Martin Pasquan

M, #2590, b. 1843, d. 19 Nov 1888
Birth*1843 Fuime, Hungary. [par Cosmo PASQUAN & Matilda MATTEO]1 
Marriage*13 Feb 1874 Spouse: Fanny Pascoe. Registrar's Office, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia, #M1087.2
Land-UBeac*28 Sep 1884Martin Pasquan selected land from the Crown. GEM-C-68. 320a 0r 0p - Land File 13569/19.20
selected by M PASQUAN. After Pasquan's death subdivided into GEM-C-68 (280a) & GEM-C-68A (40a.)3 
Death*19 Nov 1888 Madeline Street, Carlton, VIC, Australia, #D12555 (age 45) [par Cosino PASQUAN]
died of Cirrhosis of Liver.2
Death-Notice*20 Nov 1888PASQUAN.—On the 19th inst., Martin Pasquan, of Pasquan's Hotel, Bourke-street, aged 45. R.I.P.
THE Friends of the late MARTIN PASQUAN, of Bourke-street, are invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, in the Melbourne General Cemetery.
The funeral will move from his late residence, Bourke-street, THIS DAY (Tuesday, the 20th inst.), at 4 o'clock.
ALF. AUG. SLEIGHT, undertaker, 83 Collins-street east ; High-street, St. Kilda ; and Chapel-street, South Yarra.4 
Probate (Will)*20 Jun 1889 Held Lease or Licence from the Crown for 320 acres dated 1 April 1885, all fenced in with post and rail fence on which is erected a three roomed weatherboard cottage valued at £1,450. - Liabilities £9.19.11 View Hill Store Beaconsfield.5 
Land-UBeac*9 Feb 1895 GEM-C-68. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to David Jones Alfred Wymark. 320a. Transfer of leasehold from the trustees of Martin Pasquan's estate to David Jones, Stevedore and Alfred Wymark, Marine Surveyor both of Williamstown, dated 9 Feb 1895. Lease issued to David Jones on 23 Jun 1896 for 280 acres from 1 Apr 1891.6,7 
Land-UBeac*b 23 Jun 1896 GEM-C-68A. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to Jane Jones. 40a. Crown Grant for 40 acres to Jane JONES on 23 Jun 1896.8 
Land-UBeacb 11 Sep 1901 GEM-C-68. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to David Jones. 280a. Crown Grant for 280 acres to David JONES on 11 Sep 1901.9,10 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 27 Nov 1878, HOUSE-BREAKING AND STEALING FROM DWELLING HOUSES. [From Victoria Police Gazette, 20th November, 1878.] Stolen, from the dwelling of Martin Pasquin, Therry-street, Melbourne, on the 16th instant, a gold hunting lever watch, maker, Walsh Bros., Melbourne, No. 76882 ; a gold hunting lever watch, maker, Arthur Purden and Co., London, No. 31506 ; a gold Albert chain, horse-hoof pattern, a gold medal of Fitzroy Bowling Club with " Martin Pasquin, 1878," engraved on an English gold Albert ; Colonial gold locket with blue tone heart-shaped on, and two photographs of children inside ; gentleman's diamond ring, seven stones ; an English gold brooch set with imitation sapphires ; 8 old-fashioned Colonial gold brooches ; leaf pattern, for photographs ; small Colonial gold broooh ; a gold neck-chain with two tassels; a pair Colonial gold ear-rings, hoop pattern ; a gold cameo scarf-pin ; a gold wedding ring ; 2 gold-mounted pearl studs; and about £66 in notes, gold, and silver. All but money identifiable ; value, about £200.—0.7039. 19th November, 1878.11
  • 7 Oct 1893, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19 At Twelve Noon At Their Rooms, Corner of Queen and Bourke streets: GEMBROOK 320 Acres. By Order of the Trustees, Executors, and Agency Company Limited.
    W R LOOKER and SONS, instructed by the abovenamed company, will SELL (through their Mr H J Looker), on above date, in ESTATE of the Late MARTIN PASQUÍN
    Allotment 68, Section C, parish of Gembrook, containing 320 acres leasehold selection (9s per acre paid), fenced, well watered, small cottage, 30 acres have been cleared, situated on the Gembrook road, Upper Beaconsfield. Terms-One fourth cash and balance to four years at 6 per cent.12

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "information from Marriage Certificate."
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 626 Unit 1774 13569/19.20
    Consulted by Charles Wilson: On the 28th September 1884, Martin Pasquin, a restaurant keeper of Little Collins Street Melbourne, applied for 320 acres of land east of Miss Higgins, (M. J. Smith) which he had pegged 5 days earlier. This became Lot 68 Section C, Parish of Gembrook.

    Pasquan was granted a license to occupy his selection on 5th February 1885. When Pasquan died in November 1888, his executors passed the responsibility of his estate to the Trustees Executors Agency. It appears that after Pasquan died some squatters moved on to the property. The Trustees manager, James Borrowman made it clear that they were trespassing.
    In 1891, Borrowman, still in control of the property, applied for a further 14 year lease, which was granted in April 1891.
    When the lease was renewed, the application showed that Pasquan had been busy. He had enclosed the land with a post wire and rail fence, built a weatherboard cottage, planted 360 fruit trees, clover, potatoes, and cleared 10 acres of land. He had also installed some tanks, and it was noted he had a small creek of running water on the property.
    The property was then divided, 40 acres Lot 68A, became Jane Jones land. A survey in October 1891 certified the remainder of the property, Lot 68, was 280 acres.
    In May 1895 the lease of this land was transferred to David Jones a stevedore, and Alfred Wymark, a marine surveyor.
    On the 16lh September 1901, David Jones applied for and obtained a Crown Grant for Lot 68, 280 acres.
    The surveyor described the land as granitic, very rangy country, sandy soil, moderately timbered with messmate, stringy bark and apple.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Nov 1888, p1.
  5. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 39/468. Licenced Victualler.
  6. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 626/P0/1775 Land File 13569.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Lease 694-720 - David Jones of No 219 Rathdown Street Carlton Stevedore (this lease was taken out by Executors of Pasquan's estate from 1 April 1891 for 14 years - Jones continues the lease).
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - Jane Jones of 219 Rathdowne Street Carlton the wife of David Jones of 54 Osborne Street Williamstown Stevedore.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2853-461 - David Jones of 219 Rathdowne Street Carlton Stevedore.
  10. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1907/08 rates 320a lot 68 NAV 70
    in the same year David Jones also owned
    House & 140a Lot 4 Sec 21 Narre Warren NAV55
    308 ac Lot 1 Sec 1 Berwick NAV65
    100ac pt Lot 2 Sec 1 Berwick NAV25.
  11. [S14] Newspaper - New South Wales Police Gazette, 27 Nov 1878, p430.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Oct 1893, p2.
Last Edited17 Jan 2018

David Jones

M, #2600, b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Probate (Will)* David Jones. Gent. Armadale. 25 Dec 1926. 212/959. His assets amounted to £16,319, which included his property GEM-C-68+68A, valued at £800.1 
Note* In 1895+1896 jointly owned with Captain Alfred WYMARK Williamstown, Stevedore & Marine Surveyor.2 
Birth*3 Feb 1841 Llanddewi, Cardiganshire, Wales. 
Marriage*18 Feb 1873 Spouse: Jane Griffiths. Aberayron, Cardiganshire, Wales, Mar Q [Aberayron] 11b 55.3
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Jun 1886 Sailing with John Griffiths Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Cardigan Castle travelling from London. Master David Jones
Master.4 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel22 Jun 1888 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Austral
Age 30 - Cabin Passenger.5 
Land-UBeac*9 Feb 1895 GEM-C-68. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to David Jones Alfred Wymark. 320a. Transfer of leasehold from the trustees of Martin Pasquan's estate to David Jones, Stevedore and Alfred Wymark, Marine Surveyor both of Williamstown, dated 9 Feb 1895. Lease issued to David Jones on 23 Jun 1896 for 280 acres from 1 Apr 1891.6,7 
Land-UBeac*4 Jul 1896 GEM-C-68. Transfer from Alfred Wymark to David Jones. 280 acres transferred from Alfred Wymark & David Jones to David Jones.6 
Land-UBeacb 11 Sep 1901 GEM-C-68. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to David Jones. 280a. Crown Grant for 280 acres to David JONES on 11 Sep 1901.8,9 
Widower21 Dec 1918He became a widower upon the death of his wife Jane Griffiths.10 
Land-UBeac*21 Apr 1922 GEM-C-68A. Transfer from Jane Jones to David Jones. 40a.11 
Death*25 Dec 1926 "Cardigan", 7 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, Australia, #D12376 (age 85) [par Thomas JONES & Eleanor].12 
Death-Notice*28 Dec 1926JONES.—On the 25th December, at his residence, Cardigan, 7 Kelvin grove, Armadale, Captain David Jones, aged 85 years. (Interred Williamstown Cemetery 27th December.)13 
Land-Note*13 Jun 1927 GEM-C-68A: David Jones died on 25st December 1926. Probate has been grated to David Thomas Jones of Warragul Veterinary Surgeon and Edwin Jones of Kelvin Grove, Armadale, Gentleman.14 
Land-Note*1933 Capt Jones property may have been sold to George Collingburn first - it appears that the sale was not finalised - see caveat.15,16 
Land-UBeac*30 May 1934 GEM-C-68A. Transfer from David Jones to Clifton Leopold Downey. 40a.17 
Land-UBeac30 May 1934 GEM-C-68. Transfer from David Jones to Clifton Leopold Downey. 280a.18,19 
Village Bell*Apr 1994The article reads: Hearsay History: Captain Jones, an orchardist, lived at the intersection of Downey and Blue Ridge Roads.20 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 1881Tandderwen, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, WalesHead of Household: David Jones. Age 40 - Master Mariner (unemployed)
Member(s) of Household: Jane Jones, David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, John Griffiths Jones.21
19147 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: master mariner. With Jane Jones. With Edwin Jones.22
19177 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VICOccupation: master mariner. With Jane Griffiths. With Edwin Jones William Aeron Jones.23
19217 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: master mariner. With Edwin Jones.24

Grave

  • PRES*E*26*1, Williamstown Cemetery, Williamstown, VIC, Australia25

Family

Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Children 1.John Griffiths Jones+ b. Mar 1876
 2.David Thomas Jones+ b. Jun 1877, d. 6 Oct 1964
 3.Evan Jones b. Dec 1878, d. 3 Jun 1895
 4.Ellen Jones+ b. Mar 1881, d. Mar 1951
 5.Edwin Jones b. Dec 1881, d. Jun 1959
 6.Jinnie Jones b. Mar 1884, d. 17 Feb 1962
 7.William Aeron Jones b. 1891, d. Dec 1971
 8.Bessie Jones b. 1892, d. 18 Jun 1893
 9.Thomas Evan Jones+ b. 1898, d. 16 Jun 1964

Newspaper-Articles

  • 8 Sep 1882, ARRIVED.— September 7. Cardigan Castle, ship, 1200, David Jones, from London 15th June and Lizards 22nd. Passenger—cabin : Mr. H. Bickers. W. M'Culloch and Co., agents.26
  • 1 Nov 1882, FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. On Friday evening last a banquet was given to Brother S. J. Barber, past grand and late secretary of the Loyal Columbia Lodge, No. 66, as a welcome on his return from a trip to Europe. About 60 gentlemen sat down to a repast. The lodge room was appropriately decorated with evergreens and insignia of the order, Brother Templeton, district deputy, occupied the chair, Brother J Rosier, P. G. filling the vice-chair. The toast of "the Queen having been duly honoured, the chairman proposed "Our Guest," and referred to the interest and attention to his various duties at all times manifested by Brother Barbor.
    The toast was received with loud and long continued cheers. Brother Barbor responded and expressed his pleasure at receiving so cordial a welcome at the hands of his brethren on his return to the colony. The toast of "The Order," proposed by Brother Rosier, was responded to by the chairman in response to the toast of "Our Visiting Brethren," Brother Williams, deputy grandmaster of New Zealand, expressed the great pleasure he felt in being present, and spoke of the hearty reception which he had met with on all sides during his short stay in Melbourne. Brother W. J Scott proposed "Our volunteer forces and the shipping interests, coupled with the names of Captain Bewley of the Marpesia, and Captain Jones of the Cardigan Castle." Captain Jones suitably replied for the shipping interests, and Brother Ducrow for the volunteers.27
  • 21 Aug 1883, The Immigrant Ship Cardigan Castle
    The fine iron clipper ship Cardigan Castle, of the Victoria Line, entered the Heads yesterday afternoon, having 384 Government immigrants on board. The steam-tug Commodore towed her to Watson's Bay where she was boarded by Dr Sibley, the assistant health officer who made a thorough inspection of the whole of the interior arrangements of the vessel, carefully examined the passengers. and, ascertaining there had been no infectious sickness during the voyage, at once granted her pratique, and expressed a high opinion of the condition of every part of the ship and the appearance of the immigrants. The Cardigan Castle was then towed to an anchorage in the upper part of Neutral Bay, where she was boarded by our reporter, who found every part of the ship to be in the most scrupulous order and as clean as hands could make it. There was also an abscence of that unpleasant odour which seems peculiar to immigrant vessels, the most strict discipline having been exercised with regard to cleanliness; and there is not the least doubt that the absence of sickness of a contagious or infectious nature was due entirely to the observation of this primary law of health. Notwithstanding that discipline has been strict, the most harmonious relations appear to have existed between the officers and crew of the ship and their numerous passengers. The surgeon-superintendent is Mr J.M.McDonagh, F.R.C.S., I., son of Dr. McDonagh, of this city and the matron is Miss Chicken. The fact that there has been little or no sickness, and that the ship comes into port in admirable order, is some testimony to the manner in which the surgeon-superintendent performed his duties; but in addition to this is the fact that he has been presented with addresses from the married couples, single men and single women all of the most flattering kind. That from the married people spoke of the many acts of kindness they had received from him, and of his "chronic good humour," which did so much to cheer up the sick, and added that he had done all in his power to make th voyage a pleasant one. Captain David Jones, the master of the Cardigan Castle was also the recipient of an address from the whole of the immigrants in which he was thanked for the "extreme kindness and attention to their welfare" which he had shown. Whether or not Miss Chicken got a testimonial or not did not transpire but it was easily seen that she had acquitted herself to the satisfaction not only of the captain and surgeon but also of her numerous charges. The immigrants are classified as follows:- Married couples, 50; single men, 84; single women, 82; girls under 12, 49; infants ,18 - a total of 384 souls, equal to 316 statute adults. The general health of the community on board was remarkably good during the whole voyage. The only deaths that occurred were those of three infants under one year, from convulions, and there was one premature birth. The immigrants are spoken of as cleanly and respectable people, which their appearance fully confirms. Amongst the males are general labourers, shipsmiths, blacksmiths, carpernters and joiners, stone-masons, plasterers, railway porters, bakers, plumbers and gasfitters, bricklayers, sawyers, gardeners, farmers. The single women are mostly domestic servants. As the whole of the arrangements on board were excellent in every respect, it may be as well to state on the testimony of Captain Jones and the surgeon, that the officer for immigration at London, Mr. T. H. Phillips, was most particular in seeing that the food was of the best quality , and that the interests of the immigrants were carefully studied, even to the minutest detail.
    The result was that when the Cardigan Castle got under weigh at Plymouth the whole of the passengers gave lusty cheers for Mr. Phillips. Of the voyage Captain Jones reports that the ship sailed from Plymouth on the 1st June with a fresh S.W. wind, and passed the Lizard on the following day. Westerly winds and fine weather prevailed from that time until Madeira was passed on the 10th of June. The N.E. trades, which proved very light breezes, were secured in 23° N. lat., and carried the ship down to 9° N. lat., whence light and variable winds were had to 1°N., when the first of the S.E. trades caught. On the 29th June the Equator was crossed in long. 24°30. W., and the south-east trades, which were also very light, were parted with in 22° S. Moderate westerly winds followed , in which the ship did some good steady work, down to the Cape of Good Hope, the meridian of which was crossed on July 23rd in lat. 41° S. The easting was made on the parallel of 45° S. lat., and very changeable weather and variable winds were met with until the Crozets were passed. The wind then set in strong from N.W., and veering from there to S.W., enabled the sip to make some good running, the averages for several days being 310 and 320 miles. On August 8th the Cardigan Castle encountered a very heavy southerly gale, which was attended by a very high cross sea, in which she laboured heavily, but on the whole behaved remarkably well, and shipped no seas. The gale was so heavy however, that she had to hove-to for 24 hours, but this was the only occasion on which she had to heave-to during the voyage. The meridian of Cape Leuwin was passed on August 10th in lat. 45° 7m. S., Cape Wickham light was sighted at 8pm on the 15th, and Wilson's Promontory was passed on the following day at 8am. The wind, which up to this time was westerly, then hauled round to the northward, and continued from N. to N.W. until yesterday morning, when it shifted to S.S.W. and S., and carried the ship to port.28
  • 6 Sep 1883, Shipping arrivals from Great Britain August 20.—Cardigan Castle, ship. Captain D. Jones, from Plymouth.29
  • 19 Mar 1884, David Jones, (captain) Tandderwen, Mydroilyn, was charged by James Griffiths, with having assaulted him on the 11th inst., at Bridgend, Mydroilyn. Dismissed.30
  • 28 Aug 1884, CARDIGAN CASTLE from London.
    Captain JONES will be in attendance at the Jolimont Raiway sheds on Friday the 29th inst., at 11 o'clock a.m., to SETTLE all CLAIMS against the inward cargo of this ship.
    JAMES HENTY and Co., agents, 11 Little Collins street west.31
  • 30 Aug 1884, An instance of the somewhat free and easy manner in which prosecutions on behalf of the Crown are occasionally instituted was afforded at the Port Melbourne Court on Monday morning last, when the master of the Cardigan Castle was summoned by Mr. R. Stirling, Inspector of Stock, for an infringement of the "Diseases in Stock Act." The offence alleged to have been committed was, that Captain David Jones had allowed a dog to be landed from his ship without the necessary permit: From the evidence it appeared that the Inspector had never seen the dog, but had been informed by the captain—whose information was incorrect—that the dog had been allowed to escape from the ship. As a matter of fact the animal had, all the while, been fastened up in the hold, as was proved by the second mate of the vessel. The case was of course, dismissed, the only result being that the public exchequer is mulcted in the sum of five guineas, the solicitor's fee allowed in these cases.32
  • 5 Aug 1885, ARRIVED.-AUG. 4. Cardigan Castle, sh., 1,200 tons, D. Jones, from London May 11, Beach Head May 12. Passengers cabin : Mr. and Mrs Edward Hewitt, Miss Hewitt, Miss Phoebe Hewitt, Mr and Mrs Percy Day, Messrs. Edwin Myall, Stanley Mayall, W. Goodacre, and R. J. Hayhow, Dr F. C. Stevenson ; and 44 in the second and third cabins. John Blyth and Co., agents.33
  • 13 Aug 1885, At the Port Melbourne Court to-day Captain Jones ... , master of tbe ship Cardigan Castle, was summoned by tho water police for neglecting to provide a stage or34
  • 3 Jul 1886, ARRIVED. Cardigan Castle, ship, 1200 tons, Captain D. Jones, from London, 3rd May, Passengers, saloon — Messrs Darleg, Bowen, Day Read, Bristow ; Master Griffith. Australian Carrying and Shipping Company, Limited, agents.35
  • 5 Jul 1886, THE iron clipper ship Cardigan Castle has completed another of her usual annual trips from London to this port. Her cargo is of a miscellaneous character and comprises large lines of timber, cement, candles, bulk and case spirits, oilmen's stores, softwoods, &c. With the exception of one heavy gale, after passing the Cape of Good Hope, the weather fallen in with during the voyage was of the ordinary description, and the ship has come into port in first-rate order. Captain D. Jones is again in command, and concerning the voyage he reports the ship leaving on April 3 and being towed to the Downs where she had to remain on account of strong adverse gales until April 6. She was then towed to Dungeness where an accident happened to the boiler of the steamer India, which had the ship in tow, and she had to let go. The wind at the time was W.N.W shifting round westerly, and increasing in force until off Ushant on April 11. It then hauled northerly, und continued variable to lat 22deg. N., and lon. 19deg. W., where the N.E. trades were found. The winds were very light and scant throughout, and were finally parted within lat. 6deg. N. There was no improvement in the winds which followed, light variable airs being experienced to lat 2deg. N, where the ship entered on the S E. trades. The equator was crossed on May 10 in Ion. 24deg. W, and moderate breezes were carried across the region of the S.E. trades to lat. 18deg. S. Light westerly winds were taken thence to the prime meridian, which was crossed on May 31 in lat 39deg. 32 min S. Moderate N.W. to W. winds with a high troubled sea then prevailed to the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope which was crossed on June 4. The passage of the ship across the Great Southern Ocean was made on the parallel of 42deg, and along this line of lattitude the winds generally were favourable. On June 5 in lat 40deg S. 38min S. and Ion 26deg. 23min W., the wind came awav in a heavy gale from N.W., and raised a tremendous sea. During the gale there was a sudden shift to S.W., this raised a dangerous cross sea, which broke over the ship repeatedty and with crushing force. Sheep-pens were smashed and deckhouse doors damaged, and the decks were in a state of chronic deluge for several days. The ship also laboured a good deal in the sea way Moderate but very unsteady breezes from N to W continued afterwards until passing the longitude of Cape Leuwin, whence the winds were northerly and steady until passing Cape Otway al 5 p.m. on the 1st inst. The Heads were entered next day 89 days from the docks, or 81 days from the channel. The ship was taken along side the railway pier, Port Melbourne, on Saturday to a discharging berth.36
  • 2 Aug 1886, At the Port Melbourne Court to-day, Senior Constable Roach, of the Water Police, summoned Captain Jones of the ship Cardigan Castle, for not having a watch on board the vessel at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 28th July. Defendant was fined 20s.37
  • 7 Aug 1886, ship ahoy! Captain Jones, of the Cardigan Castle was proceeded against by Senior-constable Roche for not answering the challenge of the water police. Fined 20s.38
  • 27 Aug 1886, The clipper ship Cardigan Castle, Captain Jones, was this morning taken to Geelong for the purpose of beaching. It was intended to put the ship in dock prior to proceeding to the pivot, but on account of the Tannadice occupying the dock longer than was anticipated. Captain Jones decided to return and dock the ship prior to sailing direct to England.39
  • 28 Aug 1886, Yesterday forenoon the handsome and clipper built ship Cardigan Castle was towed to Corio Bay by Messrs Huddart, Parker and Co's steam-tug Falcon. The ship is a stranger to port, although she has been engaged for several years past in the direct trade between London and Melbourne. She was expressly built for the Australian trade, being fitted with a limited accommodation for passengers, whilst being admirably suited for taking away a very fair cargo on a light draught of water. Her passages between London and Melbourne have been of uniform character, and her last voyage was accomplished in 87 days, one of the quickest made during the season by sailing vessels.
    Her cargo has always been delivered in first-class order, and the ship generally is entitled to the definition of being a favorite in the trade. The Cardigan Castle, which is of 1500 tons register, recently passed her survey while in Melbourne to the entire satisfaction of Mr Watson, Lloyd's manager. She will be despatched for London with a cargo of wool, without delay, arrangements having been made to berth her at the Yarra-street wharf directly cargo is available. Captain D. Jones has command of the ship, and Messrs. White, Alford and Co., of Gheringhap-street are the Geelong agents.40
  • 12 Sep 1887, It has been decided to despatch the ship Cardigan Castle to London from this port, with wool. The vessel was placed in the Alfred graving dock at Williamstown on Friday for the purpose of being cleaned and painted prior to coming to Corio Bay. The Cardigan Castle, which is still under the command of Captain D. Jones, loaded wool at this port last year.41
  • 27 Jun 1888, Captain D. Jones, formerly of the Cardigan Castle, also arrived at Melbourne by the Austral to join the Association of Port Surveyors. The Austral will have quick dispatch from this port, sailing on her return trip to London on July 3.42
  • 7 Jul 1888, THE MERCHANT SHIPPING and UNDERWRITERS' ASSOCIATION LIMITED.
    The SURVEYING STAFF of the association now consists of the following
    Experienced surveyors :—
    Capt J. Robinson, Hull and shipwright Surveyor.
    Capt J. Adams )
    Capt T. Houston ) Bay and Cargo Surveyors.
    Capt D. Jones )
    ARTHUR W. CLEVELAND, Secretary.
    July 1, 1888.43
  • 29 Aug 1889, THE CAPE VERDE DISPUTE. Nothing of an important character occurred yesterday at the Cape Verde wreck, and appearances lead to the conclusion that a settlement of the difficulty between the underwriters and the purchasers of the hull, Messrs H Thompson and Miller, has been, or is about to be, arrived at. The water police night crew, under Senior constable Dyer, were not kept stationed at the wreck on Tuesday night, but they frequently visited it. At daylight Senior constable Norgate and his crew of water police again took up their positions for the day at the wreck Between 7 and 8 o'clock Mr. Miller arrived, soon followed by Captain Wymark, the
    former going aboard the schooner Belle Brandon lying alongside, and the latter, with 40 men, going on the stage over the Cape Verde. The two parties simply watched each other all day, with the exception that Mr. Miller had a diver down during the morning cutting away the backstays of the Cape Verdi, with a view to dismantling. A meeting of the underwriters was held early in the day, at which it is believed that some basis of agreement had been arrived at, for at 20 minutes to 5 in the afternoon Captain Jones, of the Stevedoring Company arrived, and after a few words with Captain Wymark, the latter gave direction's to his men to commence clearing away the staging, having previously passed to Mr Miller a note informing him to that effect. Mr Miller requested half an hour's time to remove the gear which he had placed on the stage, and the application was granted, The gear consists of a donkey engine, winches, &c. Mr Miller was directing the work last evening, and announced that he would work into the night until it was completed. Captain Wymark's men were also engaged pulling down the stage, and by dark had all the flooring of it removed, and had commenced cutting away the uprights. To day Mr. Miller will actively continence the operation of raising the vessel, for he intends, weather permitting, to set up the sheer legs for the cofferdam, which will also carry a staging.44
  • 29 Dec 1890, The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Monday 29 December 1890 p 2 Article
    ... 'powerof attorney was given to Captain Jones, of the Stevedoring Company to rako up tho missing clothing, and ... 3090 word
  • 29 Dec 1890, A deal of inconvenience was caused among several of the passengers, two of the stewardesses, and a number of the stewards just prior to the sailing of tho O.R.M.S. Austral on Saturday, owing to one of the laundresses at Williamstown having failed to return the necessary clothing, that had been sent on shore for renovating, and were wanted for the voyage. The vessel left without the aparel, and a power of attorney was given to Captain Jones, of the Stevedoring Company to rake up the missing clothing, and forward them on to Adelaide.45
  • 3 Jul 1896, Mining (BY QUARTZY.)
    Wymark Extended, Reedy Creek. A meeting of directors in the above company was held at the office of Mr. H. Chipperfield on 27th June, when tenders were accepted for sinking the shaft. I have received the prospectus of the Wymark Tunnel Proprietary G.M.Co. The opening paragraph in the prospectus reads-" This company is being formed to acquire and work the amalgamated leases of the "Wymark Tunnel" and 'Wymark Tunnel North," at Reedy Creek, the total area of which is 60 acres." This company propose now to do what an old and experienced miner and mine-ower in this district suggested as the best way to test this country. The directorate includes men who are known for their financial standing, and are as follows:
    Captain A. Wymark, marine surveyor, Melbourne;
    R. T. Elcoate, gentleman, Beaconsfield;
    Captain D. Jones, Stevedoring Co;
    David Melvir, gentleman, Geelong;
    A. G. Hossack, investor, Perth, W.A ;
    Dr. Gaze, M.R.C.S., metallurgist, Braybrook.
    Brokers-Messrs. W. P. Jones and Co., Melbourne, and C. P. Burridge, Beehive Exchange, Bendigo.
    Solicitor-Wm. Bruce. Manager pro tem--W. P. Jones, Empire Buildings, 418 Collins-street, Melbourne. The prospectus appears in another column, and speaks for itself.46
  • 21 Jul 1897, Captain Jones, who has recently purchased the farm of Mr. W. Moysey, is making a large number of important improvements on the estate which will be greatly admired in days to come; at present it as already made the township look brighter. The best fence ever constructed in the locality has just beep completed by the Messrs. Winter to the captain's order. We want a few more Captain Jones' to make the district go ahead a bit.47
  • 19 Jun 1902, A numerous audience assembled in St. David's Hall on Friday evening to bid farewell to Miss M. H. Jones, who, for the past ten years has occupied the position of hon. organist to the Welsh Church. The chair was occupied by Captain D. Jones (Victorian Stevedoring Company), who had on his right and left respectively the Rev. Dr. Jones, minister, and Mr. J. M. Roberts, senior deacon. The former on behalf of the church and Sunday school presented Miss Jones with a purse of sovereigns, and the latter a piece of plate suitably inscribed. Mr. E Richards, acting superintendent of the school, handed Miss Jones a presentation Bible, and Mr. S. M. Davies, on behalf of the Tea Club a framed photo of group of the members. The presentations were suitably acknowledged by the recipient's brother, Mr. Gwilym Jones. A splendid musical programme was contributed to by Mrs. Cooke, Misses Ridley, Jones, Price and Williams, and Messrs. W. T. Evans, H. Williams, O. Griffith, R. Parry and the conductor, Mr. S. M. Davies. Miss Jones leaves in a few days for a six months' trip to Wales, after which she will make her home in West Australia. Miss Jones was married on Wednesday at the church to Mr. F. M. Roberts, relieving stationmaster, W. A. railways.48
  • 19 Jan 1907, NARRE WARREN. GROWING EXPORT APPLES. VALUE OF DRAINAGE.
    (BY OUR HORTICULTURAL REPORTER.)
    The Narre Warren railway station, a few miles east of Dandenong, on the Gippsland line, is the centre of undulating country. Falling away to the south from the Dandenong Ranges, the country becomes more level as it approaches the coast line of Port Phillip Bay. At Narre Warren North, three miles back from the railway, Captain D. Jones, of the Victorian Stevedoring Company, started an orchard in June, 1901. There are now 55 acres of remarkably even trees, all of which were planted in land that was sodden owing to an exceptionally, heavy winter. A few months later the drains were laid down, and out of 5000 trees there were only 20 misses. The average rainfall is over 38 inches, and in the grey loam overlying deep clay peculiar to this locality drainage is imperative. Captain Jones asserts that one acre of orchard drained is equal to five acres left in its natural state. Throughout the district drainage is adopted wherever success is attained in fruit culture.
    Part of the land chosen by Captain Jones for his orchard was at one time devoted to hay production, and it was notice able in the first years of growth that on this particular section the trees failed to make progress as rapidly as those planted on virgin ground. The orchard, with the exception of a few peaches, apricots and plums, is devoted to apples of the best export varieties, and during the past few years the proprietor has been successful in placing consignments on the English market. So far, however, the bulk of the export lots have come from a second orchard which is a few years older, and situated on higher country at Upper Beaconsfield.
    This season Captain Jones hopes to ship over 3000 cases of apples. Jonathan, London Pippin; Sturmer and Yates apples are all well represented in the orchard under notice, but it was surprising to find some prominence being given to Munro's Favorite, an apple which has be come established in the warmer districts north of the Dividing Range. In Gippsland, however, growers have fought shy of planting this variety, owing to the risk, which is also attached to the Cleopatra, of fungus disease attacks. Captain Jones's orchard is, of course, comparatively young, and it is rather early to condemn the planting of Munro's, but this grower states that he will judge the apple on the result of the coming season. In this district there is a tendency to develop a crack on the skin near the stalk, and this blemish extends as the fruit grows. As "the proof of the pudding is in the eating," so Captain Jones claims that his results have so far justified the local culture of this variety, which is, of course, one of our best export apples. He remarks that many expert orchardists could not be blamed if they asked, "What does an old sailor know about fruit culture?" In reply, the captain need only point to his orchard, which is a model of clean and healthy trees growing in finely tilled soil. Captain Jones is of the opinion that one reason of failure with Munro's Favorite and Cleopatra is that growers use too strong a mixture when spraying, as these varieties have a more tender skin than such as Yates's. He only gives one spraying of Bordeaux mixture, and that early in the season. Apple spraying, he suggests, may tend to destroy the soft down on the skin of the fruit, and where an extra strong mixture is used the spray may be responsible for more damage than even the Black Spot. In support of this idea, he has noticed that where an odd apple near the centre of the tree has failed to receive any of the mixture the fruit has been clean, while other specimens within range of the treatment have been marked. This, however, is only submitted for the purpose of suggesting thought. A condemnation of spraying is not intended. Captain Jones makes a practice of carrying out this branch of orchard work in a systematic and thorough manner. In a recent report in "The Leader" we submitted evidence that proved the efficacy of spraying at the right time for Black Spot. Through out what are termed the Black Spot districts the fungus is only in evidence where growers failed to spray early in the season, as directed at the time in "The Leader."49
  • 8 Apr 1908, FRUIT TRANSPORT. CHEAPENING COLD-STORAGE. A PROMISING EXPERIMENT.
    An interesting experiment in respect to cold-storage for fruit in ocean transport is to be tried on the next voyage of the s.s. Somerset, of the Federal-Houlder-Shire line, which leaves Melbourne on April 14. Captain Jones, of the Melbourne Stevedoring Company, has 80 acres of orchards at Narre Warren and Beaconsfield devoted exclusively to the cultivation of export varieties of apples. For months this enterprising orchardist has carried on an extensive series of experiments in keeping fruit, both at the Government Cool Stores and on his orchard at Narre Warren, with a machine recently invented for cooling air. The results of these experiments have induced Captain Jones to obtain permission from the agents of the Somerset to fit up a chamber and provide the machines for cooling the air for a trial shipment of 200 to 300 cases of apples from his own orchard. In the opinion of practical men, who are familiar with the experimental already conducted, this trial is one of the most important yet attempted in ocean transport for fruit. lf it succeeds it will render the costly refrigeration of the ordinary cold-storage chamber unnecessary for fruit, and reduce ocean freight charges by nearly one-half.
    The machine which can be used for cooling either air or water, and is the invention of two Victorians, Messrs. Little and Wheal) has been installed for some time in a fruit-room and a packing-room on the Narre Warren orchard. The fruit-room has 3,500 cubic feet of space, and the packing-room adjoining, and separated from it by a 6in. wall, is of the same capacity. Together they hold 3,000 cases of fruit. The building is of wood, the walls being insulated with 3in. and the ceilings with 9in. of sawdust. On Monday last, when the outside temperature in the shade was 73deg. Fahr., the dry bulb thermometer registered 63deg. and the wet bulb 61deg. Fahr, inside the fruit-room, and within one or two degrees of this in the packing-room. The records of the experiments at the cool stores and in the fruit-room at Narre Warren during the summer show that an even temperature, much lower than the shade temperature of the outside atmosphere, and having a high and uniform percentage of humidity, can be secured. Those are good conditions for keeping fruit for long periods, and milk, butter, cheese, and other perishable products for a short time for home use.
    The cooling-machine consists of it series of concentric drums of galvanised iron, three-sixteenths of an inch apart, revolving slowly (about two revolutions per minute). The drums as they revolve dip into a shallow pan filled with water set underneath, and as they have 3ft. of contact they take up a thin film of water for the whole of this length, through which air, sucked in from the outride atmosphere, is blown by a fan, making 800 revolutions per minute. Portion of the heat of the air is thus withdrawn or rendered latent, and its temperature at once falls. The opening in the wall of the fruit-chamber, through which the air is blown, is 3ft. 6in. by 2ft. 6in., or 8.50 cubic feet. Measurements on Monday showed that the velocity of the air through this opening was 500ft. per minute, so that 4,250 cubic feet per minute of fresh air cooled down to 62deg. was being driven through the chamber. The humidity in the air of the chamber was about 90 per cent. It lakes less than one-horse power to drive the fan and drum, and the outfit for cooling down 7,000 cubic feet of space in the fruit-room, and packing-chamber, exclusive of the power to drive it, was about £80. The machine can be used for cooling water at butter factories or for cooling air for living-rooms and factories. Apples and pears have been kept sound for months by this cool-air process, and the skin of the fruit, instead of shrivelling, remained sound and smooth.50
  • 18 Apr 1908, Cool Storage.
    To try and secure a cheaper method of cool storage than that offered by the use of refrigerating machinery has been the aim of many during the past few years. Several of the experiments carried out have met with a large measure of success, and there are now ways of preparing cool rooms at a comparatively small cost capable, with proper attention, of holding fruit over for three and four months, and even longer. These methods, however, have been entirely confined to land storage, and none hare yet been given an opportunity of proving whether
    they will be effective in over-sea transport of fruit. Such an experiment is now being made by Captain Jones, a large orchardist, in the Narre Warren district, who has given considerable attention to both the growing and storing of export varieties of apples. So confident is he that fruit can be carried satisfactorily under his system, that he was successful in inducing the Federal-Houlder Shire line to allow him to fit up a chamber on board the Somerset, which left Melbourne on Tuesday last. By this boat he is now testing the capability of his invention for over-sea carriage by making a trial shipment of from 200 to 300 cases of fruit from his own orchard. In his store at Narre Warren (by means of a machine invented by two Victorians, Messrs. Little and Wheal) he has been successful in maintaining an even temperature much lower than the shade temperature of the outside atmosphere throughout the summer, and having a high and uniform percentage of humidity, such as is essential to the thorough storage of fruit over long periods.
    METHOD OF COOLING.
    The cooling machine consists of a series of concentric drums of galvanised iron, three-sixteenths of an inch apart, revolving slowly (about two revolutions per minute). The drums as they revolve dip into a shallow pan filled with water set underneath, and as they have 3ft. of contact they take up a thin film of water for the whole of this length, through which air, sucked in from the outside atmosphere, is blown by a fan, making 800 revolutions per minute. Portion of the heat of the air is thus withdrawn or rendered latent, and its temperature at once falls. The opening in the wall of the fruit-chamber, through which the air is blown, is 3ft. 6in. by 2ft. 6in., or 8.50 cubic feet. Measurements on Monday showed that the velocity of the air through this opening was 500ft. per minute, so that 4,250 cubic feet per minute of fresh air cooled down to 62deg. was being driven through the chamber. The humidity in the air of the chamber was about 90 per cent. It takes less than one-horse power to drive the fan and drum, and the outfit for cooling down 7,000 cubic feet of space in the fruit-room and packing-chamber, exclusive of the power to drive it, was about £80. The machine can be used for cooling water at butter factories or for cooling air for living-rooms and factories. Apples and pens have been kept sound for months by this cool-air process, and the skin of the fruit, instead of shrivelling, remained sound and smooth.51
  • 2 May 1908, PACKING APPLES FOR EXPORT. COOL STORAGE FOR FRUIT. By J.W.
    The accompanying illustrations give an idea of the methods used in the cool-air process for fruit storage and transport, recently invented by Messrs. Little and Wheal. This process has been adopted by Captain Jones, of the Melbourne Stevedoring Company, and a plant has been installed by him in the packing-house on his Narre Warren orchard, which consists of 50 acres of export varieties of apples.
    One of the pictures show the cool-air machine, the fans of which are driven by a small oil engine. In the cool chamber can be seen an opening in the wall, 3ft. 6in. by 2ft. 6in., through which the air is driven into the chamber. The air is cooled down by the machine to about 62deg., and has a high percentage of humidity (about 90 per cent.) On the right hand wall of the chamber are a number of openings, about 2in. in diameter. The cool air travels through these, and cools down to within a couple of degrees of the temperature of the ... chamber the packing-room adjoining it. The laths beside the openings hang on pivots, and can be moved over, to close the openings when necessary. An experimental shipment of 200 cases of apples under this cooling process was sent by Captain Jones a short time ago in the Somerset to London. [Illustrated]52
  • 22 Oct 1908, Bruthen Warden's Court. Monday 19th October. (Before Mr C. G. Holmes, P.M.) Captain Jones, Queen street, Melbourne, stevedore, director and largest shareholder in the Hans Mining Company, Stirling, applied for a forfeiture of the lease hold by the Jorgenson Company, Stirling, on the ground of breach of the labor covenants.
    Mr Wynne, Ballarat, appeared for the applicant, and Mr Brayshay for the lessees.
    Captain Jones said he had wanted to come to some arrangement with the Hans Company to work the lease in conjunction with them, failing which he was prepared to put £2000 or £3000 into the mine himself.
    Four witnesses gave evidence in support of the application, deposing that a breach of the labor covenants had been made, starting on 11th July, and continuing to date.
    Mr Branyshay said the present company had been formed for four years, during which 3000ft. of drives had been made and £15,000 spent in wages and stores. The reason why the mine had
    been closed down on July l1 was because of being completely driven out by water, and they had been closed down since pending the installation of a pumping plant.
    Hans Jorgesen, mine manager, Stirling, said that on 11th July he found it impossible to cope with the water, and notified the board of directors to that effect, and they replied asking him to recommend a pumping plant.
    Mr Brayshay asked that the company should be allowed two months to procure and erect the necessary pumping machinery.
    The warden decided to recommend the extension asked for, but said that if the machinery were not erected in that time he would recommend the forfeiture of the lease.53
  • 26 Dec 1908, THE APPLE INDUSTRY. A NARRE WARREN ORCHARD. COLD STORAGE FACILITIES. BY "CULTUS."
    The apple industry is developing slowly in this State. The reason is somewhat difficult to understand. There is no doubt about the suitability of the soil and climate. Part of the country south of the Dividing Range will grow apples well. In the northern areas, also, some good results have been obtained. Much of the land is devoted to payable products of another character. There are, however, hundreds of thousands of acres lying idle that might well be brought under apple cultivation.
    During the last few years an export trade has grown up. There is a demand from Great Britain, Germany and France. This demand is being met, to some extent, by fruitgrowers in Tasmania, South Australia, and Victoria, Last year Western Australia became a contributor. The largest shipments go forward from Tasmania. Last season that State exported something like 600,000 eases. The Victorian contribution amounted to less than 80,0000 cases. As against this, we had to import large quantities of apples from Tasmania and America, to meet winter requirements. These amounted to almost as much as our oversea exportations. It will be seen that Victorian fruitgrowers are only producing enough to meet the local demand. Although we have been forwarding apples to the old world for a number of years past, with profitable results, we are not producing more than sufficient for home consumption. The creation of a system of cool storage that will enable Victorian apples to be kept in good condition during winter is a matter that demands immediate attention. This will do away with the necessity for importation, and will provide a profitable outlet in the dull season. The oversea export trade will absorb asmuch as we can produce for many years to come. Over-production need not be feared.
    AN OBJECT LESSON
    About 10 years ago Captain Jones (who is prominently associated with the Victorian Stevedoring Company), acquired a property of 660 acres of land within three miles of Narre Warren, on the Gippsland railway line. The country is undulating throughout. The land is not first-class. There is a fairly good depth of surface soil, which is well suited for the growth of fruit. There are other orchards in the district, but the proportion of land so occupied to the areas available is small. Shortly after securing the property, Captain Jones decided to establish an apple orchard. He figured it out that the trees, under proper cultivation, would produce, on an average, 250 cases per acre. The growing export trade, he calculated, would as sure him a return of not less than 4s or 5s net per case, which meant between L50 and L60 per acre. This anticipation has been realised.
    Captain Jones is a Welshman by birth. His orchard bears the name of Tan-y-dderwen, which signifies "Under the oak." There are 55 acres devoted entirely to apples. The trees are planted 20ft. apart, so that an acre carries 100 trees. All the trees were planted in 1901. This is something like a record in orchard-raising in Victoria. There are many larger fruit areas in the State, but it is doubtful if any of them contain such a number of trees of the same age.
    The varieties cultivated are:— Jonathans, 10 acres; London Pippins, 10 acres; Munroe's Favorite, 10 acres; Sturmers, 4 acres; Spitzenbergs, 4 acres; Cox Orange Pippins, 2 acres; Yates, 4 acres; Reinettes, 2 acres; Rymers, 2 acres; Rome Beauty, 4 acres; and Perfection, 3 acres. So far, the best results have been obtained from the Jonathans and Cox's Orange Pippins. All the trees have made good growth, and most of them are carrying fair crops this season.
    The orchard has been thoroughly cultivated from its inception. Although the district is suffering from a lack of rain this year, the trees are vigorous and healthy. A complete system of drainage has been established. Nearly five miles of agricultural pipes have been laid 3ft. below the surface.
    A COOL STORAGE PLANT.
    Captain Jones believes in thorough ness. The homestead and outbuildings are in keeping with the orchard. Everything has been systematically and solidly constructed. There are evidences of an unbounded faith in the permanency of the industry. A packing and grading shed and a cool storage chamber capable of storing 2000 cases of fruit have been erected. This quantity will be held for local winter requirements. The bulk of the produce will be sent oversea each season as it matures. The building is of wood, 60 feet by 30 feet. The walls and roof are packed with a 6-inch layer of sawdust. This, in itself, reduces the temperature. In addition a cool-air system has been installed. To keep apples sound and wholesome, something more than a low temperature is required. Unless the fruit is supplied with moisture it will lose some of its natural juice. This is invariably followed by a shrivelling of the "flesh." At Captain Jones' establishment an atmospheric cor..ion, showing a temperature of 60 degrees of heat, and 88 degrees of humidity can be created at will. It has been found that the fruit keeps in perfect condition in the storage chamber for 5 or 6 months. Preservation for a longer period is not necessary, as the new season's fruit arrives by that time. Apart from its proved efficacy in regard to the preservation of apples, the system in operation at Tan-y-dderwen is within the reach of the smallest fruit grower. There is no expensive machinery such as is associated with refrigerating works. Captain Jones has spent a considerable sum of money in equipping his orchard. He has, however, no doubt as to the ultimate success of the venture. The export trade, he unhesitatingly affirms, justifies the wholesale, planting of suitable fruit trees in Victoria.
    THE ENGLISH MARKET.
    Having had considerable trade experience in various parts of the world, Captain Jones is assured of the permanency of the English market. There is no other country in the world so well fit ted to supply the vast population of Great Britain with fresh fruit as Australia. When our produce is ready for marketing, the English and American suppliers are exhausted. The home market is therefore the natural outlet for Australian apples. At present the freight charges, and other expenses incidental to the export trade, amount to nearly 6s 6d per bushel case. A substantial reduction in ocean rates is sure to take place within the next few years. This will add further to the value of the industry.
    Captain Jones became an exporter two years ago. His consignments consisted of close on 4000 cases of apples. Those were disposed of at high prices in the London, Liverpool, and Hull markets. Last season prices were lower than before. The produce forwarded from Tan-y-dderwen realised 10s 6d per case in London, which left the grower a net profit of 4s per case. On this basis the trade is profitable. The slump in the market was caused by an exceptionally heavy stock of stored American apples being placed on the market at the same time that the Australian produce arrived. It is not likely that the American supplies will be a recurring factor. A record yield in that country was responsible for it. The experiment of holding over large stocks, in order to compete with the fresh Australian apples, was not a success. The American fruitgrowers have made up their minds to market the bulk of their crops, however large they may be, as soon as they mature. Under these circumstances it is not difficult to see that the oversea market for Australian apples during the months of March, April and May is thoroughly well established. There is room for rapid development in apple culture. The Victorian contribution to the oversea demand is now less than 100,000 cases per annum. Provision for keeping it tenfold might with safety be made.54
  • 3 Apr 1909, ORCHARD STOREHOUSES.
    In connection with some of the orchards provision has already been made for the winter storage of apples. Two notable instances are those of Messrs. T. H. Grant and Co., Toomuc Valley Orchard, Pakenham; and Captain Jones, Tan-y-dderwen Orchard, Narre Warren. At the former place an extensive refrigerating plant has been established. The fruit storerooms are capable of holding 13.000 cases. Apples have been kept in them, in good condition, up till Christmas. They are usually cooled down to 32 degrees Fahr. That temperature, in dry-air chambers, appears to give the best results.
    Captain Jones has not gone to the expense of installing refrigerating machinery. He has introduced a cool-air system into his storeroom. Provision has been made at Tan-y-dderwen for storing 3000 cases of fruit. It is claimed that the produce can be kept sound and fresh for six months. Captain Jones' experiment has given excellent results. He has demonstrated that small orchards, at a cost well within their means, may have at command an appliance which will serve a similar purpose in the preservation of apples to what the more costly refrigerating machinery does.
    There is room for many more such enterprises as those referred to. Their general adoption would lead to a greater degree of uniformity in market rates, and a general lowering of prices in the off season. Increased consumption of apples would follow as a natural consequence. To keep pace with it extensive increases in the orchard areas would have to be made.55
  • 16 Feb 1910, NARRE WARREN NORTH. Fruit picking is in full swing here. At Capt. Jones', sixteen are employed picking and packing apples for export. Next week the first shipment of 600 cases will be made for London; to be followed next week by a further shipment of 1500 cases.
    The apple crop is exceptionally heavy this year and the 50 acre orchard of Capt. Jones is a pretty sight. There is work ahead of the hands for nearly three months and it is pleasing to note that all the labour on the place is local. This is an example that it would be well for other orchardists to follow, as the young people are thus induced to work in the country and not get away to the city to
    look for work.56
  • 1 Jan 1927, Captain David Jones, a well-known master mariner, died at his residence in Kelvin grove, Armadale, on Christmas, Day, aged 85 years. He was born at Cardigan, South Wales, and had been a resident of Victoria for 48 years. He was in command of several vessels trading to Australia in the '70's and '80's, his last ship being the well known clipper Cardigan Castle. On retiring from the sea in 1885 he accepted a position as chief surveyor of the Marine Underwriters' Association, and was later associated with the Victorian Stevedoring Company.57
  • 7 Jan 1927, DEATH OF CAPT. DAVID JONES
    By the death of Captain David Jones, which took place on Christmas Day, December 25, 1926, at his late residence, "Cardigan", 7 Kelvin-grove, Armadale, at the age of 85 years, Narre Warren North has lost one whose forethought and enterprise has considerably forwarded the interests of that district. He was born in Wales, and his mother was left a widow when he was quite a lad, and not many years afterwards he adopted the seafaring life. Starting at the bottom of the ladder, he worked his way upwards, finally obtaining a master's ticket. He commanded many trading vessels, and was always regarded as a conscientious and trustworthy officer. There were very few important ports he had not called, consequently an evening's chat, with him (which the jovial captain always enjoyed) was both interesting and instructive. He used to say, "I could tell you things that would make your hair stand on end, and, by George, they would all be true!" For some years he was surveyor to the Customs department, and he was a member of the Stevedore Company, with Captain Julius Commans and others. After retiring from a most successful career, his chief hobby was his orchards at Beaconsfield and Narre Warren North. These properties were his pride. He established his own cool storage, and was among the first to take an active part in the fruit export, and, being an authority on the subject, his guidance was often sought. Being a straightgoer, he expected those associated with him to be likewise. His many acts of kindness were known to very few, and he was most gener-ous to widows and orphans. The remains were laid to rest in the Williamstown cemetery. Four sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of a kind and generous father.58
  • 19 Mar 1927, SATURDAY, MARCH 26. At Three O'clock. On the Property, CARDIGAN, 7 KELVIN GROVE, ARMADALE. Off Airlie Avenue, Close High Street.
    EXECUTORS' SALE in Estate of Captain D. Jones, Deceased.
    COMMODIOUS TWO-STORY BRICK RESIDENCE. Slate Roof, 11 Rooms, 2 Bathrooms, Internal Sewerage, Pantries, Scullery, 2 W.B. Maid's Rooms, Bathroom, Storerooms, Electric Light Installed, Detached W.B. Washhouse, Garage, and Stabling. LAND 178ft. x 230ft. R.O.W. at Rear, Portion of Land Could Be Sold Off.
    The Position is Most Convenient, 2 Min. High Street Electric Tram and Close Toorak Station, On the Hill, with Nice Outlook Over the Bay.
    Title, Certificate. Ellison, Hewison, and O'Collins, Solicitors, 332 Collins Street
    TERMS.-One-fifth Cash, One-fifth 1 Year, Balance 3 Years. Interest 6 Per Cent.
    SYDNEY ARNOLD, BEST, and Co., Auctioneers, 16 Queen Street, City.59

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P3, unit 1724; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 749.
  2. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  3. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), mentioned in Jane Jones' probate. VPRS 28/P3, unit 965; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 609.
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Series: VPRS 7666; Series Title: Inward Overseas Passenger Lists (British Ports) [Microfiche Copy of VPRS 947].
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  6. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 626/P0/1775 Land File 13569.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Lease 694-720 - David Jones of No 219 Rathdown Street Carlton Stevedore (this lease was taken out by Executors of Pasquan's estate from 1 April 1891 for 14 years - Jones continues the lease).
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2853-461 - David Jones of 219 Rathdowne Street Carlton Stevedore.
  9. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1907/08 rates 320a lot 68 NAV 70
    in the same year David Jones also owned
    House & 140a Lot 4 Sec 21 Narre Warren NAV55
    308 ac Lot 1 Sec 1 Berwick NAV65
    100ac pt Lot 2 Sec 1 Berwick NAV25.
  10. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#D11358 (Age 64) [par John GRIFFITHS & Mary EVANS]."
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - David Jones of Kelvin Grove Armadale Gentleman is now the proprietor of the within described estate by transfer from Edwin Jones and William Aeron Jones.
  12. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Dec 1926, p1.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - David Jones died on 25st December 1926. Probate has been grated to David Thomas Jones of Warragul Veterinary Surgeon and Edwin Jones of Kelvin Grove, Armadale, Gentleman.
  15. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1931/32 rates Jones Capt David / Est of Mrs D. c/o E Jones 402 Mont Albert Road Mont Albert. 280/40ac NAV 27/72 (next NAV50)
    1932/33 rates Jones Capt David / Est of Mrs D. c/o E Jones 402 Mont Albert Road Mont Albert. crossed out 7 Oct 1933 - Collingburn George Beaconsfield Upper. NAV 27/50
    1933/34 rates Collingburn George (Estate David Jones?) 280a lot 68 NAV27 ; 40ac lot 68A House NAV50 - transfer to Downey per 29 May 1934
    1934/5 rates Downey 280a lot 68 NAV 25 40a lot 68A NAV20.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2853-461 - A caveat No 90010 was lodged 10 Nov 1933 - withdrawn 22 May 1934 (possibly by COLLINGBURN?).
  17. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - Clifton Leopold Downey of Dewhurst Via Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist.
  18. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2853-461 - Clifton Leopold Downey of Dewhurst Via Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist.
  19. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1932/33 rates Jones Capt David / Est of Mrs D. c/o E Jones 402 Mont Albert Road Mont Albert. crossed out 7 Oct 1933 - Collingburn George Beaconsfield Upper. NAV 27/50
    1933/34 rates Collingburn George (Estate David Jones?) 280a lot 68 NAV27 ; 40ac lot 68A House NAV50 - transfer to Downey per 29 May 1934
    1934/5 rates Downey 280a lot 68 NAV 25 40a lot 68A NAV20.
  20. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "Issue 97 - Apr 1994, p11 by John Milligan."
  21. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 5440; Folio: 73; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1342309."
  22. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  23. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  24. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  25. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Williamstown Cemetery - also buried there in Leighton Glyn JONES 7.2.1939 - 6.6.2005 Age 66 (Son of Emlyn),.
  26. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Fri 8 Sep 1882, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198560880
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 1 Nov 1882, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11557813
  28. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tue 21 Aug 1883, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13542537
  29. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 6 Sep 1883, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28375191
  30. [S14] Newspaper - The Aberystwith Observer, 19 Mar 1881, p4.
  31. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 28 Aug 1884, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6056227
  32. [S14] Newspaper - Standard (Port Melbourne, Vic. : 1884 - 1914), Sat 30 Aug 1884, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164932602
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 5 Aug 1885, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6089642
  34. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Thursday 13 August 1885 p 2 Article.
  35. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 3 Jul 1886, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241203675
  36. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 5 Jul 1886, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11564398
  37. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Mon 2 Aug 1886, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241219236
  38. [S14] Newspaper - Standard (Port Melbourne, Vic. : 1884 - 1914), Sat 7 Aug 1886, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164934916
  39. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 27 Aug 1886, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241204768
  40. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), Sat 28 Aug 1886, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149045811
  41. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), Mon 12 Sep 1887, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150733026
  42. [S14] Newspaper - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1923), Wed 27 Jun 1888, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237208496
  43. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 7 Jul 1888, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6893829
  44. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 29 Aug 1889, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6274711
  45. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Mon 29 Dec 1890, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242125383
  46. [S14] Newspaper - The Broadford Courier and Reedy Creek Times (Broadford, Vic. : 1893 - 1916), Fri 3 Jul 1896, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58887539
  47. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1877 - 1920; 1926 - 1927), Wed 21 Jul 1897, p3.
  48. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925), Thu 19 Jun 1902, p23
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article175393739
  49. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 19 Jan 1907, p9.
  50. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 8 Apr 1908, p9.
  51. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 18 Apr 1908, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139212939
  52. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 2 May 1908, p29.
  53. [S14] Newspaper - Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918), Thu 22 Oct 1908, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91886223
  54. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 26 Dec 1908, p47.
  55. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 3 Apr 1909, p48.
  56. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 16 Feb 1910, p2.
  57. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 1 Jan 1927, p40.
  58. [S188] Newspaper - Berwick County Times / The Times "7 Jan 1927."
  59. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 19 Mar 1927, p2.
Last Edited13 Feb 2018

Jane Griffiths

F, #2601, b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Father*John Griffiths1 b. 1813, d. 18 Nov 1869
Mother*Mary Evans b. 1814
Married NameJones. 
Birth*29 Mar 1854 Bexley Heath, Kent, England, Mar Q [Dartford] 2a 218 [par John GRIFFITHS & Mary EVANS]. Baptised St John Horsleydown, 3 May 1854 - father publican.2,3 
Note*1869 Her father John GRIFFITHS was a turncock when he married Mary EVANS in 1842. Mary had been a servant at his parents place. Later he was a licenced victualler at the Golden Lion in Bexley Heath. The family must have returned to Wales in the 1860, as John Griffiths died there in 18 Nov 1869 at Tanydderwen. 
Marriage*18 Feb 1873 Spouse: David Jones. Aberayron, Cardiganshire, Wales, Mar Q [Aberayron] 11b 55.4
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Dec 1889 Sailing with John Griffiths Jones, David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, Edwin Jones, Jinnie Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship SOBRAON.5
 
Land-UBeac*b 23 Jun 1896 GEM-C-68A. Transfer from Martin Pasquan to Jane Jones. 40a. Crown Grant for 40 acres to Jane JONES on 23 Jun 1896.6 
Death*21 Dec 1918 "Cardigan", 7 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, Australia, #D11358 (Age 64) [par John GRIFFITHS & Mary EVANS].7 
Death-Notice*23 Dec 1918JONES. -On the 21st December, at her residence, "Cardigan," 7 Kelvin grove, Armadale, Jane, dearly beloved wife of Captain David Jones, aged, 64 years.
JONES. -The Friends of Captain DAVID JONES are respectfully informed that the remains of his dearly beloved wife Jane, will be interred in the Williamstown Cemetery.
The Funeral is appointed to move from his residence "Cardigan," Kelvin grove, Armadale, THIS DAY (Monday the 23rd December) at 1.45 p m. arriving at the Cemetery gates at 3.30 pm.
THOS LONSDALE Undertaker Ferguson street, Williamstown. Phone 25 Williamstown.8 
Probate (Will)*16 Jul 1919 Jane Jones. Married. Armadale. 21 Dec 1918. 166/961. The inventory lists 40 acres (GEM-C-68A) upon which is erected a 5 roomed w/b house and outbuildings valued at £1200.0.0. There is a note that the real estate set out above was in Jane Jones' name only, but in truth was the property of David Jones, who purchased the same with his own money and put the title in the name of the testatrix.9 
Land-Note*21 Apr 1922 Jane Jones died on 21st December 1918. Probate has been grated to Edwin Jones of 7 Kelvin Grove, Stevedore and William Aeron Jones of 56 Larnook Road Veterinary Surgeon both of Armadale.10 
Land-UBeac*21 Apr 1922 GEM-C-68A. Transfer from Jane Jones to David Jones. 40a.11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
7 Apr 1861John GRIFFITHS, Land, House, Shop and Fundholder, 10 Horsleydown Lane, Southwark, Surrey, EnglandAge 7 - Scholar12
2 Apr 1871Mary GRIFFITHS Farmer (Widow), Tandderwenfarm, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, WalesAge 17 - daughter13
3 Apr 1881Tandderwen, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, Wales(Head of Household) David Jones;
Age 27
Member(s) of Household: David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, John Griffiths Jones2
19147 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties
also Clara Isabel Jones, home duties. With David Jones. With Edwin Jones.14
19177 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VICOccupation: home duties. With David Jones. With Edwin Jones William Aeron Jones.15

Grave

  • PRES*E*26*1, Williamstown Cemetery, Williamstown, VIC, Australia16

Family

David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Children 1.John Griffiths Jones+ b. Mar 1876
 2.David Thomas Jones+ b. Jun 1877, d. 6 Oct 1964
 3.Evan Jones b. Dec 1878, d. 3 Jun 1895
 4.Ellen Jones+ b. Mar 1881, d. Mar 1951
 5.Edwin Jones b. Dec 1881, d. Jun 1959
 6.Jinnie Jones b. Mar 1884, d. 17 Feb 1962
 7.William Aeron Jones b. 1891, d. Dec 1971
 8.Bessie Jones b. 1892, d. 18 Jun 1893
 9.Thomas Evan Jones+ b. 1898, d. 16 Jun 1964

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 5440; Folio: 73; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1342309."
  3. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "mother's maiden name EVANS."
  4. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), mentioned in Jane Jones' probate. VPRS 28/P3, unit 965; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 609.
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B524 003.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - Jane Jones of 219 Rathdowne Street Carlton the wife of David Jones of 54 Osborne Street Williamstown Stevedore.
  7. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 "#D11358 (Age 64) [par John GRIFFITHS & Mary EVANS]."
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 23 Dec 1918, p1.
  9. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P3, unit 965; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 609.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - Jane Jones died on 21st December 1918. Probate has been grated to Edwin Jones of 7 Kelvin Grove, Stevedore and William Aeron Jones of 56 Larnook Road Veterinary Surgeon both of Armadale.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2631-148 - David Jones of Kelvin Grove Armadale Gentleman is now the proprietor of the within described estate by transfer from Edwin Jones and William Aeron Jones.
  12. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 317; Folio: 27; Page: 47; GSU roll: 542613."
  13. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 5554; Folio: 5; Page: 3; GSU roll: 850865."
  14. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  15. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  16. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Williamstown Cemetery - also buried there in Leighton Glyn JONES 7.2.1939 - 6.6.2005 Age 66 (Son of Emlyn),.
Last Edited22 Jan 2018

David Thomas Jones

M, #2602, b. Jun 1877, d. 6 Oct 1964
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918

World War I

Transport Officer on voyage - returned to Australia August 1916.1
Probate (Will)* 618/363. David Thomas JONES Date of grant: 01 Dec 1964; Date of death: 06 Oct 1964; Occupation: Gentleman; Residence: Warragul.2 
Birth*Jun 1877 Aberayron, Cardiganshire, Wales, Jun Q [Aberayron] 11b 46.3,4,5 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Dec 1889 Sailing with Jane Jones, John Griffiths Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, Edwin Jones, Jinnie Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship SOBRAON.6
 
Military*1899Enlisted for military service: (Boer War) Veterinary-Lieutenant David Thomas Jones - 4th Battalion, Australian Commonwealth Horse - South Africa, 1899-1902.7 
Marriage*1913 Spouse: Ada Louisa Jeffreys. VIC, Australia, #M2017.8
 
Widower21 Mar 1959David Thomas Jones became a widower upon the death of his wife Ada Louisa Jeffreys.9 
Death*6 Oct 1964 Warragul, VIC, Australia, #D23209 (age 87.)10 
Death-Notice*7 Oct 1964JONES.—On October 6, at his residence, Albert Street, Warragul, David Thomas (Doc), loving husband or the late Ada, and loved uncle of Stewart and Joyce, and great-uncle of Lynette, in his 88th year.
JONES.—The Funeral of the late Mr DAVID THOMAS JONES will arrive at the Springvale Crematorium, TOMORROW, at 11 a m., for a service in the chapel.11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 1881Tandderwen, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, Wales(Head of Household) David Jones;
Age 4 - Scholar
Member(s) of Household: Jane Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, John Griffiths Jones3
bt 1903 - 1906Narre Warren NorthOccupation: veterinary surgeon.12,13,14
1912Warragul, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: veterinary surgeon.15

Newspaper-Articles

  • 24 Oct 1900, Narre Warren. A flag and pole have been presented to the local State School by Mr. David T. Jones, of "Cardigan," and the present is duly appreciated.16
  • 26 Jan 1921, JONES (nee Ada Jeffrey)—On the 8th January, 1921, "Cooinda" private hospital, Warragul, the wife of David T. Jones veterinary surgeon a son (premature, lived only two hours).17
  • 22 Jul 1931, A REMARKABLE CASE. CONDITIONS OF A DEED. Alleged Non-Compliance.
    What the Chief Justice, (Sir William Irvine) described as a very curious case was dealt with by him on summons in the Practice Court yesterday. Plaintiffs on the summons were Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert-road, Mont Albert, and David Thomas Jones, of Warragul, and defendant was Mrs. Amelia Reid, of Oxford-street, Oakleigh. Mr. Moore (instructed by Messrs. Ellison, Hewison and O'CoIlins) appeared for plaintiffs; there was no appearance for Mrs. Reid.
    It appeared that David Jones, father of plaintiffs, and grandfather of defendant, on 10th August 1926, executed a deed of trust in favour of Mrs. Reid, in respect of a piece of land having a frontage of 52 ½ feet to Oxford-street, Oakleigh, and on which there is a residence. On the same day David Jones signed a transfer of the land to plaintiffs and defendant. Mrs. Reid went into possession of the land in September, and David Jones died on Christmas day, 1926. By the deed of trust plaintiffs and defendant were to hold the land in trust for Mrs. Reid for life, and after her death it was to pass to her children as tenants in common. The life tenancy of Mrs. Reid was subject to the conditions that she should insure the building in the name of plaintiffs, pay the insurance, keep the property in good and substantial repair, and pay all rates and taxes and outgoings.
    Mr. Moore said Mrs. Reid had failed to comply with the condition under the deed, and for some years the other trustees had paid the insurance premiums, and to save the properly from being sold by the authorities had paid all rates and taxes in respect of the property. Plaintiffs had no desire to be harsh, but they had used every endeavor to get Mrs. Reid to do what the deed required of her. They asked for certain declarations, and for an order for possession of the property.
    His Honor made an order that Mrs. Reid should deliver up possession of the land and premises; that the trustees have power to let it, and from the rent pay all insurance premiums, rates, taxes and outgoings, and pay any balance over to Mrs Reid.18

Citations

  1. [S33] Australian Government: http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/search/index.aspx, Enlistment File.
  2. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P3 unit 559, item 618/363
    VPRS 28/ P4 unit 3303, item 618/363.
  3. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 5440; Folio: 73; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1342309."
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, HAWKES, George 'The Cardigan Castle': the story of a clipper ship, 1870-1907 Cymru a'r mor (Maritime Wales) 16 (1994) p.62-79.
  5. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "JONES, DAVID THOMAS GRIFFITHS GRO Reference: 1877 J Quarter in ABERAYRON Volume 11B Page 46."
  6. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B524 003.
  7. [S206] Website Australian War Memorial (http://www.awm.gov.au).
  8. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  9. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "Place of birth CASTERTON."
  10. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D23209 (age 87)."
  11. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 7 Oct 1964, p28.
  12. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  13. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  14. [S106] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1906.
  15. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  16. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 24 Oct 1900, p2.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 26 Jan 1921, p1.
  18. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wed 22 Jul 1931, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203024363
Last Edited22 Jan 2018

Ellen Jones

F, #2603, b. Mar 1881, d. Mar 1951
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Birth*Mar 1881 Llanarth, Cardiganshire, Wales, Mar Q [Aberayron] 11b 43.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Dec 1889 Sailing with Jane Jones, John Griffiths Jones, David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, Edwin Jones, Jinnie Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship SOBRAON.3
 
Marriage*22 Feb 1910 Spouse: Rev Isaac Glyn Jones. Welsh Church, Latrobe Street, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M2470.4
 
Death*Mar 1951 402 Mont Albert Road, Mont Albert, VIC, Australia, #D2745 (age 70) - cremated remains scattered at Springvale.5,6 
Death-Notice*14 Mar 1951JONES.—At her residence 402 Mont Albert road, Mont Albert, E10, Ellen Jones, the beloved wife of the Rev I Glyn Jones and loving mother of David Penry, Arnold Glyn and Emlyn Leighton - For ever with the Lord.7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 1881Tandderwen, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, Wales(Head of Household) David Jones;
Age 9 months
Member(s) of Household: Jane Jones, David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, John Griffiths Jones1
1936402 Mt Albert Road, Mont Albert, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Rev Isaac Glyn Jones. With Edwin Jones.8

Newspaper-Articles

  • 3 Mar 1910, REV. G. JONES TO MISS E. JONES.
    A large congregation of guests assembled at the Welsh Church, Latrobe-street. on 22nd February for the marriage of the former minister, the Rev. Glyn Jones, second son of Rev. and Mrs. Jones, of Nantglyn, North Wales, and Miss Ellen Jones, eldest daughter of Capt. and Mrs. David Jones. '"Cardigan," Toorak. The church was beautifully decorated with white and pale pink flowers in graceful festoons, arches, and white gates, and was the work of the girl friends of the bride. The service was conducted by the Rev. J. J. Owen, assisted by the Revs. J. Davis (Queensland) and Rorke.
    The bride was given away by her father, and wore a lovely gown of pineapple silk, richly embroidered, and inlet with Cluny lace. A black picture hat, with white feather, was also worn. The bride's sister acted as bridesmaid, and was prettily gowned in white ninon over white chiffon. taffeta, and a pretty hat trimmed with white ostrich feathers and plaited gold braid. The bridegroom's gift—a gold bracelet—was also worn. The best man was Mr. E. O. Kelly. After the ceremony a reception was held in St. David's Hall, was which was profusely decorated. The walls were hidden under a trellis adorned with sheaves of adorned corn and pink poppies : festoons of pink flowers caught up with joy bells. The presents were very numerous and handsome. The bridal couple left for their honeymoon trip by the outgoing mail steamer. Osterley, en route for the Continent and England.9

Citations

  1. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 5440; Folio: 73; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1342309."
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "JONES, ELLEN (Mo maiden name GRIFFITHS) GRO Reference: 1881 M Quarter in ABERAYRON Volume 11B Page 43."
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B524 003.
  4. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D2745 (age 70)."
  6. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    The cremated remains have been scattered - Service 13 Jun 1951.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 14 Mar 1951, p18.
  8. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936 "also Emlyn Leighton JONES, salesman."
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925), Thu 3 Mar 1910, p26
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article176544728
Last Edited22 Jan 2018

Edwin Jones

M, #2604, b. Dec 1881, d. Jun 1959
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Birth*Dec 1881 Aberayron, Cardiganshire, Wales, Dec Q [Aberayron] 11b 39.1 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Dec 1889 Sailing with Jane Jones, John Griffiths Jones, David Thomas Jones, Evan Jones, Ellen Jones, Jinnie Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship SOBRAON.2
 
Occupation*1918 Stevedore.3 
Death*Jun 1959 Fairfield, VIC, Australia, #D7100 (Age 75) - cremated remains scattered at Springvale.4,5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
19147 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk. With David Jones and Jane Jones.6
19177 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VICOccupation: clerk. With David Jones and Jane Griffiths and William Aeron Jones.7
19217 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk. With David Jones.8
1934402 Mt Albert Road, Mont Albert, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: genteman - with Eileen Jones, hd & David Penry Jones engineer.9
1936402 Mt Albert Road, Mont Albert, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: gentleman. With Rev Isaac Glyn Jones and Ellen Jones.10

Newspaper-Articles

  • 9 May 1931, UNSATISFIED JUDGMENT. Sum of £32,978 Involved.
    On September 2, 1930, Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert road, Mont Albert, obtained judgment in the Supreme Court against William Aeron Jones, of Larnook street, Armadale for £32,978 with costs. Yesterday Edwin Jones made application to Mr. Justice McArthur in the Practice Court for an order directing defendant to come up for examination about his means. Mr. Tait instructed by Messrs. Ellison, Hewison and O'Collins, appeared for the plaintiff.
    Defendant said that he had no objection to the order being made.
    In an affidavit Edwin Jones set out that on August 12 last defendant made a statutory declaration in which he said that his assets were approximately £10,800, and his liabilities (apart from the sum of £32,978) amounted to approximately £2,850. Deponent had since ascertained that at the date the liabilities amounted to more than £2,850, and he believed that the assets were considerably less than those set down. From inquiries made, he believed that the business of horse dealer carried on by defendant showed a considerable profit between the years 1917 and 1931. Deponent believed that defendant had assets sufficient to meet the judgment.
    Mr Justice McArthur directed that defendant should attend foi examination before either the prothonotary or the chief clerk of the Supreme Court. Defendant under the terms of the order will be required to produce all necessary books and documents.11
  • 22 Jul 1931, A REMARKABLE CASE. CONDITIONS OF A DEED. Alleged Non-Compliance.
    What the Chief Justice, (Sir William Irvine) described as a very curious case was dealt with by him on summons in the Practice Court yesterday. Plaintiffs on the summons were Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert-road, Mont Albert, and David Thomas Jones, of Warragul, and defendant was Mrs. Amelia Reid, of Oxford-street, Oakleigh. Mr. Moore (instructed by Messrs. Ellison, Hewison and O'CoIlins) appeared for plaintiffs; there was no appearance for Mrs. Reid.
    It appeared that David Jones, father of plaintiffs, and grandfather of defendant, on 10th August 1926, executed a deed of trust in favour of Mrs. Reid, in respect of a piece of land having a frontage of 52 ½ feet to Oxford-street, Oakleigh, and on which there is a residence. On the same day David Jones signed a transfer of the land to plaintiffs and defendant. Mrs. Reid went into possession of the land in September, and David Jones died on Christmas day, 1926. By the deed of trust plaintiffs and defendant were to hold the land in trust for Mrs. Reid for life, and after her death it was to pass to her children as tenants in common. The life tenancy of Mrs. Reid was subject to the conditions that she should insure the building in the name of plaintiffs, pay the insurance, keep the property in good and substantial repair, and pay all rates and taxes and outgoings.
    Mr. Moore said Mrs. Reid had failed to comply with the condition under the deed, and for some years the other trustees had paid the insurance premiums, and to save the properly from being sold by the authorities had paid all rates and taxes in respect of the property. Plaintiffs had no desire to be harsh, but they had used every endeavor to get Mrs. Reid to do what the deed required of her. They asked for certain declarations, and for an order for possession of the property.
    His Honor made an order that Mrs. Reid should deliver up possession of the land and premises; that the trustees have power to let it, and from the rent pay all insurance premiums, rates, taxes and outgoings, and pay any balance over to Mrs Reid.12
  • 11 Apr 1932, Seeking the sequestration of his brother's estate, Edwin Jones, retired master stevedore, of Mont Albert Road, Mont Albert, in the Bankruptcy Court today alleged that he had lent William Aeron Jones, of Larnook Street, Arma dale, large sums, aggregating with interest, £37,624/19/2, which he had not repaid.13
  • 25 Oct 1932, HORSE EXPORTER. Bankruptcy Examination. BROTHER AS CREDITOR. MELBOURNE, Monday.
    Failure as an exporter of horses to India was stated to be the main cause of the insolvency of William Aeron Jones, veterinary surgeon and horse exporter of Armadale, during his examination before the Deputy Registrar in the Bankruptcy Court to-day.
    Jones's assets were shown as £1127, and the deficiency between his assets and liabilities £36,903.
    His brother, Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert, was the petitioning creditor, and to him he owed the sum of £37,624 for money advanced and interest.
    Another unsecured creditor was the insolvent's father-in-law, Alfred Kelley, retired police magistrate, who was owed £406.
    The examination was adjourned.14
  • 17 Dec 1932, BROTHER'S SUIT
    When Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert, asked Judge Lukin, in the Bankruptcy Court recently not to allow his bankrupt brother, William Jones, veterinary surgeon and horse dealer, of Armadale, to leave Australia temporarily, Judge Lukin severely criticised what he described as
    Edwin Jones's "neglect of his own business.
    Edwin Jones told the court that he had lent his brother practically all his life's savings, amounting to more than £30.000. He alleged that the bankrupt had not disclosed all his assets.
    Judge Lukin refused to make an order restraining the bankrupt from leaving Australia.15
  • 24 Nov 1933, BANKRUPT HORSE DEALER. QUESTIONED ABOUT CHEQUE. Protest Against Third Examination.
    When William Aeron Jones a bankrupt horse dealer and veterinary surgeon of Larnook street Armadale appeared in the Bankruptcy Court yesterdav for his third public examination, his counsel Mr L. E. B. Stretton protested against the proceedings on the ground that Jones had already been examined twice at great length. "When this matter was before Judge Lukin," said Mr Stretton "he spoke strongly in disapprobation of the conduct, of the chief creditor in bringing the bankrupt here on fruitless examinations. I submit that unless there is some fresh matter before the Court the examination should not proceed. The time of the Court and of the bankrupt should not be wasted in this way."
    The registrar (Mr W Merrell) followed the examination to proceed. Mr Stretton was instructed by Messrs Macpherson and Kelley.
    Jones's estate was sequestrated in April 1932, on the petition of his brother Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert road, Mont Albert who is cliimlng £37,624 against the estate for money lent and interest. The total liabilities are set down at £ 38,039 and the assets at £1,127. Edwin Jones told the Court some time ago that between 1917 and 1930 he lent his brother practically all his life's savings. For many years William Aeron Jones was engaged in the export of horses to India and the East.
    Yesterday Jones was further cross-examined by Mr Moore (Instructed by Messrs Ellison, Hewison and O'Collins) who appeared for the brother about a cheque for £1,100 which passed through
    the bankrupts bank account in 1918. Jones had said previously that he thought that the cheque was paid to Messrs Morton and Little.
    Mr Moore.—Since the last examination an accountant has examined the bank accounts of Messrs Morton and Little and I suggest that it is obvious from the report that the cheque was not paid to either of them.
    Jones.—You say that it is obvious. As far as the documents available at the bank are concerned it could not be traced.
    Can you give the Court any assistance as to what happened to that £1,100 cheque?—No more than I have given already. Morton and Little were the only people I had transactions with at the time.
    When Mr Moore asked Jones what happened to a sum of £500 which he received from his father in the same year, Mr Stretton objected that Jones had already been questioned repeatedly about that amount.
    The Registrar.—Counsel is entitled to ask him again. He seems to be trying to guard himself against something.
    Mr Stretton.—But these transactions were 15 years ago. What is the limit of these transactions?
    The Registrar.—The limit will be when he shows that he is trying to do his best to elucidate these matters.
    Jones denied that he had ever visited the jockey Robert Lewis at his home at Gleroy or been with Lewis to Lewis's brother's racing establishment at Mentone. The only dealing he had with Lewis was some years ago when he sold Lewis a horse, but Lewis returned it.
    Mr Moore.—Did you ever make Lewis a present of £25?
    Jones.—No.
    I am told that in your books for 1925 there is an entry. "Present, R. Lewis, £25"?—I don t know anything about it.
    Jones told Mr Moore that some years ago an accountant sent in his income tax returns for the years from 1918 onwards. He had never paid any income tax, either State or Federal, but had paid tax in India. He had disclosed all his assets and he had no interest in a property in Central Australia.
    When Robert Lewis the jockey was called he corroborated Jones's account of his acquaintance with Lewis. Lewis said that he had known Jones for some years and always addressed him as Mr Jones. He had no business interests with him. Neither witness nor his brother had any interest in a property in Central Australia.
    The examination was adjourned.16

Citations

  1. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "JONES, EDWIN (Mother GRIFFITHS) GRO Reference: 1881 D Quarter in ABERAYRON Volume 11B Page 39."
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B524 003.
  3. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), mother's probate.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D7100 (age 75)."
  5. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,
    The cremated remains have been scattered - Service 10 Jun 1959.
  6. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  7. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  8. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  9. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "with wife? Or sister and her son?"
  10. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936 "also Emlyn Leighton JONES, salesman."
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 9 May 1931, p15
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4385241
  12. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wed 22 Jul 1931, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203024363
  13. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Mon 11 Apr 1932, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242802718
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Tue 25 Oct 1932, p6.
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 17 Dec 1932, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224470343
  16. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 24 Nov 1933, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11714309
Last Edited1 Mar 2018

William Aeron Jones

M, #2605, b. 1891, d. Dec 1971
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Birth*1891 Williamstown, VIC, Australia, #B7956.1 
Marriage*31 Jul 1918 Spouse: Elsie Vera Kelley. VIC, Australia, #M5788.2
 
(Passenger) Migration/Travel18 Aug 1949 On 18 Aug 1949 William Aeron Jones travelled with Elsie Vera Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia, sailing on the Stratheden. Departing from sailing 1st class from London to Melbourne. Age 58 - Vet Surgeon.3 
(Passenger) Migration/Travel4 Dec 1960 On 4 Dec 1960 William Aeron Jones travelled with Elsie Vera Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia, sailing on the Vessel:      Himalaya. Departing from sailing 1st class.4 
Death*Dec 1971 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D291/1972 (Age 82)
Funeral service 22 Dec 1971.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
19177 Kelvin Grove, Armadale, VICOccupation: veterinary surgeon. With David Jones and Jane Griffiths and Edwin Jones.6
192156 Larnock Street, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: veterinary surgeon. With Elsie Vera Jones.7

Newspaper-Articles

  • 21 Jan 1911, STRAYED from Carrum, 3 Heifers, branded JJ (second one reversed) milking rump. Reward 10/ for information where can be had. W. A. Jones, Tandderwen. Narre Warren.8
  • 22 Aug 1918, Mr. W. A. Jones, B.V.Sc., to Miss Elsie Kelley.
    Mr. W. A. Jones, B.V.Sc., fourth son of Captain and Mrs. David Jones, of "Cardigan," Kelvin-grove, Armadale, was married to Miss Elsie Vera Kelley; elder daughter of Mr. A. A. Kelley, P.M., and Mrs. Kelley, of Geelong, at Scots' Church, Collins-street, on Wednesday evening, July 31. The Rev. D. Macrae Stewart, M.A. performed the ceremony, and Mr. Mansley Greer presided at the organ. The wedding was a very quiet one.
    The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a frock of ivory Oriental satin and georgette, with an embroidered net veil. She carried a shower bouquet of white hyacinths and azaleas. Her sister, Miss Ida Kelley, attended her, in a pretty maize colored suede cloth frock, and picture hat of velours in the same shade. She wore a diamond ring, the gift of the bridegroom, and carried an 1830 posy of Safrano roses and tinted leaves. Mr. E. Jones, brother of bridegroom, was best man.
    Wedding, breakfast was served at the Francatelli, The bride's mother received her guests in a black crepe de chine and georgette gown, with hat to match. She carried an 1830 posy of violets and carnations. The bride travelled in a sand covert coating costume and black and metallic tissue hat.9
  • 9 May 1931, UNSATISFIED JUDGMENT. Sum of £32,978 Involved.
    On September 2, 1930, Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert road, Mont Albert, obtained judgment in the Supreme Court against William Aeron Jones, of Larnook street, Armadale for £32,978 with costs. Yesterday Edwin Jones made application to Mr. Justice McArthur in the Practice Court for an order directing defendant to come up for examination about his means. Mr. Tait instructed by Messrs. Ellison, Hewison and O'Collins, appeared for the plaintiff.
    Defendant said that he had no objection to the order being made.
    In an affidavit Edwin Jones set out that on August 12 last defendant made a statutory declaration in which he said that his assets were approximately £10,800, and his liabilities (apart from the sum of £32,978) amounted to approximately £2,850. Deponent had since ascertained that at the date the liabilities amounted to more than £2,850, and he believed that the assets were considerably less than those set down. From inquiries made, he believed that the business of horse dealer carried on by defendant showed a considerable profit between the years 1917 and 1931. Deponent believed that defendant had assets sufficient to meet the judgment.
    Mr Justice McArthur directed that defendant should attend foi examination before either the prothonotary or the chief clerk of the Supreme Court. Defendant under the terms of the order will be required to produce all necessary books and documents.10
  • 11 Apr 1932, Seeking the sequestration of his brother's estate, Edwin Jones, retired master stevedore, of Mont Albert Road, Mont Albert, in the Bankruptcy Court today alleged that he had lent William Aeron Jones, of Larnook Street, Arma dale, large sums, aggregating with interest, £37,624/19/2, which he had not repaid.11
  • 25 Oct 1932, HORSE EXPORTER. Bankruptcy Examination. BROTHER AS CREDITOR. MELBOURNE, Monday.
    Failure as an exporter of horses to India was stated to be the main cause of the insolvency of William Aeron Jones, veterinary surgeon and horse exporter of Armadale, during his examination before the Deputy Registrar in the Bankruptcy Court to-day.
    Jones's assets were shown as £1127, and the deficiency between his assets and liabilities £36,903.
    His brother, Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert, was the petitioning creditor, and to him he owed the sum of £37,624 for money advanced and interest.
    Another unsecured creditor was the insolvent's father-in-law, Alfred Kelley, retired police magistrate, who was owed £406.
    The examination was adjourned.12
  • 14 Dec 1932, A BANKRUPT BROTHER. MELBOURNE, December 10.
    When Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert, asked Judge Lukin in the Bankrupt Court last week not to allow his bankrupt brother, William Aeron Jones, veterinary surgeon and horse dealer, of Armadale, to leave Australia temporarily, Judge Lukin severely critlcised what he described as Edwin Jones' 'neglest of his own business. Edwin Jones told the court that he had lent his brother practically all his life's savings, amounting to more than £30,000. He alleged that the bankrupt had not disclosed all his assets.
    Judge Lukin refused to make an order restraining the bankrupt from leaving Australia.13
  • 24 Nov 1933, BANKRUPT HORSE DEALER. QUESTIONED ABOUT CHEQUE. Protest Against Third Examination.
    When William Aeron Jones a bankrupt horse dealer and veterinary surgeon of Larnook street Armadale appeared in the Bankruptcy Court yesterdav for his third public examination, his counsel Mr L. E. B. Stretton protested against the proceedings on the ground that Jones had already been examined twice at great length. "When this matter was before Judge Lukin," said Mr Stretton "he spoke strongly in disapprobation of the conduct, of the chief creditor in bringing the bankrupt here on fruitless examinations. I submit that unless there is some fresh matter before the Court the examination should not proceed. The time of the Court and of the bankrupt should not be wasted in this way."
    The registrar (Mr W Merrell) followed the examination to proceed. Mr Stretton was instructed by Messrs Macpherson and Kelley.
    Jones's estate was sequestrated in April 1932, on the petition of his brother Edwin Jones, of Mont Albert road, Mont Albert who is cliimlng £37,624 against the estate for money lent and interest. The total liabilities are set down at £ 38,039 and the assets at £1,127. Edwin Jones told the Court some time ago that between 1917 and 1930 he lent his brother practically all his life's savings. For many years William Aeron Jones was engaged in the export of horses to India and the East.
    Yesterday Jones was further cross-examined by Mr Moore (Instructed by Messrs Ellison, Hewison and O'Collins) who appeared for the brother about a cheque for £1,100 which passed through
    the bankrupts bank account in 1918. Jones had said previously that he thought that the cheque was paid to Messrs Morton and Little.
    Mr Moore.—Since the last examination an accountant has examined the bank accounts of Messrs Morton and Little and I suggest that it is obvious from the report that the cheque was not paid to either of them.
    Jones.—You say that it is obvious. As far as the documents available at the bank are concerned it could not be traced.
    Can you give the Court any assistance as to what happened to that £1,100 cheque?—No more than I have given already. Morton and Little were the only people I had transactions with at the time.
    When Mr Moore asked Jones what happened to a sum of £500 which he received from his father in the same year, Mr Stretton objected that Jones had already been questioned repeatedly about that amount.
    The Registrar.—Counsel is entitled to ask him again. He seems to be trying to guard himself against something.
    Mr Stretton.—But these transactions were 15 years ago. What is the limit of these transactions?
    The Registrar.—The limit will be when he shows that he is trying to do his best to elucidate these matters.
    Jones denied that he had ever visited the jockey Robert Lewis at his home at Gleroy or been with Lewis to Lewis's brother's racing establishment at Mentone. The only dealing he had with Lewis was some years ago when he sold Lewis a horse, but Lewis returned it.
    Mr Moore.—Did you ever make Lewis a present of £25?
    Jones.—No.
    I am told that in your books for 1925 there is an entry. "Present, R. Lewis, £25"?—I don t know anything about it.
    Jones told Mr Moore that some years ago an accountant sent in his income tax returns for the years from 1918 onwards. He had never paid any income tax, either State or Federal, but had paid tax in India. He had disclosed all his assets and he had no interest in a property in Central Australia.
    When Robert Lewis the jockey was called he corroborated Jones's account of his acquaintance with Lewis. Lewis said that he had known Jones for some years and always addressed him as Mr Jones. He had no business interests with him. Neither witness nor his brother had any interest in a property in Central Australia.
    The examination was adjourned.14
  • 29 Sep 1936, Mr W A Jones a Melbourne veterinary surgeon and horse exporter returned from the East in the Tanda yesterday. He said that there was a good market for Australian racehorses and polo ponies in the Straits Settlements, Burma, and China.15

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#B7956."
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960.
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Fremantle, Western Australia, Passenger Lists, 1897-1963.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D291 (Age 82)."
  6. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  7. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  8. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Sat 21 Jan 1911, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196178250
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thu 22 Aug 1918, p10.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 9 May 1931, p15
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4385241
  11. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Mon 11 Apr 1932, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242802718
  12. [S14] Newspaper - Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Tue 25 Oct 1932, p6.
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954), Wed 14 Dec 1932, p7.
  14. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 24 Nov 1933, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11714309
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 29 Sep 1936, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11919934
Last Edited1 Mar 2018

Thomas Evan Jones

M, #2606, b. 1898, d. 16 Jun 1964
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Probate (Will)* 618/924. Thomas Evan JONES Date of grant: 11 Dec 1964; Date of death: 16 Jun 1964; Occupation: Dairy Farmer; Residence: Narre Warren North.1 
Birth*1898 Armadale, VIC, Australia, #B185.2 
Marriage*1921 Spouse: Margaret Alice Asling. VIC, Australia, #M5522.3
 
Widower15 Jul 1925Thomas Evan Jones became a widower upon the death of his wife Margaret Alice Asling.4 
Marriage*1928 Spouse: Alice Asling. VIC, Australia, #M486 (Alice ASLING was the aunt of his first wife.)3
 
Death*16 Jun 1964 Dandenong, VIC, Australia, #D11691 (age 67)
buried springvale botanical cemetery T G Allen Lawn, Row AD, Grave 09.5,6 
Death-Notice*18 Jun 1964JONES.—On June 16, at Dandenong, Thomas Evan, dearly loved husband of Alice.
JONES.—On June 16, Thomas Evan, loved father of Evan, loved father-in-law of Janet, fond grandfather of Margaret, Robyn, Peta and Susan. At rest.
JONES.—The friends of the late Mr THOMAS EVAN JONES, of Narrr Warren North, are notified that his Funeral will leave our chapel, 10 Walker Street, Dandenong, TOMORROW, after a service to commence at 11 a.m., for the Springvale Lawn Cemetery.7 

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P3 unit 561, item 618/924
    VPRS 28/ P4 unit 3314, item 618/924.
  2. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#B185."
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D11691 (age 67)."
  6. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
  7. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 18 Jun 1964, p17.
Last Edited13 Jan 2018

Evan Jones

M, #2607, b. Dec 1878, d. 3 Jun 1895
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Birth*Dec 1878 Llanddewi, Cardiganshire, Wales, Dec Q [Aberayron] 11b 51.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel27 Dec 1889 Sailing with Jane Jones, John Griffiths Jones, David Thomas Jones, Ellen Jones, Edwin Jones, Jinnie Jones to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship SOBRAON.3
 
Death*3 Jun 1895 Williamstown, VIC, Australia, #D7613 (age 16.)4 
Death-Notice*5 Jun 1895JONES.— On the 3rd June, at his parents residence, Osbourne-street, South Wllliamstown, Evan, the dearly loved third eldest son of Capt. David and Jane Jones, aged 16 years.
JONES.— The Friends of Captain DAVID JONES are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late beloved third eldest son, Evan, to the place of interment, the Williamstown General Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to take place THIS DAY (Wednesday), the 5th inst., leaving his residence, Osbourne-street, South Williamstown, at 3 o'clock p.m.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 1881Tandderwen, Llanarth, Cardiganshire, Wales(Head of Household) David Jones;
Age 2
Member(s) of Household: Jane Jones, David Thomas Jones, Ellen Jones, John Griffiths Jones1

Grave

  • PRES*E*26*1, Williamstown Cemetery, Williamstown, VIC, Australia6

Citations

  1. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 5440; Folio: 73; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1342309."
  2. [S332] UK - General Register Office Indexes "JONES, EVAN (Mother's Maiden Name GRIFFITHS) GRO Reference: 1878 D Quarter in ABERAYRON Volume 11B Page 51."
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B524 003.
  4. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#D7613 (age 16)."
  5. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 5 Jun 1895, p1+8.
  6. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Williamstown Cemetery - also buried there in Leighton Glyn JONES 7.2.1939 - 6.6.2005 Age 66 (Son of Emlyn),.
Last Edited24 Jan 2018

Bessie Jones

F, #2608, b. 1892, d. 18 Jun 1893
Father*David Jones b. 3 Feb 1841, d. 25 Dec 1926
Mother*Jane Griffiths b. 29 Mar 1854, d. 21 Dec 1918
Birth*1892 Williamstown, VIC, Australia, #B37512.1 
Death*18 Jun 1893 Williamstown, VIC, Australia, #D8117 (Age 8M.)1 

Grave

  • PRES*E*26*1, Williamstown Cemetery, Williamstown, VIC, Australia2

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#D8117 (Age 8M)."
  2. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Williamstown Cemetery - also buried there in Leighton Glyn JONES 7.2.1939 - 6.6.2005 Age 66 (Son of Emlyn),.
Last Edited24 Jan 2018

George Collingburn

M, #2609, b. 1862, d. 22 Feb 1937
Birth*1862 Sand, VIC, Australia, #B19557 [par Francis COLLINGBURN & Ann BEST].1 
Marriage*1903 Spouse: Emily Dicken. VIC, Australia, #M1488.1
 
Residence*bt 1916 - 1924 Bowna, NSW, Australia, farmer.2 
Land-Note*1933 Capt Jones property may have been sold to George Collingburn first - it appears that the sale was not finalised - see caveat.3,4 
Death*22 Feb 1937 Warragul, VIC, Australia, #D13403 (Age 75) [par Edward COLLINGBURN & Annie BEST].5 
Death-Notice*23 Feb 1937COLLINGBURN. — On the 22nd February, at Warragul, George, beloved husband of Emily, in his 75th year. A patient sufferer at rest.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1931North Monegatta, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Emily Collingburn.7
bt 1934 - 1936Yarragon, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grazier. With Emily Collingburn.8,9

Newspaper-Articles

  • 6 Oct 1923, GIRL SHOT WITH RIFLE. TRAGEDY IN FARMHOUSE. Open Verdict at Inquest.
    ALBURY (N.S.W.), Friday.- On Tuesday afternoon Ruby Collingburn, aged 18 years, the adopted daughter of Mr George Collingburn, farmer, of Cumberoona, near Bowna, was found dead in the kitchen of her home. She had been shot through the forehead with a Winchester rifle, which lay beside the body.
    Detective Sadler, of Sydney, was present at an inquest which was held at Albury to-day before Mr. J. B. Gibson, coroner.
    Dr. Conway MacKnight, of Albury, said that when summoned he found no traces of powder or singeing. Dr. W. Cleaver, Government medical officer, who conducted a post-mortem examination, also stated that he found no traces of powder or burning. The wound was in the centre of the forehead.
    George Collingburn said that Ruby was adopted by him and his wife at Melbourne when she was aged nine months. His wife and the dead girl were having words about Creamy, a horse that was to be driven to the Albury Show, before the tragedy occurred. Witness was working in a shed about 70 yards from the house. When he left the house, 15 minutes previously, Ruby was in the kitchen and Mrs. Collingburn was in the front room. Ruby and his wife sometimes had little quarrels, which had recently been more frequent. The girl had never threatened to take her own life. She was of a cheerful and happy disposition.
    Emily Collingburn said that the girl's name, when adopted, was Phyllis Oulter, or Moulton. After lunch on Tuesday witness and Ruby had a quarrel. Witness complained that she was being deceived either by the girl or by her husband in regard to a horse which was to be driven to the Albury Show. Mrs. Collingburn said that she did not hear the report of the rifle but only the sound of a fall. Rushing into the kitchen she found the girl lying on the floor, with the rifle alongside her. When Mr. Collingburn came back to the house he said to witness, "My God! why did you do?" Witness said, "I did not do it." The shot could not have been fired through a window. The coroner returned an open verdict.10
  • 22 Feb 1938, COLLINGBURN.— In loving memory of my dear husband, George, who passed away, February 22, 1936.
    God saw that he was weary.
    The hill too hard to climb;
    So He gently closed his weary eyes,
    And whispered, peace be thine.
    — Inserted by his loving wife, Emily.11

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Sands Directories: Sydney and New South Wales, Australia, 1858-1933.
  3. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 1931/32 rates Jones Capt David / Est of Mrs D. c/o E Jones 402 Mont Albert Road Mont Albert. 280/40ac NAV 27/72 (next NAV50)
    1932/33 rates Jones Capt David / Est of Mrs D. c/o E Jones 402 Mont Albert Road Mont Albert. crossed out 7 Oct 1933 - Collingburn George Beaconsfield Upper. NAV 27/50
    1933/34 rates Collingburn George (Estate David Jones?) 280a lot 68 NAV27 ; 40ac lot 68A House NAV50 - transfer to Downey per 29 May 1934
    1934/5 rates Downey 280a lot 68 NAV 25 40a lot 68A NAV20.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2853-461 - A caveat No 90010 was lodged 10 Nov 1933 - withdrawn 22 May 1934 (possibly by COLLINGBURN?).
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  6. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Tue 23 Feb 1937, p1.
  7. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  8. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  9. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 6 Oct 1923, p31.
  11. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Tue 22 Feb 1938, p1.
Last Edited11 Jan 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.