Francis Gully Drake

M, #4561, b. 1855, d. Sep 1950
Birth*1855 Malvern, Worcestershire, England. 
Marriage*30 Apr 1877 Spouse: Florence Blakely Crawford. All Saints' Church, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #M1513.1
 
Marriage-Notice*9 May 1877DRAKE—CRAWFORD.—On the 30th ult., at All Saints' Church, St. Kilda, by the Rev J. H. Gregory, incumbent, assisted by the Rev. Frank Coghlan, chaplain to the Bishop of Perth, W. A., Francis Gully, second son of the Rev. T. Drake, Sutton-on-Trent, Newark, England, to Florence, eldest daughter of Mrs. Crawford, Belgravia, Fitzroy-street, St. Kilda.2 
Bill of Sale*1896 107644 Francis Gully Drake Florence Millicent Drake 37 Lewisham Road Prahran.3 
Divorce*1896 VIC, Australia, Divorce 1896/90
Blakeley Horence DRAKE Party: Petitioner, Francis Gully DRAKE Party: Respondent.4 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel31 May 1929 Sailing with Florence Millicent Drake to London, England. Ship Comorin Address Bank of Australia Threadneedle Street
Age 74 - Accountant.5 
Death*Sep 1950 Worthing, Sussex, England, Sep Q [Worthing] (Age 96) 5h 493.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861Thomas R DRAKE, Vicar of Fittleworth, Vicarage House, Fittleworth, Sussex, EnglandAge 6 - Son7
1903142 Williams Road, Prahran, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: manager. With Florence Millicent Drake.8
1909Malvern Road, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: manager. With Florence Millicent Drake.9
1912747 Malvern Road, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: salesman. With Florence Millicent Drake.10
bt 1913 - 1915Chilcote Avenue, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: salesman. With Florence Millicent Drake.11,12,13
bt 1917 - 1918Bath Street, Mornington, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: independent means. With Florence Millicent Drake.14,15
bt 1924 - 193152 Lillimur Road, Caulfield East, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: accountant. With Florence Millicent Drake.16,17,18,19
1934100 Hotham Street, Melbourne East, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: accountant.20

Family

Florence Blakely Crawford b. 3 Jun 1856, d. 3 Aug 1927
Children 1.Florence Millicent Drake b. 8 Mar 1878, d. 9 Apr 1953
 2.George Arthur Drake b. 12 Oct 1879, d. 25 Feb 1949
 3.Francis Joseph Drake+ b. 1 Jun 1886, d. 17 Jul 1955

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 May 1877, p1.
  3. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 8350/ P2 unit 278, item 107644.
  4. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 283/ P0 unit 97, item 1896/90.
  5. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  6. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  7. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 622; Folio: 90; Page: 11; GSU roll: 542673."
  8. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  9. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  10. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  11. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  12. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  13. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  14. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  15. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  16. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  17. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  18. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  19. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  20. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
Last Edited12 Nov 2019

Florence Millicent Drake

F, #4562, b. 8 Mar 1878, d. 9 Apr 1953
Father*Francis Gully Drake b. 1855, d. Sep 1950
Mother*Florence Blakely Crawford b. 3 Jun 1856, d. 3 Aug 1927
Birth*8 Mar 1878 Hawthorn, VIC, Australia, #B9515 - baptised Christ Church Hawthorn 26 May 1878.1,2 
Bill of Sale*1896 107644 Francis Gully Drake Florence Millicent Drake 37 Lewisham Road Prahran.3 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel31 May 1929 Sailing with Francis Gully Drake to London, England. Ship Comorin Address Bank of Australia Threadneedle Street
Age 50 - Home Duties.4 
Death*9 Apr 1953 Croydon, Surrey, England, Jun Q [Croydon] (Age 75) 5g 99.5 
Death-Notice*11 Apr 1953DRAKE.—On April 9, at the home of her cousin, Geoffrey Last, 32, The Waldrons, Croydon, FLORENCE MILLICENT, aged 75, daughter of the late FRANCIS GULLY DRAKE, of Melbourne, Australia, and Worthing. Funeral Croydon Crematorium, Tuesday April 14, at 2.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1903142 Williams Road, Prahran, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.7
1909Malvern Road, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.8
1912747 Malvern Road, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.9
bt 1913 - 1915Chilcote Avenue, Toorak, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.10,11,12
bt 1917 - 1918Bath Street, Mornington, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.13,14
bt 1924 - 193152 Lillimur Road, Caulfield East, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Francis Gully Drake.15,16,17,18
1934102 Hotham Street, Melbourne East, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.19

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Australia, Births and Baptisms, 1792-1981 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
  3. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 8350/ P2 unit 278, item 107644.
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  5. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, England, Andrews Newspaper Index Cards, 1790-1976 - DT 11 Apr 1953.
  7. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  8. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  9. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  10. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  11. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  12. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  13. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  14. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  15. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  16. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  17. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  18. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  19. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
Last Edited12 Nov 2019

Francis Joseph Drake

M, #4563, b. 1 Jun 1886, d. 17 Jul 1955
Father*Francis Gully Drake b. 1855, d. Sep 1950
Mother*Florence Blakely Crawford b. 3 Jun 1856, d. 3 Aug 1927
Birth*1 Jun 1886 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B22310.1,2 
Education*1892 Attended State School 2560 Upper Beaconsfield - admitted age 7y 5m.3 
Marriage*1916 Spouse: Louisa Gertrude Mear. VIC, Australia, #M745.4
 
Death*17 Jul 1955 Kew, VIC, Australia, #D13571 (Age 68) [par Francis DRAKE & Unknown].5 
Death-Notice18 Jul 1955DRAKE.—On July 17, Francis Joseph, dearly loved husband of Lou, father of Nancy, Frank, Ivy, and Jim.—Peace, perfect peace.6 
Death-Notice*19 Jul 1955DRAKE. — The Funeral of the late Mr. FRANCIS JOSEPH DRAKE will leave our parlors, 311-316 High street, Preston, THIS DAY (Tuesday), after a service commencing at, 2.30 p.m., for the Burwood Cemetery.7 

Grave

  • BU-CE4*W***247, Burwood Cemetery, Burwood, VIC, Australia8

Newspaper-Articles

  • 17 Jul 1956, DRAKE, Francis Joseph.—In loving memory of my darling father, and granddad of John, Faye, Joy, and Leigh.—Sadly missed. (Inserted by his daughter, Nancy—Mrs. Ken Smith.)
    DRAKE.—In loving memory of our dear dad, Francis Joseph, who passed away July 17, 1955.—Forever In our thoughts. (Inserted by son Frank, daughter-in-law Beryl, and grandson Robert.)9

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S199] Series: VPRS13718 PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Birthdate listed in School Building File 795/P0/1543 School 2560 (Listed as John Drake).
  3. [S25] School Records - Beaconsfield North 2560: parent/guardian Mrs Drake, previous schooling Beaconsfield Upper.
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "Place of birth ST KILDA."
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 18 Jul 1955, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71668101
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 19 Jul 1955, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71668454
  8. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Burwood Cemetery. http://www.gmct.com.au/deceased-search.aspx
    also buried here are the cremated remains of Robert Francis Drake 24/02/1954 - 30/03/1992 (Age 38Y) and John J Johnstone (96Y)
    ,.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 17 Jul 1956, p14
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71646465
Last Edited13 Nov 2019

George Arthur Drake

M, #4564, b. 12 Oct 1879, d. 25 Feb 1949
Father*Francis Gully Drake b. 1855, d. Sep 1950
Mother*Florence Blakely Crawford b. 3 Jun 1856, d. 3 Aug 1927
Probate (Will)* 419/114. George A DRAKE Date of grant: 16 Nov 1949; Date of death: 25 Feb 1949; Occupation: Merchant; Residence: Melbourne.1 
Birth*12 Oct 1879 Albury, NSW, Australia, #B8330.2,3 
Education*1892 Attended State School 2560 Upper Beaconsfield - admitted age 12y 2m.4 
Marriage*1904 Spouse: Elizabeth Gertrude Martin. VIC, Australia, #M3158/1904.5
 
Death*25 Feb 1949 South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #D2199 (Age 70.)6 
Death-Notice*1 Mar 1949DRAKE.—On February 25 at 19 Portland place, South Yarra, George Arthur Drake, husband of Elizabeth Gertrude, and loved father of Moira (Mrs Smith), Creina (Mrs E. Silvers, deceased), Kerin (Mrs Johnson) and Pat (Mrs Laver).
—Requiescat in pace, (Privately interred February 28).
DRAKE.—On February 25, George Arthur Drake, loved father of Moira Smith, and grandfather of Peter and Denis Smith. — R.I.P.
DRAKE.—On February 25, George Arthur Drake, loved father of Creina, (deceased) and Eric, loved grandfather of Tony and Ricky Silvers. — R.I.P.
DRAKE.—On February 25, George Arthur Drake, loved father of Kerin and Cyril Johnson, and grandfather of Kerin, Anne, Rosemary, and Terrie Johnson — R.I.P.
DRAKE.—On February 25, George Arthur Drake loved father of Pattie and Bill Laver, and grandfather of Tricia Lorraine, and Billie Laver. — R.I.P.7 

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P3 unit 4984, item 419/114
    VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 1462, item 419/114.
  2. [S199] Series: VPRS13718 PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Birthdate listed in School Building File 795/P0/1543 School 2560.
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree.
  4. [S25] School Records - Beaconsfield North 2560: parent/guardian Mrs Drake, previous schooling Beaconsfield Upper.
  5. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 1 Mar 1949, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22713815
Last Edited13 Nov 2019

Peter Tyson

M, #4565, b. 1825, d. 27 Mar 1879
Birth*1825 
Marriage*21 Dec 1878 Spouse: Blakely Robson. Hay, NSW, Australia, #M3246 or #M3426 NSW.1,2
 
Marriage-Notice28 Dec 1878TYSON–CRAWFORD. —On the 21st inst., at Hay, New South Wales, by the Rev. S. Robinson, Peter Tyson, Esq., Corrong Station, to Blakeley, widow of the late Sidney M. Crawford Esq., J.P., Adelaide, S.A., and daughter of Captain R. M. Robson, late H.E.I.C.S.3 
Death*27 Mar 1879 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D3175 (Age 56) [par William TYSON & Harriet CLEMENTS].4 
Death-Notice*29 Mar 1879HAY. FRIDAY. Mr. Peter Tyson, a well-known squatter, died today.5 
Death-Notice29 Mar 1879The friends of the late PETER TYSON, Esq, are informed that his remains will be interred in the St Kilda Cemetery.
The funeral is appointed to move from the Royal Hotel, the Esplanade, St Kilda, on Sunday, the 30th inst., at quarter to 3 o'clock.
ALF AUG SLEIGHT, undertaker, No 83 Collins-street east and High street, St Kilda.6 
Death-Notice31 Mar 1879TYSON.—On the 27th inst., at St. Kilda, Peter Tyson, Esq, of Corrong, Lachlan River, New South Wales, aged 56 years.7 
Note* Blakely Robson. Peter Tyson was born on 20 October 1825 at Appin, in the Picton district of New South Wales. He was the youngest of 11 children of William Tyson and Isabella (née Coulson). Peter’s father died at East Bargo in January 1827.
In the mid-1840s Peter Tyson’s older brothers – William, James and John – took up a pastoral run at the junction of the Lachlan and Murrumbidgee rivers.
On 2 April 1852 Peter Tyson and Margaret Ann Shiel were married at St. Mark’s church, Appin, NSW. Peter and Margaret Tyson probably joined Peter’s brothers on the Lower Lachlan soon after they were married. Their first child was born in January 1853 at “Tyson’s station” (later known as “Torrong”). The couple had the following children:
Emily Isabella, born on 4 January 1853 at “Tyson's station”, Lower Lachlan.
Alice Maria (twin), born on 12 September 1855 at “Tyson's station”.
Harriet Mary (twin), born on 12 September 1855 at “Tyson’s station”; died on 10 March 1864 at “Juanbung” station; buried on “Torrong” station.
John Alexander ("Jack"), born on 27 April 1857 at “Tyson’s station”.
Henry Francis, born about July 1859 at “Tyson’s station”; died as an infant on 31 March 1860.
Sarah Louisa Margaret, born on 8 January 1861 at “Tyson’s station”.
Susan Alonia, born on 4 July 1863 at “Toorong” station.
Victor Walter Seale, born on 23 December 1865 at “Tupra” station.
Albert Prince Edward, born on 30 November 1867 at “Corrong” station.
Arthur Charles Dennis, born on 27 February 1870 at “Corrong” station.
Over the ensuing years William, James and John Tyson extended their holdings to include land on either side of the Lower Lachlan River, as well as other Riverina holdings. The pattern of leaseholds of the three Tyson brothers was complex. Apparently William Tyson managed “Geramy” (held in the name of J. & W. Tyson) on the south side of the Lachlan; James Tyson (possibly with his brother John) held the land on the north side, which comprised the Tupra, Juanbung, Corrong, Tarwong and Til Til runs. During much of the 1850s Peter Tyson assisted James in managing this vast area. In late 1859 Peter Tyson paid £45,000 to his brother, with Peter taking “Corrong” and “Tarwong” and James Tyson retaining “Tupra” and “Juanbung”. James and Peter Tyson appear to have had a close relationship and continued in various business associations in successive years. John Tyson died in June 1860 at Deniliquin, aged 37 years; he left most of his estate to his older brother James.
Until early 1864 Peter and Margaret Tyson were based at “Toorong”, at the Lachlan-Murrumbidgee junction. An item in the Pastoral Times of 7 May 1864 reported that Peter Tyson was to manage all the Lower Lachlan stations while James Tyson is on a three-year tour of his other properties. At this point Peter Tyson and his family probably transferred to the homestead at “Tupra” (where they remained at least until early 1866).
The squatter George Desailly, who in partnership with his brother Francis, was attempting to develop back-blocks between the Lachlan and Darling rivers. George Desailly had a dam constructed during 1865 across the Lachlan River near Booligal in order to drive water through creeks that crossed his run.
At this spot two or three small creeks break out from the main stream, and the dam checking the natural course of the water drives it through these minor streams, and a great part of Mr. Desailly's run becomes inundated. As a consequence the parties below him, occupying Crown lands on both sides of the river, were deprived of their water rights… Mr. James Tyson had recourse to law proceedings, and commenced an action against Mr. Desailly, while Mr. P. Tyson, I believe, acting on his own behalf, as I am informed, proceeded with a force of eleven men to cut away the dam. The news of the intended attack had, long before the overt act, been made known to Mr. Desailly's party, who, it is alleged, instructed his men to resist, by force of arms if necessary, the destruction of the dam, he himself stating that he would, if present, shoot the first man attempting the destruction of the work. [Pastoral Times, 6 January 1866, 2(4-5)]
Nevertheless Tyson’s men succeeded in breaking the dam. It was afterwards “rebuilt on a smaller scale, and again cut away by order of Mr. Tyson”.
By late 1867 Peter and Margaret Tyson and their family had moved further upstream and were living at “Corrong” station. During 1868 and 1869 Peter Tyson served as a Sheep Director for the Hay District. In about 1870 “Til Til” was separated from “Tarwong” and sold. In late 1870 construction began on a “very imposing and commodious residence” at “Corrong”. The homestead was designed by a Melbourne architect and built by Witcombe Bros. of Hay, at a cost of £3,000.
In March 1875 a press report stated that Peter Tyson of Corrong had lately returned from Melbourne where he had been treated for rheumatism “and consequent contraction of the muscles”. He spent eight weeks under the care of three doctors.
We are glad to see that he has so far recovered as to be able to walk with the help of a staff… While in Melbourne Mr. Tyson replaced the watch he lost in the fire at the Punt Hotel by one of the best to be bought. It is of moderate size, winds without a key, and has a seconds arrangement which by one touch of a spring the hand jumps to 12 o’clock, by another touch it starts going, and by a third touch it stops upon the moment. The cost was 85 guineas. The guard at present consists of a bit of cotton tape, but Mr. Tyson (who is immensely rich) jocularly says that next time he goes to Melbourne – “if he can afford it!” – he will buy a suitable chain. So it will be seen that bodily illness has not destroyed the good humour of our friend. Mr. Tyson is one of the hardiest of our pioneers, and we wish him health to enjoy the fruits of his many years of toil under the burning sun on the once waterless wastes of Riverina. [Riverine Grazier, 17 March 1875, 2(3)]
Peter Tyson’s wife Margaret died on 1 September 1877 at “Coorong” station, aged 45 years. Tom Booth’s reminiscences do not mention this incident; by that stage Booth was probably working at George Esplin’s Tattersall’s Hotel. During his time at the hotel Tom made three trips to “Corrong”: to drive Peter Tyson (apparently severely hung-over) to his homestead; to drive Tyson’s governess out to “Corrong”; and, to deliver a telegram by horseback. The overall impressive is of an extremely disruptive period at “Corrong” homestead.
On 21 December 1878 Peter Tyson married Blakely Crawford at Tattersall’s Hotel in Hay. Mrs. Crawford was the widow of Sydney Crawford, former Police Magistrate of Adelaide. Shortly afterwards, however, on 28 March 1879, Peter Tyson died at St. Kilda in Melbourne, aged 53 years.
Upon the death of his brother, Mr. Peter Tyson, Mr. James Tyson, in conjunction with Mr. James Tyson, jun., took an active part in the administration of his estate until his brother’s youngest son became of age. [Obituary – James Tyson (Riverine Grazier, 6 December 1898)]
Mrs. Blakeley Tyson, widow of Mr. Peter Tyson, died on 22 March 1903, at her daughter’s residence at St. Kilda in Melbourne, aged 71 years [Riverine Grazier, 13 April 1903].8 

Grave

  • St Kilda Cemetery, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, St Kilda Cemetery: 0669, 0671, 0673
    Family vault of Peter TYSON
    Peter TYSON of Corrong Station, Lachlan
    River, NSW who died at St Kilda 27.3.1879 56
    also Margaret Ann his wife, died at
    Corrong 1. 9.1877 43
    also their son John Alexander TYSON, died
    at Kensington Gardens London 4. 6.1884 30
    also their daughter Alice M. TYSON,
    died at Petty's, Sydney 4. 7.1899 44
    also their son Arthur Charles Denis
    TYSON of Pevensey & Corrong Stations
    N.S.W. who died at Toorak 10. 2.1901 30
    also their son Walter Seal TYSON, died
    at Melbourne 4.12.1902 37
    also their daughter Susan Alonia
    MATTHEWS, died at East Melbourne 6.11.1904 41
    Also their daughter Emilie Isabella
    WOODS, died at Wingidgeon Jerilderie 17.7.1935 81
    also Albert Prince Edward TYSON died
    at Torrong, Brighton 27.6.1924
    also Gideon Frederick TYSON nephew
    of Peter TYSON, d . at St Kilda 14.1.1885 18
    also May Muriel, only dtr of Arthur
    Charles Denis & Laura A. TYSON 12.12.1901 11 mths
    also Jack Alexander Claude Kennedy
    TYSON, killed at Armiens 14.4.19189

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 Jan 1879, Peter Tyson, a wealthy Riverina squatter, and the noted woman-hater, married a widow at St. Kilda.10
  • 11 Jan 1879, W. T. A. (Campbelltown) asks-In reference to the marriage of Mr. Peter Tyson, is it correct or not. I have made a bet that your statement is correct?-Yes, but you must not confound Peter Tyson with his wealthy brother James, as did the writer of the notice in the Melbourne Age, which we copied with acknowledgment in our last issue. James Tyson is still eligible, and it is he who is worth £3,000,000.11
  • 15 Jan 1879, The following paragraph is from the Pastoral Times of Saturday last:-The Age must have mistaken Mr P. Tyson for Mr James Tyson when it states that Mr Peter Tyson has lived a bachelor all his life. Mr P. Tyson shows too plainly that he regards with favour wedded life. Doubtless the fact is that having had and lost an amiable wife, he felt life too lonely and has therefore made his present choice, in which all his friends with us wish him much happiness. We see the Age's version of Mr Tyson's marriage has already got into the Evening News of Sydney. The Age states that it is "no wonder such a marriage has caused quite a flutter in the circles through which the squatting millionaire was accustomed to move." Without doubt when Mr James Tyson does make up his mind to change his present busy life for the comforts of a domestic home, the event will make a flutter in the colonies: yet we do not know why it should. With all Mr Tyson's powers of making a happy home, the only wonder is that he is still proof against the fascinations of the fair sex.12
  • 1 Apr 1879, IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NEW SOUTH WALES. ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION.
    In the matter of the Will of PETER TYSON, late of Coorong, in the colony of New South Wales, Esquire, deceased.
    NOTICE is hereby given that, after the expiration of fourteen days from the date of the publication hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of New South Wales, in the Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, that Probate of the last Will and Testament of the abovementioned PETER TYSON, deceased, may he granted to JAMES TYSON, of Juanbung, in the colony of New South Wales. Esquire, one of the Executors in the said will named, leave being reserved for JAMES TYSON the Younger, of Tupra, in the said colony, Esquire, the other Executor in the said will named, to come in and prove the same.
    Dated this thirty-first day of March, A.n., 1879.
    SPAIN and SLY, Proctor's for the Applicant, 6 and 8, Exchange, Sydney.13
  • 4 Apr 1879, A ROMANTIC STORY. All newspaper readers will be familiar with the Crawford-Henry cases, tried some time ago in the Melbourne Supreme Court. Henry, the cormorant money-lender, had persecuted the widow out of house and home by his usurious exactions; and, not content with that, went so far as to tamper with a jury which was to finally close the series of actions. For thus interfering, he, with an accomplice, was indicted for the crime termed "embracery," convicted, fine a £500, and is now in Pentridge, with only about six months of four years' imprisonment completed. Mrs Crawford, who was, in 1871 and 1872, a boarding house-keeper in View-street, Sandhurst, it may he supposed was, after all these law actions, reduced to penury. Therefore, to support herself and children, she was compelled to take, it is said, the position of housekeeper in a large hotel at Deniliquin. Whilst there engaged, she became acquainted with the well-known squatter Peter Tyson, a man of peculiar style and tastes, and reputed to be worth three millions in land and money. The wealthy squatter proposed to the widow, and was accepted. Previous to that era in his life Tyson had been reputed a misogynist, but whether he chivalrously stepped in as the widow's defender, melted at the tale of her wrongs, or whether at more than fifty five years of age he began to feel the gentle passion cannot of course be said. However, he married her, and the expectations of numerous aunts, uncles, nephews, and nieces of the wealthy man fell to a discount. But married life was to him a thing of short duration. On the 27th inst, at the Esplanade, St. Kilda, he breathed his last, at the age of fifty-six, and was on Sunday interred in the Melbourne Cemetery. As his death must have been sudden, and perhaps unexpected, it is supposed he died intestate. Therefore his widow will be entitled to one-third of his enormous possessions, heiress to a million, if report is to be believed ; but supposing the intestacy to be correct, from statements reported as made by Tyson, he was only worth that sum himself, consequently her share will be about £330,000. Yet he may have made a will, consequently, until it is publlished, there is no saying what he was possessed of, or in what proportions he has left it to his relatives. In this short sketch there is a subject for a three volume novel. Thus, half a year ago we have the dispossessed and poverty-stricken widow, her persecutor thrown from his high state, ruined and imprisoned by the laws of his country, and now the persecuted heiress in all probability has enough money to buy an English dukedom, or half a dozen little German principalities. Here is mutability.-Bendigo Independent.14
  • 5 Apr 1879, THE LATE MR PETER TYSON.-The Melbourne correspondent of the Ballarat Courier writes on the 20th tilt. :-" To-morrow (Sunday) will be carried to 'that bourne from whence no traveller returns' all that is mortal of a man who, in his lifetime, was one of the richest of the denizens of the Australian continent-namely, Mr. Peter Tyson, a Queensland squatter, who has just closed his earthly course at the Esplanade Hotel, St. Kilda. -Mr. Tyson, who was remarkable for his extreme generousness (?), married a widow (Mrs. Crawford) a few months ago, and it is probable that that lady will come in for the bulk of his property, estimated as being worth at least two millions sterling. A number of characteristic anecdotes are told of the deceased-one being that, in proceeding from one of his numerous stations to another, he would never incur any hotel expenses while there was a squatter's house anywhere near his line of route, where he could get a meal and a bed for nothing ; and another that solicited for a subscription for any object of public charity, his usual reply was that he would begin to be liberal to others as soon as be had secured for himself an income of a hundred-thousand a year. Unfortunately for the public charities of Australia-and some people may be disposed to think, for his own memory as well he seems to have died just before the stage was reached at which his charity was to have begun." The Geelong Advertiser learns, on good authority, that Mr. Peter Tyson was a bachelor. It was his brother, a widower, who recently married again.15
  • 12 Apr 1879, MR. PETER TYSON.
    The HAY STANDARD, writing of the late Mr. Peter Tyson, says :-" lt is always sad to record a death, doubly so when the deceased is cut off in the prime of life, and in the midst of an active and useful career. Men like Mr. Peter Tyson, whose death we announce to-day, must of necessity benefit the district in which they reside, and their loss be a matter of deep regret, not to immediate friends alone, but to the whole community. Unlike his wealthier brother James, Peter Tyson fought the battle of life without assistance from relatives or friends-how successfully every one knows. Unlike his brother, also, everything he touched did not turn to gold ; he had reverses, misfortunes, and troubles, unavoidable and self-imposed, to contend with, which would have completely discouraged men of less determined and energetic character. In his vocabulary, however, there was no such word as 'fail,' and he had very little sympathy for those with whom that little word had significance, and formed a bar to further progress. In fact, it was in battling with and surmounting difficulties that he shone, and all his best qualities were observable. Self-reliance was, perhaps, his distinguishing characteristic, and only from those whom he knew well and believed in would he tolerate advice. Merciless in sarcasm to those who aped gentility, he was still an admirer of polite manner, and encouraged it in his family, to whom he was ever kind and indulgent. He was one of the best and fairest employers we ever knew, for to any capable hand he never even offered low wages. He paid his men well, expected and always got full value for his money, and many a poor man of whom none will ever know will deeply mourn the death of Peter Tyson. He, doubtless, had faults-as who is without them ? but in thinking or speaking of them, let his best qualities be the theme ; as to all else, let us be dumb as the sod that covers him."16
  • 11 Oct 1879, Peter Tyson, late of Corrong, in the Lachlan district; probate granted May 16 to James Tyson (leave being reserved to James Tyson, the younger, the other executor, to take out probate) ; testator died March 28 ; goods sworn under £500,000 ; on the 3rd of July following, probate was also granted to James Tyson, jun.17

Citations

  1. [S11] Newspaper - Argus.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Dec 1878, p1.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 29 Mar 1879, p5.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Mar 1879, p12.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 31 Mar 1879, p1.
  8. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://users.tpg.com.au/hayhist/NewsletterFour.html
  9. [S48] Index of burials in the cemetery of St Kilda,.
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser (Grafton, NSW), 4 Jan 1879, p5.
  11. [S14] Newspaper - Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW), 11 Jan 1879, p15.
  12. [S14] Newspaper - Gippsland Times, 15 Jan 1879, p3.
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 1 Apr 1879, p3.
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Gippsland Times, 4 Apr 1879, p4.
  15. [S14] Newspaper - The Mercury (Hobart), 5 Apr 1879, p2.
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW), 12 Apr 1879, p14.
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW), 11 Oct 1879, p17.
Last Edited7 Jul 2020

Eliza Ann Frances Crawford

F, #4566, b. 29 May 1850, d. 1869
Father*Sydney Malone Crawford b. 1 Aug 1823, d. 5 Nov 1864
Mother*Blakely Robson b. 1833, d. 22 Mar 1903
Married NameVans.1 
Birth*29 May 1850 Hindmarsh, SA, Australia, #B Ade 3/124.2 
Marriage*2 Mar 1869 Spouse: John Arthur Patrick Balbirnie Vans. Goolwa Cottage, Sandhurst, VIC, Australia, #M892.1
 
Marriage-Notice*24 Apr 1869BALBIRNIE-VANS-CRAWFORD. - On the 2nd March, at Goolwa Cottage, Sandhurst, by the Rev. George Mackie, John, youngest son of the late R. A. Balbirnie-Vans, Esq., of Balmerino, South Yarra, to Fanny, eldest daughter of the late Sidney M. Crawford, of Adelaide, South Australia.3 
Death*1869 Sandhurst, VIC, Australia, #D10235 (Age 19.)1 

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 24 Apr 1869, p3.
Last Edited9 May 2017

Isabella Gall Anderson

F, #4572, b. 1888, d. 15 Mar 1969
Probate (Will)* Isabella Gall Evans. Widow. East Ivanhoe. 15 Mar 1969. 688/484.1 
Married NameEvans. 
Birth*1888 Eaglehawk, VIC, Australia, #B28839 [par John ANDERSON & Agnes HACKLAND].2 
Marriage*16 May 1923 Spouse: Gwilyn Jack Russell Evans. Presbyterian Church, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia.3
 
Marriage-Notice*7 Jul 1923EVANS-ANDERSON.-On the 16th May, at the Hawthorn Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson, M.A., Gwilym Jack Russell, eldest surviving son of Mrs. W. R. Evans, Upper Beaconsfield, and the late William R. Evans (late Bay Ex. Co.), to Isabelle, youngest daughter of Mrs. J. Anderson, Windsor, and the late J. Anderson, J.P. (late of Eaglehawk). Present address, Emerald.3 
Widow29 Sep 1963Isabella Gall Anderson became a widow upon the death of her husband Gwilyn Jack Russell Evans.4 
Death*15 Mar 1969 Heidelberg, VIC, Australia, #D5721 (Age 80) [par John ANDERSON & Agnes HACKLAND].4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1919Emerald, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk.5
1924"Lalla Rookh", Emerald/North Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Rosetta Jane Evans and Gwilyn Jack Russell Evans Bronwyn Rose Evans.6
1925"Lalla Rookh", Emerald/North Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Rosetta Jane Evans and Gwilyn Jack Russell Evans.7
bt 1931 - 196318 Wilfred Road, Ivanhoe, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Gwilyn Jack Russell Evans.8,9,10,11,12

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P5, unit 414; VPRS 7591/P4, unit 57.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Jul 1923, p11.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  6. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  7. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  8. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  9. [S143] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1943.
  10. [S163] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1963 "Jack's occupation is now nil."
  11. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949 "also their son Evan (RAN)."
  12. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954 "also their son Evan (RAN)."
Last Edited12 Apr 2015

Ann Tremlett Crawford

F, #4573, b. 12 Jul 1852, d. 20 Jun 1854
Father*Sydney Malone Crawford b. 1 Aug 1823, d. 5 Nov 1864
Mother*Blakely Robson b. 1833, d. 22 Mar 1903
Birth*12 Jul 1852 Hindmarsh, SA, Australia, #B Ade 4/56.1 
Birth-Notice*16 Jul 1852On Monday, 12th instant, Mrs. Sidney M. Crawford, of a daughter.2 
Death*20 Jun 1854 North Adelaide, SA, Australia, #D Ade 3/69 1y 11m (Hindmarsh.)3 
Death-Notice*29 Jun 1854At North Adelaide, on the 20th June, Ann Tremlett, second daughter of Mr. Sidney Crawford, Hindmarsh, aged one year and eleven months.4 

Citations

  1. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 16 Jul 1852, p2.
  3. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia "South Australian Deaths Registrations 1842 to 1915."
  4. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 29 Jun 1854, p2.
Last Edited9 May 2017

John Bellin

M, #4574, b. 27 Apr 1827, d. 16 Mar 1892
John BELLIN (1827-1892)
Birth*27 Apr 1827 St Botolph, Aldgate, Middlesex, England. [par Robert BELLIN & Hannah ROSE]1 
Marriage*Dec 1849 Spouse: Mary Ann Wilkinson. Watford, Hertfordshire, England, Dec Q [Watford] 6 1150.2
 
Land-UBeac*23 Feb 1889 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from Charles John Richardson to John Bellin. 13a 3r 38p.3 
Land-Note*23 Feb 1889 PAK-129 (part): Mortgagee: The City of Melbourne Building Society. Foreclosed. Mortgagor was John Bellin.4 
Criminal*15 Sep 1890 5 years jail - Fraud as a director of a body coporate (2 counts) - died in jail.5
Land-UBeac*b 1891 PAK-129 (part). Transfer from John Bellin to The City of Melbourne Building Society. Foreclosed.6 
Inquest15 Mar 1892Inquest held 1892/350. Male, Bellin, John, Stricture and debility, Geelong Gaol.7 
Death*16 Mar 1892 Geelong Gaol, Geelong, VIC, Australia, #D2105 (Age 65) [par unknown].8 

Family

Mary Ann Wilkinson b. 1832, d. 1910
Child 1.Ellen Mott Bellin+ b. 1859, d. 1933

Newspaper-Articles

  • 23 Sep 1890, THE CASE OF JOHN BELLIN. SENTENCED TO FIVE YEARS' IMPRISONMENT.
    John Bellin, who last week pleaded guilty on two counts to fraud as a director, was brought up for sentence at the Criminal Court, before Mr. Justice Williams, yesterday. The prisoner was charged with defrauding the Fourth Industrial Building Society of £327, and the General Mutual Building and Investment Society of £422. The prisoner said he felt deeply grieved at what he had done. The information upon which he was convicted was prin cipally furnished by himself. He desired if he were given the chance to redeem his character. Although he might not look it, he was 63 years of age, and, having filled the positions he had, his Honor might be assured he felt his present situation keenly. That day fortnight he had buried a loved daughter, whose death was caused through this case. He could say no more. The prisoner was here overcome by his emotions and burst into tears. His Honor in passing sentence said : You have pleaded guilty to two presentments charg ing you with having fraudulently appropriated to your own use certain sums of money, the property of two several building societies, of each of which you were a trusted and an active director. I have been earnestly and forcibly appealed to by your counsel, Dr. Madden, to deal with you leniently, upon the grounds of your advanced years; of your being an offender for the first time against the criminal law ; of the high commercial position and character which for a long number of years you have held and enjoyed ; and lastly, upon the ground that the discovery of the offences of which you have pleaded guilty has proved fatal in its consequences to a loved member of your family, and that the consciousness that that loss may have been caused by your own criminal acts has accentuated the bitterness of your position to such a degree as to render the remorse and self reproach by which you are oppressed a severe punishment, in itself. I have carefully and earnestly considered all these grounds, with the result that in the performance of my duty to the public I find myself unable to comply with your counsel's appeal. It is true that you now appear before me as an offender for the first time against the criminal law, that prior to the commission of these offences you held and enjoyed in the community for many years a high commercial position and the character of being an honest man and a good citizen. Under ordinary circumstances, therefore, I should have been disposed to extend towards you that Ieniency which I am accustomed to extend towards first offenders of good character, whose crime is not of a serious or grave nature, or of so frequent occurrence as to demand repression by severity of punishment. But there are circumstances in connection with the class of crime to which you have pleaded guilty which compel me to give effect to other recognised and beneficial principles in relation to the assessment of punishment. When crimes are of a serious or heinous nature, as for instance, offences against the persons of women or children, extensive conspiracies to defraud, rob or commit perjury, violent assaults upon the person, whether individually or in company, the offen ders, even though they be such for the first time, are righteously and wisely treated, with severe punishment. So, also, should the punishment be marked when a particular class of crime becomes prevalent or of frequent occurrence in the community. Both these principles in their full force apply to the offence with which you have been charged. While occupying a prominent position of trust in each of tho two societies I have mentioned, a position in which you were placed by reason of your high character and commercial standing, you, a man of education and not in neces sitous circumstances, took advantage of your position as director, and of the confidence which was reposed in you by those who placed you in that position, to rob and defraud those who trusted you of considerable sums of money. This mere statement of your crime is sufficient to demonstrate its gravity and its serious nature. Further, it is unfortunately now public knowledge that crimes of this description have of late been committed by men holding high positions of trust with alarm ing frequency. Delinquent after delinquent has been convicted and punished, and still many now perpetrators of the same crime arise. The principle, therefore, of deterrent punishment also must be applied. I can find in relation to your crime no palliation in the fact that you held in this community so high a character as was mentioned by your counsel. It was because of that high character you succeeded in obtaining that position of trust which you betrayed, and of which you took advantage to rob those who trusted you and whose interests you were bound both morally and legally to preserve and protect. While sympathising with you in the domestic loss you have sustained, and recognising what I am told is the fact that your disgrace may have conduced to bring about that lamentable calamity, I cannot remain unmindful of what I fear is more than probable, namely, that many blameless, honest and industrious persons may have been ruined or have lost the result of years of toil by your criminal appropriation. Had you been a younger man and not so far advanced in years as I learn you to be I should for the reasons I have stated have passed a much more severe sentence than that I am now about to pass upon you. In consequence of your old age, I shall give you no solitary confinement and no hard labor, and somewhat shorten the term of your imprisonment. The sentence of the court is that you be imprisoned in her Majesty's gaol at Melbourne for a term of two years and six months upon each charge, cumulative — that is to say, for the term of five yeara in all.9
  • 7 Nov 1890, BANKRUPTCY OF JOHN BELLIN. THE SCHEDULE FILED.
    The schedule in the estate of John Bellin, formerly of Frankston, auctioneer, at present serving a sentence of five years in Melbourne Gaol for frauds as a director of building societies, was filed yesterday at the Insolvency offices, Law Courts. The insolvent declares that his estate has not previously been sequestrated, except in March, 1862, on which occasion he obtained a certificate of discharge. The causes of his insolvency now are set down as depreciation of property and inability to realise on it, and pressure of creditors.
    The balance-sheet showed debts, £71,829 6s. 7d., consisting of debts due upon mortgage, £38,809 9s; unsecured creditors, £12,005 7s. 7d; secured creditors, £20,954 10s. The assets are £62,721 5s. 6d., consisting of real property, £60,325; personal property held as security, £750 ; personal property not held as security, £1,586 1s; good debts, £60 4s. 6d. The deficiency is £9,108 1s. 10d.
    The principal secured creditors are the Standard Bank of Australasia, £15,110, balance of purchase money-security, lien on 102 acres at Pascoevale ; J. A. Bevan, England, gentleman, £12,964 9s., money lent and interest— security, mortgage of 1,000 shares in the New Tubal Cain mine ; General Mutual Building Society, Melbourne, £7,000, money had and received—security, mortgage 610 acres at Macedon ; County Bourke Building Society, £5,600, security for money deposited — security, mortgage on 610 acres at Mount Macedon ; executors of the late J. H. Allen, George-street Fitzroy, £2,300, money lent—security, mortgage over land ; C. Wilson, tentmaker, Melbourne, £2,000, money lent-security, mortgage over land ; Mrs. Urie, widow, Flemington, £1,802, balance of purchase money security, mortgage over land ; J. and J. Grice, merchants, £1,800, money lent— security, mortgage ever land ; Victoria Permanent Building Society, £1,000, money lent —security, mortgage over land ; Mrs. Ann Miles, widow, Catherine-street, Richmond, £1,400, money lent—security, mortgages on land ; C. H. Robinson, gentleman, £1,389 10s., balance of purchase money-security, lien on land : William Collis, Brighton, gentleman, £1,280, money lent—security, mortgages over land ; C. Beissel, Swan street, Richmond, gentleman, £1,000, balance of purchase money—security mortgages over land ; City of Melbourne Building Society, £975, money lent—security, mortgages on land. Total secured debts, £59,283 19s ; value of securities, £50,748.
    Amongst the unsecured creditors are Fourth Industrial Building Society. £3,137 5s. 8d. money had and received ; General Mutual Building Society (in liquidation), £2,810 3s., balance of moneys had and received ; Letitia Miles, Widow, Bell-street, Fitzroy, £1,030 4s., money lent ; E. Westleek, married woman, Northcote, £850, money lent ; A. B. Duncan, £705 8s. money lent and interest ; Ellen Sutton, married woman. North Fitzroy, £551 178. 2d., money lent ; J. P. Spargo, gentleman, Brunswick, £500, money over-paid on contract for land. Total unsecured debts, £12,005 7s. 7d.
    Included in the real property are 102 acres at Pascoevale, £20,400, mortgaged to the Standard Bank, £15,019 ; 610 acres at Mount Macedon, £12,200, mortgaged to the County of Bourke Building Society for £5,930, and also to the General Mutual Building So- ciety for £700 ; 970ft. Cassioberry Estate, Ivanhoe, £4,850, mortgaged to — Wilson for £2,231 15s. 6d. and to J. H. Allen for £2,385 ; 60 acres and residence at Frankston, £4,000, mortgaged to Mrs. Miles for £1,437 16s. 6d., and to M. Moss for £657 3s. 6d. Total value of real properly, £60,325 ; mortgaged for £48,000 16s. 1d. The debtor says that though he has stated, as required, what he believes the properties to be worth, he is aware that if forced upon the market during the present depression, and especially now that the strike has occurred (which will make things worse for some time to come), that the properties will be almost unanleüble at any price. Both now and for some time to come, he adds, it will be very difficult to put any fair and fit the same time reliable value on properties.
    Mr. James H. Cole is trustee in the estate.10
  • 16 Mar 1892, DEATH OF JOHN BELLIN GEELONG, Tuesday.
    This morning at 4 o'clock John Bellin, formerly an auctioneer of Melbourne, died in the Geelong gaol at the age of 65 years. He was received in the local gaol on the 17th ult. from Pentridge, being then an invalid suffering from general debility and stricture, and since his admission he has been gradually sinking. On the 23rd September, 1890, he was sentenced by Mr. Justice Williams at the Melbourne Supreme Court to five years penal servitude on two charges of fraud as a director of a body corporate, viz , the Fourth Investment Building Society, the sentences being two years and six months on each charge.11
  • 17 Mar 1892, DEATH AT THE GEELONG GAOL. -- At four o'clock yesterday morning there lied in the infirmary of the Geelong Gaol a man who had occupied a prominent and respected in commercial circles in the metropolis, but who through a fatal step when he had well advanced towards the attainment of
    the allotted span of life, "three score and ten" sacrificed all that makes life an existence worth retaining. This was John Bellin formerly auctioneer and building society director, convicted on the 23rd September 1890, on two charges of default as the director of a body corporate. Tie was sentenced to two years and six months imprisonment on each charge despite an earnest appeal made on his behalf to Mr Justice Williams for leniency. It was pointed out by his counsel that Bellin had suffered much mental anguish through the death of his daughter during his trial, and the degradation he had suffered was a heavy punishment in itself. On tho 17th February of the present year Bellin was transferred to Geelong as an invalid, and shortly after was placed in the infirmary, where he remained until his death yesterday morning. A formal inquiry was held before Mr Wallis, J.P., yesterday afternoon regarding the cause of death. Evidence was given by Mr Shegog, governor of the gaol, to the effect that deceased, who was 65 years of age, had been ailing since his admission to the institution and although he received every care and attention he gradually sank and died yesterday morning at four o'clock. Deceased had been convicted of misappropriating £328 6s 6d belonging to the 4th Investment Building Society, of which he was manager, and £462 2s 6d from the General Mutual Building Society. Dr. Croker, medical officer of the gaol, deposed that death was due to stricture and general debility, and a verdict to that effect closed another life chapter.12
  • 21 Mar 1892, THE DEATH OF JOHN BELLIN. INQUEST BY THE CORONER.
    The acting city coroner, Mr. C. Candler, opened an inquest at the Morgue on Saturday concerning the cause of the death of John Bellin, who died in the Geelong Gaol on the 10th inst.
    The inquiry, which is attended with peculiar circumstances, is being held at the request of the relatives of the deceased, who allege that he was neglected whilst In gaol, and that his death was due to or accelerated by that neglect. The coroner, influenced by the peculiarity of the proceeding, explained to the jury before commencing the taking of evidence, that after John Bellin had died a magisterial inquiry had been held, and that his friends, being dissatisfied with this inquiry, had notified their intention of applying to the Supreme Court for an order to compel the coroner to hold an inquest. Wheter this application had yet been made Mr. Candler did not know, but in order that there should not be a failure of justice through the delay rendering a medical examination of the body impossible he had decided to have the post-mortem examination made and the inquest opened.
    Dr. Croker, medical attendant of the Geelong Goal, and Dr. M'Coll, medical representative, and Mr. J. S. Hobday, legal advisor of the friends of the deceased, were present.
    Louis Charles Bellin, son of the deceased, said he had good reason to believe that the death of his father was either due to or accclerated by the neglect, maltreatment, or want of proper treatment of the authorities in gaol.
    At this stage, identification having been established, the coroner decided to adjourn the inquest until the 2nd of April, to give time for the application of the friends to be heard by the Supreme Court, and considered together with any objestions to it which might be urged by the penal authorities.13

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; General Register Office: Birth Certificates from the Presbyterian, Independent and Baptist Registry and from the Wesleyan Methodist Metropolitan Registry; Class Number: RG 5; Piece Number: 116.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1754-725 - John Bellin of No 318 Collins Street Melbourne Estate Agent - C/T 2126-094.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2126-094 - Mortgage No 99039 - not discharged.
  5. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Central Register of Male Prisoners; Bellin, John: No. 24207; 394
    VPRS 515/P0001 Volume 43: Prisoner nos. 23816 - 24314 Item number:      43.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2126-094 - Mortgage No 99039 - not discharged foreclosed - The City of Melbourne Building Society.
  7. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 24/P0000 unit 594, item 1892/350
    Male, Bellin, John, Stricture and debility, Geelong Gaol, 1892/350, 15 Mar 1892,.
  8. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "indexed as BELLEN."
  9. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 23 Sep 1890, p6.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Nov 1890, p9.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Mar 1892, p6.
  12. [S14] Newspaper - newspaper cutting in inquest file.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Mar 1892, p5.
Last Edited7 Jul 2020

Sidney Mordaunt Crawford

M, #4575, b. 28 Feb 1854, d. 28 May 1857
Father*Sydney Malone Crawford b. 1 Aug 1823, d. 5 Nov 1864
Mother*Blakely Robson b. 1833, d. 22 Mar 1903
Birth*28 Feb 1854 Hindmarsh, SA, Australia, #B Ade 4/293.1 
Birth-Notice*1 Mar 1854At Hindmarsh, on the 28th ult., Mrs. Sidney M. Crawford, of a son.2 
Death*28 May 1857 Blakely, Goolwa, SA, Australia. 
Death-Notice*1 Jun 1857DIED. On the 28th May, at Blakely, near Goolwa, Sidney Mordaunt, only son of Sidney M. Crawford, Esq., aged three years and three months.3 

Citations

  1. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 1 Mar 1854, p3.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 1 Jun 1857, p2.
Last Edited9 May 2017

Leila Isabelle Crawford

F, #4576, b. 16 Mar 1858, d. Jul 1947
Father*Sydney Malone Crawford b. 1 Aug 1823, d. 5 Nov 1864
Mother*Blakely Robson b. 1833, d. 22 Mar 1903
Married NameJohnston.1 
Birth*16 Mar 1858 Blakely near Goolwa, SA, Australia, #B EnB 16/448 [Encounter Bay].2 
Birth-Notice*19 Mar 1858At Blakely, on the 16th instant, Mrs. Sidney M. Crawford, of a daughter.3 
Marriage*14 Apr 1885 Spouse: Thomas Law Johnston. St Andrew's Cathedral, NSW, Australia.1
 
Marriage-Notice*24 Apr 1885JOHNSTON—CRAWFORD.—March 14, at St. Andrew's Cathedral, by the Rev. C. H. Gibson, B.A., Thomas Law Johnston, second son of the late Charles Johnston, Esq., J.P., of Tullybrook, Co. Donegal, Ireland, to Leila Isabel Crawford, third daughter of the late Sydney Malone Crawford, Esq., J.P., of Adelaide, and of Mrs. Tyson, Conville, Croydon.1 
Death*Jul 1947 QLD, Australia, #DB12554 QLD.4 
Death-Notice*15 Jul 1947JOHNSTON.— The Relatives and Friends of late Leila Isabel Johnston, late of Junction Road, Morningside, are invited to attend her Funeral, to leave the Funeral Parlour. 45 Adelaide Street. City. Tomorrow (Wednesday) Morning, at 10 o'clock, for the Bulimba Cemetery. CANNON & CRIPPS. LTD.. Funeral Directors.5 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 5 Dec 1922, Animal and Birds Protection Act.
    The name of Mrs Leila L Johnston, of Morningside, as an officer under the provisions of the Animals and Birds Act was inadvertently announced on Saturday last as Miss Leila L Johnston. Mrs Johnston is the wife of Captain Law Johnston, well known in connection with the Australian mercantile marine. As stated, this as the first appointment of a lady to such a position.6

Citations

  1. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 24 Apr 1885, p1.
  2. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Register, 19 Mar 1858, p2.
  4. [S8] Queensland Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Courier Mail (Brisbane), 15 Jul 1947, p12.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Brisbane Courier, 5 Dec 1922, p15.
Last Edited12 Nov 2019

Rosaline Mary Crawford

F, #4577, b. 5 Jan 1860, d. 29 Apr 1946
Father*Sydney Malone Crawford b. 1 Aug 1823, d. 5 Nov 1864
Mother*Blakely Robson b. 1833, d. 22 Mar 1903
Birth*5 Jan 1860 Near Goolwa, SA, Australia, #B EnB 19/197 [Encounter Bay].1 
Birth-Notice*9 Jan 1860On the 5th January, at Blakely, Mrs. Crawford, of a daughter.2 
Death*29 Apr 1946 Five Dock, NSW, Australia, #D9299 NSW (as CRAWFORD.)3 
Death-Notice*4 May 1946CRAWFORD.—April 29, at her residence, Heather Brae, Trevanion Street, Fivedock, Rosaline Mary, loved mother of Harold and Ida, and mother-in-law of Bill and Leah, in her 87th year. Privately interred Church of England Cemetery, Northern Suburbs, April 30. Thy will be done.4 

Citations

  1. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - South Australian Advertiser, 9 Jan 1860, p2.
  3. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 4 May 1946, p30.
Last Edited13 Nov 2019

George Paton Smith

M, #4581, b. 7 Oct 1829, d. 6 Dec 1877
George Paton SMITH
South Bourke
(Courtesy of SLV)
Father*James Smith
Mother*Jessie Paton b. 1793, d. 31 May 1879
AnecdoteGeorge Paton Smith. Born 7 October 1829 (London)
Died 06 December 1877 (East Melbourne) Parents James and Jessie, nee Paton, of Berwick-on-Tweed
Marriage Annie Mackay Couper; 6s. 2d.
Occupation Journalist and barrister
Religion Presbyterian
Career: Arrived Melbourne 1855 and was linen-draper in Sandhurst till c1857, when he settled Melbourne, and engaged in journalism; reporter first for Age, then Argus, where he assisted Wilson Gray as law reporter; rejoined Age; studied law and was admitted to Bar 1861; early friendship with David Syme finally severed by acting as counsel for E. Langton in libel case against the Age. Gerald Supple was found guilty of shooting and attempting to murder G.P. Smith in 1870;
MLA South Bourke 1st Feb 1866 to 1st Jan 1871
MLA South Bourke 1st May 1874 to 1st Apr 1877
MLA Boroondara 1st May 1877 to 1st Dec 1877.1 
Probate (Will)* George P Smith.      Barrister at law. Melbourne. 6 Dec 1877. 17/156.2 
Birth*7 Oct 1829 London, England, Baptism 31 Oct 1829 - Shoreditch St Leonard Hackney, England - Residence Kingsland Road, father a sailmaker.3 
Marriage*22 Jul 1854 Spouse: Annie McKay Cooper. Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England, Sep Q [Berwick] 10b 365.4
 
Death*6 Dec 1877 Valetta House, Clarendon street, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D11766 (Age 48) [par James SMITH & Jessie PATON].5 
Death-Notice*7 Dec 1877SMITH. - On the 6th inst., at his residence, Valetta-house, Clarendon-street, East Melbourne, George Paton Smith, barrister-at-law, aged 48 years.6 
Death-Notice8 Dec 1877THE Friends of the late Hon. GEORGE PATON SMITH, M.L.A., are informed that his funeral will take place THIS DAY (Saturday, the 8th inst. )
The cortege will move from his late residence, Valetta-house, corner of Clarendon and Albert streets, East Melbourne, at a quarter to 12 o'clock, and will proceed to the place of interment in the Boroondara Cemetery, Kew.
ALF. AUG. SLEIGHT, undertaker, No. 83 Collins-street east, and High-street, St. Kilda.7 
Anecdote*Smith, George Paton
Born 1829 (Berwick on Tweed?)
Died 6 December 1877. (East Melbourne)
Parents: James and Jessie, nee Paton
Marriage: Annie Mackay Couper; 6s. 2d.
Occupation: Journalist and barrister
Religion: Presbyterian

Career: Arrived Melbourne 1855 and was linen-draper in Sandhurst till c1857, when he settled Melbourne, and engaged in journalism; reporter first for Age, then Argus, where he assisted Wilson Gray as law reporter; rejoined Age; studied law and was admitted to Bar 1861; early friendship with David Syme finally severed by acting as counsel for E. Langton in libel case against the Age.
House      Electorate      Start *            End *      
MLA     South Bourke     February 1866          January 1871     
MLA     South Bourke     May 1874          April 1877     
MLA     Boroondara     May 1877          December 1877     

Appointments: Attorney-general 11 July 1868-20 Sept 1869. Chairman inquiry into Government Printing Office 1869-70.8 

Grave

  • PRES A 0087 & 0088, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, In memory of George Paton SMITH, Barrister at law for many years, & Member of the Legislative Assembly & at one time Attorney General of the Colony of Victoria, d 6 Dec 1877, aged 48 years. His energy ability & integrity won for him a distinguished position as a Politician, an Advocate, & a Journalist. This monument is erected by a few of his many friends & admirers as a lasting testimony to his private worth & public services.
    George Victor SMITH, eldest son of George Paton SMITH d 21 May 1883, aged 25 years, so loved so mourned, also his son Edward Paton SMITH d 16 Oct 1886, aged 20 years, verse.
    In loving memory of Charles Memel SMITH d 18 Dec 1891, aged 21 years, verse, also of Harry Erskine SMITH, d 10 Dec 1892, aged 24 years, verse.9,10

Newspaper-Articles

  • 19 Dec 1861, PATON—MACKAY.—By the Rev. Jas. Ballantyne, at the residence of Geo. Smith Esq., barrister-at-law, East Melbourne, Miss Maggie Mackay, youngest daughter of the late Jas. Mackay, Esq., of the revenue service, Perthshire, to Mr. David Paton, of the firm of Cowan and Paton, Beechworth.11
  • 18 May 1870, ATTEMPT TO SHOOT MR. GEORGE PATON SMITH, M.L.A.
    An extraordinary attempt to shoot Mr. G. P. Smith was made yesterday afternoon by Mr. Gerard Henry Supple, a barrister by profession, who has been for some years past following the avocation of a journalist in Melbourne, and the attempt was followed up by the shooting of an hotelkeeper. The facts are as follows :-At about half-past 4 o'clock Mr. G. P. Smith was walking from the Supreme Court, where he had been engaged at the Criminal Sessions, to the Legislative Assembly, in company with a gentleman named Mr. George M'Cullagh, late of the Royal Irish Constabulary. On reaching the corner of Spring and Latrobe streets, Mr. M'Cullagh stopped to speak to some friends, and Mr. Smith walked on about 20 yards, and while he was waiting Mr. Supple came up to within a few feet of Mr. Smith, and taking out a revolver, deliberately, and without saying a word, took aim at his head and fired. Mr. Smith suddenly stooped and thus escaped certain death, at the same moment springing into the street. Mr. Supple then rushed at Mr. Smith, who ran in the direction of the Royal Society's Hall, Mr. Supple giving chase. After going a few yards, Mr. Supple again fired, and again missed. He then fired a third shot, which took effect in Mr. Smith's left elbow, chipping a piece of bone off the joint, the ball lodging about the middle of the forearm. Mr. Supple was raising the pistol to fire again when Mr. Smith seeing Mr. John S. Walshe, the landlord of the Star of the East Hotel, coming up, called to him for assistance. Walshe rushed at Mr. Supple, and while closing with him Mr. Supple fired another shot, which took effect upon Walshe, the ball striking him in the centre of the abdomen. Mr. M'Cullagh, who had given chase, then came up just as the last shot was fired, and tripped up Mr. Supple, who was at once secured and taken to the Swanston-street watchhouse by Sergeant Summerhayes. On being searched, a sheathed dagger, about seven inches long, was found on his person. The revolver, which was a six or seven chambered one, had been, of course, already taken from him. At the watchhouse Mr. Supple was very much excited, and said he had intended to shoot Mr. Smith for some time back on account of an insult. Mr. Walshe was taken to the Melbourne Hospital as soon as Mr. Supple had been secured, and on his arrival there it was found that the ball, a conical one, had run round the body and lodged under the skin on the right flank. It was at once extracted by Dr. Moloney. Mr. Smith, having had his own wound dressed and the ball extracted by Dr. Motherwell, was well enough to go to the hospital and inquire after Mr. Walshe and thank him for his assistance. At first it was thought that Walshe's wound was a slight one, but at about 8 o'clock the symptoms became serious. He was then suffering from extreme pain and collapse, and Dr. Moloney at one time thought it would be necessary to take his depositions, as he seemed unlikely to recover. His condition improved, however, during the evening, and it was resolved not to disturb him. The above is as correct a narrative of the affair as could be obtained, and other accounts differ but very little from it. One statement was to the effect that Mr. Supple said "I'm going to shoot you" to Mr. Smith, and immediately drew the revolver and fired. Mr. Supple was very shortsighted, and, consequently, had to bring his face to within a few inches of that of Mr. Smith in order to make sure of his identity. The motives for this extraordinary outrage appear to be unknown, but amongst the many stories afloat is one to the effect that Mr. Smith, when a journalist, had a quarrel with Mr. Supple, and that the two were not upon friendly terms ; but the disagreement, if it ever really existed, was not of a nature to lead Mr. Supple to indulge in such an insane mode of revenging a supposed injury. The most probable and most widely believed reason for the outrage is that Mr. Supple was not in a sound mental state when he committed the act. It is said that the manner of Mr. Supple has been noticed to be very strange lately. He will be brought before the City Bench to-day, and probably remanded pending the result of the injuries to Mr. Walshe.
    On inquiring at the hospital shortly before 1 o'clock this morning, our reporter was informed that Mr. Walshe had improved considerably, though he was still in a dangerous condition. Mr. G. P. Smith's wounds were not serious.12
  • 14 Mar 1871, Stolen from the paddock of George Paton Smith, Hillsbury, Connor street, Kew, on the 28th February, a male and two female half-grown black swans, the male has lost one eye, and one wing of each bird is cut.—11th March 1871.13
  • 7 Dec 1877, DEATH OF MR. G. P. SMITH.
    We regret to announce the death of the Hon. George Paton Smith, M. L. A., which happened yesterday morning at an early hour at his residence in Clarendon-street, East Melbourne. For many months past Mr. G. P. Smith has been in a dangerous state of health, suffering from disease of the liver and jaundice. About two years ago it was thought the disease must have an immediately fatal termination, but he rallied and his health took a favourable turn, which enabled him not only to resume his practice at the bar, but to continue his political career. He exhibited wonderful energy in struggling against the weakening effects of the disease, and confidently expected - a hope shared in by his friends - that he would get over the illness. On Monday week last, while conducting a case in the County Court, he was suddenly taken worse, and was removed home, and though next day he recovered sufficiently to attend to his duties in the law courts, he had again to give way. During the past week he was sedulously attended by Drs. Günst and Teague, but it was soon apparent that no hopes of his recovery could be entertained. On Wednesday evening he expressed a desire to say farewell to his old political leader Sir James M'Culloch who visited him, but Mr. Smith was so prostrated by weakness that though in unimpaired possession of his mental faculties, be was scarcely able to speak. He was conscious that there was no hope of recovery. He sank gradually during the night, and died about half-past 9 o'clock in the morning. He leaves a wife and family.
    Mr. G. P. Smith was born in Berwick-on-Tweed. He came out to this colony at an early age, during the excitement of the gold discovery. Soon after his arrival he started in business at Sandhurst as a linendraper, but be was not successful in that line of life, and relinquished the trade. In the year 1857 he came down to Melbourne and joined the Age as a reporter. After a few months he passed over to The Argus staff, where he assisted the late Mr. Wilson Gray as law reporter. He remained on The Argus for about two years, and then he rejoined the Age, first as contributor and afterwards as editor - a position he filled for several years, even after he became a barrister. He was called to the bar in 1861, and entered political life during the excitement occasioned by the conflict between the two Houses in February, 1866. He was then returned for South Bourke, an electorate which he represented for many years. Mr. Smith soon obtained a reputation as a ready and a telling speaker. In July 1868, he joined the M'Culloch Government as Attorney-General. His re-election for South Bourke was opposed by Mr. O'Grady, who had great local influence, but after a fierce contest Mr. Smith was returned by a majority of 41.
    In March, 1869, he was appointed chairman of the select committee to inquire into a charge against Mr. Butters, then member for Portland, of having paid Mr. C. E. Jones £200 to vote for the Quieting of Titles Bill.
    The report of the committee resulted in the expulsion of Messrs. Jones and Butters, and in the committal for contempt of the privileges of the House of Messrs. Glass and Quarterman. The two last mentioned were discharged by the Supreme Court on a writ of habeas, much to the chagrin of the majority in the Assembly. The point in dispute was referred home to the Privy Council, which overruled the decision of the Supreme Court. Mr. Smith also, as Attorney-General had to take official action in reference to the land scandal cases of Messrs. Stutt, Miller, and others, which occasioned much comment. He was in the front rank of political warfare at this time, and at no period of his career was be more vigorous in attack, or more fre- quently called upon for defence. Events brought the M'Culloch Government to its last days, and a motion having been carried censuring the Government for having gone outside the Assembly in choosing Mr. Rolfe as Commissioner of Customs, the Ministry resigned, on September 21. The Macpherson Administration was formed, to which Mr. G. P. Smith was a strong opponent, and he took a very active part in the opposition to the re-election of the Ministers.
    On Tuesday, May 17, 1870, the Supple tragedy occurred, which resulted in the unfortunate death of Mr. J. S. Walshe, the landlord of the Star of the East Hotel. Mr. Gerald H. Supple and Mr. G. P. Smith both were members of the legal profession, and were literary men, and between them there had been for some time considerable ill-feeling. Mr. Supple believed that Mr. Smith had injured and maligned him, and being morose and suspicious by nature, the thought so worked on a mind, evidently diseased, that at length it led him to the committal of the crime for which he is now suffering, About half past 4 o'clock on the day mentioned, Mr. Smith was walking with a friend from the Supreme Court to the Parliament-houses. Whilst waiting for his friend at the corner of Spring and Latrobe streets Mr. Supple came up to him, and when within a few feet took out a revolver and deliberately, and without saying a word, aimed at Mr. Smith's head and fired. Mr. Smith suddenly stooped, and thus escaped certain death. He ran away in the direction of the Royal Society's Hall, and Mr. Supple giving chase, fired again and missed. A third shot struck Mr. Smith in the elbow, and slightly injured him. Supple was firing again when Walshe rushed up and seized him, and in the struggle Supple fired, hitting Walshe in the stomach. The wound was fatal, and Walshe died the following day. Supple was sentenced to death, but the sentence was afterwards commuted to imprisonment for life. A sum was subscribed in aid of the family of Walshe. Mr Smith naturally took an active part in the movement, and was appointed one of the trustees.
    At the general election in 1871 Mr. Smith did not stand, and for three years be devoted his energies solely to the practice of his profession. At the general election in 1874, he again entered political life, and was returned unopposed for South Bourke. He was an opponent of both the Kerferd and the Berry Administrations, and took a leading part in bringing about their defeat. He was offered the position of Minister of Justice by Sir. James M'Culloch, but declined office on the score of ill health. For some months the state of his health prevented him from taking any active part in political warfare, and he was no participator in the exciting scenes caused by the "stonewall"episode. During the session of 1876 Mr. G. P. Smith gave as active a support as his health would permit to the M'Culloch Government, and in the debate on the want of confidence motion moved by Mr. James he delivered a speech remarkable both for the circumstances under which it was made and for the ability displayed therein. He came into the House so broken down by his illness as to be scarcely able to stand, but by an astonishing effort of will he overcame his physical weakness, and spoke with a sustained power, lucidity, and force which extorted admiration even from his opponents. "These are things," he said, speaking of facts which he had stated, "which men ought to consider when they gather round the stump for the purpose of applauding men who are willing to allow the lessons of history to [go?] for nothing and the experience of the past to lie in the dust-whom no considerations of the past will deter - whom no considerations of the future will daunt - who owe nothing for the future of this great country if for the moment they can carry with them what is called public opinion, or rather popular applause, and vault into power by its agency. The time will come when this very question of the franchise will have to be reconsidered. I have no wish to restrict the suffrage, but the time will, and must, come when the exercise of the suffrage will have to be accompanied by substantial guarantees of respectability and intelligence." At the last general election, notwithstanding his illness, be fought a hard contest for Boroondara with Professor Pearson. His election speeches were marked by very considerable ability, and displayed that enlightened and intelligent appreciation of the advantages of constitutional government which distinguished the latter portion of his political career. Appealing to the electors to preserve the dignity and integrity of the institutions by which they were surrounded, and not to degrade representation by choosing men unworthy of their confidence, he proceeded - "It must be remembered that in the condition of society in which we lived, we had cast ourselves loose from the shores of the older civilisation, and there were no landmarks to guide us in the future. The future welfare of the country was in our hands, and its destiny to a very large degree. We were the pioneers, who would in a few years pass away, and a younger generation would inherit our position. He hoped we would leave to them a nobler heritage - that we would bring them up with the know- ledge of what English freedom and English constitutional government was." He conducted the contest throughout with every courtesy to his opponent, whom he beat by a majority of 70 votes. In addressing the electors on the declaration of the poll, Mr. Smith stated his opinion that the country at large would soon have reason to regret the choice which the constituencies as a rule had made, and his expressions on that occasion so greatly irritated the majorty opposed to him, that there were threats of calling him to account when Parliament met, but wiser counsels prevailed, and nothing was done. The improvement in his health enabled him to attend more regularly in Parliament during the present session, and he took part in several debates, especially in some of those which arose over the decisions of the Elections Committee. He was in attendance at Parliament until within the last fortnight. The Assembly adjourned yesterday as a mark of respect to his memory.
    Mr. Smith's career at the bar was successful, and as an advocate he had attained a good reputation. For many years be had the largest share of the business in the County Court, and he more recently took a very fair position at the Supreme Court bar. He was a man of undoubted ability and energy, and would, had he lived longer to continue the course of conduct he was pursuing, have achieved a higher position in public estimation than he had attained. In private life, we believe, he exhibited many estimable qualities, and gained the respect and esteem of a large number of friends. His remains will be interred in the Kew Cemetery. The funeral will start from East Melbourne at noon on Saturday.14
  • 2 Jun 1879, Death of Mother: SMITH. - On the 31st ult., at Kew, suddenly, Jessie, relict of James Smith, of Berwick-on-Tweed, and mother of the late Hon. George Paton Smith, aged 86 years.15

Citations

  1. [S186] Website Victorian Parliament Re-member (http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/re-member/).
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0, unit 199; VPRS 28/P2, unit 74; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 37.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, London, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 - London Metropolitan Archives, Shoreditch St Leonard, Register of Baptism, DL/T/069, Item 039.
  4. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  5. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Dec 1877, p1.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Dec 1877, p12.
  8. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/re-member/bioregfull.cfm
  9. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    PRES A 0088
    22-May-1883 Burial SMITH, GEORGE VICTOR 25
    21-Oct-1886 Burial SMITH, EDWARD PATON 20
    20-Dec-1891 Burial SMITH, CHARLES MANEL 21
    11-Dec-1892 Burial SMITH, HARRY ERSKINE 24.
  10. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Dec 1861, p4.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 18 May 1870, p5.
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 14 Mar 1871, p68.
  14. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Dec 1877, p6.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 Jun 1879, p1.
Last Edited29 Nov 2017

Annie McKay Cooper

F, #4582, b. 1835, d. 14 Jul 1909
Married NameSmith. 
Birth*1835 
Marriage*22 Jul 1854 Spouse: George Paton Smith. Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England, Sep Q [Berwick] 10b 365.1
 
Land-UBeac*1877Annie McKay Smith selected land from the Crown. PAK-214. 19a 3r 27p. Govt Land Sale 5074 30 Apr 1879. Upset price £1/ac, valued £51. Crown Grant to Annie SMITH.2,3 
Widow6 Dec 1877She became a widow upon the death of her husband George Paton Smith.4 
Land-UBeac*2 Aug 1887 PAK-214. Transfer from Annie McKay Cooper to The Freehold Investment and Banking Company of Australia Ltd. 19a 3r 27p.5 
Death*14 Jul 1909 Glebe, NSW, Australia, #D9138 [par Donald & Margaret].6       
Death-Notice*17 Jul 1909Mrs Paton Smith whose death took place in Sydney on Wednesday was the widow of the late Mr George Paton Smith, who was Attorney General in the M Culloch Ministery. The deceased lady has been resident in Glebe, Sydney, for many years, but she was buried privately at the Boroondara Cemetery yesterday in the family vault.7 
Death-Notice17 Jul 1909SMITH.-On the 14th July at Glebe, Sydney, Annie Mackay, widow of the late Hon. George Paton Smith, beloved mother of L Paton Smith and Mrs Gillies Macdonald, of Sydney, and of Frederick Couper Smith, "Hartswood," Brighton, aged 74 years. (Interred privately, Boroondara Cemetery.)8 

Grave

  • PRES A 0087 & 0088, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, In memory of George Paton SMITH, Barrister at law for many years, & Member of the Legislative Assembly & at one time Attorney General of the Colony of Victoria, d 6 Dec 1877, aged 48 years. His energy ability & integrity won for him a distinguished position as a Politician, an Advocate, & a Journalist. This monument is erected by a few of his many friends & admirers as a lasting testimony to his private worth & public services.
    George Victor SMITH, eldest son of George Paton SMITH d 21 May 1883, aged 25 years, so loved so mourned, also his son Edward Paton SMITH d 16 Oct 1886, aged 20 years, verse.
    In loving memory of Charles Memel SMITH d 18 Dec 1891, aged 21 years, verse, also of Harry Erskine SMITH, d 10 Dec 1892, aged 24 years, verse.9,10

Newspaper-Articles

  • 26 May 1892, THURSDAY, JUNE 2 ... 80 ACRES BEACONSFIELD HEIGHTS. Under Instructions from the Liquidators of the Freehold Investment and Banking Company. JOHN VALE and SON have received instructions to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION (through their auctioneer, W F Vale) at the rooms, Planet chambers, 231 Collins street, on Thursday, June 2, at half past two o'clock.
    Some of the company's carefully selected and well known properties viz.:-
    Lot 3. BEACONSFIELD.
    About 80 acres known as Smith's blocks being Crown Allotments 211, 212, 213, and 214, parish of Pakenham county of Mornington, about three miles from officer railway station. Terms easy.11

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/3752     
    2687/49 ANNE MACKAY SMITH PAKENHAM 214 20--0--0. 1877 - 1879.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-577 - Annie Smith of Kew.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-577 - The Freehold Investment and Banking Company of Australia Ltd of No 20 Collins Street West Melbourne.
  6. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jul 1909, p19.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jul 1909, p13.
  9. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    PRES A 0088
    22-May-1883 Burial SMITH, GEORGE VICTOR 25
    21-Oct-1886 Burial SMITH, EDWARD PATON 20
    20-Dec-1891 Burial SMITH, CHARLES MANEL 21
    11-Dec-1892 Burial SMITH, HARRY ERSKINE 24.
  10. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 26 May 1892, p2.
Last Edited7 Sep 2018
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.