John Kays1

M, #20641, b. 1869
Father*John Kays1 b. 1836, d. Feb 1884
Mother*Mary Ann Greenen / Grimen1 b. 1835, d. Feb 1881
Birth*18691 

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited3 Sep 2018

Fanny Kays1

F, #20642, b. 1871, d. May 1877
Father*John Kays1 b. 1836, d. Feb 1884
Mother*Mary Ann Greenen / Grimen1 b. 1835, d. Feb 1881
Birth*1871 Kilmore, VIC, Australia.1 
Death*May 1877 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D3931 (Age 5) [par John KAYS & Mary Ann GRIMEN].1 

Grave

  • 3-211-A+B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia2

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    3-211-B Kays (listed as Keys) Fanny F 5 22/05/1877 75
    3-211-A Kays Mrs. John [Mary Ann] F 43 06/02/1881 118
    3-211-B Kays (listed as Hays) John M 45 05/02/1884 149.
Last Edited3 Sep 2018

Isabella Michie

F, #20644, b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
Father*Sir Archibald Michie d. 1899
Mother*Mary Richardson d. 1910
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Married NameA'Beckett. 
Birth*27 Jan 1844 V1844311 28 - registered Sydney. 
Marriage*1864 Spouse: Thomas A'Beckett. VIC, Australia, #M3742.1
 
Widow1919Isabella Michie became a widow upon the death of her husband Thomas A'Beckett.2 
Death*1923 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D12736 (Age 79) [par Archibald MIEKIE & Mary RICHARDSON].2 

Grave

  • Baptist A 176, St Kilda Cemetery, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, Thomas a Beckett, born 31.8.1836, died      6.1919
    A Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria 1886-1917, Knight Bachelor
    also Isabella his wife, born 27.1.1844 d 16.8.1923
    also Dorothea Janet their dtr, b.30.10.1874 d 1.8.1924
    also Thomas Archibald, their elder son, born 9.11.1867     28.2.19303

Family

Thomas A'Beckett b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Children 1.Thomas Archibald A'Beckett b. 9 Nov 1867, d. 28 Feb 1930
 2.Isabella Mary A'Beckett2 b. 1870, d. 1927
 3.Edith Eliza A'Beckett1 b. 1872, d. 1974
 4.Dorothea Janet A'Beckett b. 30 Oct 1874, d. 1 Aug 1924
 5.Gilbert Michie A'Beckett b. 1879, d. 20 Jan 1957

Newspaper-Articles

  • 15 Sep 1899, Sir Archibald Michie left no will, According to the documents which have been filed in his estate he was possessed of property valued at £19,739. The deceased left a widow and five children. They are Isabella A'Beckett, wife of Mr Justice A'Beckett ; Archibald Donnelly Michie, solicitor ; Janet Eliza Ann Michie, spinster; William Michie, importer; and George Douglas Michie, shipping agent, of Colombo. According to the statutory system of distribution, the widow receives one third of the property, and the remainder is shared equally amongst the children.4

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S48] Index of burials in the cemetery of St Kilda,.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser, 15 Sep 1899, p1.
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Thomas Archibald A'Beckett

M, #20645, b. 9 Nov 1867, d. 28 Feb 1930
Father*Thomas A'Beckett b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Mother*Isabella Michie b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*9 Nov 1867 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B5774/1868.1 
Note*c 1890 Henry Rawdon Francis Chomley With Mr H. R. .F. Chomley, a nephew of the late Judge Chomley, he founded the firm of a'Beckett and Chomley, about 40 years ago.2 
Marriage*1903 Spouse: Ada Mary Lambert.
 
Death*28 Feb 1930 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D3360 (Age 62.)3 
Death-Notice*1 Mar 1930A'BECKETT.-On the 28th February, 1930 at a private hospital Thomas Archibald of Penleigh, Lansdowne road, East St Kilda aged 62 years.
A'BECKETT.-The Funeral of the late THOMAS ARCHIBALD a'BECKETT will leave Penleigh, Lansdowne road, East St. Kilda, THIS DAY (Saturday, 1st March), at 11 a.m., for the St. Kilda Cemetery.4 

Grave

  • Baptist A 176, St Kilda Cemetery, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, Thomas a Beckett, born 31.8.1836, died      6.1919
    A Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria 1886-1917, Knight Bachelor
    also Isabella his wife, born 27.1.1844 d 16.8.1923
    also Dorothea Janet their dtr, b.30.10.1874 d 1.8.1924
    also Thomas Archibald, their elder son, born 9.11.1867     28.2.19305

Newspaper-Articles

  • 28 Feb 1930, MR. T. A. a'BECKETT DIES. Father of Test Cricketer
    Mr Thomas Archibald a'Beckett, of the firm of a'Beckett, Chomley and Henderson, solicitors, Little Collins Street, died today, after a brief illness, aged 62.
    One or his sons is E. L. a'Beckett, the Victorian all-round cricketer, who is a member of the Australian 15 for England.
    Mr a'Beckett was a son of the late Mr Justice a'Beckett, of the Victorian Supreme Court. He was an ''old boy" of the Melbourne Grammar School, and a student of Trinity College, Melbourne University.
    TENNIS AND ROWING
    He represented Victoria at Intercolonial tennis in 1889, 1892, 1893 and 1894, and was a member of the University rowing crew in 1889 and 1891.
    With Mr H. R. .F. Chomley, a nephew of the late Judge Chomley, he founded the firm of a'Beckett and Chomley, about 40 years ago. He has left a widow and family.
    The burial will be in the St. Kilda Cemetery tomorrow.
    The flag at the Victorian Cricket Association building in Flinders Street was flown at half-mast today. Mrs a'Beckett is the president of the Free Kindergarten Union of Victoria of which Mr a'Beckett was Honorary solicitor.2

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 28 Feb 1930, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244474610
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 1 Mar 1930, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4071983
  5. [S48] Index of burials in the cemetery of St Kilda,.
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Gilbert Michie A'Beckett

M, #20646, b. 1879, d. 20 Jan 1957
Father*Thomas A'Beckett b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Mother*Isabella Michie b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*1879 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B12324.1 
Death*20 Jan 1957 Portsea, VIC, Australia, #D18477 (Age 78.)2 
Death-Notice*22 Jan 1957A’BECKETT – On January 20, at Portsea, Gilbert Michie, dearly loved son of the late Sir Thomas and Lady a’Beckett, beloved brother of Edith (Lady Harrison Moore).
A’BECKETT – On January 20, Gilbert Michie, dearly loved uncle of Thomas, Edward and Penleigh.
The Funeral of the late GILBERT MICHIE a’BECKETT will leave Sleight’s funeral Home, St Kilda Road, Melbourne, TOMORROW, after a service commencing at 10 am for the St Kilda Cemetery.3 

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "indexed as BECKETT (the A' is listed among the first names)."
  3. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age, 22 Jan 1957, p14.
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Dorothea Janet A'Beckett

F, #20647, b. 30 Oct 1874, d. 1 Aug 1924
Father*Thomas A'Beckett b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Mother*Isabella Michie b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*30 Oct 1874 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B26101/1875.1 
Death*1 Aug 1924 Malvern, VIC, Australia, #D10621 (Age 49) - as A'Beckett.2 

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Sir Archibald Michie

M, #20648, d. 1899
Marriage* Spouse: Mary Richardson.
 
Death*1899 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D7635 (Age 87) [par Archibald MICHIE & Unknown].1 

Family

Mary Richardson d. 1910
Children 1.Archibald Donnelly Michie d. 1910
 2.Isabella Michie+ b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Mary Richardson

F, #20649, d. 1910
Marriage* Spouse: Sir Archibald Michie.
 
Married NameMichie. 
Widow1899Mary Richardson became a widow upon the death of her husband Sir Archibald Michie.1 
Death*1910 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #D7192 (Age 94) [par John RICHARDSON & Unknown].1 

Family

Sir Archibald Michie d. 1899
Children 1.Archibald Donnelly Michie d. 1910
 2.Isabella Michie+ b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Ada Mary Lambert

F, #20650
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Married NameA'Beckett. 
Marriage*1903 Spouse: Thomas Archibald A'Beckett.
 
Last Edited16 Dec 2018

Edith Eliza A'Beckett1

F, #20651, b. 1872, d. 1974
Father*Thomas A'Beckett1 b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Mother*Isabella Michie1 b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*1872 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B19927.1 
Death*1974 South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #D5341 (Age 101) - as Edith Eliza MOORE.2 

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D5341/1974 - place of birth Melbourne."
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Isabella Mary A'Beckett1

F, #20652, b. 1870, d. 1927
Father*Thomas A'Beckett1 b. 31 Aug 1836, d. 1919
Mother*Isabella Michie1 b. 27 Jan 1844, d. 1923
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*1870 
Death*1927 Armadale, VIC, Australia, #D8190 (Age 57) as Isabella Mary TRAVERS.1 

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited4 Sep 2018

Fanny Sarah A'Beckett1

F, #20655, b. 22 Nov 1841, d. 23 Sep 1895
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT (#1)
Descendants of William A'BECKETT (#2)
Birth*22 Nov 1841 Elizabeth street north, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B354/1841.2 
Birth-Notice*23 Nov 1841On Monday, the 22nd instant, at her residence, Elizabeth-street, north, the Lady of Arthur a'Beckett, Esq., of a daughter.3 
Marriage*20 Jan 1891 Spouse: Edward A'Beckett. Thirning, Ashfield, NSW, Australia.1
 
Marriage-Notice17 Feb 1891A'BECKETT—A'BECKETT.—January 20, at Thirning, Ashfield, by the Rev. G. Walters, Edward, third son of the Hon. T. T. A'Beckett, Brighton, Victoria, to Fanny Sarah, second daughter of the late Arthur Martin A'Beckett, F.R.C.S.E.4 
Marriage-Notice*23 Feb 1891A'BECKETT—A'BECKETT.—January 20, at Thirning, Ashfield, by the Rev. G. Walters, Edward A'Beckett to Fanny Sarah A' Beckett.5 
Death*23 Sep 1895 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D8376 (Age 53) [par Arthur Martin A'BECKETT & Emma ELWIN].1 
Death-Notice*24 Sep 1895A'BECKETT.—On the 23rd inst., at Elwyn, Black street, Middle Brighton, of acute jaundice, Fanny Sarah, beloved wife of Edward A'Beckett.
A'BECKETT.—The Friends of Mr. EDWARD A'BECKETT are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late beloved wife, to the place of interment, the Brighton General Cemetery.
The funeral is appointed to move from her late residence, Elwyn, Black-street, Middle Brighton THIS DAY (Tuesday, September 24th), at 2.30 o'clock punctually.6 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 1 Nov 1895, FANNY Sarah A'Beckett, of Black-street, Brighton, married woman, by her will dated July 16, 1895, and presented for probate by Messrs. A'Beckett and Chomley of Melbourne, solicitors, appointed her husband, Edward A'Beckett, of Brighton, sole executor, and bequeathed to him the whole of her estate. Testatrix died September 23, 1895, and the estate is sworn at £1000 real and £1019 personal; total, £2019.7

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#B354/1841 V1841354 26A."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848), Tue 23 Nov 1841, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36852477
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 17 Feb 1891, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13814271
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Mon 23 Feb 1891, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13815099
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 24 Sep 1895, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9375806
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Fri 1 Nov 1895, p15
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145921917
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Emma Louise Elwin

F, #20656, b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Married NameA'Beckett.1 
Birth*26 Aug 1814 Norfolk, England. 
Marriage*Jun 1838 Spouse: Arthur Martin A'Beckett. Marylebone, London, England, Jun Q [Marylebone] 1 202.1
 
Widow23 May 1871Emma Louise Elwin became a widow upon the death of her husband Arthur Martin A'Beckett
Death*24 Jul 1904 Ashfield, NSW, Australia.2 
Death-Notice*26 Jul 1904A'BECKETT.—July 24, 1904, at her residence, Thirning, Arthur street, Ashfield, Emma Louisa, widow of the late Arthur Martin a'Beckett, F.R.C.S., Eng, born August 26, 1814.2 

Family

Arthur Martin A'Beckett b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Children 1.Arthur A'Beckett3 b. 6 Jun 1839, d. 14 Jun 1839
 2.Emma Mary A'Beckett3 b. 23 Jul 1840, d. 1841
 3.Fanny Sarah A'Beckett b. 22 Nov 1841, d. 23 Sep 1895
 4.Arthur Hastings A'Beckett3 b. 19 Jul 1844, d. 11 Jun 1854
 5.William Channing A'Beckett3 b. 16 Mar 1846, d. 1929
 6.Alice Margaret A'Beckett3 b. 21 Nov 1848, d. 16 Apr 1857
 7.Marsham Elwin A'Beckett3 b. 3 Jul 1850
 8.Madeline A'Beckett3 b. 13 May 1853, d. 6 May 1854
 9.Gilbert Holden A'Beckett3 b. 9 May 1856, d. 29 Apr 1857
 10.Caroline A A'Beckett3 b. 28 Sep 1858

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 26 Jul 1904, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14657699
  3. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Emma Mary A'Beckett1

F, #20657, b. 23 Jul 1840, d. 1841
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*23 Jul 1840 Elizabeth street north, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B435/1840.2 
Birth-Notice*24 Jul 1840On Thursday the 23rd instant, at her residence in Elizabeth-street north, the lady of Arthur a'Beckett Esq., of a daughter.3 
Birth-Notice25 Jul 1840On Thursday, the 23rd instant, at her residence, in Elizabeth-street North, the Lady of Arthur a'Beckett, Esq., of a son.4 
Death*1841 NSW, Australia, #D1533/1841 V18411533 25B.1 
Marriage-Notice*20 Jul 1858On the 17th instant, at the Unitarian Congregational Church, by the Rev. G. H. Stanley, B.A., William Frederick M'Carthy, Esq., solicitor, to Emma Mary, older daughter of the Hon. Arthur M. A'Beckett, Esq., M.L.C.5 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#B435/1840 V1840435 24A."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842), Fri 24 Jul 1840, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12865129
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841), Sat 25 Jul 1840, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32184108
  5. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 20 Jul 1858, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13012958
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Arthur Hastings A'Beckett1

M, #20658, b. 19 Jul 1844, d. 11 Jun 1854
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*19 Jul 1844 Castlereagh-street north, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B495/1844.2 
Birth-Notice*20 Jul 1844On Friday, the 19th instant, at her residence in Castlereagh-street North, the lady of Arthur A'Beckett, Esq., of a son.3 
Death*11 Jun 1854 Castlereagh-street north, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 
Death-Notice*12 Jun 1854On Sunday, the 11th instant, at No. 345, Castlereagh-street, Arthur Hastings, eldest son of Arthur M. a'Beckett, Esq., aged 9 years and 11 months.4 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "indexed twice: #B495/1844 V1844495 28 (as Arthur H)
    #B493/1844 V1844493 28 (as Arthur M)."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Sat 20 Jul 1844, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12422970
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), Mon 12 Jun 1854, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60196278
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Arthur A'Beckett1

M, #20659, b. 6 Jun 1839, d. 14 Jun 1839
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*6 Jun 1839 NSW, Australia.1 
Birth-Notice*8 Jun 1839On Thursday, the 6th instant, at her Residence in Elizabeth-street North, the Lady of Arthur a'Beckett, Esq., of a son.2 
Death*14 Jun 1839 NSW, Australia. 
Death-Notice*17 Jun 1839On Friday, the 14th instant, in Elizabeth-street North, Arthur, the infant son of Arthur a'Beckett, Esq., aged eight days.3 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Sat 8 Jun 1839, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2544679
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842), Mon 17 Jun 1839, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12857905
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

William Channing A'Beckett1

M, #20660, b. 16 Mar 1846, d. 1929
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*16 Mar 1846 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B770/1846.2 
Birth-Notice*17 Mar 1846On Monday the 16th instant, at her residence, in Castlereagh-street, the lady of Arthur A'Beckett, Esq., of a son.3 
Death*1929 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#B770/1846 V1846770 31A."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 17 Mar 1846, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12885909
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Alice Margaret A'Beckett1

F, #20661, b. 21 Nov 1848, d. 16 Apr 1857
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*21 Nov 1848 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B244/1848.2 
Birth-Notice*23 Nov 1848On the 21st instant, at 351 Castlereagh-street, the wife of Arthur M. a'Beckett, Esq., of a daughter.3 
Death*16 Apr 1857 Sydney, NSW, Australia, #D494/1857.1 
Death-Notice*17 Apr 1857On Thursday, the 16th instant, at 26, Castlereagh-street, Alice Margaret, third daughter of Arthur Martin a'Beckett, Esq., aged 8 years and five months.4 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#B244/1848 V1848244 34A."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 23 Nov 1848, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12906366
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), Fri 17 Apr 1857, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60273441
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Marsham Elwin A'Beckett1

M, #20662, b. 3 Jul 1850
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*3 Jul 1850 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B501/1850 - as Moreham E.2 
Birth-Notice*4 Jul 1850On Wednesday, July 3, at her residence, in Castlereagh-street, the wife of Arthur M. A'Beckett, Esq., of a son.3 
Marriage-Notice*6 Jul 1881A'BECKETT—SMITH.—June 27, at Llanarth, Bathurst, by the Rev. Canon Smith, Marsham Elwin, the second surviving son of the late Arthur Martin A'Beckett, F.R.C.S., England, to Mary Edith, fifth daughter of the Honorable John Smith, M.L.C.4 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#B501/1850 V1850501 38A."
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 4 Jul 1850, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12919187
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wed 6 Jul 1881, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13489592
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Gilbert Holden A'Beckett1

M, #20663, b. 9 May 1856, d. 29 Apr 1857
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*9 May 1856 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B908.1 
Birth-Notice*10 May 1856On the 9th instant, at her residence, No. 26, Castlereagh-street, Mrs. Arthur M. a'Beckett, of a son.2 
Death*29 Apr 1857 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #D495/1857.1 
Death-Notice*30 Apr 1857On Wednesday, the 29th instant, at 26, Castlereagh-street, Gilbert Holden, infant son of Arthur Martin A'Beckett, Esq., aged eleven months and three weeks.3 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Sat 10 May 1856, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12975325
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 30 Apr 1857, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12994867
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Caroline A A'Beckett1

F, #20664, b. 28 Sep 1858
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*28 Sep 1858 Wynyard-square, Sydney, NSW, Australia, #B2001.1 
Birth-Notice*30 Sep 1858On the 28th instant, at her residence, Wynyard-square, the wife of the Hon. Arthur M. A'Beckett, Esq., M.L.C., of a daughter.2 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 30 Sep 1858, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28631334
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

Madeline A'Beckett1

F, #20665, b. 13 May 1853, d. 6 May 1854
Father*Arthur Martin A'Beckett1 b. 1812, d. 23 May 1871
Mother*Emma Louise Elwin1 b. 26 Aug 1814, d. 24 Jul 1904
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Birth*13 May 1853 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 
Birth-Notice*14 May 1853On the 13th instant, at her residence, in Castlereagh-street, Mrs. Arthur M. a'Beckett, of a daughter.2 
Death*6 May 1854 Sydney, NSW, Australia. 
Death-Notice*8 May 1854On the 6th instant, Madeline, the infant daughter of Arthur M. a'Beckett, Esq., aged twelve months.3 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Sat 14 May 1853, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12945804
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Mon 8 May 1854, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12953105
Last Edited5 Sep 2018

H J Valentine

M, #20666

Newspaper-Articles

  • 22 Jan 1873, A deputation from the working miners on the Haunted Gully gold-field, recently discovered near Berwick, was introduced to the Minister of Mines yesterday by Mr. Purves, M.L.A. Messrs. Valentine and Wisehart, the original prospectors of the field, had pegged out the greater portion of the proved ground, and had sent in an application for an area of 23 acres. The object of the deputation was to oppose this being granted. Mr. P. Hodgkinson, the officer who reported on the discovery, recommended that a much smaller area than that applied for should be granted.
    Mr. Mackay considered that the original prospectors were deserving of some consideration, and therefore promised to grant them a lease for 10 acres, on condition that the length of the block taken up was not more than double the width. He also stipulated that the labour covenants should be stringent, so as to provide for the bona fide working of the ground.1
  • 25 Jan 1873, BERWICK DIGGINGS AND THE LEASING SYSTEM. To the editor of the Leader.
    Sir, — The remonstrances of the miners against the granting of a lease to Valentine and others have been but partially successful. Instead of the whole amount applied for, viz. 23 acres, the Minister of Mines has decided to compromise the matter by giving them 10 acres. This decision of the honorable the supreme arbitrator in our mining affairs has more significance than a good many people are aware of. It is the first instance which I have ever heard of in which shallow and new alluvial ground has been allowed to be taken up under the leasing regulations. Our mining boards may accept this action of Mr. Mackay as a declaration of hostilities against their by-laws, and they may quietly take the hint that it wants but a little further stretch of authority on the part of our popular minister to put his foot down upon our mining boards and their authority altogether. What great enterprise have Messrs. Valentine done that they should be so specially signalled out for a reward ? The deputation yesterday stated clearly enough that there would be no objection by the miners to leases provided it could be shown that the mining difficulties were such as to require the aid of capital and machinery to carry on its operations. In this case however no mining difficulty which cannot be overcome by the ordinary appliances of the individual miner has presented itself. It remains with the miners to decide whether they will quietly allow this innovation into the system which has been steadily pursued since the first commencement of the gold-fields in this colony to go on unchallenged. Can the Minister of Mines satisfy the representatives from our gold-fields that shallow alluvial mining can be worked more economically by public companies than by the principle of individualism ? I challenge him to do so. Lot us see by results whether the extension of the monopolistic principle which he is aiming at in the opening up of new gold-fields will be able to record any achievements worth commemorating which will benefit the miner and be serviceable to the community at large. — A gold miner and one of the deputation.2
  • 22 Feb 1873, MINING NOTES. A special coach and four left Cobb and Co.'s office on Thursday morning with, a number of gentlemen for Berwick on a visit of inspection to Messrs. Wiseheart and Valentine's lease at Haunted Gully. On arrival at Mr. Souter's Gipps Land Hotel they were provided with horses, when they proceeded to the ground, a distance of 3½ miles; and having inspected the shafts and drives just opened out, they witnessed a trial washing of a load of washdirt, which yielded some 9 dwt. When the machinery is erected it is expected that the yield will be greatly increased. The gold is of first-class quality, and the washdirt is some 5 feet thick, and about 25 feet wide as far as proved. The gentlemen present were much pleased with the prospects af this ground.3,4
  • 25 Feb 1873, Attention has been called recently to some auriferous ground situated at Haunted Gully near Berwick, in connection with an application for lease, Mr Hodgkinson having been deputed by the Minister of Mines to report respecting its value. The result has been the granting of ten acres to the original prospectors, Messrs. Wiseheart and Valentine. Invitations having been given to several gentlemen interested in mining matters to inspect the claim, on Friday a party visited the spot, a coach having been placed at the disposal of the promoters by Messrs. Robertson and Wagner, which started at 7 a.m., returning about 10 p.m. The ground was tested in various places by the visitors, not only on the claim itself but in other parts, and the auriforous character of the country, which is within 30 miles of Melbourne, was considered proved. The appliances at present in use are of the most
    primitive character, but with these one load was washed in the presence of the visitors, and yielded 9dwt. The washdirt in the shaft sunk (18ft. deep) is from 3ft to 6ft. thick. It may be mentioned that one man, who has a claim adjoining 50ft. square, stated he would not take £200 for his interest.5
  • 21 Mar 1873, THE MINES. NEW ALLUVIAL DIGGINGS NEAR MELBOURNE.
    For many years past it has been believed by practical miners that the whole of the gullies running along the sides of the Divid ing Range would prove auriferous, but there have been very few of them who would he at the trouble and expense of testing the ground for the purpose of proving whether such was the case. There has been one exception to this rule in the case of Mr. Charles Wiseheart, of Melbourne, who since 1865 has not only spent a great deal of time in carry ing on prospecting operations, but has also employed several men in trying the ground throughout the ranges, with more or less success. In the early part of last year one of these prospectors sunk a shaft in Haunted Gully, near Berwick, and having bottomed at about twenty-two feet obtained a very satisfactory prospect of about 7 dwt. to the load. The locality of the find is distant from Melbourne about thirty-eight miles, and is easily reached. The main Gipps Land road is followed as far as Souter's Gipps Land Hotel, about a mile beyond Berwick, after leaving which a track is followed over the ranges for about six miles, until the scene of operations is reached. The country in this locality is very heavily timbered, and in some of the gullies there is a dense growth of underwood, making locomotion a matter of great difficulty. Some years since a track known as Bowman's was cut through the bush by private enterprise as far as the head of the Latrobe River, but this was allowed to become overgrown with the scrub, so that at present it is only available for a short distance beyond the Dividing Range. The first portion of the track is now, however, in good order, and is used by the miners located in the Haunted Gully district constantly, and has been so far improved as to allow of a cart proceeding to the diggings with stores twice a week. The greater part of the traffic is, however, done either on foot or on horseback, as some of the descents are so steep that in wet weather it is a work both or danger and difficulty to get the cart along. At the time the prospectors first opened up the ground in this gully, named Haunted Gully, there were no other parties in the district, and a prospector's lease of 30 acres was pegged out and aplied for. As soon, however, as it became known in Berwick and the adjacent district that payable gold had been obtained there was a rush to the place, and claims were pegged off on both sides of the range the whole length of the gully. Strong objections were made against Mr. Wiseheart and his party getting the pros pecting claim they had applied for, and in November last a deputation waited upon the Minister of Mines on the subject, ande he decided upon limiting Mr. Wiseheart's lease to 10 acres. This was considered a great injustice by the party, as it would have been quite possible for them to have taken up the whole ot the gully under miners' rights. There was, however, no appeal from the de cision of the Minister, although the applica tion for the lease had been recommended by the warden. Ten acres were accordingly pegged out and surveyed in the upper portion of the gully, and steps were at once taken to clear away the dense scrub, with a view of proceeding systematically to work. In the interregnum between the application for the lease and its issue, several miners sunk shafts on the ground, always bottoming at from 22 to 30 ft., with a good prospect, vary ing from 9 dwt. to 1½ oz. to the load. Be fore, however, they could thoroughly test the extent of the washdirt the lease was issued to Wiseheart and party, and the trespassers had of course to abandon the shafts sunk by them. Work was, however, rapidly proceeded with in the lower part of the gully, which extends for over three-quarters of a mile. Seven claims were taken up, and here the sinking was found to be deeper than in the prospectors' claim, the bottom being reached at about 40 feet, but the results obtained are quite as good. The ground is easily worked, but is very wet in consequence of the pervious nature of the soil, and the bottom in a kind of hard blue alate. The washdirt averages from one foot to three feet in thickness, while the lead has been traced a width of forty feet, and had not then run out. The holders of the claims have been suffering from a want of water to carry on operations, and the work already done has been princi pally by the use of the primitive cradle and tin dish ; but Mr. Souter, the storekeeper at the diggings, who is also a claimholder, has recently erected a small dam and pud dling machine in the lower part of the gully, and now washes the dirt for the other claimholders, for which he charges 1 dwt. per load. This has been found to be a great advantage by the men, but it is doubtful whether he will be enabled to con tinue the work, during the dry season, as the catchwater area for the reservoir he has made is very small, and would not contain water sufficient to carry on puddling opera tions throughout a dry summer. It is, how ever, apparent that these parties intend to push forward the work as rapidly as possi ble while water is to be obtained, as a wooden tramway has been made along the front of the claims to the puddling machine, by which means the washdirt is rapidly conveyed to the machine, and no time lost in again filling it as soon as one lot is dis posed of. Of course, it is very difficult to ascertain the total amount of gold that has been raised from these claims, as the men are very reticent as to their gains, but the storekeeper has, during the last three months, purchased about six pounds weight from the holders, and this is estimated to be somewhat under one-third of the total amount obtained. Wiseheart's party cannot be said to have fully commenced operations in mining, as they have had ten men wholly employed for the last two months in getting everything ready to start work on a large scale. In order that they might not be stopped for want of water, one acre of ground was ob tained at the head of the gully under a water right licence, together with the power of cutting a tail race through the intervening ground to their claim. On this ground a large reservoir has been constructed, a substantial dam having been thrown across the valley from one side to the other. This dam is about 14 feet in height from the surface, but this does not represent the whole of the work done, as a trench was cut down to the bed rock, a depth of 10 feet at this spot. The dam has been substantially constructed, and good clay being plentiful, the whole of the work has been carefully paddled and additional strength given to it by a backing of stout saplings. The dam at the surface is about 18 yards long, but provision has been made so that should at any future time it be considered desirable to increase the capacity of the reservoir it can easily be done by carrying up the face of the dam. No exact computation has been made of the storage capacity of the work, but as it has a drainage area of two square miles it is evident from a cursory glance that in any moderately wet season there will always be a large quantity of water running over the by-wash. From the reservoir a tail race has been cut to the puddling-machine, a distance of a quarter of a mile. In addition to this a smaller reser voir has been constructed a short distance below the main one, which receives the overflow from the by-wash, and can be utilised for the sluicing-machine. These works, with the erection of a puddling-machine and sluicing-boxes, were only completed last week, and the heavy rain on Friday last completely filled the reservoir. As this was the first time it had been tried, some anxiety was felt by the party to ascertain whether any leakage would take place. A close in spection on Sunday last showed that although there was a great deal of water flowing over the by-wash, there was no sign of any leak in the dam, and upon opening the outlet valve a fine stream rushed down the tail race. These preliminary works have been carried out by Mr. Bell, one of the parties to the lease, to whom has been confided the management of the claim. It speaks well for the energy and perseverance of Mr. Wiseheart and his party that they should have expended nearly £500 in constructing these works before obtaining any return for their outlay, and proves that they have every confidence in the value of the ground they have taken up. They have also sunk shaft at the extreme lower end of their lease, but this is mainly intended to drain the upper part of the workings. The puddling machine is in close proximity to this shaft, and by placing a drum on it, the work of pumping can be carried on without any additional labor. At present the water has to be baled out, necessitating a considerable amount of work. At the mouth of this shaft is a large heap of wash-dirt, with which it is intended to commence working the machine. At the time of the visit a dishfull of this stuff was taken at random from the heap, and upon being washed out gave a yield of about six grains, which would average more than half an ounce to the load. The gold is coarse and much waterworn, but of exceptionally good quality, £3 19s. being paid for it by the storekeeper on the ground. A working shaft will be sunk about the centre of the claim, and work will be rapidly proceeded with by the party now that all their arrange ments are completed. In the meantime there is a considerable amount of wash-dirt to grass at the mouths of the shafts sunk by men who had no opportunity of completing washing-up, through the issue of the lease. Samples of quartz are to be found thinly scattered through the gully, and as two specimens of gold have been found studded with quartz, it is believed that at no distant date a gold-bearing reef will be discovered. With this object in view a good deal of prospecting is still going on at odd times by the men employed in the claims. Although no reef has yet been dis covered, the prospecting has conclusively proved that there are other gullies in the vicinity which will pay for working. About ten days since one of the men employed by Wiseheart's party obtained a very satisfactory prospect in a neighboring gully, and he has since formed a party of eight, and they have bottomed a shaft at about 20 feet, from whence they have obtained gold at the rate of about 9 dwt. to the load. They have since commenced the erection of a dam to conserve water for washing pur poses. This gully, which has been named Sailor's Gully, lies about N.W. from Haunted Gully, and within the past few days another good prospect has been obtained from Sparke's Gully, which is to the S.E. In the latter place the sinking is only 10 feet deep, with a yield of about 5 dwt. to the load. The washdirt in all the gullies averages from 18 inches to 3 feet thick, and from the pros-pects that have already been obtained, it is anticipated that there will be plenty of remunerative work for the next two years in the claims already taken up. One party in Haunted Gully drove forty feet into the hill on the eastern side, and were on a good lead of washdirt, but through carlessness in neglecting to tim ber up the drive, they one morning discovered that the whole of the ground had fallen in and destroyed the whole of their labor. Their success was, however, so encouraging that Mr. Wiseheart has taken up 66 feet frontage along the side of the hill under a miner's right, and intends to drive as soon as possible, in order to fully ascertain the extent of the auriferous washdirt. In addi-tion to the washdirt, it is intended to put the clay which has been taken from above the dirt through tho puddling machine, as it is believed that it will pay for so doing, the color having been seen in it. In prospecting these ranges Mr. Wiseheart has not confined himself to a search for gold alone, but has also directed himself to the discovery of tin or any other mineral to be found among tho ranges. His researches have been so for successful as to result in the discovery of a fine prospect of stream tin near the head of the Latrobe River, about thirty-five miles through the ranges from the Haunted Gully diggings, but as usual when a good thing is discovered by the pluck and energy of one party, there are plenty ready to seize the opportunity and apply for the ground without having expended a sixpence in attempting to prospect it.
    A case that occurred on this some claim at the Latrobe River only last week will give some idea of the danger and difficulty prospecting miners have to undergo in carrying on their lonely occupation among the ranges. Two men were employed by Mr. Wiseheart looking for tin, and also holding the ground. Their stores being nearly expended about ten days since, one of them started on the downward track to obtain a fresh supply, leaving his mate, a Milanese, known as Dominic, on the ground. After he had left, Dominic continued the work, and in trying to remove a huge boulder it suddenly gave way, and he was precipitated on his back to the bottom of the creek, a distance of about ten feet. Upon recovering himself, he found that he had severely injured his spine, and knowing that there was no person within many miles of him, and that his mate would not be back for several days, he considered it would be advisable for him to make the best of his way into Berwick in order to obtain medical assistance. He ac cordingly made up his swag, and taking sufficient provisions for his journey, pro ceeded on the track to Berwick. Although he had only thirty-five miles to travel, the pain he was suffering from was so intense that it took him five days to complete his journey and obtain the services of a doctor.6
  • 9 May 1873, MINING LEASES, ETC. THE Mining Leases, &c., of which the dates and terms, with the lessees' names, extent of ground leased, and annual rent reserved, are as undermentioned, have, unless otherwise specified in the note at foot, been forwarded to the wardens' offices at the places respectively named. Unless the lessees attend at the proper time to execute, the leases not executed will be liable to forfeiture.
    Castlemaine District—St Andrew's Division.
    * No. 1476, dated 9th April 1873; 15 years; C. Wiseheart and H. J. Valentine; 10 acres; £5
    Notes. No 1476 Castlemaine has been executed in the Office of Mines. Angus Mackay. Minister of Mines. Melbourne, 30th April 1873.7
  • 16 Jun 1873, THE BERWICK GOLD-FIELD.
    The new gold-field lately discovered in the ranges near Berwick about 30 miles from Melbourne, has excited some little interest, and new life has been infused by the discovery into the hitherto somewhat dull town ship. The scene of the operations can be reached without much difficulty. The road as far as Berwick is the main road to Gipps Land, and in dry weather presents few difficulties, but in the rainy season some parts of the road are rendered almost impassable. The worst portions of the road are between Oakleigh and Mulgrave, where an attempt has been made to mend the road with clayey mud, the effect being anything but pleasant to travellers. The diggings lie about five miles north-east of the township of Berwick, amongst the spurs of the Dividing Range. The nearest way of reaching the gold-field is from the Gipps Land Hotel, near Kardinia Creek. A track leads from there to the diggings and is easily passable on horseback or on foot, but the steep ranges render the road scarcely suitable for vehicles. The mining operations are confined almost entirely to Haunted Gully and the immediately adjacent gullies. It is about two years since the prospecting for gold was commenced in that locality by some men employed by Mr. C. Wiseheart, of Melbourne, and other persons who were convinced that the country in that direction was auriferous. Some of the gullies were tested, and the result showed that the belief was not ill-founded. A shaft was sunk in Haunted Gully last year by a man named Valentine, and a quantity of washdirt was obtained averaging 6 dwt per load. A prospectors' lease of 30 acres in the gully was applied for by Mr. Wiseheart and those who were acting with him, and the ground was pegged out. The news of the discovery however soon spread and in a short time the place was rushed. The ground which had been already secured by Mr Wiseheart was taken up, and in consequence of the difficulties which arose the matter was bought under the notice of the Minister of Mines. A compromise which, according to the nature of compromises, was not considered satisfactory by either side, was effected, and it was decided that Mr. Wiseheart should be allowed to choose 10 acres. He has selected 10 acres in the upper part of the gully, and the remainder of the ground which he applied for has been taken up by the other miners. The foregoing facts show the circumstances which have already transpired in connexion with this new discovery of auriferous country, but a description of the present appearance of the gold-field will doubtless prove of more general interest. The gully, which is locally known as the Haunted Gully, although why it bears that name cannot be ascertained, is situated between two steep hills, and the mining at present is principally confined to it. The workings extend down for nearly a mile, and about eight or ten claims are now opened up. The prospectors' lease, owned by Mr. Wiseheart and other gentlemen interested with him, is near the top of the gully. A considerable amount of work, representing £400, has been carried out on this ground. In a favourable spot at the junction of two smaller gullies a dam has been constructed under the superintendence of Mr. Bell, an experienced practical miner, who is the manager for the company and resides on the ground. The work is one of some magnitude, and has entailed a good deal of expense, but the storage of water is considered sufficient to supply all possible needs for some time. A race has been cut from the dam for some distance down the gully to a puddling machine, which has also been constructed for the prospectors. The lease of 10 acres extends down the gully nearly a quarter of a mile, and at the extreme end a trial shaft has been sunk. The prospect so far has been encouraging, averaging from 9 dwt to an ounce, to an ounce and a half a load. Some shafts have been sunk higher up by the miners who attempted to jump the ground during the disputes which had previously taken place, and the prospects there were also good. The permanent shaft on this ground has not yet been sunk, the previous trials having been made with the idea of fixing the most suitable position for it. From the lower shaft, however, a considerable amount of washdirt has been raised, and it is anticipated that it will yield a payable quantity of gold. Washing will be commenced within a few days, and it is expected that the puddling machine will be kept in full operation. A tin dishful of the washdirt taken at random and washed in the pool showed several grains of gold, estimated to average at least 9dwt to the load. Immediately below the prospectors' lease there are four or five claims in full work owned by different parties, and the men are said to be doing well. The sinking is not deep, the greatest depth of any shaft being about 40ft., and many of them much less, and the ground is easily worked. Some of the men are stated to be making £8 to £10 a week each, but they are very secretive over their good luck, and understand the advisa bility of keeping their own counsel. A puddling-machine has been erected below these claims by a company formed for the purpose, in order to wash the wash-dirt from these claims, and a wooden trainway has been constructed to carry the loads down. The charge made is a penny-weight per load, so that even 5dwt or 6dwt a load might be payable to the miners. There are other claims below this puddling machine with which the owners appear satisfied, but further down the gully work has been abandoned, as the water is too heavy. There are about 50 or 60 men at work in this gully, and though their appliances are of a rather primitive character, most of them appear to be getting on well. So far there has been no deep sinking, and the expenses of working the claims have been comparatively light. The gold obtained fetches $3 19s. per ounce upon the diggings. The settlement is not very extensive, and the inevitable public-house has not yet been established. On the rise of the hill a general store has been erected from whence the miners obtain their supplies, and a hut has also been erected for Mr. Bell, the manager of the prospectors' company. These two tenements constitute the central township so to speak, the miners themselves preferring to live by their claims in tents or log huts, or a conjunction of both. Within the last few weeks a branch rush has taken place from the diggings to a gully about half a mile away in the direction of Berwick. Some good prospects have been obtained, and about 20 or 30 men have settled down there for a time to try their luck. One party has commenced the construction of a dam, and has already sunk two shafts. Another gully, the other side of the range beyond Haunted Gully, has also been prospected, and the prospector is so far satisfied that he has taken out a lease. Indeed it seems probable that the whole locality is more or less auriferous, and many of the gullies in these ranges would doubtless repay an examination. The discovered gold-field is not of an extensive character, and all the proved ground is already taken up; but persons acquainted with the country consider that the ranges would be worth prospecting.8
  • 4 Jul 1873, LICENSES TO TRANSFER, ETC., MINING LEASES.
    The following is a List of Licenses, under the hand and seal of His Excellency the Governor, empowering the holders of mining leases to transfer or otherwise part with their interests in their respective leases as hereunder set forth, which have been issued on or since the 31st May 1873. The last list of such licenses was published in the Government Gazette of the 6th June 1873, p.1013:—
    Castlemaine 1476 10th June 1873 To H. J. Valentine to transfer all his right, title, and interest in the said lease unto C. Souter.9
  • 15 Jul 1873, NEW ALLUVIAL DIGGINGS NEAR MELBOURNE.
    For many years past it has been believed by practical miners that the whole of the gullies running along the sides of the Divid ing Range would prove auriferous, but there have been very few of them who would be at the trouble and expense of testing the ground for the purpose of proving whether such was the case. There has been one exception to this rule in the case of Mr. Charles Wiseheart, of Melbourne, who since 1865 has not only spent a great deal of time in carrying on prospecting operations, but has also employed several men in trying the ground throughout the ranges, with more or less success. In the early part of last year one of these prospectors sunk a shaft in Haunted Gully, near Berwick, and having bottomed at about twenty-two feet obtained a very satisfactory prospect of about 7 dwt. to the load. The locality of the find is distant from Melbourne about thirty-eight miles, and is easily reached. The main Gipps Land road is followed as far as Souter's Gipps Land Hotel, about a mile beyond Berwick, after eaving which a track is followed over the ranges for about six miles, until the scene of operations is reached. The country in this locality is very heavily timbered, and in some of the gullies there is a dense growth of underwood, making locomotion a matter of great difficulty. Some years since a track known as Bowman's was cut through the bush by private enterprise as far as the head of the Latrobe River, but this was allowed to become overgrown with the scrub, so that at present it is only available for a short distance beyond the Dividing Range. The first portion of the track is now, however, in good order, and is used by the miners located in the Haunted Gully district constantly, and has been so far improved as to allow of a cart, proceeding to the diggings with stores twice a week. The greater part of the traffic is, however, done either on foot or on horseback, as some of the descents are so steep that in wet weather it is a work both of danger and difficulty to get the cart along. At the time the prospectors first opened up the ground in this gully, named Haunted Gully, there were no other parties in the district, and prospec tor's lease of 30 acres was pegged out and applied for. As soon, however, as it became known in Berwick and the adjacent district that payable gold had been obtained there was a rush to the place, and claims were pegged off on both sides of the range the whole length of the gully. Strong objections were made against Mr. Wise heart and his party getting the prospecting claim they had applied for, and in November last a deputation waited upon the Minister of Mines on the subject, and he decided upon limiting Mr. Wiseheart's lease to 10 acres. This was considered a great injustice by the party, as it would have been quite possible for them to have taken up the whole of the gully under miners' rights. There was, however, no appeal from the de cision of the Minister, although the applica tion for the lease had been recommended by the warden. Ten acres were accordingly pegged out and surveyed in the upper portion of the gully, and steps were at once taken to clear away the dense scrub, with a view of proceeding systematically to work. In the interregnum between the application for the lease and its issue, several miners sunk shafts on the ground, always bottoming at from 22 to 30 ft. , with a good prospect, vary ing from 9 dwt; to 1 1/2 oz. to the load. Be fore, however, they could thoroughly test the extent of the washdirt the lease was issued to Wiseheart and party, and the trespassers had of course to abandon the shafts sunk by them. Work was, howover, rapidly proceeded with in the lower part of the gully, which extends for over three-quarters of a mile. Seven claims were taken up, and here the sinking was found to be deeper than in the prospectors' claim, the bottom being reached at about 40 feet, but the results obtained are quite as good. The ground is easily worked, but is very wet in consequence of the pervious nature of the soil, and the bottom is a kind of hard blue slate. The washdirt averages from one foot to three feet in thickness, while the lead has been traced a width of forty feet, and had not then run out. The holders of the claims have been suffering from a want of water to carry on operations, and the work already done has been princi pally by the use of the primitive cradle and tin dish ; but Mr. Souter, the storekeeper at the diggings, who is also a claimholder, has recently erected a small dam and pud dling machine in the lower part of the gully, and now washes the dirt for the other claimholders, for which he charges 1 dwt. per load. Although no reef has yet been discovered, the prospecting has conclusively proved that there are other gullies in the vicinity which will pay for working. This gully, which has been named, Sailor's Gully, lies about N.W. from Haunted Gully, and within the past few days another good prospect has been obtained from Sparke's Gully, which is to the S.E. In the latter place the sinking is only 10 feet deep, with a yield of about, 5 dwt. to the load. The washdirt in all the gullies averages from 18 inches to 3 foot thick, and from the pros pects that have already been obtained, it is anticipated that there will be plenty of re munerative work for the next two years in the claims already taken up. In prospecting these ranges Mr. Wise heart has not confined himself to a search for gold alone, but has also directed himself to the discovery of tin or any other mineral to be found among the ranges. His researches have been so far successful as to result in the discovery of a fine prospect of stream tin near the head of the Latrobe River, about thirty-five miles through the ranges from the Haunted Gully diggings, but as usual when a good thing is discovered by the pluck and energy of one party, there are plenty ready to seize the opportunity and apply for the ground without having expended a sixpence in attempting to prospect it. A case that occurred on this same claim at the Latrobe River only last week will give some idea of the danger and difficulty prospecting miners have to undergo in carrying on their lonely occupation among the ranges.10
  • 27 Nov 1902, TRAVELLING SHEEP WITHOUT DUE NOTICE.—H. J. Valentine was proceeded against by John Ryan, common herdsman, for having travelled a flock of sheep through the town common without giving due notice.
    Mr Cohen appeared for the plaintiff. There was no appearance of the defendant.
    John Ryan deposed that he saw defendant travelling sheep through the common on 3rd November. Witness asked him why he had not given him notice, and he said that he had posted a notice to him at Toolleen the night previous. He did not get the notice until after he had taken out the summons. The sheep were in good condition.
    A fine of 10s, with 18s costs was imposed.11
  • 10 Feb 1904, BALLARAT. Tuesday, February 9.
    A well known resident named John Townsend was arrested by the detective police to-night, charged with embezzling sums of money belonging to H. J. Valentine, agent of the Standard Life Assurance Association Limited Melbourne.12

Citations

  1. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 22 Jan 1873, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5846727
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 25 Jan 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197929035
  3. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Sat 22 Feb 1873, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198573020
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 1 Mar 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197931043
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 25 Feb 1873, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61493065
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 21 Jun 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197925247
  7. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 9 May 1873, p796."
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 16 Jun 1873, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5865294
  9. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 4 Jul 1873, p1183."
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875), Tue 15 Jul 1873, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60448020
  11. [S14] Newspaper - The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser (Heathcote, Vic. : 1863 - 1918), Thu 27 Nov 1902, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89329744
  12. [S14] Newspaper - The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Wed 10 Feb 1904, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227005061
Last Edited16 Dec 2018

Charles Wiseheart

M, #20667, b. 1837, d. 30 Mar 1914

Navy

Merchant Seaman.1
Birth*1837 Dublin, Ireland, parents probably John WISEHEART & Anna McDERMOTT. 
Marriage* Spouse: Emma Lyons.
 
Residence*1872 32 Webb Street, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia, Charles Wiseheart Stationer, living in 5-roomed house, owner Benjamin Bell.2 
PROV*1874Wiseheart, William [Reg. no. 7482]
Ward Registers (known as Children's Registers 1864 - 1887.)3 
Widower20 Jul 1897Charles Wiseheart became a widower upon the death of his wife Emma Lyons.4 
Death*30 Mar 1914 Mosman, NSW, Australia, #D939 [par John].5 
Death-Notice31 Mar 1914WISEHEART.—March 30, 1914, at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. H. B. Bell, Lindenfels, 10 Boyle-street, Mosman, Charles Wiseheart, beloved father of Mrs. Bob Smith, Mrs. Harry Bell, Miss Maud Wiseheart, and the late Mrs. G. L. Bauer, aged 77 years.6 
Death-Notice*31 Mar 1914WISEHEART.—ThE Funeral of the late Mr. CHARLES WISEHEART will leave Fort Macquarie, THIS (Tuesday) AFTERNOON, at 2.15 o'clock, for Waverley Cemetery.
WOOD, COFFILL, and COMPANY, Ltd.7 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 2 Apr 1862, SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. HOBSON'S BAY. ARRIVED. - APRIL 1. Wonga Wonga, A.S.N. Company's s.s.s., 734 tons, David Walker, from Sydney 29th ult. Passengers - .... C. Wiseheart. W. P. White and Co., agents.8
  • 19 Jan 1863, A Good Idea.—Provision is about to be made for the reading portion of the travelling public. What the world-famous Smith &, Co., have done for England, with its net-work of railways, is about to be done for Victoria, and the Murray River Railway. Messrs. Wiseheart and Co., of Spencer street, Melbourne, have leased the right of establishing book-stalls at each station on the line, and of supplying newspapers, books, stationery, &c., to passengers or residents. The railway will thus serve as a diffusor of knowledge as well as an aid to material progress, and the railway book-stall will be, at many bush stations, as a light in a dark place, a thing which will testify of progress, and civilizing influences in the midst of much that is rude and unpolished. The convenience of such an arrangement is evident, the Melbourne papers will be delivered by the first train, and English books and periodicals will be obtainable at Melbourne prices at the shortest notice. Take Malmsbury as an example, there is no bookseller's shop there, articles of stationery, &c., can only be obtained at some of the stores, but a book-stall at the Railway station would supply the want and would be a great convenience not only to passengers but to tho whole surrounding district. A book may perhaps be borrowed at one station and returned at another, and the tedium of waiting for the train, (that most unpleasant trial of patience), may henceforth be rendered more endurable if we can get a book or paper from the book stall.9
  • 26 Sep 1863, An accident of a rather serious nature occurred in Collins street on Saturday last. The sufferer is a boy named Charles Wheeler, aged thirteen, who is in the employment of Messrs Gordon and Gotch, news agents. It appears that Wheeler was at the Spencer street Railway station on business for his employers about the same time that Mr Wiseheart, news agent, rode up on his pony, and that, watching an opportunity when he was engaged, Wheeler mounted the animal and rode out of the yard into Spencer street. It is supposed that something had occurred to startle the horse, as it dashed off down Collins street at a furious rate. The boy struggled hard but unsuccessfully to maintain his seat, for the animal, giving a sudden plunge forward, he was thrown from the saddle, and his foot being caught in the stirrup, he was dragged a considerable distance before he could be extricated from his perilous position. He was picked up in state of insensibility, the blood flowing profusely from his head and mouth, and was conveyed to the Hospital, where he still lies in a very precarious condition, little hope being entertained of his recovery.10
  • 10 Sep 1868, INSOLVENT COURT. Wednesday, 9th September. — (Before the Chief Commissioner.)
    First and Only Meetings were held and closed in the estates of ... Charles Wiseheart, of Melbourne, commercial traveller.11
  • 5 Jan 1872, Marquis of Lorne Quartz Mining Company (Limited). Second Schedule. Nominal Capital 24,000 shares at 7s. 6d. each.
    Paid up amount £3,000. Place of operations or intended operations Fenton's Reef Taradale
    Shareholders include: Charles Wiseheart, Melbourne Stationer, 300 shares.12
  • 3 Jan 1873, THE NEWS GOLD-FIELD NEAR BERWICK.— A miner thus reports the discovery of a payable gold-field at Haunted Gully, near Berwick: — "There Is a good extent of ground here, several miles in fact, of which half a mile is proved to contain good payable gold. The washdirt will average from ½ oz. to ¾ oz. per load, and is from 18 in. to 4 ft. thick. The gully is situated about north-east of Berwick, a distance of five miles. There are very few miners on the ground.13
  • 10 Jan 1873, A correspondent informs the Argus that a large meeting of miners took place on Tuesday, at the new rush, situate in the neighbourhood of Berwick, for the purpose of protesting against the attempt made by several parties to monopoalise the ground by the introduction of' the leasing system. The chair was occupied by Mr. Souter. The following resolution was unanimously adopted:-" That the attempt made by Messrs. Valentine, Wiseheart, and others to obtain a lease of 30 acres of ground in the new alluvial gully situate near Berwick, is an encroachment upon the rights of alluvial miners, by introducing a spirit of monopoly, which should be immediately resisted. That in furtherance of this object, a deputation be appointed to wait upon the boiln. the Minister of Mines, and represent to him the injustice which would be inflicted upon a large number of miners should these leases be granted on this new gold-field."14
  • 22 Jan 1873, A deputation from the working miners on the Haunted Gully gold-field, recently discovered near Berwick, was introduced to the Minister of Mines yesterday by Mr. Purves, M.L.A. Messrs. Valentine and Wisehart, the original prospectors of the field, had pegged out the greater portion of the proved ground, and had sent in an application for an area of 23 acres. The object of the deputation was to oppose this being granted. Mr. P. Hodgkinson, the officer who reported on the discovery, recommended that a much smaller area than that applied for should be granted.
    Mr. Mackay considered that the original prospectors were deserving of some consideration, and therefore promised to grant them a lease for 10 acres, on condition that the length of the block taken up was not more than double the width. He also stipulated that the labour covenants should be stringent, so as to provide for the bona fide working of the ground.15
  • 25 Jan 1873, THE NORTH BERWICK GOLDFIELD
    A number of working miners, introduced by Mr. Furves, M.L.A, waited upon the Minister of Mines yesterday to oppose the granting of a lease to a Mr. Wisehart and party of ground on the Kardinia Creek, North Berwick, for mining purposes. The deputation stated that the field was limited, and that, as the sinking was only from 12ft. to 25ft., and only required the pick and shovel, a monopoly would be created if the lease was granted. They further pointed out that there was room for at least a hundred miners to work, and that it would be wrong to deprieve them of the means of earning a living. Mr Wiseheart who was present, contended that his party, having discovered the field, were entitled to consideration. Mr. Mackay, in order to do justice to all parties, decided to limit the area .. Wiseheart and party to ten acres, the length not to be greater than twice the breadth.16
  • 25 Jan 1873, BERWICK DIGGINGS AND THE LEASING SYSTEM. To the editor of the Leader.
    Sir, — The remonstrances of the miners against the granting of a lease to Valentine and others have been but partially successful. Instead of the whole amount applied for, viz. 23 acres, the Minister of Mines has decided to compromise the matter by giving them 10 acres. This decision of the honorable the supreme arbitrator in our mining affairs has more significance than a good many people are aware of. It is the first instance which I have ever heard of in which shallow and new alluvial ground has been allowed to be taken up under the leasing regulations. Our mining boards may accept this action of Mr. Mackay as a declaration of hostilities against their by-laws, and they may quietly take the hint that it wants but a little further stretch of authority on the part of our popular minister to put his foot down upon our mining boards and their authority altogether. What great enterprise have Messrs. Valentine done that they should be so specially signalled out for a reward ? The deputation yesterday stated clearly enough that there would be no objection by the miners to leases provided it could be shown that the mining difficulties were such as to require the aid of capital and machinery to carry on its operations. In this case however no mining difficulty which cannot be overcome by the ordinary appliances of the individual miner has presented itself. It remains with the miners to decide whether they will quietly allow this innovation into the system which has been steadily pursued since the first commencement of the gold-fields in this colony to go on unchallenged. Can the Minister of Mines satisfy the representatives from our gold-fields that shallow alluvial mining can be worked more economically by public companies than by the principle of individualism ? I challenge him to do so. Lot us see by results whether the extension of the monopolistic principle which he is aiming at in the opening up of new gold-fields will be able to record any achievements worth commemorating which will benefit the miner and be serviceable to the community at large. — A gold miner and one of the deputation.17
  • 8 Feb 1873, SHALLOW ALLUVIAL GROUND AND MINING LEASES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE LEADER.
    SIR.— The decision of the Minister of Mines in the dispute between the lease-holders and the alluvial miners at the rush near Berwick may he accepted as satisfactory in this respect, for it shows plainly enough that fertile future the individual miner will receive but little consideration from the authorities in the mining office. The capitalist is to be predominant. The shallow alluvial grounds are now included within the territory over which the scrip manufacturers shall have dominion. I ask of the present Minister of Mines what he intends to do with the large number of old miners in this colony, when he has taken away the shallow alluvial ground from them. Let us but take a glance at the number of old miners wh0 are eking out an existence on the shallow workings in this colony — the battle of life being fought fiercer and fiercer as time moves onwards, and the diggings become more exhausted. The habits and independent spirit of the gold miner unfit him to betake himself for a liveliehood to menial occupations should be by an unjust administration of the mining laws be driven by the pressure of the unscrupulous speculator from the occupation to which he has been so long accustomed. Since I have come to this locality I have had an excellent opportunity of coming in contact with a number of mining veterans lingering on the stage. Their physical powers may not he so active as they have been, but still there, is the same buoyant hope of something to be discovered, and the same expression of determined resolve to yet make amends for past misadventures by discoveries in prospective. But the honorable the Minister of Mines is permitting the speculative promoters of mining companies to monopolise their shallow alluvial grounds, and thereby hem them in with such restrictions as will deprive them of their means, of subsistence, and press them in upon society in a state of hopeless despair.
    Berwick, 2nd February. A GOLD MINER.18
  • 21 Feb 1873, Applications for mining leases.
    Mining District Castlemaine. No of application 192; C Wiseheart and another. No of lease 1476. Area 10 acres. Amount of money proposed to be invested £200 sluicing and puddling. Minimum of men to be employed when commencing operations: Ten men. Precise locality and time of commencing operations Haunted Gully, near Berwick. On grant of lease. Term of lease, and general remarks. 15 years. A portion of the ground originally marked out has been excised.19
  • 22 Feb 1873, MINING NOTES. A special coach and four left Cobb and Co.'s office on Thursday morning with, a number of gentlemen for Berwick on a visit of inspection to Messrs. Wiseheart and Valentine's lease at Haunted Gully. On arrival at Mr. Souter's Gipps Land Hotel they were provided with horses, when they proceeded to the ground, a distance of 3½ miles; and having inspected the shafts and drives just opened out, they witnessed a trial washing of a load of washdirt, which yielded some 9 dwt. When the machinery is erected it is expected that the yield will be greatly increased. The gold is of first-class quality, and the washdirt is some 5 feet thick, and about 25 feet wide as far as proved. The gentlemen present were much pleased with the prospects af this ground.20,21
  • 25 Feb 1873, Attention has been called recently to some auriferous ground situated at Haunted Gully near Berwick, in connection with an application for lease, Mr Hodgkinson having been deputed by the Minister of Mines to report respecting its value. The result has been the granting of ten acres to the original prospectors, Messrs. Wiseheart and Valentine. Invitations having been given to several gentlemen interested in mining matters to inspect the claim, on Friday a party visited the spot, a coach having been placed at the disposal of the promoters by Messrs. Robertson and Wagner, which started at 7 a.m., returning about 10 p.m. The ground was tested in various places by the visitors, not only on the claim itself but in other parts, and the auriforous character of the country, which is within 30 miles of Melbourne, was considered proved. The appliances at present in use are of the most
    primitive character, but with these one load was washed in the presence of the visitors, and yielded 9dwt. The washdirt in the shaft sunk (18ft. deep) is from 3ft to 6ft. thick. It may be mentioned that one man, who has a claim adjoining 50ft. square, stated he would not take £200 for his interest.22
  • 21 Mar 1873, THE MINES. NEW ALLUVIAL DIGGINGS NEAR MELBOURNE.
    For many years past it has been believed by practical miners that the whole of the gullies running along the sides of the Divid ing Range would prove auriferous, but there have been very few of them who would he at the trouble and expense of testing the ground for the purpose of proving whether such was the case. There has been one exception to this rule in the case of Mr. Charles Wiseheart, of Melbourne, who since 1865 has not only spent a great deal of time in carry ing on prospecting operations, but has also employed several men in trying the ground throughout the ranges, with more or less success. In the early part of last year one of these prospectors sunk a shaft in Haunted Gully, near Berwick, and having bottomed at about twenty-two feet obtained a very satisfactory prospect of about 7 dwt. to the load. The locality of the find is distant from Melbourne about thirty-eight miles, and is easily reached. The main Gipps Land road is followed as far as Souter's Gipps Land Hotel, about a mile beyond Berwick, after leaving which a track is followed over the ranges for about six miles, until the scene of operations is reached. The country in this locality is very heavily timbered, and in some of the gullies there is a dense growth of underwood, making locomotion a matter of great difficulty. Some years since a track known as Bowman's was cut through the bush by private enterprise as far as the head of the Latrobe River, but this was allowed to become overgrown with the scrub, so that at present it is only available for a short distance beyond the Dividing Range. The first portion of the track is now, however, in good order, and is used by the miners located in the Haunted Gully district constantly, and has been so far improved as to allow of a cart proceeding to the diggings with stores twice a week. The greater part of the traffic is, however, done either on foot or on horseback, as some of the descents are so steep that in wet weather it is a work both or danger and difficulty to get the cart along. At the time the prospectors first opened up the ground in this gully, named Haunted Gully, there were no other parties in the district, and a prospector's lease of 30 acres was pegged out and aplied for. As soon, however, as it became known in Berwick and the adjacent district that payable gold had been obtained there was a rush to the place, and claims were pegged off on both sides of the range the whole length of the gully. Strong objections were made against Mr. Wiseheart and his party getting the pros pecting claim they had applied for, and in November last a deputation waited upon the Minister of Mines on the subject, ande he decided upon limiting Mr. Wiseheart's lease to 10 acres. This was considered a great injustice by the party, as it would have been quite possible for them to have taken up the whole ot the gully under miners' rights. There was, however, no appeal from the de cision of the Minister, although the applica tion for the lease had been recommended by the warden. Ten acres were accordingly pegged out and surveyed in the upper portion of the gully, and steps were at once taken to clear away the dense scrub, with a view of proceeding systematically to work. In the interregnum between the application for the lease and its issue, several miners sunk shafts on the ground, always bottoming at from 22 to 30 ft., with a good prospect, vary ing from 9 dwt. to 1½ oz. to the load. Be fore, however, they could thoroughly test the extent of the washdirt the lease was issued to Wiseheart and party, and the trespassers had of course to abandon the shafts sunk by them. Work was, however, rapidly proceeded with in the lower part of the gully, which extends for over three-quarters of a mile. Seven claims were taken up, and here the sinking was found to be deeper than in the prospectors' claim, the bottom being reached at about 40 feet, but the results obtained are quite as good. The ground is easily worked, but is very wet in consequence of the pervious nature of the soil, and the bottom in a kind of hard blue alate. The washdirt averages from one foot to three feet in thickness, while the lead has been traced a width of forty feet, and had not then run out. The holders of the claims have been suffering from a want of water to carry on operations, and the work already done has been princi pally by the use of the primitive cradle and tin dish ; but Mr. Souter, the storekeeper at the diggings, who is also a claimholder, has recently erected a small dam and pud dling machine in the lower part of the gully, and now washes the dirt for the other claimholders, for which he charges 1 dwt. per load. This has been found to be a great advantage by the men, but it is doubtful whether he will be enabled to con tinue the work, during the dry season, as the catchwater area for the reservoir he has made is very small, and would not contain water sufficient to carry on puddling opera tions throughout a dry summer. It is, how ever, apparent that these parties intend to push forward the work as rapidly as possi ble while water is to be obtained, as a wooden tramway has been made along the front of the claims to the puddling machine, by which means the washdirt is rapidly conveyed to the machine, and no time lost in again filling it as soon as one lot is dis posed of. Of course, it is very difficult to ascertain the total amount of gold that has been raised from these claims, as the men are very reticent as to their gains, but the storekeeper has, during the last three months, purchased about six pounds weight from the holders, and this is estimated to be somewhat under one-third of the total amount obtained. Wiseheart's party cannot be said to have fully commenced operations in mining, as they have had ten men wholly employed for the last two months in getting everything ready to start work on a large scale. In order that they might not be stopped for want of water, one acre of ground was ob tained at the head of the gully under a water right licence, together with the power of cutting a tail race through the intervening ground to their claim. On this ground a large reservoir has been constructed, a substantial dam having been thrown across the valley from one side to the other. This dam is about 14 feet in height from the surface, but this does not represent the whole of the work done, as a trench was cut down to the bed rock, a depth of 10 feet at this spot. The dam has been substantially constructed, and good clay being plentiful, the whole of the work has been carefully paddled and additional strength given to it by a backing of stout saplings. The dam at the surface is about 18 yards long, but provision has been made so that should at any future time it be considered desirable to increase the capacity of the reservoir it can easily be done by carrying up the face of the dam. No exact computation has been made of the storage capacity of the work, but as it has a drainage area of two square miles it is evident from a cursory glance that in any moderately wet season there will always be a large quantity of water running over the by-wash. From the reservoir a tail race has been cut to the puddling-machine, a distance of a quarter of a mile. In addition to this a smaller reser voir has been constructed a short distance below the main one, which receives the overflow from the by-wash, and can be utilised for the sluicing-machine. These works, with the erection of a puddling-machine and sluicing-boxes, were only completed last week, and the heavy rain on Friday last completely filled the reservoir. As this was the first time it had been tried, some anxiety was felt by the party to ascertain whether any leakage would take place. A close in spection on Sunday last showed that although there was a great deal of water flowing over the by-wash, there was no sign of any leak in the dam, and upon opening the outlet valve a fine stream rushed down the tail race. These preliminary works have been carried out by Mr. Bell, one of the parties to the lease, to whom has been confided the management of the claim. It speaks well for the energy and perseverance of Mr. Wiseheart and his party that they should have expended nearly £500 in constructing these works before obtaining any return for their outlay, and proves that they have every confidence in the value of the ground they have taken up. They have also sunk shaft at the extreme lower end of their lease, but this is mainly intended to drain the upper part of the workings. The puddling machine is in close proximity to this shaft, and by placing a drum on it, the work of pumping can be carried on without any additional labor. At present the water has to be baled out, necessitating a considerable amount of work. At the mouth of this shaft is a large heap of wash-dirt, with which it is intended to commence working the machine. At the time of the visit a dishfull of this stuff was taken at random from the heap, and upon being washed out gave a yield of about six grains, which would average more than half an ounce to the load. The gold is coarse and much waterworn, but of exceptionally good quality, £3 19s. being paid for it by the storekeeper on the ground. A working shaft will be sunk about the centre of the claim, and work will be rapidly proceeded with by the party now that all their arrange ments are completed. In the meantime there is a considerable amount of wash-dirt to grass at the mouths of the shafts sunk by men who had no opportunity of completing washing-up, through the issue of the lease. Samples of quartz are to be found thinly scattered through the gully, and as two specimens of gold have been found studded with quartz, it is believed that at no distant date a gold-bearing reef will be discovered. With this object in view a good deal of prospecting is still going on at odd times by the men employed in the claims. Although no reef has yet been dis covered, the prospecting has conclusively proved that there are other gullies in the vicinity which will pay for working. About ten days since one of the men employed by Wiseheart's party obtained a very satisfactory prospect in a neighboring gully, and he has since formed a party of eight, and they have bottomed a shaft at about 20 feet, from whence they have obtained gold at the rate of about 9 dwt. to the load. They have since commenced the erection of a dam to conserve water for washing pur poses. This gully, which has been named Sailor's Gully, lies about N.W. from Haunted Gully, and within the past few days another good prospect has been obtained from Sparke's Gully, which is to the S.E. In the latter place the sinking is only 10 feet deep, with a yield of about 5 dwt. to the load. The washdirt in all the gullies averages from 18 inches to 3 feet thick, and from the pros-pects that have already been obtained, it is anticipated that there will be plenty of remunerative work for the next two years in the claims already taken up. One party in Haunted Gully drove forty feet into the hill on the eastern side, and were on a good lead of washdirt, but through carlessness in neglecting to tim ber up the drive, they one morning discovered that the whole of the ground had fallen in and destroyed the whole of their labor. Their success was, however, so encouraging that Mr. Wiseheart has taken up 66 feet frontage along the side of the hill under a miner's right, and intends to drive as soon as possible, in order to fully ascertain the extent of the auriferous washdirt. In addi-tion to the washdirt, it is intended to put the clay which has been taken from above the dirt through tho puddling machine, as it is believed that it will pay for so doing, the color having been seen in it. In prospecting these ranges Mr. Wiseheart has not confined himself to a search for gold alone, but has also directed himself to the discovery of tin or any other mineral to be found among tho ranges. His researches have been so for successful as to result in the discovery of a fine prospect of stream tin near the head of the Latrobe River, about thirty-five miles through the ranges from the Haunted Gully diggings, but as usual when a good thing is discovered by the pluck and energy of one party, there are plenty ready to seize the opportunity and apply for the ground without having expended a sixpence in attempting to prospect it.
    A case that occurred on this some claim at the Latrobe River only last week will give some idea of the danger and difficulty prospecting miners have to undergo in carrying on their lonely occupation among the ranges. Two men were employed by Mr. Wiseheart looking for tin, and also holding the ground. Their stores being nearly expended about ten days since, one of them started on the downward track to obtain a fresh supply, leaving his mate, a Milanese, known as Dominic, on the ground. After he had left, Dominic continued the work, and in trying to remove a huge boulder it suddenly gave way, and he was precipitated on his back to the bottom of the creek, a distance of about ten feet. Upon recovering himself, he found that he had severely injured his spine, and knowing that there was no person within many miles of him, and that his mate would not be back for several days, he considered it would be advisable for him to make the best of his way into Berwick in order to obtain medical assistance. He ac cordingly made up his swag, and taking sufficient provisions for his journey, pro ceeded on the track to Berwick. Although he had only thirty-five miles to travel, the pain he was suffering from was so intense that it took him five days to complete his journey and obtain the services of a doctor.23
  • 9 May 1873, MINING LEASES, ETC. THE Mining Leases, &c., of which the dates and terms, with the lessees' names, extent of ground leased, and annual rent reserved, are as undermentioned, have, unless otherwise specified in the note at foot, been forwarded to the wardens' offices at the places respectively named. Unless the lessees attend at the proper time to execute, the leases not executed will be liable to forfeiture.
    Castlemaine District—St Andrew's Division.
    * No. 1476, dated 9th April 1873; 15 years; C. Wiseheart and H. J. Valentine; 10 acres; £5
    Notes. No 1476 Castlemaine has been executed in the Office of Mines. Angus Mackay. Minister of Mines. Melbourne, 30th April 1873.24
  • 16 Jun 1873, THE BERWICK GOLD-FIELD.
    The new gold-field lately discovered in the ranges near Berwick about 30 miles from Melbourne, has excited some little interest, and new life has been infused by the discovery into the hitherto somewhat dull town ship. The scene of the operations can be reached without much difficulty. The road as far as Berwick is the main road to Gipps Land, and in dry weather presents few difficulties, but in the rainy season some parts of the road are rendered almost impassable. The worst portions of the road are between Oakleigh and Mulgrave, where an attempt has been made to mend the road with clayey mud, the effect being anything but pleasant to travellers. The diggings lie about five miles north-east of the township of Berwick, amongst the spurs of the Dividing Range. The nearest way of reaching the gold-field is from the Gipps Land Hotel, near Kardinia Creek. A track leads from there to the diggings and is easily passable on horseback or on foot, but the steep ranges render the road scarcely suitable for vehicles. The mining operations are confined almost entirely to Haunted Gully and the immediately adjacent gullies. It is about two years since the prospecting for gold was commenced in that locality by some men employed by Mr. C. Wiseheart, of Melbourne, and other persons who were convinced that the country in that direction was auriferous. Some of the gullies were tested, and the result showed that the belief was not ill-founded. A shaft was sunk in Haunted Gully last year by a man named Valentine, and a quantity of washdirt was obtained averaging 6 dwt per load. A prospectors' lease of 30 acres in the gully was applied for by Mr. Wiseheart and those who were acting with him, and the ground was pegged out. The news of the discovery however soon spread and in a short time the place was rushed. The ground which had been already secured by Mr Wiseheart was taken up, and in consequence of the difficulties which arose the matter was bought under the notice of the Minister of Mines. A compromise which, according to the nature of compromises, was not considered satisfactory by either side, was effected, and it was decided that Mr. Wiseheart should be allowed to choose 10 acres. He has selected 10 acres in the upper part of the gully, and the remainder of the ground which he applied for has been taken up by the other miners. The foregoing facts show the circumstances which have already transpired in connexion with this new discovery of auriferous country, but a description of the present appearance of the gold-field will doubtless prove of more general interest. The gully, which is locally known as the Haunted Gully, although why it bears that name cannot be ascertained, is situated between two steep hills, and the mining at present is principally confined to it. The workings extend down for nearly a mile, and about eight or ten claims are now opened up. The prospectors' lease, owned by Mr. Wiseheart and other gentlemen interested with him, is near the top of the gully. A considerable amount of work, representing £400, has been carried out on this ground. In a favourable spot at the junction of two smaller gullies a dam has been constructed under the superintendence of Mr. Bell, an experienced practical miner, who is the manager for the company and resides on the ground. The work is one of some magnitude, and has entailed a good deal of expense, but the storage of water is considered sufficient to supply all possible needs for some time. A race has been cut from the dam for some distance down the gully to a puddling machine, which has also been constructed for the prospectors. The lease of 10 acres extends down the gully nearly a quarter of a mile, and at the extreme end a trial shaft has been sunk. The prospect so far has been encouraging, averaging from 9 dwt to an ounce, to an ounce and a half a load. Some shafts have been sunk higher up by the miners who attempted to jump the ground during the disputes which had previously taken place, and the prospects there were also good. The permanent shaft on this ground has not yet been sunk, the previous trials having been made with the idea of fixing the most suitable position for it. From the lower shaft, however, a considerable amount of washdirt has been raised, and it is anticipated that it will yield a payable quantity of gold. Washing will be commenced within a few days, and it is expected that the puddling machine will be kept in full operation. A tin dishful of the washdirt taken at random and washed in the pool showed several grains of gold, estimated to average at least 9dwt to the load. Immediately below the prospectors' lease there are four or five claims in full work owned by different parties, and the men are said to be doing well. The sinking is not deep, the greatest depth of any shaft being about 40ft., and many of them much less, and the ground is easily worked. Some of the men are stated to be making £8 to £10 a week each, but they are very secretive over their good luck, and understand the advisa bility of keeping their own counsel. A puddling-machine has been erected below these claims by a company formed for the purpose, in order to wash the wash-dirt from these claims, and a wooden trainway has been constructed to carry the loads down. The charge made is a penny-weight per load, so that even 5dwt or 6dwt a load might be payable to the miners. There are other claims below this puddling machine with which the owners appear satisfied, but further down the gully work has been abandoned, as the water is too heavy. There are about 50 or 60 men at work in this gully, and though their appliances are of a rather primitive character, most of them appear to be getting on well. So far there has been no deep sinking, and the expenses of working the claims have been comparatively light. The gold obtained fetches $3 19s. per ounce upon the diggings. The settlement is not very extensive, and the inevitable public-house has not yet been established. On the rise of the hill a general store has been erected from whence the miners obtain their supplies, and a hut has also been erected for Mr. Bell, the manager of the prospectors' company. These two tenements constitute the central township so to speak, the miners themselves preferring to live by their claims in tents or log huts, or a conjunction of both. Within the last few weeks a branch rush has taken place from the diggings to a gully about half a mile away in the direction of Berwick. Some good prospects have been obtained, and about 20 or 30 men have settled down there for a time to try their luck. One party has commenced the construction of a dam, and has already sunk two shafts. Another gully, the other side of the range beyond Haunted Gully, has also been prospected, and the prospector is so far satisfied that he has taken out a lease. Indeed it seems probable that the whole locality is more or less auriferous, and many of the gullies in these ranges would doubtless repay an examination. The discovered gold-field is not of an extensive character, and all the proved ground is already taken up; but persons acquainted with the country consider that the ranges would be worth prospecting.25
  • 15 Jul 1873, NEW ALLUVIAL DIGGINGS NEAR MELBOURNE.
    For many years past it has been believed by practical miners that the whole of the gullies running along the sides of the Divid ing Range would prove auriferous, but there have been very few of them who would be at the trouble and expense of testing the ground for the purpose of proving whether such was the case. There has been one exception to this rule in the case of Mr. Charles Wiseheart, of Melbourne, who since 1865 has not only spent a great deal of time in carrying on prospecting operations, but has also employed several men in trying the ground throughout the ranges, with more or less success. In the early part of last year one of these prospectors sunk a shaft in Haunted Gully, near Berwick, and having bottomed at about twenty-two feet obtained a very satisfactory prospect of about 7 dwt. to the load. The locality of the find is distant from Melbourne about thirty-eight miles, and is easily reached. The main Gipps Land road is followed as far as Souter's Gipps Land Hotel, about a mile beyond Berwick, after eaving which a track is followed over the ranges for about six miles, until the scene of operations is reached. The country in this locality is very heavily timbered, and in some of the gullies there is a dense growth of underwood, making locomotion a matter of great difficulty. Some years since a track known as Bowman's was cut through the bush by private enterprise as far as the head of the Latrobe River, but this was allowed to become overgrown with the scrub, so that at present it is only available for a short distance beyond the Dividing Range. The first portion of the track is now, however, in good order, and is used by the miners located in the Haunted Gully district constantly, and has been so far improved as to allow of a cart, proceeding to the diggings with stores twice a week. The greater part of the traffic is, however, done either on foot or on horseback, as some of the descents are so steep that in wet weather it is a work both of danger and difficulty to get the cart along. At the time the prospectors first opened up the ground in this gully, named Haunted Gully, there were no other parties in the district, and prospec tor's lease of 30 acres was pegged out and applied for. As soon, however, as it became known in Berwick and the adjacent district that payable gold had been obtained there was a rush to the place, and claims were pegged off on both sides of the range the whole length of the gully. Strong objections were made against Mr. Wise heart and his party getting the prospecting claim they had applied for, and in November last a deputation waited upon the Minister of Mines on the subject, and he decided upon limiting Mr. Wiseheart's lease to 10 acres. This was considered a great injustice by the party, as it would have been quite possible for them to have taken up the whole of the gully under miners' rights. There was, however, no appeal from the de cision of the Minister, although the applica tion for the lease had been recommended by the warden. Ten acres were accordingly pegged out and surveyed in the upper portion of the gully, and steps were at once taken to clear away the dense scrub, with a view of proceeding systematically to work. In the interregnum between the application for the lease and its issue, several miners sunk shafts on the ground, always bottoming at from 22 to 30 ft. , with a good prospect, vary ing from 9 dwt; to 1 1/2 oz. to the load. Be fore, however, they could thoroughly test the extent of the washdirt the lease was issued to Wiseheart and party, and the trespassers had of course to abandon the shafts sunk by them. Work was, howover, rapidly proceeded with in the lower part of the gully, which extends for over three-quarters of a mile. Seven claims were taken up, and here the sinking was found to be deeper than in the prospectors' claim, the bottom being reached at about 40 feet, but the results obtained are quite as good. The ground is easily worked, but is very wet in consequence of the pervious nature of the soil, and the bottom is a kind of hard blue slate. The washdirt averages from one foot to three feet in thickness, while the lead has been traced a width of forty feet, and had not then run out. The holders of the claims have been suffering from a want of water to carry on operations, and the work already done has been princi pally by the use of the primitive cradle and tin dish ; but Mr. Souter, the storekeeper at the diggings, who is also a claimholder, has recently erected a small dam and pud dling machine in the lower part of the gully, and now washes the dirt for the other claimholders, for which he charges 1 dwt. per load. Although no reef has yet been discovered, the prospecting has conclusively proved that there are other gullies in the vicinity which will pay for working. This gully, which has been named, Sailor's Gully, lies about N.W. from Haunted Gully, and within the past few days another good prospect has been obtained from Sparke's Gully, which is to the S.E. In the latter place the sinking is only 10 feet deep, with a yield of about, 5 dwt. to the load. The washdirt in all the gullies averages from 18 inches to 3 foot thick, and from the pros pects that have already been obtained, it is anticipated that there will be plenty of re munerative work for the next two years in the claims already taken up. In prospecting these ranges Mr. Wise heart has not confined himself to a search for gold alone, but has also directed himself to the discovery of tin or any other mineral to be found among the ranges. His researches have been so far successful as to result in the discovery of a fine prospect of stream tin near the head of the Latrobe River, about thirty-five miles through the ranges from the Haunted Gully diggings, but as usual when a good thing is discovered by the pluck and energy of one party, there are plenty ready to seize the opportunity and apply for the ground without having expended a sixpence in attempting to prospect it. A case that occurred on this same claim at the Latrobe River only last week will give some idea of the danger and difficulty prospecting miners have to undergo in carrying on their lonely occupation among the ranges.26
  • 12 Sep 1873, Mineral Leases. Gippsland District-Stringer's Creek Division.
    * No 368, dated 28 Aug 1873; 15 years; L L Smith; 500a 2r 30p; £25 0s. 10d.
    * No 369, dated 28 Aug 1873; 15 years; J Woods; 192a 2r 32p; £9 12s 10d.
    t No 370, dated 28 Aug 1873; 15 years; W. Bell, C Wiseheart, and D Melovich; 151a 1r 8p; £7 11s 6d.
    * leases 368 and 369 (mineral) await execution in Office of Mines.
    t 370 (mineral) was forwarded for execution to Heidelberg.
    Angus McKay Minister of Mines. 30 Aug 187327
  • 10 Oct 1873, Castlemaine Appl. 210; C Wiseheart; Lease 398; area 45 1 30 both on and below the surface; £1000 Sinking and sluicing; First six months two men, subsequently 10 men; La Trobe River, on grant of lease; 15 years. Tin is the mineral to be worked.28
  • 2 Jan 1874, Mining and Mineral Leases declared void. It is hereby notified, in accordance with the orders in Council related to Gold Minng and Mineral Leases, that the undermentioned leases of auriferous and mineral crown lands have been declared void:—Castlemaine District—St Andrew's Division. No 1476, dated 9th April 1873; C Wiseheart and another; 10 acres; near Berwick.29
  • 7 Jan 1874, For the last four years a great deal of prospecting has been going on about the head of the Latrobe River for a lead of tin ore which was known to exist there. The prospecting, says the Age, may be credited to Messrs Wiseheart, Bell, and several of their friends who found the money for the work. They have recently been successful, as they are now able to show a smelted block of tin weighing 28lb, from about 60lb of ore. The assay of the ore by Mr Chapman, of the Colonial Bank, show 65½ per cent of pure metal, while the assay of some ore sent home to Mr J. Penrose, of Parkenver, Penruth, Cornwall, gives 66½ per cent., the latter gentleman stating that the metal is of first-class quality.
    When the lead was discovered last year serious difficulties were anticipated in bringing down the ore, as the greater part of the route from Berwick to the Latrobe is almost impenetrable scrub. The distance is about thirty-five miles, but there is a sort of dray track, for about fifteen miles and as the bed of the river was taken up for above ten miles in five leases, an application was made to the Government some months ago to cut a track to the head of the river. The Minister of Mines then promised that if a passable track was discovered the Government would provide a sum of money to open it up for traffic. The leaseholders are Wiseheart, at the head of the river ; Dr Iffla next ; Bell and Co., next, Mr L. L. Smith, M.L.A., next, and Mr Woods, M.L.A., next. Messrs Bell and Co., who have been the longest time prospecting, have managed to secure tbe best claim, and now intend to form a company under the name of the Victorian Tin Mining Company. They have had a man named William Saurblom on the ground for some months past prospecting for a track which, after much difficulty, he has at length discovered, so that the metal can be easily brought to a market if the Government fulfil their promise, and make the track available for drays. The block of tin referred to above is in the hands of Mr Chas. Bright, who has taken the management of the property on behalf of the proprietors.30
  • 5 Feb 1874, The neighbourhood of the Latrobe River, on the holders of Mornington and Gipps Land, has for some time past attracted attention in consequence of the heavy deposits of tin ore found in the vicinity. A belt of thick scrub suuoumling the locality has hitherto proved on impediment to mining enterprise, but a track has recently been discovered which will place the mines in ready communication with the main road at Berwick. This track has been opened out by employers of the promoters of the Victoria Tin-mining Company, who are, through the agency of Mr. Charles Bright, placing their property before the public in our advertising columns.
    A tract of 151 acres of land extending for a mile along the banks of the river has been leased, and considerable samples of the ore obtained. These have been assayed in the colony and in England, and found to yield about 66 per cent of pure tin. The tin in its crude and smelted state is now being exhibited in the window of Mr. Whitehead, stationer, Collins-street. The new track to the mine is reported to open up some magnificent country, and a Government surveyor is to be despatched along it prior to the necessaiy expenditure being granted to render it available for drays. By this means the wants of the men engaged at the mine will be supplied, and the metal brought down to the Melbourne market. As water for sluicing purposes is plentiful, and the sinking easy, varying from 4ft. to 8ft., mining in this locality ought to prove a profitable enterprise.31
  • 13 Feb 1874, MINING LEASES, ETC.
    THE Mining Leases, &c., of which the dates and terms, with the lessees' names, extent of ground leased, and annual rent reserved, are as undermentioned, have, unless otherwise specified in the note at foot, been forwarded to the wardens' offices at the places respectively named. Unless the lessees attend at the proper time to execute, the leases not executed will be liable to forfeiture.
    Mineral Leases. Gippsland District—Stringer's Creek Division. * No 398, dated 24th January 1874; 15 years; C Wiseheart; 45a 1r 30p; £2 5s 6d. Lease No 398, Mineral, await execution in Office of Mines. Angus McKay Minister of Mines, 31 Jan 1874.32
  • 7 Mar 1874, At the FITZROY Court on Thursday, three men—Bernard Hutton, secretary of the Journeymen Bakers' Association, Barney Lane, and Charles Wiseheart—were summoned to contribute towards the support of their children in the Industrial Schools. They each had one child, a boy, on board the training-ship. They were ordered to pay 5s. a week each.33

Citations

  1. [S187] Familysearch ""United Kingdom, Merchant Navy Seamen Records, 1835-1941," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KCQ5-PT5 : 10 December 2017), Charles Wiseheart, ; From "Merchant Navy Seamen1835-1941," database and images, findmypast (http://www.findmypast.com : n.d.); citing BT 112-116, 119-120, series BT116, The National Archives of the UK, Kew, Surrey."
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2336/P Microfilm copy of Rate Books, City of Fitzroy [copy of VPRS 4301] [1858-1901].
  3. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 4527/ P2 item Book 8, record page 406 bottom.
  4. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  5. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "John Frederick WISEHEART #D14110/1913 Young [par John S & Isabella] - possibly a nephew of Charles. John F was "run down and killed by a motor car at Young" aged 49."
  6. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 31 Mar 1914, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15470015
  7. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 31 Mar 1914, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15470032
  8. [S14] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 2 Apr 1862, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5712682
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Mount Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1854 - 1917), Mon 19 Jan 1863, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200379696
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 26 Sep 1863, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197289146
  11. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Thu 10 Sep 1868, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article177003715
  12. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 5 Jan 1872, p30."
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Fri 3 Jan 1873, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88248033
  14. [S14] Newspaper - South Bourke Standard (Vic. : 1861 - 1873), Fri 10 Jan 1873, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70084317
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 22 Jan 1873, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5846727
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 25 Jan 1873, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220454088
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 25 Jan 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197929035
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 8 Feb 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197929506
  19. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 21 Feb 1873, p360."
  20. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Sat 22 Feb 1873, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198573020
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 1 Mar 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197931043
  22. [S14] Newspaper - Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 25 Feb 1873, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61493065
  23. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 21 Jun 1873, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197925247
  24. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 9 May 1873, p796."
  25. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 16 Jun 1873, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5865294
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875), Tue 15 Jul 1873, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60448020
  27. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 12 Sep 1873, p1620."
  28. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 10 Oct 1873, p1781."
  29. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 2 Jan 1874, p7."
  30. [S14] Newspaper - Mount Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1854 - 1917), Wed 7 Jan 1874, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197108573
  31. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 5 Feb 1874, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5880938
  32. [S194] Newspaper - Victorian Government Gazette "Victoria Government Gazette, 13 Feb 1874, p294."
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 7 Mar 1874, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5865420
Last Edited6 Sep 2018

Emma Lyons

F, #20668, b. 1837, d. 20 Jul 1897
Married NameWiseheart. 
Birth*1837 
Marriage* Spouse: Charles Wiseheart.
 
Death*20 Jul 1897 St Leonards, NSW, Australia, #D9649 [par William & Isabel].1 
Death-Notice*21 Jul 1897WISEHEART.—July 20, at her late residence, Namoi, Victoria-street, North, Sydney, Mrs. Charles Wiseheart, aged 60 years. Funeral will leave for Waverley Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon, at 1.30.2 

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wed 21 Jul 1897, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14104877
Last Edited6 Sep 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.