Bartholomew Mulcahy

M, #25741, b. 1840, d. 1911
Father*Thomas Mulcahy
Mother*Ellen or Cath Scully
Marriage* Spouse: Bridget Delaney.
 
Birth*1840 
Land-UBeac*9 Jul 1881Bartholomew Mulcahy selected land from the Crown. PAK-48. 113a 0r 22p.1 
Land-UBeac*5 Apr 1886 PAK-48. Transfer from Bartholomew Mulcahy to Michael James O'Brien. 113a 0r 22p.2 
Death*1911 Cowwarr, VIC, Australia, #D4634/1911 (Age 71) [par Thomas MULCAHY & Cath SCULLY].3 

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - Bartholomew Mulcahy of Cowwar.
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - Michael O'Brien of Nar Nar Goon Hotelkeeper.
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "#D4634/1911 (Age 71) [par Thomas MULCAHY & Cath SCULLY] - as Bartw MULCAHY."
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Thomas Mulcahy

M, #25742
Marriage* Spouse: Ellen or Cath Scully.
 

Family

Ellen or Cath Scully
Children 1.Bartholomew Mulcahy+ b. 1840, d. 1911
 2.John Patrick Mulcahy+ b. 1846, d. 1923
 3.Johanna Mulcahy+ b. 1853, d. 1914
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Ellen or Cath Scully

F, #25743
Marriage* Spouse: Thomas Mulcahy.
 
Married NameMulcahy. 

Family

Thomas Mulcahy
Children 1.Bartholomew Mulcahy+ b. 1840, d. 1911
 2.John Patrick Mulcahy+ b. 1846, d. 1923
 3.Johanna Mulcahy+ b. 1853, d. 1914
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Bridget Delaney

F, #25744
Married NameMulcahy. 
Marriage* Spouse: Bartholomew Mulcahy.
 
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Michael James O'Brien

M, #25749, b. 1841, d. 6 Nov 1915
Birth*1841 
Land-UBeac*5 Apr 1886 PAK-48. Transfer from Bartholomew Mulcahy to Michael James O'Brien. 113a 0r 22p.1 
Marriage* Spouse: Johanna Mulcahy.
 
Widower1914Michael James O'Brien became a widower upon the death of his wife Johanna Mulcahy.2 
Death*6 Nov 1915 Melbourne South, VIC, Australia, #D14615/1915 (Age 74) [par Daniel O'Brien & Bridget WALSH].2 
Death-Notice*8 Nov 1915O'BRIEN. - On the 6th November, at the residence of his brother (J.G. O'Brien, 85 St. Vincent's place, Albert Park), Michael O'Brien, of Nar Nar Goon, eldest son of the late Daniel O'Brien, beloved father of Catherine, Daisy, and Francis, aged 74 years.
Requiescat in pace.3 
Land-Note*29 Oct 1918 PAK-48. Michael O'Brien died on the 6th November 1915. Probate of his will has been granted to Jeremiah Gerald O'Brien of Erica Avenue Caulfield East Gentleman and John Robert Buxton of Collins Street Melbourne Auctioneer. Dated 29 Oct 1918.4 
Land-UBeac*4 Sep 1919 PAK-48. Transfer from Michael James O'Brien to James Reginald Henty. 113a 0r 22p.5 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Nov 1915: Crossed the Bar
    The death occurred on November 6 of Mr. Michael O'Brien, 75, a pioneer resident of Narrargoon.6

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - Michael O'Brien of Nar Nar Goon Hotelkeeper.
  2. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  3. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 8 Nov 1915, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/1577894
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - Michael O'Brien died on the 6th November 1915. Probate of his will has been granted to Jeremiah Gerald O'Brien of Erica Avenue Caulfield East Gentleman and John Robert Buxton of Collins Street Melbourne Auctioneer. Dated 29 Oct 1918.
  5. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - James Reginald Henty of Pakenham Park Pakenham Grazier.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 13 Nov 1915, p24
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132709507
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

James Reginald Henty

M, #25750, b. 1871, d. 17 Feb 1929
Birth*1871 Benalla, VIC, Australia, #B21636/1871 [par Thomas HENTY & Lucy Mary PINNOCK].1 
Land-UBeac*4 Sep 1919 PAK-48. Transfer from Michael James O'Brien to James Reginald Henty. 113a 0r 22p.2 
Land-Note*30 Mar 1920 PAK-48 (pt). State Rivers and Water Supply Commission Creation of Easement - along Northern Boundary.3 
Land-UBeac*30 Mar 1920 PAK-48 (pt). Transfer from James Reginald Henty to State Rivers and Water Supply Commission. 14a 3r 37 3/10p.4 
Death*17 Feb 1929 Pakenham, VIC, Australia, #D2804/1929 (Age 57) [par Thomas HENTY & Lucy Mary PINNOCK].5 
Death-Notice18 Feb 1929HENTY.—On the 17th February, at Pakenham Park, Pakenham, James Reginald Henty, aged 57 years.6 
Death-Notice*22 Feb 1929HENTY.—The Friends of the late Mr. JAMES REGINALD HENTY are informed that his ashes will be buried at Pakenham on Sunday next, the 24th February.
The funeral is appointed to leave his late residence, Pakenham Park, at 3 p.m., for the special burial-place.7 
Land-Note*3 Oct 1930 PAK-48 (pt). James Reginald Henty died on 17th February 1929. Probate of his will has been granted to James Dudley Seymour of Mount-street Heidelberg Estate Agent. 3 Oct 1930.8 
Land-Notea 3 Oct 1930 PAK-48 (pt). Red Ink 3195539 - Title cancelled see C/T 5763-461.9 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 23 Feb 1929: The death occurred on February 17 of Mr. James Reginald Henty, of Pakenham Park (V.) Mr. Henty, who was in his 58th year, was a son of Mr. Thomas Henty, a former member of the Legislative Council, and the youngest son of Mr. James Henty, who led the original Henty expedition to Australia. He fought in the Boer War, in which he gained commissioned rank. A few years ago he went on a big game shooting expedition to Central Africa.10
  • 24 Jun 1929: GRAZIER'S £47,000 WILL. Employes Remembered by Mr. J. R. Henty
    The will and three codicils of James Reginald Henty, late of Pakenham Park; Pakenham, grazier, who died on February 17, were lodged for probate today.
    He left in Victoria real estate £23,994, and personal property £23,136. He directed that his guns and curios be distributed among his brothers and sister, and £50 each given certain employes. He also directs his trustees to increase by 10/ a week the salary of any person who has been continuously employed at Pakenham Park for five years before his death and is afterwards employed on the estate.
    Specific gifts are made as follows To Anita M. Read, £100; to his niece, Vair Adams, £350; to Elly Bygrove Marie Linton, £300, to Cecily O'Shannassy, £500; to his sister Lucy Macarthur, £1000; to his brothers, Cecil and Edward, £1000 each; to Mary Collier Henty, widow of his late brother Francis Harold Henty, £1000; to his brother Thomas, £500; to Joan Henty, daughter of his late brother Francis, £100; to William Mervy Mervyn Henty, son of his late brother £500; to Mrs Fannie Linton, of Maffra, £100; and £100 each to his nephews Reginald and Jim Macarthur; and his niece, Jean Macarthur.
    The residue is to be divided into 23 parts, and one part given to his brother Robert, two parts to his brother Thomas, four parts each to his brothers Phillip, Cecil, and Edward, and
    his sister Lucie Macarthur.
    Trustees to invest
    The trustees are directed to invest the remaining four parts and pay the income to Mary Collier Henty during her life, so long as she remains a widow of Francis Henty, and upon her death to hold this part of the estate for the children of Mary and Francis Henty.
    The will gives the testator's brothers the option of purchasing a specified part of Pakenham Park, but direct that the estate be carried on as at present for at least two years after Mr Henty's death.
    If it is not then considered by the trustees to be a payable proposition, and if none of his brothers have tendered for it, the property, is to be sold.11

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online).
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - James Reginald Henty of Pakenham Park Pakenham Grazier.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - State Rivers and Water Supply Commission.
  4. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - State Rivers and Water Supply Commission - C/T 4305-855.
  5. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "indexed as James Reginaldd."
  6. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 18 Feb 1929, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3980808
  7. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Fri 22 Feb 1929, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3995992
  8. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - James Reginald Henty died on 17th February 1929. Probate of his will has been granted to James Dudley Seymour of Mount-street Heidelberg Estate Agent. 3 Oct 1930.
  9. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1297-380 - Red Ink 3195539 - Title cancelled see C/T 5763-461.
  10. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 23 Feb 1929, p12
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140818586
  11. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 24 Jun 1929, p1
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/244110662
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Johanna Mulcahy

F, #25751, b. 1853, d. 1914
Father*Thomas Mulcahy
Mother*Ellen or Cath Scully
Married NameO'Brien. 
Birth*1853 
Marriage* Spouse: Michael James O'Brien.
 
Death*1914 Nar Nar Goon, VIC, Australia, #D2940/1914 (Age 61) [par Thos MULCAHY & Ellen SCULLY].1 

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

George Thomas Johnson

M, #25753
Land-Note*14 Mar 1890 GEM-E-26: Mortgagee: George Thomas Johnson. Mortgage 110624 - discharged 22 Mar 1893 on sale to John Gull Johnson. Mortgagor was Richard Sadleir Forster.1 

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2116-115 - Mortgage 110624 - discharged 22 Mar 1893 on sale to John Gull Johnson.
Last Edited1 Apr 2021

Alexander MacKenzie

M, #25758, d. 28 Aug 1892
Probate (Will)* 52/455. Alexander MACKENZIE Date of grant: 12 Aug 1893; Date of death: 28 Aug 1892; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Colombo.1 
Land-UBeac*18 Mar 1885 GEM--73. Transfer from Charles Stiffing Alexander to Alexander MacKenzie. 289a 0r 0p.2 
Land-Note*2 Mar 1892 GEM--73: Mortgagee: The Royal Bank of Australia. Mortgage 132340 - discharged on sale of property by the bank on 17 Nov 1908. Mortgagor was Alexander MacKenzie.3 
Land-UBeac*a 2 Mar 1892 GEM--73. Transfer from Alexander MacKenzie to The Royal Bank of Australia. 289a 0r 0p - The Royal Bank of Australia took over the property before MacKenzie's death.3 
Death*28 Aug 1892 Colombo, Ceylon. 
Land-Note*12 Aug 1893 GEM--43.43A.44. and B. William Austin Zeal Mortgage of £4,000 not repaid. 
Note*12 Aug 1893 William Austin Zeal. Assets. Real Estate.
Crown allotments 43.43A.44 and B parish of Gembrook containing 951 acres 1 rood 20 perches on which is built a 7 roomed dwelling. The property is grazing farm and was at deceased's death in a very neglected state and was not being worked. It is 12 miles from Beaconsfield the nearest Railway Station.
250 acres only are cleared. Previous to deceased's death a great portion of the fences were burnt + were not rebuilt. The stable was also at same time burnt down. The property has been offered for sale since by public auction and privately by Officer and Smith but would not realise sufficient to pay off the mortgage. They have also been unsuccessful in getting a tenant the property has been allowed to get into such a bad state of repair. Value £4000
Liabilities
W A Zeal MLC Amount due on mortgage of the aforesaid Real Estate
Principal £4000
Interest 195.0.0
£4195.0.0.1 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 5 Jul 1884: SALES of STATION PROPERTY. &c
    Messrs. Shaw and Young have sold, on account of Mr. Charles Alexander, the Fairview Estate, situated at Gembrook, consisting of 950 acres of freehold land, together with the cattle and horses thereon, at a satisfactory price, Mr. Alexander Mackenzie being the purchaser. Charles Stiffing Alexander4
  • 23 Dec 1885: From Alex. Mackenzie, Gembrook west, asking for improvements on road from Stony Creek towards his property.—Dayman to attend, on motion of Councillor Souter. Seconded by Councillor Dore.5
  • 19 Mar 1892: TUESDAY, APRIL 5. At Twelve Noon.
    Corner of Bourke and Queen Streets, Melbourne.
    947 ACRES. GEMBROOK.
    W. R. LOOKER and SONS are instructed by Alex. Mackenzie, Esq., who is leaving for India, to SELL, as above, through their Mr. H. J. Looker (in conjunction with Messrs. Officer and Smith), Crown Portions 43, 44, 43A and B, parish of Gembrook, containing 947 acres, of which a large portion is some of the richest land in the colony, and being only 40 miles from Melbourne, and within easy drive to Beaconsfield railway station, which has the great advantage of suburban trains and suburban fares, also any of the three proposed Gembrook lines will cross the property ; it is therefore bound to become very valuable. The homestead comprises a good ten-roomed house, eight-stall stable, dairy, cowsheds, men's cottage, carpenter's shop and smithy, garden, orchard, tennis court, &c; 300? acres have been cleared, 15 paddocks splendidly watered, 70 acres ploughed. The views cannot be surpassed, and the climate cool and most salubrious.
    Title Certificate. Terms Easy.6
  • 4 Feb 1893: NOTICE is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will be made to the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria in its Probate jurisdiction, that PROBATE of the LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of ALEXANDER MACKENZIE, formerly of Gembrook, in the said colony, farmer, but late of Newera Eliya, in the island of Ceylon deceased, may be granted to Charles Boyes, of Collins street, Melbourne, stock and share broker, and Joseph Sabelberg, of Number 491 Elizabeth street, Melbourne aforesaid, solicitor, the attorney under power of Jessie Jane Mackenzie, of Newera Eliya aforesaid, the sole executrix named in and appointed by the said will.
    Dated this fourth day of February, 1893.
    JOSEPH SABELBERG, 49 Elizabeth street, Melbourne, proctor for the applicants.7
  • 10 Aug 1893: Alexander Mackenzie, late of Colombo, Ceylon, but formerly of View Hill, Gembrook, gentleman, who died at Colombo on 28th August, 1892, by his will, dated 4th November, 1891, appoints his wife, Jessie Jane, sole executrix of his will. He bequeaths the whole of his estate to his wife, trusting that at her death she will devise it to his daughter, Charlotte. Value of real estate in the colony, £4000.8
  • 31 Dec 1898: LANDS FORFEITED. The following licences have been revoked, forfeited or declared void:—Alexander Mackenzie, Gembrook, 32 sec., 363 a9
  • 14 Feb 1903: Mr. F. S. Grimwade, M.L.C., chairman of the Royal Bank of Australia Limited, entertained a large number of the financial and mercantile community at luncheon yesterday at the bank's new premises, corner of Elizabeth and Collins streets. About 70 gentlemen responded to Mr. Grimwade's invitation, amongst whom were the Lord Mayor, Messrs. F. W. Prell, Henry Henty, the directors and general managers of all the Melbourne Banks with the exception of one or two absent on their holidays, and the seniors of the bank's staff. After the usual loyal toasts, Sir William Zeal proposed Prosperity to the Royal Bank of Australia.
    The chairman, in replying, briefly referred, to the steady success of the bank, which was the best earnest of its continued prosperity. The Lord Mayor of Melbourne, one of the board of directors, also responding, referred to the possible influence the new income tax proposals of The Government would have on banking and other investments. William Austin Zeal10

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P0 unit 666, item 52/455
    VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 211, item 52/455
    VPRS 28/ P2 unit 365, item 52/455.
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1638-513 - Alexander MacKenzie of East Melbourne Gentleman - C/T 1671-095.
  3. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1671-095 - Mortgage 132340 - discharged on sale of property by the bank on 17 Nov 1908.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 5 Jul 1884, p31
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/138092749
  5. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic.), Wed 23 Dec 1885, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/70391612
  6. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 19 Mar 1892, p4
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/138624675
  7. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 4 Feb 1893, p14
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/8511181
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Melbourne Punch (Vic.), Thu 10 Aug 1893, p16
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/174636736
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 31 Dec 1898, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/197535609
  10. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 14 Feb 1903, p10
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/197901099
Last Edited6 Apr 2021

The Royal Bank of Australia

?, #25759
Land-Note*2 Mar 1892 GEM--73: Mortgagee: The Royal Bank of Australia. Mortgage 132340 - discharged on sale of property by the bank on 17 Nov 1908. Mortgagor was Alexander MacKenzie.1 
Land-UBeac*a 2 Mar 1892 GEM--73. Transfer from Alexander MacKenzie to The Royal Bank of Australia. 289a 0r 0p - The Royal Bank of Australia took over the property before MacKenzie's death.1 
Land-UBeac*17 Nov 1908 GEM--73. Transfer from The Royal Bank of Australia to Charles William Neville. 289a 0r 0p.2 

Citations

  1. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1671-095 - Mortgage 132340 - discharged on sale of property by the bank on 17 Nov 1908.
  2. [S185] Property Titles ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1671-095 - Charles William Neville of 285 Collins Street Melbourne Real Estate Operator.
Last Edited2 Apr 2021

William Austin Zeal

M, #25760, b. 1830, d. Mar 1912
The Late Sir William Zeal
(In his Robes as President of the Legislative Council).
Land-Note* Land Selection Files, Section 33, Land Act 1869
10681 WILLIAM AUSTIN ZEAL NARRE WARREN 58
13639 WILLIAM AUSTIN ZEAL MARY CORNISH NARREE WORREN 58.1 
Probate (Will)* 124/331. William A ZEAL Date of grant: 03 May 1912; Date of death: 11 Mar 1912; Occupation: Civil Engineer; Residence: Melbne.2 
Birth*1830 
Land-Note*12 Aug 1893 GEM--43.43A.44. and B. Alexander MacKenzie Mortgage of £4,000 not repaid. 
Note*12 Aug 1893 Alexander MacKenzie. Assets. Real Estate.
Crown allotments 43.43A.44 and B parish of Gembrook containing 951 acres 1 rood 20 perches on which is built a 7 roomed dwelling. The property is grazing farm and was at deceased's death in a very neglected state and was not being worked. It is 12 miles from Beaconsfield the nearest Railway Station.
250 acres only are cleared. Previous to deceased's death a great portion of the fences were burnt + were not rebuilt. The stable was also at same time burnt down. The property has been offered for sale since by public auction and privately by Officer and Smith but would not realise sufficient to pay off the mortgage. They have also been unsuccessful in getting a tenant the property has been allowed to get into such a bad state of repair. Value £4000
Liabilities
W A Zeal MLC Amount due on mortgage of the aforesaid Real Estate
Principal £4000
Interest 195.0.0
£4195.0.0.3 
Death*Mar 1912 Armadale, VIC, Australia, #D77/1912 (Age 82) [par unknown].4 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 14 Feb 1903: Mr. F. S. Grimwade, M.L.C., chairman of the Royal Bank of Australia Limited, entertained a large number of the financial and mercantile community at luncheon yesterday at the bank's new premises, corner of Elizabeth and Collins streets. About 70 gentlemen responded to Mr. Grimwade's invitation, amongst whom were the Lord Mayor, Messrs. F. W. Prell, Henry Henty, the directors and general managers of all the Melbourne Banks with the exception of one or two absent on their holidays, and the seniors of the bank's staff. After the usual loyal toasts, Sir William Zeal proposed Prosperity to the Royal Bank of Australia.
    The chairman, in replying, briefly referred, to the steady success of the bank, which was the best earnest of its continued prosperity. The Lord Mayor of Melbourne, one of the board of directors, also responding, referred to the possible influence the new income tax proposals of The Government would have on banking and other investments. Alexander MacKenzie5
  • 16 Mar 1912: DEATH OF SIR WILLIAM ZEAL.
    Sir William Zeal died at his residence, "Clovelly," Lansell road, Toorak, on Monday morning last, at the age of 82 years. Deceased was born at Westbury, Wiltshire, England, and was educated as a civil engineer, and arrived in Melbourne in 1852, being attracted by the gold fever. For some time he followed the engineering profession, and was prominently connected with the construction of many important railway and other works. He entered Parliament (the Assembly) first in 1864 for Castlemaine. He also sat in the Legislative Council, of which he occupied the position of President with credit and honor. He was one of the ten members that represented Victoria at a convention elected to frame the Federal Constitution. He was also one of Victoria's first Senators, but retired in 1906. Sir William was also a director of a number of banking, insurance and commercial companies, and his outspoken frankness in both his political and commercial careers won for him warm esteem from all with whom he came in contact. He was a bachelor, and his hospitality was unbounded.
    At the Prahran Council meeting on Monday the Mayor (Councillor Embling), in regretfully announcing the death of Sir William Zeal, mentioned that the deceased gentleman had been a member of the council from 1879 to 1881. The funeral took place on Wednesday, the place of interment being the Melbourne
    General Cemetery. There was a large attendance of leading Melbourne citizens.6

Citations

  1. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 629/ P0 unit 57, item 10681
    VPRS 629/ P0 unit 72, item 13639.
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 477, item 124/331
    VPRS 28/ P3 unit 280, item 124/331.
  3. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P0 unit 666, item 52/455
    VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 211, item 52/455
    VPRS 28/ P2 unit 365, item 52/455.
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  5. [S16] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 14 Feb 1903, p10
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/197901099
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Malvern Standard (Vic.), Sat 16 Mar 1912, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66390211
Last Edited6 Apr 2021

Charles William Neville

M, #25761, b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Charlie NEVILLE
(image ancestry family tree)
Name Variation Charles William Neville was also known as William Charles Neville Ussher. 
Note* George Spencer Herne. Business Partners. 
Birth*Jun 1880 Islington, London, England, William Charles Neville Ussher. Jun Q 1880 (Islington) 01b 292. Mother's maiden surname: Sutton.1,2 
Marriage*6 Aug 1898 Spouse: Althea May 'Allie' Copeland. Wentworth, Ontario, Canada.3
 
Land-Note*14 Nov 1908 GEM--73. The Land and Resort Co. advertises the lots. 
Land-UBeac*17 Nov 1908 GEM--73. Transfer from The Royal Bank of Australia to Charles William Neville. 289a 0r 0p.4 
Note*10 May 1909 Subdivision of the 'Garden City' land at the end of 1908, lots start being transferred from 10 May 1909. 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel4 Jun 1911 Sailing with George Spencer Herne to Southampton, England. Ship St Paul sailing from New York, United States
Tourist (Charles Neville.)5
(Migrant) Migration/Travel24 Oct 1911 To Fishguard, England. Ship Lusitania sailing from New York, New York, United States
Estate Agent.6 
Marriage*30 Jun 1932 Spouse: Dorothy Rochard. Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.7,8
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel29 Jul 1932 To Southampton, England. Ship Berengaria sailing from New York, New York, United States
Sailing with Dorothy (42)
Age 51 - Director. Address Holmbush Manor, Shinfold, Sussex.9 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel29 Apr 1935 To Southampton, England. Ship Marnix van Sint Aldegonde sailing from Villefranche
travelling with Dorothy (45) Charles R (20) Roland J (19)
Age 54 - Director. Address Holmshurst Man. Shirfold 1st.10 
Widower17 Apr 1937Charles William Neville became a widower upon the death of his wife Althea May 'Allie' Copeland.3 
Death*22 Oct 1960 St. Marks Hospital, Finsbury, London, England, Dec Q 1960 (Finsbury, London) (Age 79)
Cause of death: Hepatic Pneumonia, Heart Failure, Diabetes, DVT.11,12,13 
Probate (Will)*10 Jan 1961 NEVILLE Charles William of 2 Dean Close Dean Court Road Rottingdean Sussex died 22 October 1960 at St. Marks Hospital Finsbury London Probate London 10 January to Dorothy Neville widow and Roderick Charles Neville company director. Effects £139,179 l6s. 9d.
Resealed Sydney Australia 13 September 1961.11 
Note From Debra Gill (ancestry tree): I have written this profile on William Charles Neville "Charlie" Ussher based on the writings of his first cousin, my grandfather's brother, John William "Bob" Sutton. To read Uncle Bob's report in its entirety please refer to the hard copy, which can be found within the pages of Sutton Saga, the family research report written by Bob Sutton.
"Perhaps the most extensive personal influence in my life was my life long association with my first cousin, Charles William Neville Ussher. I feel greatly indebted to him, and grateful for his interest, for he was responsible for getting me out of those bleak, hopeless work days in London and making it possible for me to return to Canada and make a life there for myself.
"The Neville Saga," as I like to think of it, is a remarkable and exciting story of success in a material sense. He inherited from his father a flair for making money, a love of women, charisma and good looks and an appetite for the best wine, food, etc. Both lived by their wits, were promoters for enterprises that were phony, even criminally projected in misrepresentation, but they succeeded in successfully outwitting the law and both made fortunes. Both men were involved in countless affairs, deserted their wives and families, were devoid of any moral sense and capable of extreme mental and physical cruelty.
An international entrepeneur, Charlie had business ventures in England, Australia, New Guinea, Canada and the U.S. and enjoyed all the comforts of successful, higher class living in England, however there was a hostile, cruel and malicious streak in his dealings with people, even his own family, particularly when opposed. Perhaps his most successful promotion scheme was "Peacehaven," a retirement development he was promoting for a real estate company by the name of The South Coast Land and Resort Co., he had interest in. The end result had him involved in considerable ligation, but he managed to stay out of jail."
Note: Certainly one of the most, shall we say, colorful characters I have come across to date in this tree. Information on Peacehaven, and some other of Charlie's "investments" can be found on the internet.14 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
29 Sep 1939The Grange, Brighton, Sussex, EnglandHead of Household: Charles William Neville. Charles W Neville, Married, born 9 Apr 1881, Land Company Director, The Grange.
In the same household were Minnie A. L. Jeffs (housekeeper), Ruby Biggs (Cook), Albert Baker (head gardener), two school teachers, and a twelve year old girl (at school). Two or more records are 'officially closed.15'

Family 1

Althea May 'Allie' Copeland b. 1 Nov 1880, d. 17 Apr 1937
Child 1.Robert Lionel Ussher3 b. 30 Jan 1899, d. 1 Oct 1918

Family 2

Dorothy Rochard b. 13 Nov 1890, d. 1973
Children 1.Roderick Charles Neville50 b. Mar 1914
 2.Charles Richard Neville51 b. Mar 1915
 3.Roland John Neville52 b. Mar 1916

Newspaper-Articles

  • 18 Dec 1907: To-morrow. At 3 o'Clock. In Morton and Coghill's Rooms, 72 Swanston-street, MELBOURNE.
    FARM LANDS at COCKATOO CREEK.
    By Order of the Mortgagee.
    TR. B. MORTON and COGHILL (in conjunction with C. H. COOKE, of Emerald) will sell—That superbly situated block of 289 ACRES, being Crown allotment 73, parish of Gembrook, within a quarter of a mile of COCKATOO railway station, having an extensive frontage to the picturesque drive along the Cockatoo Creek.
    Commanding from its rises for reaching and most charming views of picturesque country, this property is pre-eminently suitable for the gentleman requiring a country seat or week-end farm home, the speculator seeking cheap land, to subdivide, or the orchardist or florist wanting high land, with a splendid mountain climate, easily accessible from a railway station.
    Terms easy, up to 5 years.
    Title, certificate.
    T. R. B. Morton and Cogltill, 72 Swanston-street, Melbourne; Canterbury and Box Hill.16,17
  • 19 Dec 1907: THIS DAY. At 3 o'Clock. At their Rooms, 72 SWANSTON-STREET.
    By order of the Mortgagee.
    T. R. B. MORTON and COGHILL (in conjunction with C. H. COOKE, of Emerald) will sell as already more fully advertised,
    That superbly situated block of
    289 ACRES,
    being Crown allotment 73, parish of Gembrook, within a quarter of a mile of COCKATOO railway station.
    Terms easy, up to 5 years.18
  • 14 Nov 1908: 500 FREE LOTS 500 * THE GARDEN CITY. A BEAUTIFUL SUMMER RESORT.
    No Cost or Restrictions Whatever in Regard to Building,
    They are Free for the Asking.
    In order to advertise their beautiful summer resort, The Land, and Resort Company are going to give away ABSOLUTELY FREE Five Hundred Freehold Lots to the first applicants.
    The lots are close to the station, just the thing for an ideal summer cottage, or should you wish to enjoy the pleasures of camping out, here is an opportunity to do so on your own land, or you can hold it as an investment or speculation. This fine estate has just recently been purchased from The Royal Bank of Australia for summer resort purposes, and is on the Fern Tree Gully and Gembrook line, being only 36 miles from the city and situated among most ideal surroundings, at the height of the Dandenong Hills, from which a magnificent view of more than one hundred miles in extent can be obtained, extending on one side to Western Port Bay, in which French and Phillip Islands can be seen, to the Great Dividing Range on the other, while before us lies that cradle of beauty called by those who first saw its charms the LOVELY VALLEY, and in which a portion of the GARDEN CITY lies.
    Of the many charming resorts in the near vicinity of Melbourne, none can compare, in situation and beauty of surroundings with the Garden City. We can offer you every facility for health and enjoyment, with the advantage of being within easy distance of the City. Greatly reduced fares are given for weekends and holidays, and special excursions will he run from time to time, in order to allow purchasers to view the property. A trip to the Garden City is one continuous view of mountain and vale, with fern tree gullies and silvery creeks on every hand. On arrival at the station there are no hot, dusty roads to travel over; you are at home at once. So very interesting as it is to the pleasure seeker, it is doubly so to the disciple of rod and reel, as the creeks in this locality are well supplied with fish, while the woods afford sport to the hunters, for rabbits, foxes, &c., make of this region a veritable hunter's paradise. To those in search of rest and recreation, there is no place that can rival it, while those in search of health will find a purity of air among the stately gums and general surronndings which is most beneficial. The resort region along the Gembrook line, with its high altitude and health giving air, is becoming well known throughout the State. Thousands of excursionists flock every year to this region, and wealthy citizens are rapidly buying all available land.
    PICTURESQUE VICTORIA, published by the Victorian Railways Department, says "Along this line are strung, as heads upon a thread, a series of the most exquisite pictures" from Nature's easel; each curve in the line disclosing some fresh view of sylvan beauty. From every gully spring towering trees, around whose gnarled bases nestle the lesser growths of "hazel or myrtle, while ferns of endless variety, from the maiden hair, fringing each tiny rill, "to the tall tree fern, with its drooping fronds, are everywhere in evidence."
    But not until the valley of the Cockatoo is reached, wherein the Garden City lies, is the full beauty of these glorious hills made manifest.
    To a person who has not seen The Garden City, surrounded as it is with all its picturesque scenery, it is simply impossible to form a mind picture that will compare with its actual beauty. It is simply beyond the power of man to describe it. There is perhaps no prettier spot in all Victoria, laying as it does, at an altitude of almost a thousand feet above the sea. The Garden City Estate is ever swept by cool and invigorating breezes, and the temperature is always agreeable, while its cottagers will not be annoyed by the scorching north winds and rough weather so frequently experienced on the Bay and seaside resorts.
    Many beautiful bungalows will be erected during the coming summer, and this great free distribution of lots is sure to make this the best known and most popular resort in Victoria.
    In order to quickly and extensively advertise this resort, The Land and Resort Company have decided to give away ABSOLUTELY FREE every other one of their building lots to the first applicants. Each lot is high and dry, and has shade trees, and is as good in every way as those retained by the company, no lot being less than one-fourth acre. Lots in Queenscliff, Sandringham, Mordialloc and other popular resorts are now selling from £75 to £200 and more, which a few years ago could have been obtained for little or nothing. This is an opportunity of a lifetime—take advantage— you may never have the same chance again.
    HOW TO GET ONE OF THESE LOTS FREE.
    The Garden City Estate is at present being surveyed and subdivided. Transfers will be given as soon as possible to all who take advantage of this offer. Owing to our extensive real estate operations, we have been enabled to have the survey made at a most reasonable price, and the only cost to the parties taking advantage of one offer is for the survey fee and other necessary expenses, which we have placed at THIRTY SHILLINGS. A transfer form is given you signed by the vendor, free of charge. This, recollect, is the only cost to you for the lot. The company reserves the right of limiting each person to five lots only. After the distribution of the five hundred lots is made the remaining lots will he sold at their normal values, ranging from £10 and upwards. Remit direct by postal note, money order or any other safe way to ensure delivery, to The Land and Resort Company, Citizens'-buildings, 281-285 Collins-street, Melbourne.
    DON'T OVERLOOK THIS GREAT OPPORTUNITY,
    As you can obtain a summer home in this grand resort for the mere cost of the survey of your lot. If you want a lot for a cottage or to hold as a speculation act at once. This notice may not appear again, and your money will be returned promptly if not received in time to secure a lot. Bear in mind each applicant is limited to five lots. The time to act is now if you wish a free lot; do not delay. We expect this notice will quickly dispose of all the 500 lots. Persons outside of Melbourne will have the same opportunity as those living in the City, and one-half of the lots will he reserved for orders by letter, thus giving a fair chance to all who desire to participate in our offer. Be sure and write FULL name and address plainly, and do not forget that there is no further cost to you beyond the payment of the survey fee—Thirty Shillings—which gives you absolute ownership of your lot.
    ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO
    THE LAND AND RESORT CO.,
    CITIZENS' BUILDING,
    281-5 COLLINS-STREET, MELBOURNE.19
  • 18 Nov 1908: Berwick Shire Council. Saturday, November 7th. From Thos. H. Braid, Temple Court, re subdivision of crown allotment 73, Gembrook.—The secretary said he had written in reply.—On motion of Crs James and Grant, action approved of.20
  • 28 Nov 1908: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4.
    Commencing at Twelve O'Clock and Will Conclude About Two O'Clock.
    At the Auction rooms SYDNEY HAYNES and CO., 333 COLLINS STREET Adjoining Commercial Bank
    THE LAND and RESORT COMPANY Have Decided to SUBMIT by PUBLIC AUCTION THE WHOLE OF THE REMAINING LOTS In the
    GARDEN CITY ESTATE Charmingly Situated on the Famous Gembrook Line.
    Immediately Adjoining the Cockatoo Railway Station.
    The Property Possesses All the Natural Beauty and Picturesque Features of This Delightful District Including Fern Gullies and Perpetually Running Springs and All the Attributes that Go to Make the Ideal Mountain Holiday Resort.
    TERMS
    Deposit 10/ on Each Lot Purchased
    Title Certificate
    WB SIMPSON and SONS instructed by the vendors will SELL by AUCTION, as above Plans and fullest information may be obtained at the Land and Resort Company 285 Collins street and at the auctioneers 12 Victoria street Melbourne North and of the solicitors Daly, Hall and Davey, 101 Swanston street.21
  • 4 Dec 1908: HOLIDAY RESORT BLOCKS. AN AUCTION SALE.
    After having disposed of the 500 alternate blocks at Cockatoo, which were given away on payment of the survey fee, the Land and Resort Company instructed Mr J. W. Simpson to offer 200 of the reserved blocks for sale by auction to-day. The land was submitted at Morton and Coghill's rooms, and out of 150 blocks put up between 20 and 30 were reported as sold. Those auctioned in the body of the estate realised about 30s per block.22
  • 2 Jan 1909: RESORT BLOCKS. RECORD OF SALES.
    Evidence of the increasing favor in which country resort blocks are advancing appears in the very considerable number of purchasers, of blocks in Garden City on the Gembrook line. This property was thrown open in quarter-acre blocks a month ago by the Land and Resort Company.
    To date, some 770 quarter-acre lots have been disposed of. Two weeks ago this company threw open the Clacton-on-Sea Estate, which adjoins Rosebud, about three miles from Dromana. The lots in this estate sold within two weeks number close on 600, prices ranging from 30s upwards., surely establishing a record.23
  • 13 Jan 1909: REAL PROPERTY. HOLIDAY RESORT BLOCKS. A COMPLAINT INVESTIGATED
    Writing on behalf of himself and nine other persons, a correspondent makes some complaint about certain alleged methods of the Land and Resort Company, which has opened up a new vein in the property market by selling small lots of land for holiday resort purposes at Cockatoo, on the Gcmbrook line, and at Clacton-on-Sea, near Dromana.
    The correspondent says that he cannot get information either at the company's office or on the property as to the situation of blocks of land on the Clackton estate. He was told the surveyors' pegs would be put in and numbered, but on going over the property he could see some pegs "by peering through the grass," and not others. He was told he could have his title by a certain date, but on calling again was put off. The Cockatoo purchasers, he added, have not yet got their titles.
    These complaints were brought under the notice of Mr Neville, the manager of the company, who readily replied to questions put to him. He turned up a marked plan of the Clackton property, and stated that nearly half of the land had been properly surveyed, trenched and pegged out. The pegs were of the correct size and form, but of course were not as easily found as finger-posts.
    He then showed a letter from the surveyor, Mr W. S. Steane, who stated that the survey of the remaining blocks was being pushed on.
    Mr Neville added that he hoped to have the survey complete by January 30. The survey contract had a penalty clause to be enforced if the work was not completed in time.
    With respect to Cockatoo, the surveyor's plans were not yet completed, and until they were nothing more could be done. The company intended, however, to have finger-posts put up on the land, and he was expecting the surveyor in immediately with the plans.24
  • 14 Jan 1909: REAL PROPERTY. HOLIDAY RESORT BLOCKS ROSEBUD PRICES QUESTIONED THE SCHEME CRITICISED. "Look Before You Leap" (Yarraville) writes:—
    I am glad to see that somebody has seen fit to draw attention to the methods of the Land Resort Co. Your correspondent's remarks re the pegging of blocks hardly goes to the root of the matter.
    After an arduous trip to Cockatoo by road from a neighboring settlement, and feeling the need of a team of horses to climb the hills and gullies which comprise the "Garden City," and having had a conversation with a local councillor, I find there are far more pertinent questions to be answered.
    In the first place; I am told that the Berwick Council, which is also the local Board of Health threw out the submitted subdivision of "Garden City," as being wholly impossible of acceptance.
    The rejection of this subdivision renders it impossible to locate a block, and, furthermore, absolutely prevents a title being obtained from the Titles Office as long as such embargo remains on a submitted subdivision. Many buyers are led to believe that there is no further expence. This is not so. The Land Resort Company only promises a signed transfer; the real title to the land must be obtained from the Government at considerable further expense to the buyer.
    I note an invitation "to compare prices with those now asked for other seaside or mountain resort-lots."
    Let us compare. At Clacton the blocks are quoted at an inferred flat rate of 30s each. Calculation shows that there are 10 blocks to the acre (35 x 120 each block). This totals L15 an acre. The plan discloses a very small minority of 30s blocks, and they are just a mile from the beach. The water frontages are quoted on the plan at L10 to L25 a lot, which is L100 to L230 an acre. Intermediate lots are quoted from L35 to L40 an acre, and others work out at L25 to L32 10s an acre. A vast difference between this and 30s a lot!
    Carrum, Aspendale, Beaconsfield, Ferntree, Croydon, etc., etc., never brought prices like these as untried settlements, and even now, as your excellent articles on real property have shown, mountain blocks are readily obtainable in settled districts with all facilities of cheap travelling from about L15 downwards for blocks twice or three times the size of the Rosebud blocks.
    There can only be bitter disappointment in respect to plans of subdivisions such as these proposed, and the sooner those in authority exercise some supervision over the offers made the better it will be for those who are trying to acquire their own little "week-end retreat" without being grossly misled.25
  • 19 Jan 1909: COCKATOO BLOCKS. A surveyor's criticism. Mr A. Tuxen (licensed surveyor) writes:—
    Re Cockatoo subdivision. Mr Neville, of the Land and Resort Company, seems in your issue of to-day to be under the impression that the mere sending of a subdivision plan to the Titles' office constituted the lodging of the same, so that transfer can immediately take place. That is not so.
    On sending a sub-division plan to the Title office, the plan is examined as to accuracy of survey, mathematical correctness, agreement with title, access to allotments, etc; then requisitions are made, amongst others, if the land is in a shire, that proof be given that the shire is not under sections 522-525 Act 1893, or if it is, that the consent of the Shire Council under seal be obtained to the lodging of the plan.
    The Shire Council would probably require levels to be shown at every allotment corner, and would reject the plan if the drainage of every lot and all roads were not provided for. The council may also have the right to reject the plan if the gradients of the roads are unsuitable.
    As I believe the Shire of Berwick is now under the sections mentioned, I do not think their consent to the plan can be given; even if given, that the necessary steps could be gone through, and titles obtained in a few days, as suggested by Mr Neville.26
  • 21 Jan 1909: GARDEN CITY BLOCKS.
    A correspondent writes:—"In reference to Mr Neville's letter, explaining that the company known as The Land and Resort Co. have not promised to give a certificate of title in connection with their blocks, I would like to say that many purchasers are under the belief that they were to receive same free of cost upon payment of the sums agreed on, and I, for one, will immediately be willing to sell my little lot, since even the small sum of L2 for a block of land, possibly a swamp a mile distance from the beach, is not worth the cost of obtaining the title."27
  • 30 Jan 1909: WANTED, ONE thousand acres or more of good land near irrigation channels, must be suitable for irrigation and price low. Give full particulars to C. W. Neville, 285 Collins-street, Melbourne.28
  • 30 Jan 1909: SALES BY AUCTION.
    It is somewhat surprising that in our state the development of the many beautiful places around the Bay has been so tardy. True it is that a few places have gone ahead, but considering the climatic conditions of this country the seaside bungalow is conspicuous by its absence, possibly on account of the fact that no one in particular has brought into prominence its possibilities. Hence the general tendency year after year, to go to the one place, paying usually exhorbitant rates for accommodation. The Land and Resort Company are making a laudable attempt to break away from set lines and with most astonishing success. We are informed by their representative that close an a thousand lots have been actually sold in their Clacton on Sea Estate during the last six weeks, proving beyond doubt that where the opportunity offers of securing a low price
    lot, and £2 is low enough in all conscience, the people of Victoria are ready buyers. In order to give the people of Ballarat the opportunity of obtaining fullest possible information about Clacton on Sea, the principals of the Land and Resort Company have taken an office in Ballarat for a few days. We would draw our readers' attention to the special advertisement appearing in this issue. Those wishing to learn all particulars of the lots, and to see plan of the £40 Bungalow, would do well to call at the office in the National Mutual Building at once. After Tuesday all information may be obtained at the office of Mr T. R. Jones, Estate Agent, 34
    Lydiard street south, Ballarat.29
  • 13 Mar 1909: BACK TO NATURE.
    It will give you an appetite! This is a remark one frequently hears, and its value is undeniable wben the specific is recommended from actual experience. It is advice usually given with the best of intentions. The city dweller unfortunately very often needs his appetite whetting, especially during the summer, when his system is likely to become somewhat jaded. People who live in the country very seldom need a fillip in this respect. Living and constantly breathing the pure country air, which is man's national element, appetisers are an unknown quantity. Back of the nature of all of us the inherent desire exists to get away from the forced condtions of living, inseparable from city life, be those conditions as ideal as they may. Hence the growing desire for week-end trips and the prejudicial sojourn in the country, which constitutes an appetiser to all fortunate enough to be able to indulge therein. It gives one an appetite for work. After a respite, however brief, one can return to work with a zest. By the many these week end trips have hitherto been looked upon as altogether too expensive, principally on account of the charges of those who profess to cater for the week-ender, and not so much, the railway fares. The opening up of Yosemite Park at Bridgewater, which is, by-the-way, one of the beauty spots in the Hills, and only 14 miles from Adelaide, by the Land and Resort Company of Melbourne, has simultaneously opened, as it were, the secret door which hid from view the solution to the week-end problem. These gentlemen have subdivided the property into blocks of a convenient size, from quarter-acre upwards, the lesser size being ample for the purpose of erecting a little rustic cottage, or bungalow. The size of the lots, however, is not by any means the only convenient thing about the scheme. The first and most natural question is, "How much are they?" After giving away 150 lots, we learn the prices for the remaining lots runs from £3 to £5, which prices include the cost of survey work and transfer form, signed and stamped. In addition, one finds also that it is possible to build a little week-end cottage from £20 complete. No doubt some people are looking for the hidden purpose, and view the matter askance, not so much that they would not like or do not wish to buy, but the scheme has things about it which no other land transaction had. Whilst caution is a commend able quantity, it behoves those who hesitate to see they do not risk a loss altogether, since a peep at the plan shows that some 200 people have already taken advantage of the opportunity, which is presenting itself to South Australians, an opportunity the like of which has never before presented itself.
    And who knows but that the young man who has whetted his appetite with a block in Yosemite Park may not posses such a voracious desire for land that he will not stop short of hundreds of acres and a fortune? Surely a desideratum by no means unlikely. mx30
  • 20 Mar 1909: YOSEMITE PARK.
    Two hundred and fifty lots sold within 10 days is the astonishing report from the Land and Resort Company. This new estate, which almost adjoins Bridgewater Station on the Hills line, and recently opened up as a summer resort, certainly ranks as the most successful subdivision in the hills for many years, and plainly evinces the fact that a very great number of people are only too glad to take advantage of an opportunity to secure a block of land in the beautiful hills, provided the price be reasonable. Herein lies the secret of the success of Yosemite Park Estate.
    Prices ranging from £3 to £5 for quarter-acre blocks. These amounts include transfer and stamp dues, and payable at the rate of 10/ per month, which bring the lots within reach of every one and is certainly an opportunity which in all probability will never again present itself. As the population of the city increases so will land any way convenient to a railway station in the hills inevitably increase in value. The majority of purchasers in Yosemite Park, we understand, have bought with a view to putting up a cottage or bungalow for weekends and holidays, and a more delightful spot so close to town for the purpose it would be hard to find.31
  • 7 Apr 1909: Surveyors at Variance
    On Saturday Mr. Hall attended at the Berwick council meeting and asked that amendments be made in the plan of the Garden City Estate, Gembrook, to which the council's seal was attached at a previous meeting, viz., the insertion of a 50 ft. roadway between the reserve and the property on one side, as the Government would not allow the reserve to be used as a road; that a roadway be substituted for a creek in a gully running down the centre of the land; and that the creek as a boundary be erased.
    Cr. Martin said that, according to Mr. Tuxon, C.E. grave errors existed in the plan the council had been induced to pass. He said that the Institute of Surveyors set a rate at which work should be done, and Mr Stein, C.E., had undercut them. Personally, he did not agree with sweating in any form, and condemned Mr. Stein's action. Mr. Tuxon had made a survey of the estate, which was in direct opposition to that of Mr. Stein as regards drainage. The plan had been passed on the recomnmendation of Mr. Ramage, not Mr. Keys, who was their engineer; and the Institute had called upon Mr. Keys for an explanation. He doubted if Mr. Ramage had power to pass the plan ; and thought that they should see that Mr. Keys was not held responsible for that with which he had nothing to do. Since last meeting circulars had been sent to purchasers in reference to the delay in issuing titles, and statements made to the effect that the plan had been endorsed by the shire engineer, where it incorrect to say so.
    Cr. Wilson thought that if the company held the consent of the council to the plan, and it was inaccurate, they would be in a peculiar position.
    Cr. Martin : It seems as though the surveyors had fallen out.
    Mr. Ramage said that Mr. Keys had never seen the plan. The amendments would not injure those who bought land from the company. It his opinion Mr. Tuxon was making all the fuss because he did not get the work, and in his opinion the survey was a better one than that gentleman's. They got the falls by contour, and he was thoroughly satisfied with the plan. The council should not allow itself to be made a tool of revenge.
    Mr. Hall said that a rumour was afloat long before the plan had been submitted to the council that it had been rejected. It was only done by Mr. Tuxon to injure Mr. Stein, who said that the levels were perfect, which opinion had been endorsed by Mr. Ramage.
    Cr. Carney stated that the consent of the council had been granted conditionally to a certain road being fenced.
    Cr. Wilson said that it seemed to him as though the consent of the council had been obtained through misrepresentation.
    Mr. Hall remarked that Mr. Keys had written to the Surveyor's Institute to the effect that he was consulting engineer to the shire, not the shire engineer.
    Cr. Martin said that Mr. Keys was the shire engineer, and had been appointed such, and he doubted if Mr. Keys had written such a letter as stated by Mr. Hall.
    Cr. Wilson wished to know if the amendments affected the drainage.
    Mr. Hall replied that they did not.
    Mr. Ramage gave the opinion that the survey was the best in the country. The feeling prompting the opposition was a bad one and should not be tolerated by the council.
    Cr. Carney said that they had already consented to the plan, and moved that permission, as asked, be granted to amend it.
    Cr. T. Bourke seconded, and remarked that Cr. Martin had apparently taken this matter up for Mr. Tuxon.
    Cr. Martin denied this, and said that M. Tuxon had brought the plan to him, and he considering it his duty had laid it before the council. He had no party feeling.
    Cr. Wilson said that he had not considered the question of one party cutting the fees. But as the plans differed materially one must be wrong.
    The President thought that professional jealousy was the cause of the trouble.
    The motion was carried.
    Cr. Martin moved that a copy of Mr. Tuxon's plan be sent to Mr. Stein, with a request for an explanation.
    Seconded by Mr. Wilson and carried.
    Cr. McNamara hoped that the decision would not land the council with a bill for professional advice.32
  • 3 May 1909: MOUNTAIN RESORT BLOCKS.
    The Land and Resort Company, which, during the summer months, caused some stir by selling small holiday encampment blocks on the Emerald line of railway at cheap rates, has begun to issue transfers to purchasers.
    The site of Garden City, it should be mentioned, was bought by the company, which, as the owner of the land, dealt direct with the public. The transfers now being issued give the purchaser the right to register their names at the Titles Office as the transferees of the various blocks.33
  • 3 Jul 1909: Land at the Seaside.
    On page 15 of this issue is published an offer made by the Land and Resort Company of Melbourne regarding allotments in the Scarborough Beach Estate.
    Briefly the company announce that they are practically giving away 150 allotments, the purchaser having only to pay the survey fee and other necessary expenses.
    The only condition is that the vendors retain every alternate lot and will not give more than five lots, on these terms, to any one norson. After 150 lots have been disposed, of the remainder, it is announced, will be on sale at nominal values.34
  • 14 Aug 1909: Scarborough Beach Estate.
    In our advertising column will be found particulars of an offer made by the Land and Resort Company, Bank Chambers, 258 Queen-street, Brisbane, in regard to the Scarborough Beach Estate.
    The company announce that they have purchased this estate, and in order to quickly and extensively advertise the resort they have decided to give away every other one of a large number of the building lots to the first applicant.35
  • 15 Sep 1909: Yosemite Park, Bridgewater.— The Land and Resort Company, of Melbourne, regret the delay in the issue of transfers for allotments purchased in the above snbdivision. The transfers will be issued as soon as the plan is approved, but owing to the magnitude of the work the checking of the survey man will take some time yet. x36
  • 17 Sep 1909: ELTHAM SHIRE COUNCIL. MONDAY, SEPT. 6TH., 1909. ORDINARY MONTHLY MEETING.
    Correspondence
    From The Land and Resort Compaty, re proper bridge over the Diamond Creek to Glen Park Estate, Eltham. To build a new bridge and raise it 4ft above the present one would, they understood, cost between £60 and £70, and they wanted to know if the Council would contribute to the cost of construction. The Heidelberg Council had also been written to. - Cr Morris said the bridge was a private one, and the Council had not taken over the road leading to it; consequently they could not do anything.
    -Cr Taylor remarked that if the company and the Heidelberg Shire co-operated with the Eltham Shire something might be done.
    - Cr Beale said that if there was any chance of doing anything it should be done, as it was unwise to choke off enterprise.
    - Cr Scott moved that the Secretary write to the Company and ask what they were prepared to in do in the matter.
    Seconded by Cr Fitch and carried.37
  • 22 Oct 1909: ELTHAM SHIRE COUNcIL. The ordinary monthly meeting of above council was held on Monday, 4th inst. Correspondence.
    From the Land and Resort Company, re bridge over Diamond Creek. Referred to engineer.38
  • 10 Dec 1909: ELTHAM SHIRE COUNcIL. The ordinary monthly meeting of above council was held on Monday, last. Correspondence.
    From Land and Resort Company, stating that it could not entertain the thought of contributing to such an expensive bridge over Diamond Creek as that suggested.—Received.39
  • 15 Dec 1909: RAFF V. NEVILLE.
    There was no appearance for the defendant in an action in which Harry Raff, licensed surveyor, made a claim against Charles William Neville, trading as the Land and Resort Company, of Brisbane, for £20 for work done, and money expended for the defendant at his request.
    Mr. P. P. Fewings (instructed by Messrs. Roberts and Roberts) appeared for the plaintiff. The defendant had entered a defence, and paid £8 into court.
    The details of the claim were as follow : For professional services in connection with survey of auction block on Moreton Island, £8 ; payment due for professional services and searches at survey office, and registrar of titles office, including search fees, and for preparation of professional design of portion 249, 253, 254, 260, 262, and 363, parish of Redcliffe and county of Stanley, as per agreement.
    Judgment was entered for the amount claimed.
    Tlie court then adjourned until tomorrow at 2.30 p.m.40
  • 21 Jan 1910: HEIDELBERG SHIRE COUNCIL. ORDINARY MONTHLY MEETING. WEDNESDAY, January 12th, 1910. Correspondence: From Land and Resort Co., forwarding plan of Glen Park Estate, Eltham. — Referred to Engineer for report.41
  • 26 Jan 1910: HISTORY OF THE LAND. RECENT TRANSACTIONS. THE SUB-DIVISION.
    Particulars of the recent history of the property in which the blocks are situated have been obtained by an inspection of the title at the Titles Office.
    On December 22, 1908, C. W. Neville, principal of the Land and Resort Company, purchased from the Freehold Investment Company 116 acres 2 roods 2 perches of the land for L350. In February, 1909, C. W. Neville bought from W. F. Vale an adjoining block of 102 acres for L825. This gives an average price of about L7 2s 6d for the whole 218 acres.
    It appears that the Land and Resort Company had the whole 218 acres surveyed and subdivided into 1700 blocks the great majority of which were one-tenths of an acre. The company, of which C. W. Neville was the principal, seems to have sold 800 of these blocks. However this may be, on January 10, 1910, C. W. Neville sold 900 of the blocks to G. S. Herne for L150. At this price the average cost of each block to G. S. Herne was 3s 4d. According to the title the property extends back from Beach road for a mile, on the Rosebud side, and three-quarters of a mile on the Sorrento side. The cost of survey and subdivision was apparently paid by the Land and Resort Company. The schedule of surveyors' fees for town and suburban lots in the Government regulations is L9 11s for twenty lots, and 6s a lot for all over twenty. An experienced licensed surveyor states, however, that the work of a large subdivision like this, with 1700 lots, would he undertaken by contract, and the price certainly would not exceed 4s per lot, even if it amounted to this. Accepting the price as 4s, the survey of the 1700 blocks would cost L240.
    Mr S. Cook, a leading member of the well-known firm of C. J. and T. Ham, real estate agents and valuers, was asked his opinion of the present value of the land at Rosebud in large blocks and in allotments like those in the Clacton-on-Sea estate.
    He replied that Rosebud land is very poor. In its natural state it has been offered of late in blocks at L3 to L4 per acre, but very little has been sold, for there are few purchasers.
    As to campers or holiday allotments, Mr Cook said that none have been sold at Rosebud excepting those in the Clacton-on-Sea estate. The vendors in such cases put their own value on the allotments and that depends upon the number of people they think they can attract to the spot.42
  • 31 Jan 1910: NEW COMPANIES. The following new companies have been registered in New South Wales under the Limited Liability Act: Papuan Rubber and Trading Company, Limited; registered January, 28, with a capital of £75,000, in £1 shares. To aquire from C. W. Neville 99 years' lease of land (5900 acres), Sagarai Valley, Papua; to carry on the business of traders, planters, etc. The signatures to the registration are those of Jos. Cox, Hy. Weedon, J. G. Aikman, G. S. Herne, W. L. Younger, V. C. W. Neville, and J. H. Robinson. Registered office, Sydney. George Spencer Herne43
  • 26 May 1910: NEW COMPANIES. The following companies have been registered in New South Wales under the Limited Liability Act:—
    Papua Lands, Limited (registered May 24), in New South Wales, with a capital of £10,000, in £10 shares (of which 400 are to be issued to G. S. Herne a fully paid up), to acquire from J. S. Herne, trading as the British Australasia Investment Company the lease of 10,000 acres of land to be issued to him by the Government of Papua. The signatures to the registration are those of Wm. Simpson, G. S. Herne, W. L. Younger, C. W. Neville, E. J. M'Carron, W. G. Pye, and J. M. Vaskess. Registered office, Sydney. George Spencer Herne44
  • 1 Jun 1910: DISASTROUS RUBBER DEAL. MANAGING DIRECTOR AND ANOTHER CHARGED, A THIRD PARTY "STEPS IN." SYDNEY Tuesday.
    A case is proceeding at the Water Police court, in which Charles William Neville, 29, managing director, and George Spencer Herne, 31, estate operator, are charged with having on 12th April last, falsely represented to Lionel Francis Stanley that they were in possession of 10,000 acres of land in Papua New Guinea, suitable for the cultivation of rubber, by which pretence they did obtain £300 from him with intent to defraud. The further hearing was adjourned till Tuesday.
    Before the case was called it was found that a peculiar development had arisen.
    Detective Brown arrested a man named Charles Nicholson, 38, a traveller, and he appeared before the court. The charge against him was "that he did falsely pretend to Charles William Neville that he was authorised by Ernest R. Abigail, solicitor for the prosecution in the case in which Neville and Herne are charged with obtaining money by false pretences, to arrange for the settlement of the case on payment by Neville of the sum of £80, and that by means of false pretences he attempted to obtain the sum of £80 with intent to defraud."
    A remand for a week was granted, bail being allowed.45
  • 4 Jun 1910: THE PAPUAN RUBBER CASE.
    The case against W. Neville, and G. Herne, who were charged with fraud in connection with a Papuan rubber plantation, has collapsed. Evidence was procured for the defence showing that the accused actually held leases in Papua. George Spencer Herne46
  • 7 Jun 1910: ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO DEFRAUD. SEQUEL TO THE RUBBER CASE.
    Charles Nicholson, 38, a traveller, was before Mr. G. H. Smithers. S.M., at the Water Police Court to-day, on a charge of having, at Sydney, on May 30th last, falsely pretended to Charles William Neville that he was authorised by Ernest R. Abigail, a solicitor acting for the prosecution in a case against Neville and another, on a charge of obtaining money by false pretences then pending, to make arrangements for a settlement of the case on payment of the sum of £80, and by such false pretence he endeavored to obtain the sum of £80, the property of Charles William Neville, with intent to defraud. Mr. Mant (of the Crown Law Office) appeared to prosecute, and Mr. H. E. M'Intosh defended Nicholson.
    The case is one arising out of the recent prosecution of Neville and Herne for an alleged attempt to obtain a sum of money from a man named Stanley by means of false pretences in connection with a Papuan rubber company, which was heard by Mr. Clarke, S.M., at the Water Police Court, last week, and, after a hearing of several days, was dismissed.
    Detective Turbett stated that on May 28 he went to Neville's office at Challis House, Martin-place. Neville told witness something, the outcome of which was that witness took one receiver of the telephone and Neville the other. Witness took down in writing the conversation that he heard through the telephone. On Monday, May 30, witness went to Challis House, and again Neville and witness took a receiver, and witness wrote down the statements made on the telephone. Just prior to this taking place witness told Detective Brown something, and he went out. About 3 o'clock the same afternoon witness saw the accused in front of the G.P.O. in company with Detective Brown. Witness told accused who he was, and Detective Brown said: "This man says he has not telephoned to anyone at Challis House to-day." Witness replied, I have been over to Challis House, and heard someone telephone to another person there; do you know anyone there? I think it was your voice I heard." Accused said, "You are making a mistake; I don't know anybody at Challis House; I've never been there in my life. Witness then asked him, "Haven't you telephoned to Mr. Neville to-day about 12 o'clock?" Accused replied, "No." Witness then asked him if he had been in one of the public telephone boxes at between 12 and 1 o'clock that day, and accused replied, "I was in a telephone box at the G.P.O. about a quarter of an hour ago telephoning to my wife. Witness told him that would be at 3.35 p.m. Detective Brown then said to accused, I saw you in a public telephone box at the G.P.O. between 12 and 1 o'clock to day, and accused then said, "I'm not going to answer any questions." Witness took accused over to Mr. Neville's office, and asked Neville did he know accused, and received an answer in the affirmative. Neville also said, "I've seen him several times in my office here. He came to me and asked me if I would give him £11 to get Mr. Abigail to let my case drop." Witness told accused how the statements which he was about to read to him had been taken. When the statements were read to him accused said, "I'm glad you have read them to me; they are very interesting."
    Detective Brown gave evidence as to seeing accused in the telephone box at the G.P.O. between 12 and 1 o'clock on May 30, and an officer from the telephone branch also gave evidence as to the numbers called and connections made in connection with the alleged conversation on the same date.
    Ernest R. Abigail, a solicitor, stated that he had been acting on behalf of Lionel Francis Stanley in a prosecution of Charles William Neville and George Spencer Herne on a charge of false pretences, which was pending at the Water Police Court between May 6 and June 2 inst, on which latter day the accused were discharged. He had never authorised the accused in any way to settle the case against Neville and Herne, and had had no conversation with him while the case was pending that he could remember. He had never authorised accused to offer to have the case settled for £80, of which he (witness) was to get one-third, Stanley one-third, and the accused the remainder.
    In reply to Mr. M'Intosh. witness said it would be difficult to remember all the persons who had spoken to him with reference to the case. Witness had told accused that he would have to speak to Stanley with regard to the question of a settlement.
    William Charles Neville stated that he was manager of the Papuan Rubber and Trading Co., Ltd. He knew the accused Nicholson, who came to him on Tuesday, May 24,
    through being introduced to witness by Mr. Jamieson (secretary of the company). Nicholson said, "I prefer to see you alone, as I wish to speak to you on private business." Witness sent the lady typewriter away on a message, and Jamieson was on the other side of the partition. Nicholson, in a low voice, said, "Aren't you C. W. Neville with whom I travelled in New Zealand?" Witness replied, "No; you must be mistaken; I was never in New Zealand," Accused said, "I have heard of your trouble, and I thought perhaps I could help you; Abigail had me arrested on a similar charge about six weeks ago, and I squared it with him, and I can do the same for you." Witness replied, "You are apparently laboring under a misapprehension," and Nicholson then left the office. On the following Saturday accused came to witness's office about 1 o'clock, when the matter was again referred to. Accused said "I will meet you at the corner of George-street at 1 o'clock." Witness went there, and they went to the Burlington Cafe, where they had lunch. Whilst there accused said, "Abigail thinks you will be lucky if you get out of it for less than £100, as you are sure to be committed." At a later stage accused also told witness that Stanley, the prosecutor, was a had witness and a "first-class liar."
    The Magistrate; Did you say lawyer?
    Witness: No; a "first-class liar."
    Witness then proceeded to detail the arrangements he made with accused in the way of communicating with him by telephone. Accused expressed a dislike to go ing to witness's office, as he declared that he was not disposed to "take any chances," or words to that effect.
    In cross-examination by Mr. M'Intosh, Neville said he knew a man named Blackman, who said he had seen Mr. Abigail, but that he had done so on his own account, and not as representing Neville and Herne. Blackman did not say Abigail referred him to Stanley. Witness did not recollect clearly what Blackmail did say. When Nicholson was in his office, in the presence of Detectives Brown and Turbett, he did not say he would have the case dropped if witness gave him £100. Nicholson denied, in the presence of the detectives, that he had lunched with witness the previous Saturday. Witness had never suggested to Nicholson that he might see what he could do in the case against himself and Herne. He did not want the case settled, and had no doubt in his own mind that the case would have been settled if he paid the money over. From the start he thought Nicholson was endeavoring to blackmail him.
    George Spencer Herne and Hugh Kirwan Robinson Jamieson also gave evidence. Accused, who reserved his defence, was committed to the Quarter Sessions for trial. Bail was allowed.47
  • 19 Sep 1912: PAPUAN RUBBER CASES. PROSECUTION OF DIRECTORS. SIR HENRY WEEDON'S EVIDENCE. SYDNEY, Wednesday.
    The case in which Joseph Cox and John Geo. Aikman, directors of Papuan Rubber and Trading Co. Ltd., are charged with conspiracy to cheat and defraud, was continued before Mr. Payten. S.M. at the Water Police Court to-day.
    Sir Henry Weedon, who was a director of the company, in his evidence said Mr M'Cutcheon, the company's solicitor, advised making careful investigations regarding Jamieson's defalcations before taking any drastic steps. M'Cutcheon said that they might become responsible for statements regarding defalcations which would not be proved. There was nothing said about defalcations at the general meeting except that Mr. King, the auditor, was sent for. Nothing was said at the meeting about the medical certificate for Jamieson. He was sure of that. At the shareholders' meeting one of the shareholders asked if the saw mill plant had been sold, and the chairman answered "Yes." When witness consented to become a provisional director the prospectus of the company was in blank form. It was a rough draft and contained no names of directors. Before witness joined the board of the company he went to the Department ot External Affairs in Melbourne and saw Mr. Atlee Hunt to whom he spoke about the company's undertaking. He asked about the means of transport, prospects, and the quality and value of the soil of the plantation in Papua. He also asked about r Murray Strachan, one of the Government plantation managers in New Guinea, and Mr. Hunt said Mr. Strachan was a good officer. He had never dealt with shares in the company in any way, and had them at present locked away. He thought now that the prospects of the plantation were "Very excellent." Mr. M'Cutcheon, solicitor, carried out the negotiations for the company, and received £1000. He first met Neville at the first general meeting of the company.
    At the directors meeting the chief topic of conversation was the defalcations of Jamieson, which news upset witness somewhat.
    Mr. Strachan was not now manager of the plantation, hut Mr. Watson. Mr. Cox was managing director, and witness had always found him a good man in the position. Witness was satisfied that Mr. M'Cutcheon's bill of costs for £1000, extending over three months, was not an exorbitant charge.
    Witness said he still had all his shares, and, in his opinion, the prospects were excellent.
    To Mr. Mack, witness said he imagined he got the prospectus a few days after 15th February. Assuming that the date was correct, the agreement with Mr. Herne was in letter form. It was returned to Herne. Witness met Horan and Steenbohm casually at the general meceting, and did not tell them anything about the agree ment with Herne. He first met Neville at the first general meeting, and afterwards at meetings until he went to Papua. He understood Herne was now in England, but he did not know where Neville was. Mr. Mack: I suppose he is looking for you.
    Witness (laughing): I think not. Walter Bothwell M'Cutcheon, barrister and solicitor, practising in Melbourne, said Sir Henry Weedon and Mr. Aikman had called on him in reference to a letter they had received from Sydney from Cox, and said it was hard luck to have this trouble (Jamieson's) on top of the trouble they had had with Neville. He warned them that they would have to be careful of their facts. They said they knew the balance sheet to be correct, as it had been audited, and the meeting would be held. Mr. Aikman said they would have to prosecute Jameson if the directors were to obtain the guarantee money. The directors consulted witness over certain exaggerations alleged to have been made by Neville regarding the cocoanut and sago palms and the timber on the company's plantation. The hearing was not concluded when the court rose. George Spencer Herne48
  • 17 Aug 1916: LAND SELLING TRICK. BRITISH COURT CONDEMNS ADVERTISEMENTS EXPOSED
    Strong judicial condemnation of trick advertising of subdivisional land was given in the "New Anzac-on-Sea" case, which has recently excited much attention in the English courts.
    In this case 125 plaintiffs, sued Mr Neville (trading as the South Coast Land and Resort Company) for the return of money (three guineas apiece) which they had paid for conveyancing and stamp duties, a rescission of their contracts to take up plots of land at "New Anzac-on-Sea" and costs, with damages for fraudulent misrepresentation. Defendant would not admit the fraudulent misrepresen tation, but offered to submit, to the order of the Court on the other points.
    Mr Justice Younger decided that the more important count must be proceeded with, and evidence was heard from the selected plaintiffs.
    He said that in December, 1914, the defendant acquired 624 acres of land about 8½ miles from Brighton and 2½ miles from Newhaven, for which he paid £9500, or about £15/4/ an acre. The land on the south was bounded by cliffs 80ft. to 100ft. high, and there was no access to the sea, except at Telscombe, some distance to the west, which, was now closed altogether, and had never been suitable for children. There was no sand on the beach, and the place was unsuitable either for bathing or boating. The land had been described by Mr. Lesley, one of the witnesses, as very bleak and exposed. The defendant, calling himself the South Coast Land and Resort Company, conceived a project for dealing with this somewhat unpromising piece of land, and began operations by causing advertisements to be inserted in a multitude of newspapers and periodicals. The advertisement his Lordship took, that from "The Daily Express," was surrounded by pictures showing bathing machines and children disporting themselves on the beach and in the sea. The advertisement was headed "£2600 in Prizes," and the offer was of £100 in cash and "fifty other prizes" will be given, consisting of splendid freehold building plots similar to those offered by us in this magnificent estate at £50 each." There were to be no entrance fees, and the advertisement proceeded to describe in glowing terms the advantages of the estate. It said it was a "most charming" estate on the South Coast, which had been sought after many times in recent years with a view to development, and had at last become available. The defendant said he had decided to hold a competition for a name for the new resort, and invited suggestions.
    CIRCULARS SENT OUT
    Then followed the conditions with which the competitor had to comply. In that advertisement, said his Lordship, the defendant intended to represent that the awards were to be awards of merit, and strictly limited in number to 50, and taking the form of a plot of land similar to those offered at £50 each. He said it was likely to quickly become one of the brightest and most popular seaside resorts near London, and it was not surprising, that this appeal to the
    cupidity of the public resulted in replies from 50,000 people. Each of the plaintiffs before his Lordship received several documents. One announced that the name "New Anzac-on-Sea" had been selected, and that the prize had been divided between E. Kemp, 2 Dover, street, Maidstone, and C. L. West, 42 Cranbrook road, Ilford.
    The defendant also sent a pamphlet containing a full and glowing description not so much of this particular estate as of other beauty spots in Sussex, but the difficulty was to distinguish whether it was this estate or the other parts of Sussex which were referred to.
    The front page contained a photograph of a sea beach with a number of people disporting themselves on the sands and in the sea. The page, was headed "The Estate," and contained the words, "A Bit of Sussex by the Sea, on the Sunny South Coast." Many of the witnesses said that on seeing this picture they were satisfied that this particular part of the beach was that on the estate in which they had been awarded a plot.
    A plan which accompanied the other documents showed 49 or 50 plots, all close to the "promenade," and immediately adjoining the sea. He thought the object was to convey to the competitors that, these were the fifty plots awarded as prizes, and that the competitors thought they would get one of these. There was also a statement to the effect that the demand for building plots had largely exceeded their expectations, but that they still had a few for sale at from £50 to £70 a plot, but the price would be advanced shortly.
    WORTHLESS LAND
    The documents sent to the competitors, said his Lordship, had this plain meaning, that this was an estate in active course of development, in which thousands had already become interested as purchasers at prices from £50 to £70 a plot. As a fact, up to the early part of the month, and probably now, the land was absolutely and entirely worthless. According to Mr. Basley, £350 only, including the cost of erecting an office, had been laid out. There had been no roads made, there was no drainage system, there had been no arrangements for lighting or for a water supply. The defendant was free from any obligation in respect of any of these matters, and in truth these plots were not awarded as a prize for the competitors' cleverness, but in consideration for the sum of three guineas, and for that sum the competitors had received a thing which was worthless.
    He (his Lordship) was satisfied that the legal expenses of the conveyance wore substantially nil. Further, it appeared that each of these conveyances was stamped with a 6d. stamp, and, as was pointed out by Mr. Pollock, it must have been made clear to the authorities that the consideration was the three guineas, and not that the value of the plot was £50, as he was representing to the competitors. If the defendant had represented that the plot being conveyed was worth £50 the proper stamp would have been 5/. Instead of receiving an advantage, these people paid their money for something which was worthless, while the scheme had been calculated to have realised a profit to the defendant, less costs of advertisements, of £25 an acre, or £6572 in all. The plaintiffs, characterised this, as a wicked fraud.
    Many of the people demanded their money back. A serious charge of deliberate fraud had been made against the defendant, and he had refused to meet it, and he had only himself to blame if the conclusion arrived at stamped both him and his scheme with the stamp of trickery and dishonor.
    Each of the plaintiffs who had been called, his lordship added, was entitled to have his judgment for rescission, for the repayment of the money he had paid and for his costs. The order he should make was that the defendant repay the three guineas to such of the plaintiffs as had paid them and not withdrawn from the proceedings, that the contracts be rescinded, and that defendant must pay the costs, except in so far as they had been increased in a certain way by the plaintiffs.49

Citations

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    Charles W Neville, Birth Date: abt 1881, Arrival Age: 54, Arrival Date: 29 Apr 1935, Port of Departure: Villefranche, Port of Arrival: Southampton, England, Ship Name: Marnix van Sint Aldegonde.
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  49. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 17 Aug 1916, p4
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242383682
  50. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Birth Roderick C Neville (Kensington) 1a 180. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
  51. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Charles R Neville. Mar 1915 (Battle) 2b 73. Mother's Birth Name: Rechard."
  52. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Mar Q 1916 (Brentford) 3a 202. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Dorothy Rochard

F, #25762, b. 13 Nov 1890, d. 1973
Married NameNeville. 
Birth*13 Nov 1890 Steyning, Sussex, England, Dorothy Rochard. Mar Q 1891 (Steyning) 02b 281. Mother's maiden surname: Bryenton.1 
Marriage*30 Jun 1932 Spouse: Charles William Neville. Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.2,3
 
Widow22 Oct 1960Dorothy Rochard became a widow upon the death of her husband Charles William Neville.4,5,6 
Death*1973 Madrid, Spain.7 

Family

Charles William Neville b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Children 1.Roderick Charles Neville8 b. Mar 1914
 2.Charles Richard Neville9 b. Mar 1915
 3.Roland John Neville10 b. Mar 1916

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Dorothy Rochard. Mar Q 1891 (Steyning) 02b 281. Mother's maiden surname: Bryenton."
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Stanley Bernard.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New York, New York, U.S., Extracted Marriage Index, 1866-1937.
  4. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966 "England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations)."
  5. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007
    Death Charles W Neville, Dec Q 1960 (Finsbury, London) (Age 79), Birth Date: abt 1881."
  6. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, debragill858 - lists cause of death.
  7. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Ussher Family Tree (Stanley Bernard).
  8. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Birth Roderick C Neville (Kensington) 1a 180. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
  9. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Charles R Neville. Mar 1915 (Battle) 2b 73. Mother's Birth Name: Rechard."
  10. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Mar Q 1916 (Brentford) 3a 202. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Roland John Neville1

M, #25763, b. Mar 1916
Father*Charles William Neville1 b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Mother*Dorothy Rochard1 b. 13 Nov 1890, d. 1973
Birth*Mar 1916 Brentford, Middlesex, England, Mar Q 1916 (Brentford) 3a 202. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard.1,2 

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Mar Q 1916 (Brentford) 3a 202. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Roland John Neville. Mar Q 1916 (Brentford) 03a 202. Mother's maiden surname: Rochard."
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Charles Richard Neville1

M, #25764, b. Mar 1915
Father*Charles William Neville1 b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Mother*Dorothy Rochard1 b. 13 Nov 1890, d. 1973
Birth*Mar 1915 Battle, Sussex, England, Mar 1915 (Battle) 2b 73. Mother's Birth Name: Rechard.1,2 

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Charles R Neville. Mar 1915 (Battle) 2b 73. Mother's Birth Name: Rechard."
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Charles Richard Neville. Mar Q 1915 (Battle) 02b 73. Mother's maiden surname: Rochard."
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Roderick Charles Neville1

M, #25765, b. Mar 1914
Father*Charles William Neville1 b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Mother*Dorothy Rochard1 b. 13 Nov 1890, d. 1973
Birth*Mar 1914 Kensington, London, England, Roderick C Neville (Kensington) 1a 180. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard.1,2 

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Birth Roderick C Neville (Kensington) 1a 180. Mother's Birth Name: Rochard."
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "Roderick Charles Neville. Mar Q 1914 (Kensington) 01a 180. Mother's maiden surname: Rochard."
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Althea May 'Allie' Copeland1

F, #25766, b. 1 Nov 1880, d. 17 Apr 1937
Married NameNeville.1 
Birth*1 Nov 1880 Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.1 
Marriage*6 Aug 1898 Spouse: Charles William Neville. Wentworth, Ontario, Canada.1
 
Death*17 Apr 1937 Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Motor Vehicle Accident.1 

Family

Charles William Neville b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Child 1.Robert Lionel Ussher1 b. 30 Jan 1899, d. 1 Oct 1918

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, debragill858.
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

Robert Lionel Ussher1

M, #25767, b. 30 Jan 1899, d. 1 Oct 1918
Father*Charles William Neville1 b. Jun 1880, d. 22 Oct 1960
Mother*Althea May 'Allie' Copeland1 b. 1 Nov 1880, d. 17 Apr 1937
Military*Enlisted for military service: Private ROBERT LIONEL USSHER - Service Number: 133242 - Canadian Infantry 13th Bn. - Son of Charles William and Altha May Ussher, of 5208, St. Urbain St., Montreal.2 
Birth*30 Jan 1899 Wentworth, Ontario, Canada.1 
Death*1 Oct 1918 Cambrie, France.1 

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, debragill858.
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/…
Last Edited5 Apr 2021

George Spencer Herne

M, #25768, b. Dec 1877, d. 8 Jun 1924
Note* Charles William Neville. Business Partners. 
Birth*Dec 1877 Chelsea, London, England. 
Marriage*1911 Spouse: Anna Jane Morrison. VIC, Australia, #M4670/1911.1,2
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel4 Jun 1911 Sailing with Charles William Neville to Southampton, England. Ship St Paul sailing from New York, United States
Tourist - also Elizabeth Herne, Housewife.3
(Migrant) Migration/Travel22 Aug 1912 Sailing with Anna Jane Herne to New York, New York, USA. Ship S.S. Cedric sailing from Liverpool
Age 36.4 
Death*8 Jun 1924 Guy's Hospital, Surrey, England. 
Probate (Will)*7 Jul 1924 HERNE George Spencer of 64 Handside-lane Welwyn Garden City Hertfordshire died 8 June 1924 at Guy's Hospital Surrey Probate London 7 July to Anna Jane Herne widow.
Effects £135 17s. 11d.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
31 Mar 1901Frederick ERRINGTON, 8 Milton Road, Acton, Middlesex, EnglandAge 24 - House Agent (Visitor) born Chelsea6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 31 Jan 1910: NEW COMPANIES. The following new companies have been registered in New South Wales under the Limited Liability Act: Papuan Rubber and Trading Company, Limited; registered January, 28, with a capital of £75,000, in £1 shares. To aquire from C. W. Neville 99 years' lease of land (5900 acres), Sagarai Valley, Papua; to carry on the business of traders, planters, etc. The signatures to the registration are those of Jos. Cox, Hy. Weedon, J. G. Aikman, G. S. Herne, W. L. Younger, V. C. W. Neville, and J. H. Robinson. Registered office, Sydney. Charles William Neville7
  • 12 Mar 1910: INCORPORATED UNDER THE COMPANIES ACT 1899-1907, N.S.W.
    This Company has been successfully floated.
    Abridged Prospectus.
    CAPITAL £75,000
    IN 75,000 SHARES, OF THE VALUE OF £1 EACH.
    The PAPUAN RUBBER and TRADING COMPANY LIMITED Offers an Exceptional Opportunity to the Small Investor.8
  • 26 May 1910: NEW COMPANIES. The following companies have been registered in New South Wales under the Limited Liability Act:—
    Papua Lands, Limited (registered May 24), in New South Wales, with a capital of £10,000, in £10 shares (of which 400 are to be issued to G. S. Herne a fully paid up), to acquire from J. S. Herne, trading as the British Australasia Investment Company the lease of 10,000 acres of land to be issued to him by the Government of Papua. The signatures to the registration are those of Wm. Simpson, G. S. Herne, W. L. Younger, C. W. Neville, E. J. M'Carron, W. G. Pye, and J. M. Vaskess. Registered office, Sydney. Charles William Neville9
  • 4 Jun 1910: THE PAPUAN RUBBER CASE.
    The case against W. Neville, and G. Herne, who were charged with fraud in connection with a Papuan rubber plantation, has collapsed. Evidence was procured for the defence showing that the accused actually held leases in Papua. Charles William Neville10
  • 16 Dec 1910: MATUNGA FOR PAPUA.
    Passengers booked by the Matunga for Papua leaving the Federal Wharf at noon to day are - Sir Alfred Cowley, Hon W J Little, Mr E J Metcalfe, Mr G S Herne, Mr J M Vaskess, Mr H Jobson, Mr Greenwell, Mr H Lawson, Mr Priddle Mr G Aumuller, Mr Frank Horn, Mr Stoneham, Mr W H Perkins, Mr H Holland, Mr E Davis, and Mrs Horn and 2 children.11
  • 23 Jan 1911: COBLENZ FROM JAPAN. BRISBANE, Sunday.
    The following is the list of passengers by the German mail steamer Coblenz from Japan:
    For Sydney:—First-class: Mesdames F. Newman, J. Arnold, and F De Rust; Messrs. F. Newman, John Arnold, T. De Rust, Rev. Father Wm. O'Sullivan, Messrs. W. H. Wright, C. B. Higginson. Second-class: Messrs. A. Fohr, Fisher, H. Ellis, G. S. Herne, F. M. Vaskes.
    For Melbourne: Mr. and Mrs. F. Ronagry, T. F. Konasteris.12
  • 3 Mar 1911: Mr. Stanworth Smith. NO FURTHER TIDINGS.
    No reassuring news regarding the fate of Mr. Staniforth Smith and his party was received by the arrival of the steamer Matunga from Papua. It was stated that the consensus of opinion among the people of Papua was that the Administrator and his white companions would never see civilisation again. If they have not been massacred, said a man who knows this part of the country which has been explored, "they have starved."
    Another passenger said he did not think there was the remotest chance for the party, as relief was not sent quickly enough. To make the trip safe the expedition should have taken at least 100 boys.
    Mr. G. S. Herne, director of the Papuan Rubber and Trading Company, states that Mr. Smith had ideas of his own about exploration. The party was not following native tracks, but was cutting its own tracks. Mr. Smith wanted to do everything himself. His idea was to travel light, and after sending Messrs Murray and Hennelly back, he went on with Messrs Pratt and Bell, with only fourteen boys, eleven of whom were police, carrying rifles. They could not carry nearly enough luggage, and they had only one change of clothes, no extra pair of boots, no tents, only blankets and mosquito nets. "You fellows don't know how to get through the country," Mr. Smith used to say. "I'll show you how to travel through the country." Most of the travelling parties took changes of clothes "and plenty of provisions but when Messrs Murray and Hennelly left Mr. Smith he was eating tabloids, so that there was a big chance of his being starved. On the other hand, he might only be delayed.13
  • 19 Sep 1912: PAPUAN RUBBER CASES. PROSECUTION OF DIRECTORS. SIR HENRY WEEDON'S EVIDENCE. SYDNEY, Wednesday.
    The case in which Joseph Cox and John Geo. Aikman, directors of Papuan Rubber and Trading Co. Ltd., are charged with conspiracy to cheat and defraud, was continued before Mr. Payten. S.M. at the Water Police Court to-day.
    Sir Henry Weedon, who was a director of the company, in his evidence said Mr M'Cutcheon, the company's solicitor, advised making careful investigations regarding Jamieson's defalcations before taking any drastic steps. M'Cutcheon said that they might become responsible for statements regarding defalcations which would not be proved. There was nothing said about defalcations at the general meeting except that Mr. King, the auditor, was sent for. Nothing was said at the meeting about the medical certificate for Jamieson. He was sure of that. At the shareholders' meeting one of the shareholders asked if the saw mill plant had been sold, and the chairman answered "Yes." When witness consented to become a provisional director the prospectus of the company was in blank form. It was a rough draft and contained no names of directors. Before witness joined the board of the company he went to the Department ot External Affairs in Melbourne and saw Mr. Atlee Hunt to whom he spoke about the company's undertaking. He asked about the means of transport, prospects, and the quality and value of the soil of the plantation in Papua. He also asked about r Murray Strachan, one of the Government plantation managers in New Guinea, and Mr. Hunt said Mr. Strachan was a good officer. He had never dealt with shares in the company in any way, and had them at present locked away. He thought now that the prospects of the plantation were "Very excellent." Mr. M'Cutcheon, solicitor, carried out the negotiations for the company, and received £1000. He first met Neville at the first general meeting of the company.
    At the directors meeting the chief topic of conversation was the defalcations of Jamieson, which news upset witness somewhat.
    Mr. Strachan was not now manager of the plantation, hut Mr. Watson. Mr. Cox was managing director, and witness had always found him a good man in the position. Witness was satisfied that Mr. M'Cutcheon's bill of costs for £1000, extending over three months, was not an exorbitant charge.
    Witness said he still had all his shares, and, in his opinion, the prospects were excellent.
    To Mr. Mack, witness said he imagined he got the prospectus a few days after 15th February. Assuming that the date was correct, the agreement with Mr. Herne was in letter form. It was returned to Herne. Witness met Horan and Steenbohm casually at the general meceting, and did not tell them anything about the agree ment with Herne. He first met Neville at the first general meeting, and afterwards at meetings until he went to Papua. He understood Herne was now in England, but he did not know where Neville was. Mr. Mack: I suppose he is looking for you.
    Witness (laughing): I think not. Walter Bothwell M'Cutcheon, barrister and solicitor, practising in Melbourne, said Sir Henry Weedon and Mr. Aikman had called on him in reference to a letter they had received from Sydney from Cox, and said it was hard luck to have this trouble (Jamieson's) on top of the trouble they had had with Neville. He warned them that they would have to be careful of their facts. They said they knew the balance sheet to be correct, as it had been audited, and the meeting would be held. Mr. Aikman said they would have to prosecute Jameson if the directors were to obtain the guarantee money. The directors consulted witness over certain exaggerations alleged to have been made by Neville regarding the cocoanut and sago palms and the timber on the company's plantation. The hearing was not concluded when the court rose. Charles William Neville14
  • 24 Nov 1928: PRELIMINARY NOTICE. Important Land Sale at Scarborough, Redcliffe.
    Under instructions from the Public Curator, in the Estate of the late G. S. Herne.
    200 Allotments (200), in one lot, varying in area from 20 perches to 8½ acre blocks, being subdivisions of Portions 249, 253, 254, 260, 262, and 263, Parish of Redcliffe, situated between Scarborough Hotel and Deception Bay.
    2½ to 3 miles from Jetty.
    EDWARD H. DECKER, Redcliffe Property Exchange, will submit the above ground, in one lot, at his office on SATURDAY, 16th December, at 4 p.m.
    Eric P. Decker, Auctioneer.
    Detailed R.P. Description and other information on application to the agent.15
  • 2 Aug 1951: PUBLIC AUCTION BY SOPER BROS. — AUCTIONEERS - OF LAND ON THE BLUE MOUNTAINS FOR OVERDUE RATES
    By Order of the Public Trustee for the Council of the City of the Blue Mountains At Soper Chambers, 118-120 Katoomba Street, KATOOMBA.
    SATURDAY, 1st SEPTEMBER, 1951, 2.15 p.m,
    VACANT LAND:
    G. S. HERNE, Lot 3. First Avenue.
    G. S. HERNE, Lot 27 Minna Ha Ha Road.
    G. S. HERNE. Lots 39 and 40, Seventh Avenue.16

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Kay Overington.
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, George S Herne, Arrival Date: 4 Jun 1911, Port of Departure: New York, New York, United States, Port of Arrival: Southampton, England, Ship Name: St Paul.
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New York, U.S., Arriving Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957
    Address M W Maidments, 5 Manor Road, Westcliffe, England.
  5. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  6. [S83] UK census - viewed on Ancestry "1901 England Census. RG13/1202/123/43
    Enummerated at , Acton, Middlesex.
    Household Members: Frederick Errington, Mary Errington, William Leggatt, George S Herne."
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Evening News (Sydney, NSW), Mon 31 Jan 1910, p3
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/116053845
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Post (Hobart, Tas.), Sat 12 Mar 1910, p9
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/193246782
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Evening News (Sydney, NSW), Thu 26 May 1910, p4
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/115238868
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW), Sat 4 Jun 1910, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/228542828
  11. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Fri 16 Dec 1910, p10
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/15170884
  12. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 23 Jan 1911, p24
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/15246808
  13. [S14] Newspaper - The Horsham Times (Vic.), Fri 3 Mar 1911, p5
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73159464
  14. [S14] Newspaper - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.), Thu 19 Sep 1912, p10
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/196253335
  15. [S14] Newspaper - The Brisbane Courier (Qld.), Sat 24 Nov 1928, p28
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/21332068
  16. [S14] Newspaper - The Blue Mountains Advertiser (Katoomba, NSW), Thu 2 Aug 1951, p7
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/189745016
Last Edited5 Apr 2021
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.