John Thomas Butler

M, #2194, b. 13 Dec 1836, d. 15 Aug 1920
Father*John Allen Butler
Mother*Harriet Palk
Birth*13 Dec 1836 Shoreditch, Middlesex, England.1 
Marriage*1 Jan 1862 Spouse: Elizabeth Alice Searle. Shoreditch, Middlesex, England.1
 
Land-UBeac*22 Dec 1880 GEM-D-1A l/p 1137 (Lot 1). Transfer from James Oliver Walford to John Thomas Butler. Beaconsfield House.2 
Land-UBeac*18 Aug 1882 GEM-D-1A l/p 1137 (Lot 1). Transfer from John Thomas Butler to Grace Somner. Beaconsfield House.3 
Marriage-Notice*11 Jan 1912GOLDEN WEDDING.
On New Year's Day the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Butler was celebrated at the residence of their son, Mr. J. H. Butler, of Brighton, the well-known accountant. The celebration, which took the form of a garden party, was attended by a large number of relatives and friends.4
Death*15 Aug 1920 Elsternwick, VIC, Australia, #D9997 (Age 83) [par John Allen BUTLER & Harriet PALK].5 
Death-Notice*18 Aug 1920BUTLER.—On the 15th August, at his residence, Kiora, Osborne street, Elsternwick, John Thomas Butler, dearly loved and much devoted husband of Elizabeth Alice, and loving father of J H and W A Butler and the late Beatrice Alice Propstring, aged 84 years (Private interment.)
At rest.6 
Probate (Will)*4 Nov 1920 174/056. Gent. Elsternwick.7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 187197 Hampstead Road, Pancras, London, EnglandHead of Household: John Thomas Butler. Age 27 - Cheesemonger
Member(s) of Household: Elizabeth Alice Butler, John Herbert Butler, Beatrice Alice Butler, Willie Albert Butler.8
bt 1909 - 1914Osborne Street, Elsternwick, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: independent means. With Elizabeth Alice Butler.9,10

Family

Elizabeth Alice Searle b. 12 Oct 1840, d. 13 Sep 1924
Children 1.John Herbert Butler b. Mar 1863, d. 14 Dec 1944
 2.William Povey Butler b. Sep 1864, d. Dec 1865
 3.Beatrice Alice Butler b. Mar 1866, d. 28 Jul 1919
 4.Willie Albert Butler b. Sep 1869, d. 10 Oct 1956

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Jan 1881, BEACONSFIELD HOUSE. BEACONSFIELD, Gipps Land Ranges. The proprietor has much pleasure in informing the public that he has obtained a licence to sell WINES and SPIRITS &c., and none but the very best quality will be kept. Conveyances meet trains at Beaconsfield railway station.11
  • 5 Feb 1881, EASY TRIPS FROM MELBOURNE. - BEACONSFIELD.
    The view before you as you sit in the front verandah of Beaconsfield-house is one of which I have not seen the equal in Victoria. I have seen many of the "show" views, but none that can compare with this for extent, and diversity, and interest. As you sit here you can, without moving, look over those wooded rolling hills close around, over the wide stretch of lowland, mottled with grassy plain and light forest and you see far away to the south the broad blue waters of Western Port, with its great islands, French Island and Phillip Island, which spread over so much of its surface. Slightly turning your head to the right or the westward, you see the afternoon sun flashing on the waters of Port Phillip Bay, and can with the naked eye trace many of its high head lands, such as Portarlington, Mount Martha, and Arthur's Seat. Close at hand you are surrounded by dark, wooded hills, and the one on which you are is the highest of all. They have not the straight, rigid, backbone-and-rib formation of our greater mountain ranges, but are rounded and undulating, pleasantly divided by gently-sloping gullies. Down many of these trickles a clear, cold stream of spring water, over which graceful fern-trees here and there cast a tracery-like shade. On almost every hilltop is a little clearing, in which stands a little cottage with its roof of galvanised iron gleaming like diamond in the sun. Behind us the bulges grow darker and higher, and run back into thelofty mass of the Dandenong. More to the east are seen the blue distant summits of the Juliet and Mount Monda Ranges. Of all this great mass of ranges connected one with the other, or only divided by high passes, Beaconsfield occupies a lofty, prominent outwork, dominating the plains below, and nothing but lowland lies between us and these two great inland seas. And the result of it all is that nowhere else can you find a position commanding such a view as this—a view at once of land and sea, of mountain and plain, presenting close at hand aspects of picturesque nature, dotted with the signs of growing civilisation, and in the dis tance spreading out into limitless expanse, over which the sight ranges till it reaches and becomes lost in the misty margin where earth melts into sky and sky hardens into earth.
    Of the cottages which sprinkle the hills around the greater number are inhabited and owned by Melbourne people, who have taken up theae pieces of land for the purpose of forming easily-accessible country retreats in these cool, shady hills. They are found here in great numbers, and are scattered from far up towards the Dandenong in one way, and down to Gembrook in another. By settling here they manage to secure an altitude of from 1,000 feet and upwards, freely open to the south sea breezes, and within about 30 miles or so from their offices in Melbourne. Some have perched their cottage on the crown of a hill overlooking half a county, some from their front door lookout over ridge after ridge of dark hills, some are on the edge of deep fern tree gullies, along the bottom of which a clear stream steals silently, and some are in proximity to a creek which flashes musically along between huge granite boulders. Each has consulted his preference, and chosen the site most in accordance with his tastes and his convenience. And thus it is that unassuming citizens, who, as you meet them in Collins-street, suggest to your mind nothing at all geographical, up here give their names to hilltops and mountain-gullies. They give them selves bucolic airs, affect leather gaiters, talk of swine and cows, and crops of maize, and forget, or appear to forget, that there are such places as Flinders-lane or Temple-court in the world.
    We left Melbourne, Mrs. X. and I, on Saturday morning by the early train for Gipps Land, and reached Beaconsfield station soon after 9 o'clock. Well, that is very early, and you have the day still before you. Mr. Butler, who is to be our host for a day or two, is waiting at the station, and drives us up the winding, rapidly-rising road to Beaconsfield house, which stands about six miles from the railway line. On the line you are, I should think, not very much above sea level, but by the time you get to the hill-top you are 1,200ft. high. The road is pretty and picturesque, and by looking back now and then you get to see far and farther over the low country. Beaconsfield-house was founded, as I understand, some two or three years ago by Mr. Brisbane, who intended it for the purpose of a sanitarium of easy access to the heat-oppressed citizens of Melbourne. This purpose the railway has helped to foster, and many people, it seems, are now getting into the way of seeking an outlet to pure fresh air and breezes at once of the sea and the mountain in the hills of Beaconsfield. We get to our destination about half-past 10 in the morning, and at once utilise the time between then and dinner in taking a walk. To take a walk is, in fact, your one occupation and resource here. Fortunately, walks are plenti ful. There are close at hand a large number of gullies to explore, and you soon get to see that they all possess different characteristics and different vegetation, and, more especially, different ferns. Then there are numberless tracks leading off in all directions into the forest, most of them conducting along ridge and saddle-back to some or other cottage in the hills, in using the term cottage, I have no intention of speaking disrespectfully, although I must admit that many of these residences are properly entitled to some more imposing ap pellation. In this way would the interval between one meal time and another be filled up by easy strolling in the pure light mountain air, and under the pleasant shade of the forest trees. As the time for the next meal approached the visitors at the hotel would gather together out of the gullies and forest impatience for the sound of the dinner bell. After tea there was nothing pleasanter than to sit and watch the sun descend among the gorgeously-tinted clouds in the west, to see the notched summit-line of the You Yangs fuse and melt in rosy mist, and blood-red gleam quiver on the broad surface of the distant Port Phillip Bay. Gradually the deep rich colours die out of the sky, the vast landscape slowly, imperceptibly fades into shadow, and then into darkness, the stars come out in the sky, still all lucent with the afterglow, till at length night comes down and draws the horizon in close around us, and only the dim outline of a neighbouring hill can be discerned through the darkness.
    But you cannot live altogether on mountain air or diversified hill scenery. Indeed, the more of these you get, the more imperative, as I have before hinted, becomes the call of meal time. I am happy to say that, in that respect, nothing was wanting on our side or on that of our host and hostess. We were very well treated, and we did good justice to our opportunities. Whether it was the walking up and down these hills, of the altitude—a thousand feet of dense atmosphere shaken, off your shoulders—or the breezes coming up fresh and cool from the sea and beating freely on the seaward face of this block of mountain ranges, I do not attempt to explain, but the result was that we sat down to our meals uncommonly hungry. The thermometer indicated a very low temperature, which was shown, too, by the stinging cold air on our faces on the last morning of our stay in Beaconsfield-house. We had to get up very early to take breakfast before starting on the pleasant drive down to the station. It had taken us an hour and a half to ascend, but we ran down easily in an hour. I was amused as we returned to town by the suburban train—not the Gipps Land train, that does not stoop to each undignified pro ceedings—to see how we stopped at almost every cross-road to pick up passengers for Melbourne. And so on through the pretty park-like lands of Berwick and Dandenong, and the sandy heaths of Oakleigh and Caulfield, till we reach the wonderful series of palatial stations, one of which, under the liberal and generous régimé of Mr. Woods, was built at almost every level crossing in the aristocratic districts of Malvern and Toorak.
    X.12
  • 4 Apr 1881, BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, Beaconsfield, GippsLand, is now OPEN for the reception of visitors, and is entirely under new management. Best quality wines, spirits, and ales kept. By wire or letter to proprietor a conveyance will meet any train at Beaconsfield station.13,14
  • 8 Dec 1881, BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, with 40 acres of LAND, for SALE.
    This is a rare opportunity for a merchant wishing to secure a nice summer residence. The house contains about 40 rooms, including large diningroom 20 x 60 or thereabouts, several sittingrooms, about 24 bedrooms, kitchen, pantry, dairy, and scullery ; 12 large iron tanks, two large waterholes with an abundance of water, extensive stabling and coachhouses, nicely laid out garden with choice fruit trees, and a plentiful supply of vegetables. Beaconsfield house is about four miles from the Beaconsfield railway station, on the Gipps Land line (28 miles from Melbourne), or about 1½ hours from the city, trains running frequently ; it is 1200ft above sea level with charming and extensive views the air pure and bracing. The house is very well furnished, which can be taken at valuation. Post and telegraph office attached.
    The above would be suitable for an hotel, with the grounds laid out as pleasure gardens.
    Terms easy.
    Apply to WILLIAM WEAVER, auctioneer, 22 Collins street west.15
  • 12 Jul 1882, BERWICK POLICE COURT. Friday, July 7. A transfer of publican's license was granted for the Beaconsfield hotel, from John T. Butler to A. H. Sumner.16
  • 11 May 1888, VIOLENT CONDUCT.—John McGrath a quarryman, was charged with insulting behaviour, unlawful assault, and damage.
    J. T. Butler license of the United Kingdom hotel said, that on the 5th inst.. about 11 p.m., prisoner entered his bar and called for drink, but finding he was already under the influence he refused to supply him, where upon he jumped over the counter and kept possession of the bar for some time. F. Brandon barman gave corroborative evidence. Mr. Alley expressed his determination to put down offences of this nature and sentenced McGrath, for the insulting behaviour to be fined 40s or fourteen days imprisonment, for assault and damages three months with twelve days solitary, at intervals of three days, the imprisonment to be cumulative.17

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, FearonHall - Owner: jkfearon.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1219-777 - John Thomas Butler of Melbourne Gentleman - C/T 1220-964.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1220-964 - Grace Somner the wife of Arthur Hay Somner of Beaconsfield Gentleman - C/T 1383-562.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925), Thu 11 Jan 1912, p27
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article175614054
  5. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 18 Aug 1920, p1.
  7. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  8. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 201; Folio: 86; Page: 12; GSU roll: 824591."
  9. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  10. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Jan 1881, p8.
  12. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian, 5 Feb 1881, p8.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 Apr 1881, p8.
  14. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 31 Mar 1881, p7.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 8 Dec 1881 p12.
  16. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1877 - 1920; 1926 - 1927), Wed 12 Jul 1882, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70052828
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Mercury and Weekly Courier (Vic. : 1878 - 1903), Fri 11 May 1888, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58464434
Last Edited28 Mar 2019

Walter William Nicholas

M, #2195, b. 1861, d. 30 Jul 1923
Birth*1861 London, England.1 
Marriage*9 Nov 1892 Spouse: Priscilla Paul. Kew, VIC, Australia, #M7156.1
 
Marriage-Notice19 Nov 1892NICHOLAS-PAUL.-On the 9th inst, at the residence of the bride's parents, by the Rev Professor Gosman, Walter William Nicholas, son of W Nicholas, Esq , The Drive, Walthamstow, England, to Priscilla Paul, only daughter of Mrs Arthur H Somner, of Kelso, Cotham road, Kew. No cards.2 
Death*30 Jul 1923 Miram, VIC, Australia, #D10909 (Age 62) [par unknown] reg. Kaniva.3 
Death-Notice*1 Aug 1923NICHOLAS.- On the 30th July, Walter William at Miram Victoria, beloved husband of Priscilla and loving father of Arthur, Grace, and Dorothy, of Ballarat.4 

Family

Priscilla Paul b. Mar 1866, d. 4 Apr 1938
Children 1.Arthur William Nicholas+ b. 1893, d. 10 Jul 1959
 2.Dorothy Nicholas b. 1896, d. 1958
 3.Grace Nicholas b. 1898, d. 1961

Newspaper-Articles

  • 25 Nov 1892, Nicholas—Paul.—A very pretty wedding took place at the residence of the bride's parents " Kelso," Cotham-road, Kew, on Wednesday, November 9, when Miss Priscilla Paul (Prissie), only daughter of Mrs. Arthur H. Somner, was united to Mr. Walter W. Nicholas, F.R.G.S., of "The Drive," Walthamstow, England. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Professor Gosman, in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends. The bride was given away by Mr. Somner, and the groomsmen were Messrs. H. B. Nicholas and A. Kelly. The bride was attired in an exquisite gown of cream china crepe a-la-Princesse, one side of gown being wholly of silk Maltese lace continued round train and finishing with plume of feathers and orange blossom. The bodice was draped from right shoulder, finishing on left side with chatelaine of orange blossom and ribbon velvet. Portia sleeves with inside bishop sleeves with ruche at wrist. The whole had a very artistic effect. The bride was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Ethel Dempster and Miss Elsie Pagan, who wore pretty frocks of creme crepon made in Empire style, trimmed with Irish point and buttercup surah. The house was most beautifully decorated, the drawingroom presented a lovely appearance, being filled with ferns, palms, and flowering pot plants. The wedding cake was of a very novel desgin, being in the form of diamonds in tiers, beautifully ornamented with real flowers. A beautiful marriage bell, composed of white carnations, was suspended above the cake. The happy pair left by the express for Sydney, en route for the Blue Mountains. The bride's travelling dress was of pearl grey bengaline, trimmed with shot grey and pink Ottoman silk. The bride's mother wore a very handsome black silk gown trimmed with heliotrope. The bride received a number of beautiful and costly presents.5

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#M7156."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Nov 1892 p1.
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10909 (Age 62) [par unknown]."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Aug 1923 p1.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 25 Nov 1892, p18.
Last Edited24 Mar 2019

Arthur William Nicholas

M, #2196, b. 1893, d. 10 Jul 1959
Father*Walter William Nicholas b. 1861, d. 30 Jul 1923
Mother*Priscilla Paul b. Mar 1866, d. 4 Apr 1938
Birth*1893 Kew, VIC, Australia, #B32781.1 
Marriage*31 Mar 1920 Spouse: Linda Rose Silvester. Methodist Church, Cobden, VIC, Australia, #M2815.2
 
Widower9 Oct 1921Arthur William Nicholas became a widower upon the death of his wife Linda Rose Silvester.3 
Marriage*1926 Spouse: Edna Jane Williamson. VIC, Australia, #M2316 - as Edna Jane MADDERN.2
 
Death*10 Jul 1959 Ballarat, VIC, Australia, #D24668 (Age 65) (as Arthur Charles.)4 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1925Miram South, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farm labourer. With Priscilla Nicholas and Dorothy Nicholas Grace Nicholas.5
bt 1931 - 1954Mount Rowan, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Edna Jane Nicholas.6,7,8,9,10

Family

Edna Jane Williamson b. 1897, d. 25 Jul 1966
Child 1.Herbert William Nicholas3 b. 1931, d. 1935

Newspaper-Articles

  • 22 Apr 1920, NICHOLAS—SILVESTER
    A pretty, wedding was celebrated at the Cobden Methodist Church, by the Rev T Pollard James, on Wednesday, March 31. The contracting parties were Miss Linda, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs W. J.Silvester, of Cobden, and Mr A Nicholas (late AIF), only son of Mr and Mrs Nicholas, of Ballarat.
    The bride, who was given away by her father, entered the church as the bridal hymn "The Voice that breathed o'er Eden," was rendered. The bride wore a dainty dress of white crepe de chene, and the customary wreath and veil (arranged in cap fashion) held place in her adornment. She carried an artistic bouquet of white carnations and chrysanthemums with red and white streamers (the bridegroom's late battalion colors). The bridesmaid, Miss Sylvia Silvester (cousin of the bride) wore a mastic crepe de chene dress with hat to match. Mr.
    James Pilkington acted as best man.
    As the bride left the Church a kewpie (tied with the bridegroom's colors) was placed on her arm by her sister, Mrs. Gentles, of Sydney.
    A reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents, Rev. James presiding, and the usual toasts were enthusiastically honored.
    The bride and bridegroom left by motor for Camperdown en route for Geelong, where the honeymoon was spent, the bride travelling in a smart navy costume and white satin hat.
    The newly wedded pair have taken up their residence in Ballarat.11

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#B32781."
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D24668 (Age 65) (as Arthur Charles) mother as Priscilla SOMNER."
  5. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  6. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  7. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  8. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  9. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  10. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  11. [S14] Newspaper - Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Thu 22 Apr 1920, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article34474733
Last Edited24 Mar 2019

Dorothy Nicholas

F, #2197, b. 1896, d. 1958
Father*Walter William Nicholas b. 1861, d. 30 Jul 1923
Mother*Priscilla Paul b. Mar 1866, d. 4 Apr 1938
Married NameRurade. 
Birth*1896 Kew, VIC, Australia, #B28863.1 
Marriage*1942 Spouse: Ernest Walter Rurade. VIC, Australia, #M22270.2
 
Death*1958 Elwood, VIC, Australia, #D9610 (Age 61) as Dorothy RURADE.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1925Miram South, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Priscilla Nicholas and Arthur William Nicholas Grace Nicholas.4

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#B28863."
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D9610 (Age 61) as Dorothy RURADE mother as Priscilla SOMNER."
  4. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
Last Edited24 Mar 2019

Grace Nicholas

F, #2198, b. 1898, d. 1961
Father*Walter William Nicholas b. 1861, d. 30 Jul 1923
Mother*Priscilla Paul b. Mar 1866, d. 4 Apr 1938
Birth*1898 Malvern, VIC, Australia, #B12496.1 
Death*1961 Brighton, VIC, Australia, #D15557 (Age 64) as NICHOLAS.2 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1925Miram South, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Priscilla Nicholas and Arthur William Nicholas Dorothy Nicholas.3

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#B12496."
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D15557 (Age 64) as NICHOLAS."
  3. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
Last Edited24 Mar 2019

Dr William Fetherstonhaugh

M, #2202, b. c 1842
Birth*c 1842 
Occupation* FETHERSTONHAUGH William, MD Dub 1866, LRCSI 1867. Regd 2 Oct 1876: Kumara / left NZ 1880 / South Australia. Name at first on NZ register: FEATHERSTONHAUGH. Regd in UK 31 Oct 1867. Asst surgeon RN for a time. Apptd public vaccinator for Kumara 27 Jan 1877. Regd in Victoria 4 July 1878: Colac, Vic. Practd in Tintaldra, Vic; moved to Waukaringa, Sth Aust 1893. Regd in Queensland 1888. Then moved to Ladysmith, Natal, Sth Africa. Deleted from NZ register 1915. Letter returned unclaimed.1 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelMar 1878 Sailing with Grace Foreman Arthur Hay Somner to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Tararua from New Zealand
Age 36.2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelDec 1878 Sailing with Grace Foreman, Priscilla Paul, George Paul to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Aconcagua from England or Scotland
Age 35.3 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 30 Aug 1876, Messrs Osborne, Walker, Meyer, Somerville, and Dr Fetherstonhaugh, left for Greymouth, yesterday, on business connected with the building of the new Hokitika Hospital.4
  • 25 Sep 1876, Registrar of Births, Deaths, &c. Hokitika. SIR I hereby apply to be Registered by you, under the provisions of "The Medical Practitioners Act, 1867." and have deposited my Diplomas with you for Inspection. WILLIAM FETHERSTONHAUGH, A.B.M.B., Trinity College, Dublin, L.R.C.S.I.L5
  • 9 Nov 1876, We take the following from the Kumara Times of Tuesday evening:— A very narrow escape from a fatal accident occurred yesterday afternoon to a young man named William Dove, belonging to Dove and party's claim, adjoining O'Rorke's. Dove had been engaged m slabbing, and was sending up a bucket loaded with stone, when by some means the bucket slipped off the hook and fell a distance of about 40ft, striking Dove on the head and shoulders, inflicting fearful wounds. He was brought into town and conveyed to Rugg's Hotel, where he was attended by Drs Bulmer and Fetherstonhaugh, who dressed his wounds and stopped the bleeding with some difficulty, leaving him in charge with the wardsman of the hospital. He was removed: early this morning to the temporary hospital, Seddon street, where, under the circumstances, he is progressing as favorably as can be expected.6
  • 30 Jan 1877, A letter was read and received from Mr J Twiss, conveying his thanks to the committee for his admission to the Hospital, and expressing his gratitude to Dr Fetherstonhaugh and Mr Suter, for the skill and attention which restored him to health.7
  • 9 Jul 1878, A letter was received from Dr Fetherstonhaugh tendering his resignation as Surgeon- Superintendent on account of ill-health. Mr King, Chairman of the House Committee, said that he had waited on Dr Fetherstonhaugh, who was recommended change of air. The committee recommended that Dr Fetherstonhaugb should receive three months salary in consideration of the circumstances, and in lien of notice. Mr Walker moved, that Dr Fetherstoohaugh's resignation be accepted, and that he receive three months salary from the 21s July instant, on which date his leave expired. On the motion of Mr Cross it was resolved to forward a letter of condolence to Dr Fetherstonhaugh.8
  • 19 Jan 1889, It is notified in to-day's " Government Gazette " that William Fetherstonhaugh, of Brisbane, having failed to produce the neces sary papers, the provisional license to practise medicine granted to him by the Queensland Medical Board has been cancelled.9
  • 22 Jan 1889, DR. FETHERSTONHAUGH IN REPLY. TO THE EDITOR OF THE BRISBANE COURIER.
    Sir,-Under the heading of "A Disqualified Doctor" a short article appeared in your issue of Saturday I am fully aware that the information contained therein emanated from the "Government Gazette," but as the "Gazette" notice is not only misleading but likely to do me an incalculable amount of harm, unless explained, I sincerely trust that you will do me the justice to publish this letter of explanation. I am a duly qualified man, having diploma of Licentiate of the Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland, diploma of Bachelor of Medicine of the University of Dublin, and Bachelor of Arts of the same university. In addition to this I am a retired surgeon of the Royal Navy. Some time ago, when practising my profession in Adelaide, South Australia, I intrusted for safe keeping my diplomas, &c. to a chemist named Anderson, and up to this time I have not been able to regain possession of the said documents from him. The matter is now lying, together with an affidavit of facts, in the hands of the Medical Board of South Australia, in order that they may trace Anderson and recover my papers. I still hold certificates of registration in New Zealand, Victoria, New South Wales, and South Australia, which are ample proof of my bona fides. The Medical Board of Queensland registered me for six months, during which time I was expected to produce my diplomas. I was unable to do so owing to the detention previously explained, and without the slightest warning from the board, I find myself gazetted as a disqualified man, adver tised in the leading journals of the colony, and deprived of my livelihood. I think you and the Brisbane public will admit, sir, that my case is one of peculiar hardship. -I am, sir, &c.,
    WILLIAM FETHERSTONHAUGH, A.B., M.B., L.R.C.S.I., R.N.10

Citations

  1. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, www.library.auckland.ac.nz/external/WrightSt-Clair-HistoriaNuncVivat.pdf.
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), N155 002.
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B365 012.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - West Coast Times, 30 Aug 1876, p2.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - West Coast Times (New Zealand) , Issue 2338, 25 September 1876, Page 3.
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Grey River Argus, 9 Nov 1876, p2.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - West Coast Times, 30 Jan 1877, p2.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - West Coast Times , Issue 2890, 9 July 1878, Page 2.
  9. [S14] Newspaper - The Brisbane Courier, 19 Jan 1889, p5.
  10. [S14] Newspaper - The Brisbane Courier, 22 Jan 1889, p6.
Last Edited4 Apr 2019

William Wade

M, #2203
Marriage* Spouse: Mary Cecil Hardinge.
 

Family

Mary Cecil Hardinge
Children 1.Herbert Cecil Wade+ b. 1869, d. 2 Jun 1948
 2.Rev Eustace Vernon Wade+ b. 8 Aug 1877, d. 21 Sep 1967
Last Edited31 Aug 2015

Mary Cecil Hardinge

F, #2204
Married NameWade. 
Marriage* Spouse: William Wade.
 

Family

William Wade
Children 1.Herbert Cecil Wade+ b. 1869, d. 2 Jun 1948
 2.Rev Eustace Vernon Wade+ b. 8 Aug 1877, d. 21 Sep 1967
Last Edited31 Aug 2015

Herbert Cecil Wade

M, #2205, b. 1869, d. 2 Jun 1948
Father*William Wade
Mother*Mary Cecil Hardinge
Birth*1869 Malmesbury, VIC, Australia, #B9760.1 
Marriage*4 Apr 1896 Spouse: Sarah Elizabeth Lievesley. St Paul's, Bendigo, VIC, Australia, #2044R.2
 
Marriage-Notice*2 May 1896WADE - LIEVESLEY.—On the 4th ult., at St. Paul's, Bendigo, by the Ven. Archdeacon M'Cullagh and the Rev. W. C. Sadlier, B.A. (brother-in-law of the bride), Herbert Cecil, third son of Wm Wade, East Melbourne, and grandson of the late Rev. W. E. Wade, and of the late S. R. Hardinge, formerly Deputy Postmaster-General of Tasmania, to Sarah Elizabeth (Lizzie), eldest daughter of Wm. Lievesley, Quarry Hill, Bendigo. Tasmanian papers please copy.3 
Death*2 Jun 1948 Sydney, NSW, Australia.4 
Death-Notice*16 Jun 1948WADE.-On June 2, at Sydney, Herbert Cecil, beloved brother of Florence, Arthur, Eustace, and Vera Wade.4 

Family

Sarah Elizabeth Lievesley b. Mar 1869
Child 1.Edith Irene Cecil Wade b. 14 Jul 1899, d. 1983

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B9760."
  2. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#2044R."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 May 1896, p1.
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Jun 1948, p2.
Last Edited31 Aug 2015

Matilda Hill

F, #2220, b. 1810, d. 28 Apr 1886
Married NameMoss. 
Birth*1810 
Marriage*26 May 1829 Spouse: Henry Moss. Aston Yuxta, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, M011681.1,2
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJan 1856 Sailing with Henry Moss, Henry Edwardes Moss, Ellen Robinson, Louisa Matilda Moss to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Clasmerden
Age 50 (as Henrietta.)3 
Death*28 Apr 1886 Boscobel, Princes-street, Port Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D6800 (Age 76) [par Richard Edward HILL].1,4 
Death-Notice29 Apr 1886MOSS.—On the 28th inst., at her late residence Boscobal, Princes-street, Port Melbourne, Matilda, the late wife of Henry Moss, in her 77th year.5 
Probate (Will)*27 Aug 1886 32/450. Leaves her assets to Henry MOSS. Value £1460.6 

Grave

  • C/E C1029,a & C/E C1030,a, Boroondara Cemetery, Kew, VIC, Australia, Sacred to the memory of Matilda, wife of Henry MOSS, d 28 Apr 1886, aged 77 years, also Henry, husband of above, b 17 Jun 1807, d 29 Aug 1889, also Henry Edwardes MOSS, d 1 Sep 1891, aged 61 years.
    In loving memory of Alice, d 18 Jun 1945, aged 50 years, beloved wife of Richard P. C. MOSS, d 14 Jan 1954.
    Rev Arthur Estal SEDSMAN, d 17 Aug 1971, aged 84 years, also Margaret, his beloved wife, d 27 Dec 1975, aged 62 years, our beloved Mother.
    In loving memory of Ellen, wife of Edwardes MOSS, d 28 Apr 1917, aged 92 years.7,8

Family

Henry Moss b. 1807, d. 29 Aug 1889
Child 1.Louisa Matilda Moss+ b. 21 Dec 1832, d. 1 Apr 1886

Newspaper-Articles

  • 27 Apr 1888, MOSS.—In loving remembrance of Matilda Moss, who departed this life at Port Melbourne, 27th April, 1886. (Inserted by her grandchildren, S. M. and E. G. Moss.)9

Citations

  1. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Apr 1886.
  2. [S31] IGI "M011681."
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B104 001.
  4. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#D6800 (Age 76) [par Richard Edward HILL]."
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Apr 1886 p1.
  6. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 32/450.
  7. [S46] Index of burials in the cemetery of Boroondara, Kew,
    C1029: Henry MOSS; Henry MOSS (grandson); Edm George MOSS (husband of Sophie)
    C1030: Matilda MOSS; Henry Edwards MOSS; Ellen MOSS (his wife); Sophia Matilda MOSS.
  8. [S20] Various indexed records of GSV - Genealogical Society Victoria "Boroondara Memorial Inscriptions compiled by Port Philip Pioneers Group Inc 1993."
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Apr 1888, p1.
Last Edited23 Mar 2019
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.