Jan 1929, C.W.A. of Victoria. WHEN it is taken into consideration that the Country Women's Association of Victoria has only been in existence a little over 15 months, the headway that has been made seems nothing short of wonderful. It was Lady Somers who first suggested its establishment at a meeting called by Colonel Merritt during the Royal Show of 1928. For several months following this suggestion events necessarily moved slowly, for the idea had to be discussed, the opinion of country women had to be taken, and then a good deal of organisation had to be accomplished. But, at the outset, the association had the influence and ability of Lady Mitchell at the back of it, and there is no doubt that it was through her powers of organisa tion that the movement was so promptly put on a solid foundation. To-day there are thriving branches in many of the important country centres—18 branches and a mermbership of 1268—this extension is proof posi tive that the association was needed, for wherever branches have been formed they have been greeted with enthusiasm; some have been marvel lously successful from their very first meeting. The work that the associa tion has done, and proposes to do, can best be appreciated by finding out What each branch has done to date. TAKING a glance through the activities of the branches, we find that instructive lectures have been given on gardening, cookery, rug work, rug making, raffia, fruit preserving, cake decorating, &c. at the Beaconsfield branch, of which Mrs. Hurditch is president. The members have also en joyed lantern lectures by the Forestry Department on Australian timber. Market stalls and a cookery recipes exchange are also important features. ... Flinders branch is well established, for until October last it was a Women's Institute. It was the second to be formed, and it attained the most re markable success. This branch is ex tremely fortunate in its president, Mrs. Larking, who, two years ago, vis ited America, and there made a close study of the Women's Institute move ment. She returned to Victoria, inspired to do something to develop the idea, in Australia, and she found Miss Elsa Grice equally enthusiastic, and was convinced that the time had come to make a definite move. (extract)5

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B14140."
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  3. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    BANKSIA, POSITION IN ROSE BED, GARDEN 4 BED 31 POSITION 47.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Aug 1928 p10.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Queenslander: 17 Jan 1929 p53.
Last Edited2 May 2017

Dr Arthur Norman McArthur

M, #1002, b. 12 Jul 1869, d. 11 Dec 1950
Dr Arthur Norman McARTHUR
1911

Upper Beaconsfield Relevance

Had McArthur Road named after him.
Father*Peter Graham McArthur
Mother*Margaret McLean
AnecdoteMcArthur, Dr Arthur Norman (1869-1951), Dr Norman McArthur, the son of Peter McArthur and Margaret nee McLean was a boarder at the College from 1881 to 1886, and excelled in school sports, being especially interested in boxing and football. He was a member of the 1st Football XVIII from 1884 to 1886 and the 1st Cricket XI in 1885 and 1886. In the 1886 Annual Report his football talent was described as ‘generally roves, plays with dash, uses his weight to advantage and a good kick.’ At Cricket,-‘Good bat, has scored well this season, fair fielder.’ At tennis-‘a good player, gets plenty of pace on, needs practice. From the Geelong College he proceeded to medical studies at Ormond College, Melbourne University and at King's College, London. By 1909 he was Senior Gynaecological Surgeon at St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne and became a distinguished medical consultant practising in Collins Street. At University he gained a double blue for cricket and football.
A member of the well-known pioneer family of Meningoort, Camperdown, he was a worthy follower of their tradition, and was an original member of the Old Collegians' Association which he helped to form in 1908, and of which he became President in 1909 and 1910. His keen support of the College was lifelong, and after the tragic death of Norman Morrison he and Neil Campbell were largely responsible for the survival of the College. He, it was, who supplied the drive for the erection of the Norman Morrison Memorial Hall. His father Peter McArthur of Camperdown was one of the original twelve members of the Corresponding Committee formed at the establishment of the School in 1861. Dr McArthur was a member of the Geelong College Council from its inception in 1908 until 1947 and acted as Chairman of the Council during 1939 to 1941 during Arthur Coles' absence. Dr McArthur married Millicent Elizabeth Noakes. His brothers, Leslie Graham, Robert Ernest, Peter Campbell, Sir William Gilbert Stewart and John Neil McArthur also attended the College as did his son Peter Norman McArthur.
Dr Pillow and Dr Wettenhall at the Council Meeting of 4 May, 1951 described Dr MacArthur: ‘His entertaining personality was highly appreciated at College functions, with his ready wit, sound judgment, and diverting reminiscences. His example was outstanding, and one of which we can all be proud. It is impossible to exaggerate the debt owed to him by the College.’
Sources: Pegasus June, 1909 Page 41; Obituary Pegasus June, 1951 Page 35: Council Minutes 4 May, 1951.1 
Birth*12 Jul 1869 Camperdown, VIC, Australia, #B14164.2 
Marriage*12 May 1900Spouse: Mellicent Elizabeth Noakes. Sanderstead, Surrey, England, Jun Q [Croydon] 2a 575.3
Land-Note*17 Aug 1904 GEM-D-49.53: Mortgagee: Dr Arthur Norman McArthur. Discharged 8 July 1907. Mortgagor was Henry August Albers Anna Pauline Albers.4 
Land-Note*24 Feb 1906 GEM-C-72.79: Mortgagee: Dr Arthur Norman McArthur. Discharged 27 Jun 1915. Mortgagor was Egbert Charles Tyler.5 
Land-Note*4 Apr 1907 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: Dr Arthur Norman McArthur. 319a 3r 37p - foreclosed 22 Aug 1908. Mortgagor was Thomas Henry Cregan Mary Ellen Cregan.6 
Land-UBeac*22 Aug 1908 GEM-D-71A. Transfer from Thomas Henry Cregan Mary Ellen Cregan to Dr Arthur Norman McArthur. McArthur foreclosed on the mortgage he had provided on 4 Apr 1907.7 
Land-Note6 Sep 1911 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: Frances Boran. Discharged 22 Apr 1915. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.8 
Land-Note22 Apr 1915 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: Lydia Umphelby. Discharged 23 Aug 1930. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.9 
Land-Note23 Aug 1930 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: Joseph Emanuel Goonan. Discharged 27 Nov 1934. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.10 
Land-Note*27 Nov 1934 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: James Armstrong Bell. Discharged 1 Jul 1938. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.11 
Land-Note25 Sep 1936 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: John Grenville Bell. Discharged 25 Nov 1938. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.12 
Land-Note*28 Nov 1939 GEM-D-71A: Mortgagee: The Bank of Australasia. Discharged 2 Sep 1941. Mortgagor was Dr Arthur Norman McArthur.13 
Land-Note*2 Sep 1941 GEM-D-71A (part): subdived 3a 3r 7p in the south western corner of the property to retain.14 
Land-UBeac*13 Jul 1942 GEM-D-71A (part). Transfer from Dr Arthur Norman McArthur to Albert Barton Bennett. 3a 3r 7p.15 
Land-UBeac*23 Jul 1943 GEM-D-71A (part). Transfer from Dr Arthur Norman McArthur to Stanley Henry Earle. 316a 32p.16 
Death*11 Dec 1950 Harrison Street, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, #D22676 age 81 [par Peter McARTHUR & Margaret McLEAN].17 
Death-Notice*12 Dec 1950The death occurred at his residence in Harrison Street, Camperdown, on Monday morning, of Dr. Arthur Norman McArthur, at the age of 81 years.18 
Anecdote*1956ARTHUR NORMAN McARTHUR
(1869 - 1950) M.B. (Melb), M.R.C.S. (Eng.), F.A.C.S. (Hon.), F.R.A.C.S.
Born 12 July 1869 Camperdown, Victoria, Australia
Died 11 December 1950 Australia
Occupation Gynaecologist, Medical practitioner and Obstetrician
There have been few more colourful persons in the medical world of Australia than Arthur Norman McArthur, affectionately called "Potts" by his many friends. He lived to the eightieth year of a very full life in his profession of medicine, in lusty sports, such as boxing, polo and foxhounds, and in public and philanthropic interests. Into whatever he pursued, McArthur threw his whole heart and great physical and mental powers.
McArthur was the fifth son of Peter McArthur, pioneer pastoralist of the Western District of Victoria. Born at "Meningoort", his father’s station, near Camperdown, on July 12 1869, educated at Geelong College, and studying medicine at the University of Melbourne, where he was a resident in Ormond, he finished his course in London, becoming M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. in 1895. Three years later he was appointed House Surgeon in the Launceston General Hospital. Returning to England to marry Mellicent, daughter of Wickham Noakes of Selsdon Park, Surrey. McArthur subsequently commenced practice as an obstetrician and gynaecologist in Collins Street, Melbourne.
In 1903 he took the degrees of Bachelor of Surgery and Bachelor of Medicine of the University of Melbourne, and was appointed Honorary Obstetric and Outpatient Surgeon to the Women’s Hospital.
In 1905 he began a long period of association with St. Vincent’s Hospital, eventually becoming its Senior Honorary Gynaecologist. He resigned his Women’s Hospital appointment in 1909 and ceased to practice obstetrics.
McArthur’s interests in the field of medicine were varied, his achievements many and he evolved some special operative techniques. One of them was demonstrated to Dr. William Mayo (of Rochester U.S.A.) when the latter visited Australia in 1924; this resulted in McArthur being elected a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He organized a fund which raised £6,000 to buy radium for St. Vincent’s Hospital, and was prominent in a campaign, under the Chairmanship of Mr. B.T. Zwar, to organize cancer clinics.
He was a foundation Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, and a member of Council of the Victorian Branch of the British Medical Association (being first elected thereto in 1916). McArthur was a regular contributor to "The Medical Journal of Australia" on the subjects in which he specialized.
Outside medicine, McArthur’s great loves were sport and country life. He was a University blue in both cricket and football and was an amateur boxer of the top grade, in London in student days being runner-up in the inter-hospital heavyweight championship. He was for many years Chairman of the Victorian Amateur Boxing and Wrestling Championships. He played polo from early youth, was captain of the Melbourne Polo Club for four years, and with his three elder brothers had formed a famous polo team of his early years in the Western District.
Field shooting was possibly his favourite pastime and the openings of the quail and duck seasons were sacred - no professional work then. Accompanying this was active interest in game and native flora and fauna preservation. He was for many years Chairman of the Game Preservation Society of Victoria, and of the Advisory Council of Fauna and Flora of Victoria.
In his latter years, McArthur became more and more crippled with osteoarthritis of the hips, but his lively sense of humour never deserted him and right to the end he was ready to tell a good story from an unending fund of reminiscences.
He died on December 11th 1950 and his final jest was to leave a sum of money in order that his friends could hold a "wake". So, after the funeral these friends foregathered and drank a toast to "good shooting in the next world". Norman McArthur was a fine and generous personality, one of the best sons of Victoria’s squatting era, and a man of exceptionally wide accomplishments.19 

Grave

  • Tristania, Wall 2B, Niche 320, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Clayton, VIC, Australia20

Family

Mellicent Elizabeth Noakes b. Jun 1874, d. 31 Oct 1956
Child 1.Peter Norman McArthur b. 3 May 1911, d. 19 Jun 1996

Newspaper-Articles

  • 3 Jul 1897, DEATH OF MR. PETER McARTHUR. One of the Pioneers of the District. A Sketch of His Career. The generation of sturdy pioneers who led the way in the colonisation of Victoria are rapidly passing away. There are a few still who linger on the field, even in their old age splendid samples of the manhood that went out to conquer un- known country. Mr. Peter McArthur, of Meningoort, was one of those who took a prominent part not only in the pioneering work of this district, but in the work that followed, and when it was announced in these columns that he had been overtaken by an illness that would prove fatal, genuine regret was felt and expressed by all classes of the community. For the past 18 months he had been ailing more or less, and the last few weeks alarming symptoms began to set in. He gradually got worse, and on last Monday week Dr. Pettigrew pronounced his case hopeless. It was expected then that two or three days would see the end, but his wonderful vitality asserted itself, and although he grew weaker day by day, it was not until Thursday at about half-past one o'clock that he passed peacefully away, surrounded by the members of his family. Mr. McArthur's death marks the break- ing of another link in the chain that binds the present and the past. He was a native of Islay, one of the numerous islands off the west coast of Scotland, where his parents were well-to-do farmers, and was born, as far as can be ascertained, on the 14th July, 1817, two years after the Battle of Waterloo. When quite a boy he went to sea for three or four years, after which he returned home and for a while worked on his father's farm. He did not remain long, however, and again taking to the sea he made his way to Australia, arriving in Sydney in the year 1836. In the beginning of 1839 he went to Melbourne, and with Messrs. N. Cole and Du Vernay set out for the Western district, with the object of taking up some land and engaging in pastoral pursuits. At Geelong the party met the Messrs. Manifold, who had the previous year taken up the land at present held by their descendants, and from whom they purchased a flock of sheep. They then made their way with all speed to the Messrs. Manifold's station, where they obtained possession of their sheep and drove them on to the country now comprising the West Cloven Hills and Meningoort stations,which they took up in partnership. Du Vernay did not remain long in the partnership, and leaving Messrs. McArthur and Cole on the station he established a house of call at what is now known as Cressy, but was for years after his advent called The Frenchman's. There is still a memento of him in this district in the Frenchman's Marsh on the road to Terang, which derived its name from him. For several years the station continued to be worked by Messrs. McArthur and Cole, but in 1849 or 1850 it was divided between them, Mr. Cole taking the part now known as the West Cloven Hills, and Mr. McArthur the other part, which was called Meningoort after the native name of the mount which shelters the homestead from the westerly winds. The next important event in Mr. McArthur's life was his marriage, which took place in 1855, when he was united at Geelong to Miss Margaret McLean, sister of Captain John McLean, who was widely known as a daring and adventurous navigator, and commanded the Citizen, the first vessel to trade between Melbourne and Geelong. Mr. and Mrs. McArthur took up their abode at Meningoort, and lived happily together until Mrs. McArthur's death, which oc- curred about 14 years ago. The issue of this marriage was ten children, two of whom are dead. The eldest son is Mr. J. N. McArthur, M.L.A., of Lawrenny. The other sons of the deceased gentleman by his first marriage are Mr. Stuart McArthur, leader of the County Court Bar in Melbourne; Mr. Campbell McArthur, who manages Meningoort; Mr. E. McArthur, who manages Leechfield; Dr. Norman McArthur, at present in London; and Mr. Leslie McArthur. There were only two daughters, Mrs. G. W. Dowling, of Fine View, and Miss Jean McArthur. Three or four years after the death of his first wife Mr. McArthur married Miss Hood, of Camperdown, daughter of Dr. Hood, who was then practising at Ondit, and there was by this marriage one son, Master Douglas McArthur. The various members of the family have always thoroughly identified themselves with the district, throughout the whole of which they are widely known and respected. Although Mr. McArthur never took a prominent part in political matters he did much useful public work. He was a member of the first Road Board for this district, which was constituted at a meeting held at Darlington on the 8th July, 1857, at which the late Hon. Francis Ormond presided. It may be interesting to mention that the members of the Board were Messrs. William Anderson, John L. Currie, Peter McArthur, Daniel Curdie, Adolphus Clark, Benjamin Dowling, John Walls, and John McFarlane. Mr. Currie was elected chairman. Mr. McArthur continued a member of the Road Board during the whole period of its existence, and when it gave place to the Hampden Shire Council he became a member of that body and sat for several years. He was also one of the first magistrates appointed in the district, and frequently occupied the bench. Mr. McArthur also did good work in con- nection with the Hampden and Heytes- bury Pastoral and Agricultural Society, of which he was President for 18 years continuously. He was likewise a prominent member of the Leura Lodge of Freemasons, and was a Past Grand Lodge officer. In all his public positions Mr. McArthur was active and energetic, and could always be relied upon to do whatever he under- took. Through the death of Mr. McArthur the district has lost a resident who ever worked for its good. He was noted for his honesty of purpose and integrity of character, and for that genial and kindly nature which has descended to his children. He was a man of strong personality, as were all the pioneers of civilisation in the colony, and he has done work that will keep his memory alive for genera- tions, and bear fruit till time shall be no more. He needs no eulogy in Camperdown, where he was known to all as that noblest work of God - a man. THE FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS. The funeral procession will leave Meningoort at noon to-day, and is expected to arrive at the Camperdown Cemetery, where the remains will be interred, at 2 o'clock. The W.M. of the Leura Lodge of Freemasons requests members of the craft to assemble at the Masonic Hall at noon today for the purpose of attending the funeral.21
  • 9 Oct 1897, WILL OF THE LATE MR. PETER MCARTHUR. ESTATE VALUED AT £152,483.
    The will of the late Mr Peter McArthur, of Meningoort, near Camperdown, grazier, was lodged for probate yesterday by the executors, Mr James Chester Manifold, of Talindert, near Camperdown, grazier; Mr. Nicholas Cole, of West Cloven Hills, near Camperdown, grazier; and Mr. William Kinross Mackinnon, of Marida Yallock, near Terang, grazier. The testator, who was favourably identified with the Western District, died on the 1st of July last, and his will bears date of April 2 last. The real property is valued at £131,533 and the personal property at £20,950. The testator bequeats to his widow, Elizabeth Mary, the horse, buggy, and harness which she has been accustomed to use and to his daughter, Maggie M'Arthur, the pair of ponies, harness, and buggy which she has been accustomed to use; to his son, Leslie Graham M'Arthur, his gold watch and chain and appendages, and all articles of jewellery and personal adornment, to his son Peter Campbell M'Arthur, a legacy of £1,000; to his son, George Alexander Douglas M'Arthur, a legacy of £4,000, payable when he reaches the age of 25 years, to each of his daughters, Maggie M'Arthur and Catherine Jean M'Arthur, a legacy of £7,500, the freehold land and buildings thereon, at Camperdown, and now occupied by his niece, Margaret Carmody are bequeathed to her during life, and afterwards to fall into and become part of the residuary estate; the freehold land and four houses erected thereon, situate in the village of Bowmore, Island of Isla, in Argyleshire, Scotland, are bequeathed to his niece, Mary M'Kay of Bowmore, the freehold land, containing 5,989 acres, being part of the Meningoort estate, is bequeathed to his son, John Neil M'Arthur subject to the payment of £13,000 to his trustees towards his residuary estate. The residue of the property subject to an annuity of £300 to his widow, an annuity of £50 to his niece Margaret Carmody; and an annuity of £175 to his son, George Alexander Douglas M'Arthur, until he attains the age of 25 years, is divided in equal shares amongst his sons—William Gilbert Stewart M'Arthur, Peter Campbell M'Arthur, Robert Ernest M'Arthur, Norman M'Arthur, and Leslie Graham M'Arthur.22
  • 31 Oct 1917, RAILWAY COMEDIES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    Sir,-To supplement the series of articles in "The Argus on the management of the Victorian railways I would like to supply some facts that read almost like a comic opera. I have a property at Upper Beaconsfield. Some years ago I had sent to Beaconsfield station, 23 miles from Melbourne, a 1.000-gallon tank and a 9ft. cyclone gate. They were lost for 2 months, the Railways department being unable to trace them. At last a man whom I knew from Gippsland stopped me in the street and asked me when I was going to remove my tank from the Drouin railway platform, as it was obstructing the platform. He knew the tank was mine because it had painted on it 12in. letters in black on the galvanised iron, "Dr. McArthur, Beaconsfield." I immediately asked if he also a 9ft. cyclone gate. He said "Yes," and that it had a label on it fully addressed. I informed the railway authorities, but a shrug of the shoulders, a bland smile, and a few platitudes dismissed the whole matter as far as the department was concerned.
    I bad a bag of potatoes sent to me on July 1. From Beaconsfield to the Toorak station is 24 miles. On July 14 the bag of potatoes had arrived at Toorak. The explanation of the railway authorities was that the goods train conveying a certain amount of perishable goods could not deliver at Toorak at 3 o'clock in the morning, as the department could not afford to employ men to unload and shunt goods at that time. The goods, had to go to Spencer street, and then at last when a full truck was made up to deliver goods at Toorak the return was made and the truck shunted off at Toorak.
    Again, a bag of cement sent to Beaconsfield was lost. The department was notified and re-notified that the cement could not be traced. Three months went by, and a claim of 5/3 was made against the depart ment. In another month it was notified that payment was passed, and awaited col- lection at Spencer street. I did not collect. When the department received my letter expressing what I thought of them they kindly sent the 5/3 to my office in Collins street. I had half a dozen windows sent up from a timber merchant. They arrived at Beaconsfield. Two of the windows were broken in transit, and my manager would not take delivery. I sent back the win dows, and had them replaced at the department's expense. On the return they were lost on the railways. Three months again before a claim could be sent in. Another month expired, and a notice was sent that payment would be made on calling for the money at Spencer street. I protested, as I had already made four visits to Spencer street about the windows. The payment was then made at my rooms within half an hour.
    Some eggs and butter recently were sent from Beaconsfield to Toorak, and I was notified. I sent my carrier for them. They were not there. I sent again—not there! I called next day—not there! I thought perhaps they would be at Armadale—a mistake on the part of my manager. Not there! On the fifth day I went to Toorak again. Not there! But I got into the parcels office, searched for myself, and found the parcels, fully labelled. I made the official look up the waybill. There it was five days old. I saw the stationmaster, and gave him all I knew."
    I always have money deposited at Beaconsfield railway station to cover goods arriving. The stationmaster notifies me when this is exhausted. It has been explained frequently to officials at Toorak. Yet every time egg-boxes or butter-boxes are sent by my carrier to Toorak a refusal is given to send them on because 2d. must be paid cash down for return of "empties."
    These are only a few instances selected out of an extraordinary number of irritating comedies that the Victorian railway management has personnally supplied to me. Can anyone conceive of such management in a private company, where dividends were looked for?
    Yours, &c., A. NORMAN MCARTHUR. 74 Collins street, Oct. 26.23
  • 13 Dec 1917, Berwick Shire Council Correspondence. From A Norman McArthur, "Puumba," Beaconsfield Upper, applying for a road through Morphett's property from Waters' orchard to Pine Grove Hill—Received.24
  • 14 Dec 1917, Berwick Shire Council. CORRESPONDENCE. From A. N. McArthur, re a road through Mr Morphett's property at Beaconsfield Upper.-Received.25
  • 28 Jan 1932, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. Early last week bush fires broke out again. On Tuesday morning a call came from Montuna, to subdue a fire there, that was threatening a number of week-end homes. The Bush Fire Brigade burnt a break, but not, unfortunately, until portions of Mr. Geo. Grant’s orchard had been de stroyed. Whilst they were away an other call came for help to quell a fire that had broken out on Judge Bevan’s property, and which threa tened Mrs. Wheeler’s cottage and Mr. F. Funnell’s orchard; however, it was “got under’’ before much damage was done. In the afternoon a fire started on Dr. McArthur’s property, and, fanned by a strong wind, it swept over a big tract of country. Dr. Mc Arthur’s sheds and outbuildings were only saved, after hard work. The fire then got into Mr. G. Lewis’s place, and all his sheds, including carts, har ness and implements' were destroyed, and the house was saved with great difficulty. Whilst the fighters were concentrating their efforts to save Mr Lewis's house, the fire swept on to Mrs. Bennett’s whose house was destroyed. Mr. Morgan’s large sheds were destroyed, and one corner of his house was burned before the fire could be checked. All the valuable orchard implements, including a power spray pump, was destroyed in Mr. Morgan’s sheds. Another fire broke out at the head of the Cardinia Creek and burnt all the outbuildings, including a detached kitchen, at Mr. Ladds; the house was only saved after a hard fight. On Wednesday a fire started in the gully opposite Mr. Armstrong’s, and a break had to be burnt to save Mrs. Renfries, Miss McConachie’s and Messrs. Armstrong and Landor’s houses, as the wind was blowing fairly strong. Some members of the brigade were on duty all night to prevent the fire spreading to Messrs Ballanytyne’s, Walker’s, and Baxter’s places. On Sunday night the brigade was called out to burn a break to save Mr. Walker’s fine fernery from being destroyed, as a fire was coming up the Haunted Gully.26
  • 15 Feb 1938, TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS
    Sir,-The article by the agricultural editor on the appalling spread of the blackberry is a timely contribution to rouse a dilatory Government department. The menace of the blackberry is impossible to understand or realise except by those who know the mountains as I do. Once a year (if he does not forget) an inspector passes down the lane passing my orchard, and leaves the usual notice to destroy blackberries on the road up to nine feet of my fence. The poor inspector has to come a long way round from Kalista, Monbulk, Sassafras, or wherever it might be. There were short cuts he could have taken, but in many of those lanes the chain-wide road is occupied by blackberry for miles quite impenetrable and 15ft. in height.
    In the mountains Crown lands are covered with blackberry. Shire councils are so appalled by what is in front of that they cannot tackle the problem. It is the most dreadful evidence of Governmental neglect that one can possibly conceive. The increase on Crown lands in the Dandenong Ranges during the last 20 years is inconceivable. A united attack, as indicated by your agricultural editor, must at once be undertaken, and action must be continuous, unsparing, and unyielding.-Yours, &c.
    A. NORMAN MCARTHUR. Upper Beaconsfield.27
  • 15 Dec 1950, Death of Dr. A. N. McArthur
    THE death occurred on Monday, December 11, of Dr. Arthur Norman McArthur, M.R.C.S. (Eng.), F.R.C.S. (Lond.), M.B., B.S. (Melb.), F.A.C.S. (Hon. U.S.A.), F.R.A.C.S., of Harrison Street, Camperdown, at the age of 81 years. Widely known throughout the Western District, the late Dr. McArthur was born at Meningoort Estate and was the son of the late Mr. Peter McArthur, a pioneer of the district. He was educated at Geelong College, Melbourne University and King's College. London. The late Dr. McArthur was house surgeon of Launceston General Hospital in 1898-99 and was obstetric surgeon at the Women's Hospital, Melbourne, and senior gynaecological surgeon at St. Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne. He became a member of the British Medical Association in order to rectify conditions for doctors in lodge practices. After some time the B.M.A. supported his action and Dr. W. W. Boyd became the active agent to adjust conditions with lodges which ultimately resulted favorably to general practitioners in the Wasley Award. He had been a member of the Geelong College Council since 1908, and chairman of the Game Protection Society, and chairman of the advisory council of the Flora and Fauna Society of Victoria. A keen sportsman, the late Dr. McArthur played football and cricket for Geelong College and Ormond College. He was captain of Ormond College football team. At Melbourne University he gained his double Blue for cricket and football. He played polo at Camperdown and Melbourne and was captain of Melbourne Polo Club for four of the seven years he played with that club. From 1905 to 1925 he was chairman of the Amateur Boxing and Wrestling Association of Victoria. The late Dr. McArthur re tired from his surgical practice a few years ago to live quietly at Camperdown. He was a brother of the late Miss Joan McArthur and an uncle of Mr. G. S. McArthur. M.L.C. He married Miss Mellicent Elizabeth Noakes, daughter of the late Mr. Wickham Noakes, of Selsdon Park, Surrey, England. He leaves three daughters, Joan (Mrs. Geoff. Austin, Coleraine), Noel (Mrs. C. Seymour, Narracoorte, S.A.), and Alison (Mrs. F. L. Blair, Calcutta. India) and one son, Peter, of Narracoorte. S.A.) The funeral was to the Springvale crematorium on Tuesday, December 12.28

Citations

  1. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://gnet.geelongcollege.vic.edu.au:8080/wiki/…
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B14164."
  3. [S9] GRO "Jun Q [Croydon] 2a 575."
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3005-940 - Anna Paulina Albers and August Henry Albers to Arthur Norman McArthur.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1625-865 + C/T 2638-568 - discharged 27 Jun 1915 - Mortgage No 240869.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2563-439 - Thomas Henry Cregan and Mary Ellen Cregan obtained a mortgage from Arthur Norman McArthur. He foreclosed on 22 Aug 1908 - C/T 3292-230.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2563-439 (319a 3r 37p) - Thomas Henry Cregan and Mary Ellen Cregan obtained a mortgage from Arthur Norman McArthur. He foreclosed on 22 Aug 1908 - C/T 3292-230 - Arthur Norman McArthur of No 74 Collins Street Melbourne Surgeon.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to Frances Boran. Discharged 22 Apr 1915. Mortgage No 297320.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to Lydia Umphelby. Discharged 23 Aug 1930. Mortgage No 346346.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to Joseph Emanuel Goonan. Discharged 27 Nov 1934. Mortgage No 651450.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to James Armstrong Bell. Discharged 1 Jul 1938. Mortgage No 703957.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to John Grenville Bell. Discharged 25 Nov 1938. Mortgage No 729268.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Mortgage to Bank of Australasia. Discharged 2 Sep 1941. Mortgage No 784108.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2563-439 - see C/T 6501-180.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6501-180 - Arthur Norman McArthur of Mortlake Surgeon to Albert Barton Bennett of 271 Lonsdale Street Melbourne Master Tailor - a caveat was lodged on 23 Jul 1941, lapsed 13 Jul 1942 - by whom? Did Bennett obtain the property before it was officially subdivided?
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3292-230 - Arthur Norman McArthur to Stanley Henry Earle of 6 Bay Street Brighton Managing Director - C/T 6635-827.
  17. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D22676 age 81 [par Peter McARTHUR & Margaret McLEAN]."
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle: 12 Dec 1950 p4.
  19. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.thewomenshistory.org.au/biogs/e000028b.htm
    Transcription of item written by Dr Colin Macdonald and published in "The Book of Remembrance", The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, 1956.
  20. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    wife cremated at Springvale - location not recorded - contact administration regarding the tenure of this location.
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle, 3 Jul 1879, p3.
  22. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Oct 1897, p11.
  23. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 31 Oct 1917 p11.
  24. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "13 Dec 1917."
  25. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "14 Dec 1917, p3."
  26. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "28 Jan 1932, p4."
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Feb 1938 p12.
  28. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle: 15 Dec 1950 p1.
Last Edited1 May 2017

Peter Norman McArthur

M, #1007, b. 3 May 1911, d. 19 Jun 1996
Father*Dr Arthur Norman McArthur b. 12 Jul 1869, d. 11 Dec 1950
Mother*Mellicent Elizabeth Noakes b. Jun 1874, d. 31 Oct 1956
Birth*3 May 1911 Armadale, VIC, Australia, #B8198.1 
Birth-Notice*4 May 1911McARTHUR.—On the 3rd May, at Kuungil, Kooyong-road, Toorak, the wife of Dr A. Norman McArthur—a son. (Both well.2
Marriage*1948Spouse: Mary Louise Murchie. VIC, Australia, #M9989.3
 
Village Bell*Sep 1987The article reads: PETER McARTHUR'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY
If you enjoy a good yarn and are interested in the early history of Upper Beaconsfield, make sure you read 'Whimsy and a Little Bull' by Peter McArthur. Mr. McArthur's family owned an orchard here early this century and visited it regularly from Melbourne. The hazards of early horse transport and motor-cars, running an orchard, and, later, raising pigs, local cricket, and making the golf course, plus characters such as Boss Shorthouse and Claud Harris, are described and illustrated with vim and humour in what was clearly a favourite period of the author's life.
The first three chapters are likely to be of most interest to you, the remaining chapters recall his life and experiences in Naracoorte S.A. where he took up land, and his years in the Australian Army.
The author will be signing copies of the book at the Upper Beaconsfield Hall on Monday, 5th October, from 10.00 a.m.4 
Death*19 Jun 1996 Mt Gambier, SA, Australia, age 85.5 

Census (UK/IRL) and Electoral Rolls (Australia)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
29 Jun 1934"Puumba", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer.6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 30 Dec 1931, BEACONSFIELD UPPER
    On Christmas Eve a choral party of 24 members visited the guest houses and sang carols. On Boxing Day a tennis tournament was held on the public courts. The silver cups presented by the local club were won by Miss Brown and Mr Alan Brown. A croquet tournament was won by Miss Campbell and Miss Dora Stenhouse. Those who did not join in the touraments found plenty of amusement walking, riding, and playing tennis and golf. In the evening the Traders' Association in conjunction with the tennis and cricket clubs held a dance. On Monday evening Mr Peter McArthur gave a party at Dr McArthur's home, when farewell was said to Miss Anne Williamson who will shortly leave the district. Many entertainments have been arranged for the New Year holiday.7
  • 13 Dec 1944, Ann Marguerite McArthur of Crimea street, St. Kilda, Victoria, against Peter Norman McArthur, soldier, of Victoria, on the ground of adultery with a woman unknown. Mr J. C Travers for Mrs. McArthur.8

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#B8198."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 May 1911, p1.
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  4. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "058-1987, p4 by Jane Holth."
  5. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, Carinya Cemetery
    http://mountgambier.dcw.lga.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?c=27662
  6. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Dec 1931 p5.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), Wed 13 Dec 1944, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129884382
Last Edited27 Jun 2018

Dr William Alexander Teao Lind

M, #1016, b. 25 May 1881, d. 6 Oct 1928
Father*William Alexander Teao Lind b. 1852, d. 3 Nov 1928
Mother*Mary Ann Todd Smith b. 1851, d. 12 Mar 1932
Probate (Will)* William A T Lind. Medical Practitioner. Kew. 06 Oct 1928. 225/087. Owned property at Upper Beaconsfield containing 10a 3r 15p with a 5 roomed weatherboard house theron, valued at £480 in inventory but at £600 in unrealised assets.1 
Birth*25 May 1881 Geelong, VIC, Australia, #B16704.2 
Land-UBeac*5 Jan 1906 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (Lot 4). Transfer from Frederick William Henry Dale to Dr William Alexander Teao Lind. 6a 2r 37p.3 
Land-UBeac6 Apr 1908 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (Lot 3). Transfer from James Dale Atchison to Dr William Alexander Teao Lind. 4a 1r 17 2/10p.4 
Marriage*1915Spouse: Monica Marian Gamble. VIC, Australia, #M2974.5
 
Occupation*b 6 Oct 1928 According to his probate WAT Lind worked for the Lunacy Department Melbourne prior to his death.1 
Death*6 Oct 1928 South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #D17231 (Age 46.)6 
Land-UBeac*a 6 Oct 1928 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (Lots 3.4). Transfer from Dr William Alexander Teao Lind to William Alexander Teao Lind. 6a 2r 37p (lot 4) & 4a 1r 17 2/10p (lot 3.)7,8 
Death-Notice*8 Oct 1928LIND.—On the 6th October, 1928 (suddenly) at Toorak Dr W A T Lind the beloved husband of Monica M Lind, of 18 Walpole street Kew and loving father of William and Neeta, aged 46 years.
LIND.—The Friends of the late Dr. W. A. T. LIND, of 18 Walpole street, Kew, are respectfully informed that his remains will be interred in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew.9 

Grave

  • PRES B378 & B379, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, In memory of Jane Elizabeth LIND died 14 Aug 1894 aged 69 years, for 43 years loving wife of Rev William Alexander LIND & of the above W. A. LIND b London 28 Jan 1828, d Surrey Hills 1 Mar 1915.
    In memory of Jane Elizabeth LIND only and well beloved daughter of Rev. W.A. LIND & J.E. LIND, b Ballarat 5 Sep 1860, d Surrey Hills 23 Mar 1918.
    William Alexander LIND M.D. d 6 Oct 1928.10,11

Newspaper-Articles

  • 17 Nov 1928, The Perpetual Executors and Trustees Association of Australia Limited, 100-104 Queen street, Melbourne, is applying for probate of the will of William Alexander Teao Lind, late of 18 Walpole street, Kew, medical practitioner. The deceased left real estate valued at £3,880 and personal estate valued at £2,308. After devising a property to his son the residue of his estate he left to his widow.12

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P3, unit 1930; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 790.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B16704."
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1889-602 William Alexander Teao Lind of Alfred Hospital Prahran Medical Practitioner.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2583-455 - James Dale Atchison to William Alexander Teao Lind of Ararat Medical Practitioner.
  5. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2583-455 - Title not changed after Dr W A T Lind's death.
  8. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Oct 1928 p1.
  10. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    PRES B 0378 & B 0379.
  11. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Nov 1928, p18.
Last Edited27 Jun 2018