Mildred Esther Taylor

F, #22861, b. 1880
Married NameSmith. 
Birth*1880 [par James John TAYLOR & Elizabeth Esther GILLIGAN].1 
Marriage*15 Jan 1919 Spouse: William Carter Smith. St Mark's Church, Darling Point, Sydney, NSW, Australia, married as PRYDE (widow.)2,3
 
Marriage-Notice*1 Feb 1919CARTER-SMITH—PRYDE.—On the 15th January, at St. Mark's Church, Darling Point, Sydney, by the Rev. Canon Lea, William Carter Smith to Mildred Esther Pryde.2 

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Marriage Certificate.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 1 Feb 1919, p57
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140218055
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Marriage Certificate: Age 39, widow, married as PRYDE. William may have been using double surname. Occupation solicitor.
Last Edited9 Jul 2019

Margaret Catherine Mills

F, #22869, b. 1874, d. 26 Apr 1915
Married NameSmith. 
Birth*1874 
Marriage*15 Sep 1896 Spouse: Herbert Henry Smith. St Peter's, Ballarat, VIC, Australia, #M4130/1896.1
 
Marriage-Notice*10 Oct 1896SMITH—MILLS.—On the 15th September, at St. Peter's, Ballarat, by Rev. Slaney Poole, Herbert, fourth son of the late Mr. Sydney Smith, C.F., St. Kilda, to Cassie, third daughter of the late Mr. John Mills, Ballarat.2 
Death*26 Apr 1915 Kew, VIC, Australia, #D5576/1915 (Age 41) [par John MILLS & Eliza McGOVAN].3 
Death-Notice*27 Apr 1915SMITH.—On the 26th April, 1915, at her residence, "Godalming," corner Barker's road and Denmark street, Kew, Margaret Catherine, the deqrly beloved wife of Herbert H. Smith, aged 41 years.4 

Citations

  1. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 10 Oct 1896, p51
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139731908
  3. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 27 Apr 1915, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1512583
Last Edited9 Jul 2019

Charles Englebert Propsting

M, #22873, b. 1860, d. 1933
Birth*1860 Hobart, TAS, Australia. 
Marriage*16 Apr 1917 Spouse: Clara Elizabeth Smith. Holy Trinity Curch, Balaclava, VIC, Australia.
 
Death*1933 Alberton, VIC, Australia, #D12001/1933 (Age 73) [par George PROPSTING & Rachel COOK].1 

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Hobart Tasmania."
Last Edited9 Jul 2019

Marian Lavinia Jones1

F, #22876, b. 1867, d. 1 Dec 1954
Married NameMcKay. 
Married NameSmith.1 
Birth*1867 Stratford, VIC, Australia.1 
Marriage*1888 Spouse: Ninian Bow MacKay. VIC, Australia, #M1169/1888.2
 
Marriage*1907 Spouse: Clifford Thornburgh Smith. St Peters, NSW, Australia, #M5726/1907 (as McKAY.)1
 
WidowJul 1947Marian Lavinia Jones became a widow upon the death of her husband Ninian Bow MacKay.3 
Widow12 Sep 1949Marian Lavinia Jones became a widow upon the death of her husband Clifford Thornburgh Smith.4 
Death*1 Dec 1954 South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #D13898/1954 (Age 87) [par William Henry JONES & Ann Jane CAVANAGH].1 
Death-Notice*4 Dec 1954SMITH. — On December 1, at a private hospital, Melbourne, Marian Lavinia, beloved wife of the late Clifford T. Smith and loved mother of Audrey and Clifford. Privately cremated December 2.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1913Bown's Road, Kogarah, NSW, AustraliaOccupation: domestic duties. With Clifford Thornburgh Smith.6
192245 Robe Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Clifford Thornburgh Smith.7
19266 Royal Crescent, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Clifford Thornburgh Smith. With Clifford Thornburgh Smith.8

Grave

  • Pittosporum, Wall 3AA, Niche 44, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia9

Newspaper-Articles

  • 11 Jul 1905, Decree Nisi. Ninian Bow McKay versus Marian Lavinia
    McKay and Clifford Smith.
    Mr. Paris Nesbit, who appeared for the petitioner, moved for a decree nisi for the dissolution of the marriage of Ninian Bow McKay and Marian McKay, and mentioned that the case was heard by Mr. Justice Gordon on Friday last. Mr. Justice Gordon reported that he found the allegations set out in the petition proved, and a decree nisi was made, the petitioner to have the custody of the child (a girl of 16). Costs were ordered against the co-respondent.10
  • 12 Jul 1905, ADELAIDE DIVORCE CASE. ADELAIDE. Tuesday.—At the Supreme Court to-day a decree nisi was granted in the case of Ninian Bow M'Kay v. Marion Lavinia M'Kay and Clifford Smith was joined as co-respondent.
    M'Kay, who resides at Hindmarsh, was married at Richmond, Victoria, in 1888. He said he saw his wife last about six or seven years ago. They lived together at Richmond, Newmarket, and North Melbourne. They had one daughter. In 1891 he came to South Australia under an engagement to work. About a month after he cam his wife followed, and they lived together at Hindmarsh till October, 1893. Between that time, and October, 1897, his wife visited her friends in Melbourne several times. In the following March he received a letter, and subsequently sent and had the child taken away and placed with his sister. He did not see his wife for 12 months. When he did see her again in Victoria she consented to return to South Australia. She remained with him for about 12 months, when she
    again went on a visit to Victoria, and, as his wife preferred to live there, he went there for three months. At the end of that term he came back to Hindmarsh, and his wife promised to follow, but he had never seen her since. That was in 1899. He had tried to trace her in New Zealand and subsequently in New South Wales. Last Christmas he sent money through his sister to his wife for the purpose of having his daughter sent to him. His daughter was now with him at Hindmarsh.
    N. A. Webb detailed an interview with Mrs M'Kay at Marickville, Sydney. She said she was mrs Clifford Smith. She had a baby, about 12 months old, in her arms. Subsequently he saw Smith's brother, who said his brother and wife had, a few months before, came back from New Zealand.
    A decree nisi was granted, with costs against the co-respondent, and custody of the child.11
  • 15 Jul 1905, Ninian Bow McKay versus Marion Lavinia McKay and Smith.
    Mr. Paris Nesbit, K.C, appeared for the petitioner, who asked for a dissolution of his marriage with the respondent on the ground of misconduct.
    His Honor intimated that he would report to the Full Court that he found that allegation proved.12

Citations

  1. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born Stratford."
  2. [S27] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Marriages) (online).
  3. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia.
  4. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online) "born St Kilda [par Sydney SMITH & Sarah UNKNOWN]."
  5. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Sat 4 Dec 1954, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205732583
  6. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  7. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  8. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  9. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery,.
  10. [S14] Newspaper - The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Tue 11 Jul 1905, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208892073
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 12 Jul 1905, p9
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9879716
  12. [S14] Newspaper - Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Sat 15 Jul 1905, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88172461
Last Edited9 Jul 2019

Agnes Simmons

F, #22881, b. 1851, d. 26 Jun 1929
Probate (Will)* 229/511. Agnes SIMMONS Date of grant: 15 Aug 1929; Date of death: 26 Jun 1929; Occupation: Spinster; Residence: Sth Sassafras.1 
Birth*1851 England. 
Property-Rates16 Oct 1878 At Reilly Street / Emma Street, Collingwood, VIC, Australia, 1382. Simmons Agnes. Dressmaker. Brick House. Owner James Cole. NAV 16.2 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelFeb 1883 To New Zealand. Ship could be her? ROTOMAHANA sailing from Melbourne.3
 
Property-Rates25 Jan 1886 At Clyde Street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, 3412. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Swimming. 3 rooms. Owner Eliz Evans. NAV 12. Paid 9 Jun 1886.4 
Property-Rates12 Dec 1887 At Clyde Street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, 4314. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Gymnastics. 3 rooms. Owner E Evans. NAV 12. Paid 8 Jun 1888.5 
Property-Rates26 Nov 1888 At Clyde Street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, 4970. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Gymnastics. 3 rooms. Owner E Evans. NAV 12. Paid 6 Apr 1889.6 
Property-Rates1889 At Dorcas Place, South Melbourne, VIC, Australia, No 8207. Simmons Agnes. (no occ). Owner Frederick Skinner, Carrier. Dorcas Place. 2 rooms. NAV 12.7 
Property-Rates1890 At Clyde Street, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, 4970. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Swimming. 3 rooms. Owner Mrs Evans. NAV 12. Paid 9 Apr 1890.8 
Note*1894 Geraldine Helena Minet. In 1894, the Victorian Coal Mining Company sank a shaft opposite the abattoir. Coal was in great demand for power and heating. According to the first volume of the History of St Kilda, the company’s actions were guided by a spirit entity called Pat who communicated with one of the owners, Geraldine Minet. Pat proved unreliable and the venture was unsuccessful. Miss Minet’s partner was Agnes Simmons who taught swimming at Hegarty’s Baths with her fellow instructor, Miss Harriet Elphingstone Dick. There was a feminist flavour to the coal venture with the driving engine named Helena. Apparently Simmons and Minet owned a farm at Clayton where male animals were banned and after her death, Miss Simmons left her estate to the Society for the Protection of Animals.9 
Property-Rates24 Jan 1898 At 94 Packington Street W, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, No 2551. Simmons Agnes. Domestic Duties. Owner City of Melbourne Bank (in liquidation). 94 Packington Street W. 4 rooms. NAV 13. Paid 21 May 1898.8 
Property-Rates6 Feb 1899 At 94 Packington Street W, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, No 2595. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Swimming. Owner City of Melbourne Bank (in liquidation). 94 Packington Street W. 4 rooms. NAV 12. Paid 10 Jun 1899.8 
Property-Rates*8 Jan 1900 At 94 Packington Street W, St Kilda, VIC, Australia, No 2597. Simmons Agnes. Teacher of Swimming. Owner City of Melbourne Bank (in liquidation). 94 Packington Street W. 4 rooms. NAV 14. Paid 24 Apr 1900.8 
Death*26 Jun 1929 Belgrave, VIC, Australia, #D8133/1929 (Age 78) [par SIMMONS].10 
Death-Notice*2 Jul 1929SIMMONS.—On the 26th June (passed peacefully away), at Grantulla, Kallista, Miss Agnes Simmons, the dear neighbour of Mrs. Dethridge.11 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1912 - 1928South Sassafrass, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer.12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26

Grave

  • COE A 1 10, Fern Tree Gully Cemetery, Fern Tree Gully, VIC, Australia27

Newspaper-Articles

  • 29 May 1885, THE WOMEN S SUFFRAGE QUESTION. To the editor of The Herald.
    Dear Mr Editor,— If "J.P.T.C," had sufficient capacity to realise the different positions that women take in the various nations of the world, he will find that her sphere is just what man makes it, instead of what her own intelligence and ability ought to make it. In Austria her sphere is to do adavengers' work and build houses; in Dahomey, to fight ; in Germany, to be yoked with a cow and draw the plough ; in Savagedom, the man carried his lordly spear, and war paint, while his better half's sphere is to stagger under his goods and chattels ; and if an extra gallant Britisher suggest that the division of labor might be more equitably divided the idea is scouted with as much idiotic scorn as a Boy Politician gives to the earnest efforts of women to raise themselves to the level of human beings with human rights, who, being taxed, ask for representation, The average Britisher's notion of woman's sphere is that she may, and should, do all dirty ill paid work that men don't want. She is not out of her sphere in the hospitals, doing all the dirty work, till she asks for a Doctor's degree. "J.P.T.C." is 20 years behind the time with his fossilised arguments infantile in the extreme, which have been all combatted and answered by abler pens than mine, years ago—
    I am, etc., AGNES SIMMONS.28
  • 19 Feb 1887, A gallant rescue of a little boy from drowning was effected on Thursday last at Hegartys baths, St. Kilda, by Miss Simmons, the well-known teacher of swimming. The boy fell into the deep water in the baths and Miss Simmons plunged into the water with her clothes on and brought him out safely. The courageous and timely act of Miss Simmons was properly appreciated by the boy's parents. His mother warmly thanked Miss Simmons and presented her with a cheque for L20.29
  • 16 Mar 1895, HOUSEBREAKING AT ST. KILDA. The residence of Mrs Agnes Simmons, 94 Pakenham street, St. Kilda,
    was broken into and robbed yesterday afternoon during the abscence of the occupant. Entrance was gained by forcing open the kitchen window. The property stolen was a Waterbury watch, two purses containing jubilee coins, a silver neckchain, pair of opera, glasses, gold brooch, gold hunting geneva watch and some coppers, the whole being valued at L10.30
  • 16 Mar 1895, Agnes Simmons, lady, 94 Packington-street, St. Kilda, reports stolen from her dwelling, on the 15th inst., a lady's waterbury watch ; a silver albert, curb pattern, with a small silver horse bit in centre; a pocket inkstand, leather covered; a red morocco leather purse ; an alligator-skin purse ; a silver neck-chain ; a silver locket, with " A.S." in monogram on it, and the photo of a lady and gentleman inside; a small pair of opera glasses, top of one barrel missing ; a gold bar brooch, set with 3 moonstones; a lady's gold hunting geneva watch, front case out of repair, wich a female's head engraved on front case; a half-crown, a florin, and a four-shilling piece, all jubilee coins ; and a rupee. Value £8. Entrance effected through the kitchen window.—
    0.2139. 16th March, 1895.31
  • 20 Oct 1911, Ferntree Gully Shire Council Correspondence. From Miss A. Simmons, South Sassafras, complaining of a dangerous hole in the road made by burning a stump away and thus exposing the hole, which has made it unsafe to pass along with a cart.—Clerk of works to have hole filled up, on the motion of Crs. Plowman and Nugent.32
  • 29 Jun 1929, 30 YEARS ALONE IN DANDENONG HILLS. Woman Hermit Dead
    Miss Agnes Simmons, the woman who for 30 years lived as a hermit in the hills near Ferntree Gully, died on Wednesday at the age of about 80. She was buried at Ferntree Gully yesterday.
    Everyone in the district knew Miss Simmons. Until recently she rode about the district on her horses — her only companions. Every week she went to the store for her supplies, and if her horse was limping a little she used to lead him rather than ride. Residents have always speculated as to the story of her life, but she always kept to herself. One story told was that she once lived in a mansion at St. Kilda and kept a retinue of servants. What brought her to living in a tumble-down hut remained a secret. She was thin, and had heavy black hair, which she wore down to her collar. Her dress was always the same — riding breeches and leggings.
    FEW FRIENDS
    "The Hermit" had few friends except her neighbors in that mountain fastness. She could talk of literature, art, and kindred subjects with keen interest. According to a Herald correspondent, she was left £3000 by relatives in England some time ago.
    HOUSE STREWN WITH LETTERS
    Miss Simmons was under treatment at the Grand Tower House, Belgrave, before her death. She was in the special care of Mrs Dethridge, the proprietress. Constable Bruce, of Belgrave, said today that he went up to the shack after her death, and found letters strewn all over the floor, and stored up everywhere. Some of them dated back to the early nineties. He found £130 in money and there were five horses. Constable Bruce said he had documents which indicated that she owned property at Kallista, a house at St. Kilda, and held shares in an Indian company. He understood that she had made a will, and lodged it with a solicitor.33
  • 6 Feb 1932, The Strange Hermit of Kallista. A WOMAN WHO LIVED FOR HER HORSES
    MISS AGNES SIMMONS, of Kallista, was one of the strangest friends the Victorian Society for the Protection of Animals ever had. In her canvas coat with four buckles, and wearing a sou'-wester, she was often seen in the hills near Kallista, where she lived as a hermit for 30 years. A hut was her home, and her only friends were five horses. Her past was something of a mystery. She was an educated woman, and it is said that she ran awar from her home in England at the age of 18 years, after her father had sold a hunter to which she was greatly attached. The running away was a characteristic undertaking, for she was a woman of iron determination, tall and masculine in features. From England she went to New Zealand, and from there she came to Australia. For some time she lived in a house at St Kilda, but more than 30 years ago, with characteristic abruptness, she left her home suddenly, leaving personal belongings in the house, and retired to Kallista where, until her death in 1929, at the age of 80 years, she lived like a hermit, devoting herself completely to the welfare of her horses, of which at the time of her death, she possessed five. When Miss Simulons died, the Society for the Protection of Animals, acting in conjunction with the police, took charge of the animals. They were taken to the society's rest home for horses at Ashburton for the time being.
    The sequel was curious. A neighbour sent word to the society that Miss Simmons had made a will leaving her estate to the Victorian Society for the Protection of Animals. About a year before Miss Simmons died this neighbour had witnessed her will and he recalled its contents. The secretary of the society (Mr. A. T. Latham) visited the hut at Kallista to search for the will. What he found there revealed a pathetic story. Apparently Miss Simmons had received small sums of money from England from time to time and from accounts found in the hut it appears that almost all her money was spent on horse rugs and horse feed. For herself Miss Simmons had been content with a bare living. The will was found after a long search. It was written upon a sheet of paper and was wrapped in one of the circulars which are issued by the society. Miss Simmons bequeathed every thing to the organisation and asked that a good home should be found for her five horses, or that they should be humanely destroyed. An ironical fact was that some time before her death Miss Simmons had been bitten by one of the horses while feeding it. One of her hands was mutilated. The society carried out her wishes. Three of the horses were destroyed, one was given to a neighbour mentioned in the will, and the filth was allowed to stay at the rest home, where it still is fat and contented. From Miss Simmons's estate the society received £900.34
  • 14 Jan 1933, Horses and Dogs Enjoy Happy Day. INMATES OF BURWOOD REST HOME ... Dolly a blue roan, has been there since June, 1929. Formerly the mare belonged to Miss Agnes Simmons a strange woman known as the Hermit of Kalista For nearly 30 years she lived in the hills with only her five horses for company, the reason for her solitary seclusion never having been revealed. It was known, however that she had no liking for men or the male sex, and it is significant that all her pets were mares.
    She was an educated woman, and it was said that she had run away from home in England at the age of 18 years because her father had sold a hunter to which she was greatly attached. She was a woman of strong determination masculine in appearance and attire and she spent practically all her income a horse rugs and horse feed. In her canvas coat and sou'-wester she was a familiar figure invariably riding or lead ing one of her horses through the Dandenong Hills.
    Substantial Benefaction
    When she died in 1929 at the age of 80 years, it was found that she had led her entire estate to the V.S.P.A. She requested that good homes should be found for her five horses, or that they should be humanely destroyed, and her wishes were observed. One was given to a neighbor mentioned in the will and three which were so old and decrepit that they could not leave the farm were put out of their misery. Dolly, the blue roan, was moved to the rest home when she has been ever since.
    As a result of Miss Simmons' benefaction. the funds of the society benefited to the extent of about £900. "The farm at Kallista and a house which she owned at St. Kilda were sold to the best advantage. and a small portion of the proceeds was devoted to the erection of a headstone in the Fern Tree Gully cemetery. It bears the inscription:" "Agnes Simmons. Died at Kallista. 26th June, 1929. A True Friend To Animals Erected by the V.S.P.A.''
    Photographs will be reproduced next week in the Picture Section.)
    By "MENTOR"35

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 7591/ P2 unit 804, item 229/511
    VPRS 28/ P3 unit 2003, item 229/511.
  2. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2340/P Microfilm Copy Of Rate Books, City of Collingwood [copy of VPRS 377] [1864-1901].
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  4. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2335/P Microfilm copy of Rate Books, City of St Kilda [1858-1900]
    Note: The following entry is Elizabeth Rushall (land), the previous entry Elizabeth Evans.
  5. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2335/P Microfilm copy of Rate Books, City of St Kilda [1858-1900]
    Note: The following entry is Elizabeth Rushall, the previous entry Elizabeth Evans.
  6. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2335/P Microfilm copy of Rate Books, City of St Kilda [1858-1900]
    Note: The house/land next to it is owned by Elizabeth Rushall.
  7. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), ublic Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2332/P Microfilm Copy Of Rate Books, City of South Melbourne [copy of VPRS 8264] [1855-1901].
  8. [S366] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Public Record Office Victoria; North Melbourne, Australia; Series Title: 2335/P Microfilm copy of Rate Books, City of St Kilda [1858-1900].
  9. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://skhs.org.au/~SKHSflood/Noxious_Activitiesl.htm
  10. [S28] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Deaths) (online).
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 2 Jul 1929, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4018116
  12. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  13. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  14. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  15. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  16. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  17. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  18. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  19. [S112] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1912.
  20. [S113] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1913.
  21. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  22. [S115] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1915.
  23. [S116] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1916.
  24. [S117] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1917.
  25. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  26. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  27. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/100409267/agnes-simmons,.
  28. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 29 May 1885, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241344725
  29. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 19 Feb 1887, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241239229
  30. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 16 Mar 1895, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241097370
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 20 Mar 1895, p88.
  32. [S14] Newspaper - Reporter (Box Hill, Vic. : 1889 - 1918), Fri 20 Oct 1911, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90368393
  33. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 29 Jun 1929, p16
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244107276
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 6 Feb 1932, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4419703
    By EDGAR HOLT.
  35. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 14 Jan 1933, p22
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223808896
    Well Cared for Inmates of the V.S.P.A. Rest Home at Ashburton
    1. Some of the "guests" whose owners are on holidays. Their pets are well eared for during their absence. 2. In a shady spot. More than 600 horses have been given a short holiday since the Victorian Society for the Protection of Animals established its rest home. 3. Waiting for their turn. Don and Pompey, the cocker spaniel twins look forward to their morning swim 4. Tiger has an affectionate greeting for the Tail Wagger In Chief (Mr Geo. Sutton). The idea of finding a temporary home for household pets originated with the Tail Waggers Club. 5. Prince, the Samoyed. is a prime favorite with visitors. 6. Elsie Stones, daughter of the caretaker of the home, finds three of her charges rather a handful. [ILLUSTRATED]
    Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 21 Jan 1933, p37
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page23864510
Last Edited17 Jun 2020

Florence Carmel Rieke Parker

F, #22882, b. Jul 1893, d. May 1977
Rieke PARKER
(Punch, 17 Jul 1913)
Father*Erskine James Rainey Parker b. 10 Oct 1857, d. 29 Dec 1919
Mother*Florence Agnes Leary b. 24 Jan 1859, d. 27 Jul 1949
Married NameDunham. 
Birth*Jul 1893 TAS, Australia.1,2 
Note*1898 Caroline Mercy Alice Moon. Rieke Parker lived with Anna, Ellen and Josephine McCormick at The Steyne in Abbotsford. This house formerly belonged to Alice Moon. 
Note*bt 1898 - 1943 Anna Julia Josephine McCormick. Rieke Parker stayed at with the McCormicks.' 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel18 May 1915 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Osterley travelling 2nd class from London. Departure 9 Apr 1915
as Miss R. Parker - contracted to land at Sydney.3 
(Heir) Will9 May 1919Josephine Russell. Ellen Maria McCormick, Anna Julia Josephine McCormick. In their wills, which they wrote at the same time, they stated: "As to my share and interest in the house at Abbotsford owned by me and my sister [name] upon trust for my said sister during her life and and after her death upon trust for Josephine Russell and Florence Carmel Reike Parker absolutely as joint tenants and I request them if they should determine at any time to sell the said house to offer to the Convent of the Good Shepherd Abbotsford the first opportunty of purchasing the same. Provided however that this request shall not be deemed to create any trust to that effect."
At the time of Ellen's death in 1943 the property was valued at £800.
[Note: By the time of Josephine Russell's death in 1949 she did not own any real estate.]4 
Marriage*25 Jun 1947 Spouse: Bertram Clive Dunham. Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M12566/1947 - as Florence Carmel Rieke.5
 
Marriage-Notice*17 Jul 1947Married in Melbourne ... A WEDDING of interest to Tasmanians which took place in Melbourne recently was that of Rieke Parker, one of the well known daughters of Mrs. and the late Mr. Erskine Parker, of Parknook, Cressy, to Mr. Clive Dunham, of Melbourne. Rieke is a talented pianist, and is very well known to Melbourne and Sydney audiences. They will make their home at Abbotsford, Melbourne.6 
Marriage-Notice*26 Jul 1947DUNHAM—PARKER.—On June 25, at Melbourne. Bertram Clive Dunham (R.A.N.), to Rieke Parker.7 
Death*May 1977 Toorak, VIC, Australia, #D11547/1977 (Age 68) [par Francis PARKER & Florence] - as Florence Carmel Rieke DUNHAM.8,9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1931 - 194218 St Helier's Street, Abbotsford, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: musician - as Ricke Parker.10,11,12
194918 St Helier's Street, Abbotsford, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: musician. With Bertram Clive Dunham.13
195440 Elm Grove, Kew, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: musician. With Bertram Clive Dunham.14
196361 Dudley Street, Sherwood, QLD, AustraliaOccupation: musician. With Bertram Clive Dunham.15
197261 Dudley Street, Sherwood, QLD, AustraliaOccupation: musician - also Clive Dunham, musician. With Bertram Clive Dunham. With Clive Dunham.16

Grave

  • E E Simpson Lawn, Row B, Grave 64, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia17

Newspaper-Articles

  • 9 Feb 1901, The Steyne, Jan. 14, 1901. My Dear Aunt Patsy,—Thank you so much for the collecting card. I have got a little money already, but I am afraid I cannot collect as much as Children who can go about, but I will do my very best to fill my card. I hope Santa Claus was good to you and the little orphans this Christmas. He filled two pillow-cases with lovely gifts and toys for me. Don't you think I am a lucky little child, dear Aunt Patsy? Perhaps Santa is sorry for a little girl always lying down, I put up one pillow-case, but Santa put up another one and filled them well. I went to Mass on Christmas morning, and had a lovely time. A little friend of mine, Leila Doubleday, has written to you. I will send it with this letter. I must tell you that I have a lovely little altar of my very own. When I was taken to bed on Christmas Eve I found that it had been made for me at the foot of my bed. I love my altar, and say my prayers before it every day.
    Dear Aunt Patsy, may I send you my photo and will you kindly send me yours in return? I would love to have it. Thanking you very much for allowing me to be one of your nieces, and wishing you a very happy New Year, I am ever your loving little RIEKE PARKER.
    Dear little Rieke, you may rest assured that I will prize your photo, and also send you one of mine in return. When yours reaches me, I will forward mine.18
  • 16 Mar 1901, The Steyne, Feb. 26, 1901.
    My Dear Aunt Patsy,—I was glad to see my letter in the "Advocate" of Februaay 9th. As you asked me to write soon again, I am writing you a letter now. Kingsley and I are spending the day with Reike. I am learning to play the violin, so I brought my violin with me to play to Reike; she can sing a song called "Just One Girl," and I played it for her. Reike has a lovely doll's house, and we have a nice play with it. Thank you dear Aunt Patsy for the collecting card. I will get as much as I can for the little orphans. I hope the photo, reached you. With much love from your loving niece, LEILA DOUBLEDAY.
    Dear Leila I was delighted to get the photo. You all look so nice—such sweet little faces. I am quite proud of them. The photos are now in a nice frame on my mantelpiece. I love the music of the violin, too.19
  • 4 May 1901, "The Steyne," April 17, 1901. Dear Aunt Patsy,—I hope you spent a very happy Easter, and that you are quite well. Yesterday I got a letter from a lady written from a place called "Pannoobamawn;" as she only signed herself K.A.J. I cannot answer her. Will you allow me to thank her in the "Advocate." She had seen my letters to you and wrote to me, and kindly sent me a prayer to St. Joseph. I wish to thank her very much, and to say that we will all try to spread the devotion to dear St. Joseph as she desires. She sent the letter for me, care of Leila Doubleday, not knowing my address, which is "The Steyne," St. Heliers-street, Abbotsford, Melbourne. I would wish this kind friend to know my address, as I would very much like to hear from her again. She asks me if my back is better. I am thankful to say it is much better. With much love to you, dear Aunt Patsy, I am, your loving niece, RIEKE PARKER.
    Dear Rieke, with much pleasure I publish your letter of thanks to the kind unknown friend. I hope to see you soon, dearie.20
  • 20 Jul 1901, Abbotsford. June 24. My Dear Aunt Patsy.— I am thinking so much of you, and wishing so much to see you that I must write you a little letter to-day. I hope that you are quite well, and that you still remember to say a little prayer for me. I know you will be glad to hear I am now so much better that I am taken out of my support and allowed to stand two or three times a week. This is a great treat to me after lying down for nearly three years. I have not written to you since the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York were here. I was taken several times to see them, and I thought I would like to write a letter to the Duchess, which I did. and H.R.H. sent me a very kind letter in reply. I will show you the letter when you come to see me. I am sending you a little story which came into my head the other evening when I had got tired of threading beads. With much love to you, dear Aunt Patsy, I am ever your loving little niece.
    RIEKE PARKER.
    I also send you a little prayer which I composed.
    Dear little Rieke. I must try and make time to go and see you. I do not forget you in my prayers, darling. I am so glad you are better. This little prayer is beautiful.
    THE PALACE OF JOY.
    By Rieke Parker (aged 7).
    Once upon a time there lived two little girls, one named Mary and the other named Jane.
    One day they went for a walk: they had not gone far before they met an old man who said to them; "What are you doing in my wood?" and "Who are you?" ''I did not know it was your wood," said Jane. "Mary and I only came to this wood to find a doctor to cure mother, who is ill, very ill," and as she spoke she burst into tears. The man's heart was softened; he took Jane in his arms and lifted her in his carriage of gold. He then lifted Mary into the carriage, and he kissed them both. He got in himself and rode away. They soon came to what seemed a beautiful fairy palace, which indeed it was not, but only Heaven, where their mother and father waited for them.
    How happy the children were now little angels next to their own dear Saviour's Throne, lived in everlasting happiness in Heaven, where we all hope to be some day with God.21
  • 20 Dec 1902, The Steyn, December 8th, 1902. My Dear Aunt Patsy,—I suppose you will have quite forgotten me by this time, I have not forgotten you. I am the little niece that was lying so long on my back. I am quite cured now, and I am able to run about and romp like any other little girl. I still love to read the children's letters and the stories in the "Advocate." I am three months out of my splint. I love to run about, and I have great games with my little friends. I am now sending you the money—£1—which I collected for the dear little children at St. Joseph's Home. I wish them and the dear sisters a very Happy Christmas. I am now learning French, German, English and music. I love all my lessons. You will be glad to hear that I am going to make my first Confession in a few days. I went to church on September 8th for the first time after lying down. It was a great treat to me. I also went to-day, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. A lot of little children made their first Communion in our lovely convent church. It was a most beautiful sight to see them in their white dresses and veils and wreaths.
    Now, good-bye, dear Aunt Patsy.—With much love to you, and wishing you and my dear cousins a very happy Christmas, I am ever your loving little niece, RIEKE PARKER. P.S. My likeness was taken on our verandah lately. I will send you one for Christmas if I can, and if you would care to have it. "The Steyn." St. Helier's-street, Abbotsford. I am 9 years and 5 months old.
    I have not forgotten you, Rieke, dear. I shall be delighted to get your portrait. I have that other little one on the wall. You are a kind-hearted little woman to send the pound to the orphans. I am so glad to see you are cured, dear child.22
  • 15 Dec 1904, Miss Atchison, assisted by her pupils and a number
    of our leading amateur and professional artists, gave a most pleasant "at home" at the Austral Salon on Saturday eventing last. Amongst the visitors who packed the hall we noted a number of our leading citizens. Some fifteen or more of Miss Atchison's pupils played solos of more or less difficulty from recognised classical sources upon the piano, and though most of them were juvenile, they did their work with an artistic skill that speaks volumes for the methods of this clever teacher. Even at this early stage of their careers they gave ample evidence of the fact that both technique and interpretations have received equal and careful attention, and that the confidence placed in Miss Atchison's power of imparting knowledge has not been misplaced. A high-class programme was also supplied by the following ladies, viz.:—Misses B. Hoadley, Ivy Deakin, Courtney Dix, Vic. Parsons and Charlotte Sutherland. Creature comforts concluded an evening which proved more than enjoyable to all present.
    Of the pupils we single out for special distinction Miss Ettie Ellis, who essayed the difficulties of Chopin's brilliant "Fantnsie Impromptu" with great success, and a brilliant "Capriccio " (Mendelssohn). Miss Rieke Parker gave a most poetic rendering of Gurlitt's "Blüten and Knopsen." She is a mere child yet, but brimming with talent.23
  • 9 Dec 1905, "The Steyne," St. Heliers-street, Abbotsford, Nov. 26, 1905. Dear Aunt Patsy, - Perhaps you will remember that I wrote to you about Christmas time last year, and suggested that all your nieces and nephews should unite and form a fund for the benefit of the dear little children of St. Joseph's Home. You wrote, and told me the appeal was too late, and asked me to re-write it, and leave out Christmas. I got ill immediately after that, and was not able to do so. Now, I wish to ask your nieces and nephews if they will send one penny a month to you, and will you kindly take charge of the money, and forward it to the good Sisters at Christmas time each year. But where are all your nieces and nephews, Aunt Patsy, dear? I fear as you say, the crew are sleeping and I am afraid I have been one of the careless sailors, but let us one and all make up now, and do our share in this work of charity. Most of us, I suppose, have a little pocket money, and can surely spare a penny a month. If any of us can give any of us can more, let us do so, just to thank God for his goodness and loving care of us during the year, and for the joy that always comes to us at Christmas, and also to make some return to you for all your kindness to us, for I feel sure nothing would please you better than that we should try to brighten Christmas for the little ones whom you love so dearly. I now start the fund by enclosing you 1s. worth of stamps. I would ask the crew of the M.F.B., if any of them can think of any better scheme than this to help the little ones. I propose to call the fund "The Aunt Patsy M.F.B. Fund." - Your loving niece, RIEKE CARMEL PARKER.
    P.S.—After writing this letter to you, it was suggested to me that your nieces and nephews might wish to collect something during the year, which we would add to our own penny a month. Now, let us all promise to collect at least one shilling during the year, or as much money as we can, so that you may have a good sum every year to hand to the good Sisters of St. Joseph's Home.—RIEKE CARMEL PARKER.
    1s. stamps received. May this thought of your warm little heart bring forth good fruit, dear Rieke.24
  • 23 Dec 1905, Evenvale, Trafalgar, 10/12/05.
    Dear Aunt Patsy,—This is the first time I have written to you. I hope to become a member of the M.F.B. I go to the State school, and am in the third class. We are milking 19 cows. I have a pet magpie. I was pleased to see the letter of Rieke Carmel Parker. I am sending you a shilling that my mother gave me to help the poor little children at Xmas time. I like reading the "Advocate." I have no more news this time.—I remain, your loving niece, GRETTA GRIFFITHS.
    1/ gratefully received. Kind little girl: a truly happy Xmas.25
  • 30 Dec 1905, 105 Noone-street, Clifton Hill, December 19th, 1905.
    Dear Aunt Patsy,—I would have written to you before, and sent my little offering, only that I did not know about it. My sister and I are sending you a half-crown's worth of stamps, as we think it is the best scheme, like Rieke Parker's. If any other child can find a better scheme than this, my sister and I will send what we think of it. My little sister is too small to write to you, so I am writing for her and myself. Rieke Parker belongs to the same school as we do, and that is St. Euphrasia's, Convent of the Good Shepherd, Abbotsford.
    The nuns were all very pleased with Rieke's letter. Every month my sister and I will save a penny, or as much as we can, till Christmas, and give it to you; and please will you send it on to the good Sisters? My sister is very pleased, also myself, to be able to write to you. God will reward you and us, even if we only send a penny. God would be better pleased than if He received hundreds of pounds. I will now finish my little letter, hoping that you will have many more of us sending their offerings to the poor little children, for I am sure nearly every little child gets penny a month. I now wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, dear Aunt Patsy.—We remain, your fond nieces, VERA AND EILY VAN PROOYEN.
    One of the nicest letters Aunt Patsy has received. The Sisters thank you from their hearts for your offering. Strange to say, Aunt Patsy and your father were, as children, close neighbours.26
  • 5 Jan 1907, The Steyn, Heliers-st., Abbotsford, December 22, 1906. Dearest Aunt Patsy,—It is a very long time since I have written to you. I am afraid my oar must be rusty. I wish you, the little captain, the crew of the M.F.B., and the dear little orphans a very Happy Christmas and New Year. I enclose you 2s. for the little orphans.—With fond love, I remain, your fond niece, RIEKE PARKER.
    Dear Rieke, many thanks for your kind wishes and contribution to M.F.B. fund. So glad to see you using your oar again. Write me a long letter soon.27
  • 18 Jan 1908, "The Steyne," St. Heliers-street, Abbotsford, 19/12/07. Dear Aunt Patsy,—It is a very long time since I have written to you, but I hope you will forgive me and allow me to take up my oar, which, I trust, has not rusted. I am sending you a small offering, 2/6, for the dear little orphans. I trust the dear captain and first mate are well, likewise yourself and my cousins. Will you kindly say a little prayer for a particular intention to St. Ignatius', also in thanksgiving for a great favour which I have received? Wishing you a happy Xmas and glad New Year, - Ever you loving niece, RIEKE PARKER
    P.S.—I am going to Tasmania for the Xmas holidays. You know it is my birth-place, and I have not been there for nine years. So pleased to hear from you, dearie. Good luck for New Year. 2/6 received.28
  • 10 Oct 1908, UNIVERSITIES OF MELBOURNE AND ADELAIDE. PUBLIC EXAMINATIONS IN MUSIC, SEPTEMBER, 1908. PRACTICAL EXAMINATIONS. MELBOURNE CANDIDATES.
    PIANOFORTE - GRADE- II
    Obtained Honours.—Mabel Josephine Muntz (Mrs W. Nott), Rieke Florence Carmel Parker (Mrs W. Nott).29
  • 9 Jan 1909, The Steyne, Abbotsford, 23/12/'08. Dear Aunt Patsy,—It is a long while since I have written, and I suppose there is no longer room for me in the M.F.B. I enclose one shilling's worth of stamps, and wish you all a very happy Christmas and New Year. With love to the captain, first mate, and all my cousins, and hoping the dear little orphans will have a jolly Christmas,—I remain, with love, your affectionate niece, RIEKE PARKER.
    Dear Rieke, there should always be room for you. Do write often. Shilling received.30
  • 2 Dec 1909, On Monday, 22nd ult., Mrs. W. E. Nott and Miss Littlewood gave a most enjoyable "at home" at the Paris Cafe. The upstair room was transformed into a beautiful drawingroom, profusely decorated with palms and flowers. About 180 guests responded to their invitation, and a charming programme of music was rendered by their pupils, the instrumental numbers by those of Mrs. Nott, among whom there were several showing decided musical talent. Miss Rieke Parker's performances were much admired, her touch being most artistic, and showing much talent. Among Miss Littlewood's pupils were some charming singers, Miss Margaret Caraher and Miss Elsie Treweek possessing lovely voice, both of whom sang to Madame Melba just lately, and received praise from her and advice that they should make Europe their goal. Mr. Weston Pett played the flute obligato to "Lo, Here the Gentle Lark," and Miss Eva Jones and Mr. Burrell divided the accompaniments.31
  • 20 Oct 1910, On 15th October, at "The Steyne," Abbotsford, Miss Rieke Parker entertained between 50 and 60 of her friends in a novel and picturesque manner at a Japanese dance. The garden, which abounds with roses and bowers of wistaria and is prettily situated on the Yarra, was illuminated with innumerable lanterns, and the whole scene was fairylike. The guests included — Mesdames Raynor, Rennick, Varden Nott, Dr. Constance Ellis, Misses Michaelis, Carreno, Martin, Hindley, Sykes. The Medical School of the University was represented by Messrs. Shields, Jolley, Podby, Mahon, and Joske.32
  • 29 Oct 1910, The Children's Hospital. NEW SURGICAL WARD.
    The concert in aid of the new surgical ward of the Children's Hospital, organised and conducted by the indefatigable worker and talented musician, Mrs. Franklin Peterson, was, as it deserved to be, a great success.
    ....
    Young Master Max Pirani played a gavotte of Max Vogrich's in a self-possessed and capable manner very creditable for a child of his tender years. But it was to Miss Rieke Parker, one of our own M.F.B. Crew, and the first to suggest the name "Aunt Patsy M.F.B. Fund" for the Surrey Hills Home for Destitute Children, that the chief honours to the soloists of the evening were paid. Miss Parker—a child still, but with the soul of a woman in her sensitive fingers—played Godard's "Etude de Concert" with such wonderful technique and refined feeling and sympathy of expression that a storm of applause insisted on her return to the piano, where she gave a clever rendering of MacDowell's "Hexen Tauz" in her usual earnest manner. A great career should await this child-genius, as it awaits her friend, Miss Leila Doubleday, now studying in Europe.33
  • 25 May 1912, Talented Miss Rieke Parker, I note, is to give a pianoforte recital on June 5th, Miss Violet Somerset as assisting vocalist, with Mrs. W. C. Nott as accompanist. It is marvellous what little Miss Parker accomplishes in classical music. Her technique is wonderful for her age. Beethoven's Sonata op. 27, No. 2 (Adagio, Allegretto, Presto agitato), is one of the numbers to be given; also Ravel's "Jeu d'eau"— the latter for the first time in Melbourne.
    I remember Mrs. W. C. Nott's late gifted husband well. He could literally make the piano and the organ speak. Called away to a better world, where perfect symphonies enrapture, he was one of our most gifted and promising Australian geniuses; and his early death was much deplored. His glorious talent passed with him—for he left no child to succeed him. His wife then, as now, had a good standing in the musical world.34
  • 6 Jun 1912, MISS PARKER'S RECITAL.
    A pianoforte recital of much more than ordinary interest was given in the Chapter house of St. Paul's last night, by Miss Rieke Parker, a pupil of Mrs. W. E. Nott's. When a young student fresh from the teacher's hands makes a first appearance, one expects accurate technique, and a careful following of traditional renderings; but certainly not the quite extraordinary musical feeling and mature and free interpretations which were in evidence last night. The Grieg Concerto was a piece of masterly work, quite amazing for the power and sympathy with which it was played; it was a noble interpretation, worthy of any player; the technique was there, and was amply displayed in the brilliant ovtave passages, and throughout the cadenza, but one forgot all that in the breadth and atmosphere which Miss Parker secured. Miss Mabel Muntz supplied the orchestral part on a second piano in skilful and sympathetic style. It was the last number on the programme, but the audience, which quite filled the hall, insisted on more, and yet again more; and in response, Miss Parker played first Schumann's "Warum" with very fine feeling and expression, and then Macdowell's dainty "Shadow Dance." The earlier numbers in the programme were all well played, though nothing reached the high level of the Grieg Concerto; indeed, in her first bracket of Corelli, Scarlatti, and Gluck, the young artist was evidently some what nervous and constrained, and hardly did herself justice. Beethoven's "Moonlight" Sonata (op. 27, No. 2) found her more at ease, and the first movement in particular was full of feeling; as encore Chopin's "Bell" Prelude (No. 17) was added, in a delicate and sympathetic fashion. A Romance of Sibelius proved
    very interesting, and a piece by Ravel, "Jet d'Eau," played for the first time in Melbourne, made one wonder what music is coming to. Ravel would appear to be to Debussy as Debussy is to Chopin; a Debussy gone mad. There were passages which might have been the result of reckless banging on the keys without regard to key or harmony, or rhythm, or anything else. Debussy takes some appreciating, but he is simplicity itself to this new prophet. There is one advantage, however, in this sort of music—the player can make as many mistakes as he likes, and no one would be the wiser. It was enterprising to introduce such a number, and the audience recognised the skill of the player by another encore, which took the form of an Etude of Heller's. Miss Parker is still in her teens, and with her fine basis of technique, and her evident girt of temperament, she cannot well be too ambitious, nor her friends too sanguine of her brilliant success in the future.
    Miss Violet Somerset rendered valuable assistance to the programme by her songs, in which she was skilfully accompanied by Miss Rene Masson. They included Jensen's "Lehn Deine Wang," and "Am Ufer des Flusses, des Manmanares, " and the well-known Gavotte from Thomas's Mignon," which was so charmingly sung that it had to be repeated.35
  • 13 Jun 1912, RIEKE PARKER. This brilliant young artiste made her appearance at the Chapter House on Wednesday evening in the presence of a packed and very fashionable audience. The enthusiasm at her efforts was very great, and deservedly so. Miss Parker is an example of the triumph of mind over matter. For the greater part of her still short life she has been an invalid. She is a Tasmanian, we understand, and came over to Miss M'Cormick's famous School of Medical Gymnastics, where she was, after long care, nursed back to health. During this time Mrs. M'Cormick, senior, who is a talented pianist, though advanced in years, gave the young invalid her only training in an art in which she bids ere long to become famous. Mrs. W. G. Nott, a prominent Melbourne teacher, then took the young aspirant up, and the results are as we now find them. She is, though yet a mere girl, a very brilliant executant, with no end of technique, forcible, fluent and full of character. Her readings of the masters are characterised by real depth of thought and a delightful poetic appreciation most refreshing to contemplate. We must confess, apart altogether from sentiment, that no young player for many a long day has given us such unalloyed satisfaction. Sitting out her full programme was a pleasure. Her reading of the "Moonlight" (Op. 27) Sonata (Beethoven) was decidedly good, whilst the Grieg Concerto would have done justice to many an older and harder head than hers. Never for a moment was she in doubt as to her honest conception of the famous Norwegian's intention. The audience recognised this, too, and demanded a double encore. Miss M. Munz (second piano) proved for her an admirable ally, and played splendidly. Miss Violet Somerset, a contralto already well known here by reason of the splendid work she has done, was in delightful voice. Her reading of certain excerpts were rich in tone and full of poetic inspiration. Miss J. Masson was her accompanist.36
  • 15 Jun 1912, MISS RIEKE PARKER'S CONCERT
    Miss Rieke Parker, who is a pupil of Mrs. W. E. Nott, gave a pianoforte recital in the Chapter House, Little Flinders-street, on Wednesday evening, the 5th June. The hall was well filled, and the young artist, who is still in her teens, was given an enthusiastic reception, and had to respond to encores in both parts of the programme. Miss Rieke Parker was the recipient of many elegant floral gifts, and a like compliment was paid to Miss Violet Somerset, who rendered several of Jensen's songs. Of the performance of Miss Rieke Parker, the "Argus" says:—"When a young student fresh from the teacher's hands makes a first appearance, one expects accurate technique, and a careful following of traditional renderings: but certainly not the quite extraordinary musical feeling and mature and free interpretations which were in evidence last night. The Grieg Concerto was a piece of masterly work, quite amazing for the power and sympathy with which it was played; it was a noble interpretation, worthy of any player; the technique was there, and was amply displayed in the brilliant octave passage, and throughout the cadenza, but one forgot all that in the breadth and atmosphere which Miss Parker secured. Miss Mabel Muntz supplied the orchestral part on a second piano in skilful and sympathetic style. It was the last number on the programme, but the audience, which quite filled the hall, insisted on more, and yet again more; and, in response, Miss Parker played first Schumann's "Warum" with very fine feeling and expression, and then Macdowell's dainty "Shadow Dance." The earlier numbers in the programme were all well played, though nothing reached the high level of the Grieg Concerto. With her fine basis of technique, and her evident gift of temperament, she cannot well be too ambitious, nor her friends too sanguine of her brilliant success in the future." Miss Jessie Masson was the accompanist.37
  • 2 Jan 1913, Miss Reike Parker, daughter of Mr and Mrs Erskine Parker, Launceston, arrived from Melbourne last Saturday on a holiday visit to her parents. Miss Parker is a talented little pianiste. .... at her recent pianoforte recital given at the Chapter House, Melbourne, won very flattering praises from both musical critics and the public. Miss Parker has arranged, I hear, to give a concert at the Mechanics on February 5, further particulars of which will be available soon.38
  • 1 Feb 1913, MISS PARKER'S CONCERT
    An event which is creating considerable interest in local musical circles is Miss Rieke Parker's concert, to be given in the Mechanics' Institute on Tuesday evening. An excellent programme will be presented, including one song composed by her sister, Miss Kitty Parker, who is now in England. Miss R. Parker recently gave a successful concert in Melbourne before a critical audience, and obtained favourable notices in the leading papers, of which the following are excerpts. Of her playing of the Greig concerto the "Argus" says:— "When a young student fresh from the teacher's hands makes her first appearance, one expects accurate technique and a careful following of traditional renderings, but certainly not the quite extraordinary musical feeling and mature and free interpretation that were in evidence. The Greig concerto was a piece of masterly work, quite amazing for the power and symnpathy with which it was played, etc." "In a well-chosen programme of excellent music," the "Herald" said, "the young pianist showed musical intelligence, sympathetic insight into different styles, and advanced technique." The box plan is now open at Birchall's, and day sales are available at Fitzgerald's.39
  • 24 May 1913, Friends of Miss Rieke Parker, our talented young Catholic pianist, who has already distinguished herself among us, are planning a concert which should bring in enough funds to enable her to go to Europe to study under the best masters of the art. It will be advertised in our Catholic papers shortly, as well as in the secular dailies and weeklies. She is a hard-working student, and deserves all the practical assistance that can be extended, to her.40
  • 14 Jun 1913, MISS RIEKE PARKER. An energetic committee, among whom are Mrs. A. L. Kenny, Mrs. Cussen, Mesdames Edward and Albert Miller, and Mrs. Harrison Moore, are arranging a highly-attractive programme for the July benefit concert of the young Catholic-Australian pianist, Miss Rieke Parker, of "The Steyne," Abbotsford.
    On that evening Madame Jansen and Mr. Horace Stevens will sing, Mrs. A. L. Kenny and Signor Amadio will play favourite songs and themes for a music-loving public, and Miss Parker herself should be heard to greater advantage in the Melbourne Town Hall than opportunity and a marvellous talent has given her yet. The following are some of the testimonies to her talent which she has at times received:
    (1). "I am thoroughly convinced that Miss Rieke Parker possesses musical talent of a quite unusually high degree, manifesting itself by outspoken temperament, natural feeling for phrasing, astonishing insight into the character of various styles of composition and a fine memory. Besides (and this to my mind is very important), the condition of nerves and muscles "promises a natural and easy technique, precluding the eventuality of an early limit being drawn to the purely pianistic part of her development, as is so often the case with (otherwise even highly talented) students. "This is certainly a case where 'sending home' is absolutely justified." "EDOUARD SCHARF " (Teacher of Piano at Marshall-Hall Conservatorium). 28/5/'13."
    (2). "Miss Rieke Parker is sufficiently far advanced both musically and technically to take every advantage of the broader musical life of Europe which is essential to her further development."
    (Testimony of Mrs. W. E. Nott, Merton Hall, South Yarra.)
    (3). Mr. W. A. Laver, Melb. University, writes:—"Miss Rieke Parker is undoubtedly possessed of much musical ability and should develop into a fine pianist if opportunity be afforded her." It is an interesting coincidence that Miss Leila Doubleday, now pursuing her musical studies so successfully in Europe, and Miss Parker as children were always - and are still - devoted friends, the instrument in which Miss Doubleday's talent expresses itself being the violin. For the last couple of years it has been very evident that Miss Parker is fully entitled to cross the seas to win the laurels that await true genius.41
  • 14 Jun 1913, PROMISING PIANIST
    By QUEEN BEE.
    Just now much interest is being taken in Miss Rieke Parker, who is shortly to make her appearance on the concert platform, and to make her more widely known before this occasion influential people are giving teas to hear her play. Foremost among these was Lady a'Beckett's, given jointly with her daughter, Mrs. Harrison Moore, at Karbarook, on Wednesday after noon, June 1. The young pianst, who is not yet out of her teens, is undoubtedly possessed of musical ability, and if able to obtain the advantages of a visit to Europe and other large musical centres abroad may develop into a fine pianist. So far she has an exceptional memory for music, and under stands its phrasing and temperaments. During the afternoon she gave selections from the composers Chopin, Brahms, and Schumann, and the sincerity and ease that she concentrated into her playing suggested that she is certainly a student whose "sending home" is justified. Among the guests were Mrs. Albert Miller, Mrs. Suetonius Officer, Mrs. Edward Officer, Mrs. Edward Miller, Mrs. John Gurner, Mrs. Edward Fanning, Mrs. Pullen, Miss Alice Spowers, Mrs. Harry Emmerton, Mrs. W. Travers (Lady a'Beckett's eldest daughter), Mrs. T. A. a'Beckett, Mrs. Albert Austin, Mrs. Harvey Hamilton, Miss E. S. Hebden, Mrs. F. R. Godffrey, the Misses Godfrey, Miss Barrett, Mrs. Theyre Weigall, Mrs. Frank Walker, and Mrs. Baldwin Spencer.
    It is proposed to tender a complimentary concert to Miss Parker in the Town Hall, Melbourne on Wednesday, July 23. Mr. Sutton Crow has undertaken the management, and many leading artists have intimated their intention to assist in the programme. The first meeting of those who are interesting themselves in the movement, was held in the Town Hall, Melbourne, on Friday, June 13. The Lady Mayoress presided, and the proceedings pointed to the concert proving a complete success in every way.42
  • 26 Jun 1913, SOCIAL NOTES.
    Miss Mona Parker returned last Thursday from Melbourne, where she has been spending three or four months with her sister, Miss Rieke Parker.
    Mrs Hubert Eisdell, nee Miss Kitty Parker, who has been devoting her self to composing lately, has just had a song accepted by the publishers, which will very shortly be out. Her husband, Mr Hubert Eisdell, has a delightful tenor voice, which, by the way, I, with others, heard the other day at Messrs. Hopwood and Co.'s, where two of his records of the songs 'Somewhere a Voice is Calling' and 'Come, Sang to Me,' are included among some of the best and latest records received by the firm for the gramophone. These two records are not obtainable yet, but the first mentioned song will be here after the 26th inst., and the other a little later.43
  • 12 Jul 1913, The Rosemont Ball on the 13th and the Rieke Parker Testimonial Concert on the 23rd promise to be most successful and enjoyable - the former at the St. Kilda Town Hall, the latter at the Melbourne Town Hall, under the patronage of his Excellency Lord Denman, his Excellency Sir John Fuller, and the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress.44
  • 15 Jul 1913, GENERAL NOTES. Events of the Day. Women and Their Work. Miss Rieke Parker.
    Miss Rieke Parker, the young Tasmanian pianist, is preparing for flight. She wants to wing her way to Europe, and develop in the right atmosphere. The dream of her young life is to study under Schnabel. Experts who know a good thing when they see it declare that this is a case where "sending home" is absolutely justified.
    The girl is not only talented, but she has the cast-iron kind of nerves and muscles, which will stand the strain of strenuous work; to use a sporting term, she is a pianist who will last the distance. Little Rieke will take a complimentary concert in the Melbourne Town Hall on July 23, and a score or so of people well known in the musical world are hoping to hand over a well filled purse to their favorite protege after the event. Miss Parker is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Erskine Parker, of Launceston. She has some of the fire of the South of Europe in her veins, because she claims a Spanish grandmother as an antecedent.45
  • 17 Jul 1913, MISS RIEKE PARKER.
    A young Australian Pianist, who is being tendered a Grand Complimentary Concert in the Melbourne Town Hall (prior to her departure for Europe) on Wednesday next, 23rd July. She will be assisted by the following artists:—Madame Janson, Miss Jessie Temby, Miss Olga Zichy-Woinarski, Mr. Horace Stevens, Mr. John Amadio and Mr. William Webber. The concert is under the direction of Mr. J. Sutton Crow.
    Photo : Melba Studios.46
  • 19 Jul 1913, Miss Rieke Parker, the talented young piano student of Mrs. Wm. Nott, has been strongly recommended by several leading musicians of Melbourne to spend some time in Europe and continue her studies in the main art centres of the old world. In order to assist her in this, a complimentary concert has been arranged by her many friends, to take place in the Town Hall on Wednesday evening next, under the direction of Mr. J Sutton Crow, the programme of which will be contributed to by leading artists. The box plan is now open at Allan's where seats may be reserved for 5/.
    (includes photo)47
  • 24 Jul 1913, "The Australian Music and Dramatic News" for July publishes a portrait of Miss Reike Parker, of Launceston, who was tendered a complimentary concert prior to her departure for Europe in the Melbourne Town Hall yesterday, July 23, and says: "Miss Reike Parker's concert in the Town Hall on July 23 promises to be a huge success. Not only has she the support of a large and influential committee, but there are also two junior committees each with its own convenor, who hold their own meetins, and seem determined to outdo their senior enthusiasts in enthusiasm. Amongst the artists are included the names of several of our leading vocalists and instumentalists, and Mr J. Sutton Crow, the manager, informs us that the programme to be presented is an excellent one. Miss Parker's many friends here and Launcestonians generally will be interested to hear that the concert was indeed the success it promised to be.48
  • 2 Aug 1913, MISS RIEKE PARKER'S CONCERT.
    Miss Rieke Parker is to be congratulated on the large and enthusiastic audience which her fame as a brilliant pianist of exceptional talent gathered together at the Melbourne Town Hall on the 23rd ult., the object of this benefit concert being to assist in providing funds for a European training under the best masters of the art. The warm sympathy extended to the young artist gave her the confidence needed for the display of her talents, and she abundantly proved how worthy she is of a helping hand in her musical career. Her powers of expression, and her originality, were never more evident, and her "Arietta" (Leo's) and Ramean's "Call of the Birds" charmed all hearers, while her more amibitious efforts—Grieg's A Minor Concerto and Chopin's G Minor Ballade—with the heavier and more difficult work entailed, came as a surprise to many who were unaware of the extent and earnestness of her studies. To be original is, in itself, a recommendation in these days, when opportunities for the followers of art are more generally offered than of yore, and it was easily seen that Miss Rieke Parker would never be one of the self-satisfied army, who, gaining a few laurels,
    are content to rest for the remaining term of their natural lives. Given the opportunity, she will rise to a place of distinction in the musical world, and be thus enabled to carry out the ideas which her present work shows are forming in a gifted brain, which is rich in imagination, even if not in worldly experience. What she has to learn she will set herself to learn, grudging no effort. All she has to beware of is musical indigestion - for she is very young yet, and it is not expected of her that she should utterly master themes which long years of strenuous work have given into the power of the few to perform in a manner beyond criticism. That she will more
    than fulfil all that is hoped for her by her numerous friends and well-wishers none can doubt, and in the world's great centre she will add another to the number of Australian Catholic artists of whom we have such reason to be proud. Her musical career will be followed with interest and all true lovers of good music will welcome the day when the seal is first set on her ability in the art to which she is devoted, by the verdict of those who, having reached the topmost pinnacle, look down. "And onward urged the favoured few, For whom fame weaves a crown."
    Miss Parker was ably supported by not only well-known but distinguished artists, among whom Miss Agnes Janson was a delightful acquisition, singing Sibelius' (the Flemish composer) "Sunrise" in a most perfect manner. Miss Jessie Temby's voice rang out sweetly in Bellini's "Qui la Voce," and Miss Olga Zichy-Woinarski's violin solos were played with her customary careful attention to style and expression, while Mr. John Amadio, always a favourite, gave an exquisite rendering of a flute morceau de concert, aptly named "Spring." Mr. Horace Stevens' "Young Dietrich" (Henschel) was full of "colour," and when the concert ended there was the satisfied feeling in the atmosphere which emanates from a crowd of people who have been amply provided with what was of the best only. Herr Edouard Scharf took the second piano part in the Grieg concerto, and the remaining accompaniments were played by Miss Nellie Billings, Miss Biddy English (a former Vaucluse pupil), Messrs. J. Sutton Crow and Horace Gleeson.
    The Lady Mayoress and most of the well-known devotees of music in Melbourne were present. It is to be hoped that the financial result of the concert will prove as excellent as the entertainment offered.49
  • 18 Oct 1913, Miss Rieke Parker travels Europeward next month, and there is no doubt that she will abundantly avail herself of every musical opportunity offered her, as well as of the chance to become proficient in languages. Her future career will be watched with much interest by her many true Australian friends, who appreciate thoroughly the talent and the affectionate and loyal heart of "dear little Rieke Parker."50
  • 1 Nov 1913, A very enjoyable At Home took place at Linden, St. Kilda, on Monday afternoon, when Mrs. Barden and Miss Michaelis gave a large company the opportunity of saying good-bye to Miss Reike Parker. This talented girl pianist is -full of enthusiasm, and so very great is her talent that her success is a foregone conclusion. During her early childhood she worked under a big handicap, as her physical strength was far below the ayerage. Fortunately, she has grown up strong enough to justify the hopes of all who have heard her play. Combined with immense powers of perseverance and the capacity of hard work is a remarkably pleasant personality, and the girl sets forth on her travels to the accompaniment of countless good wishes. Linden looked quite beautiful on Tuesday. Great masses of azaleas were grouped in the entrance hall. In the drawingroom was a magnificent display of roses, while in the diningroom, where refreshments were served, the table was grouped with a fragrant profusion of double pink stock. Band music provided the only set entertainment, and the party proved a remarkably enjoyable one.51
  • 8 Nov 1913, Letter from another girl staying at The Steyne. "The Steyne," Abbotsford, 26/10/'13. Dear Aunt Patsy,—This is the first time I have written to you, and I hope you will accept me as one of your many nieces. I am eleven years of age, and I have three brothers and one sister ; their names are Bert, Frank; Eric, and Velma. I have been paralysed for five years, but I am getting better now. There are such a lot of birds about here, especially jackasses. I went to Henley last night, and the skyrockets and lights were lovely. I have a governess coming to me every day, and I like lessons very much. I receive Holy Communion every first Friday. I will try and write to you often. The River Yarra is at the bottom of our garden. Now, goodbye, dear Aunt Patsy.—I remain, your loving niece, EDNA PRICE.
    Accepted with much pleasure, dear. I think you write very neatly. Row often.52
  • 8 Nov 1913, Letter from another girl staying at The Steyne. "The Steyne," St. Heliers-street, Abbotsford, 26/10/'13 Dear Aunt Patsy,—I have intended to write to you for some time, and at last I am doing so. I am thirteen years of age, and I am an invalid. I am recovering from paralysis, I have four sisters and two brothers ; their names are Kate, Mary, Alice, Lucy, Jacky, and Dessie. Katie and Mary have written to you before. I was so surprised to see a letter from my sister Mary in in last week's "Advocate." I live in Alvie, but am staying in Abbotsford at present, and I like it very much. We have a lovely garden, which is now full of roses. I expect to receive Confirmation next month. I thick I will take Agnes for my Confirmation name. I have a great devotion to St. Agnes ; I think she is a lovely saint. We take ''The Advocate" at home and all there will be surprised to see a letter from me, as I did not tell them I was writing to you. I will conclude now, with fondest love to you, captain, and first mate.—I remain, your loving niece, PATTY MORRISSY.
    Dear Patty, I hope St. Agnes will pray for your complete recovery. I have a very high statue of St. Agnes, in the robe of a Roman lady, holding a lamb; and with a sword and a palm by her side.52
  • 8 Nov 1913, Letter from another girl staying at The Steyne. "The Steyne," Abbotsford, October 26, 1913. Dear Aunt Patsy,—This is the first time I have ever written to you, and I hope you will accept me as one of your many nieces. I live with Mrs. M'Cormick. I suppose you have seen my little sister; her name is Julia, Raynor, and she lives with my grandmamma, at Malvern. There are five children in our family—namely, Willie, Charlie, Harold, Julia, and myself. I sometimes read the letters in "The Advocate." I have often been going to write to you. I am eleven years old. My mother and father live in Western Australia, but my father is on a visit over here now. I am going to be confirmed in November. Do you remember your one-time niece, Rieke Parker? She is going to Europe on the 1st of November. This is all I can find to say at present, dear Aunt Patsy.—I remain your niece, RUTH RAYNOR.
    A nice letter, Ruth. Keep your silver oar bright. We all wish Miss Parker the best of good luck abroad, and hope she won't forget our Fairy Barque when "o'er the sea."52
  • 7 Mar 1914, Now for an artist's point of view in her "world." Miss Rieke Parker writes a cheery letter from London: 'I have been here five weeks, seeing and loving London. I leave for Berlin in March, but am doing some work here. I had a good trip home, and was charmed with all the ports. Colombo was simply delightful. I have been to several orchestral concerts, and they are wonderful. . . . I have seen Miss Leila Doubleday, our gifted Australian violinist; she will be famous some day. Her playing is full of a sort of crystal purity, and of tender sweetness. You will be interested to know that I have been twice to hear Monsignor Benson, the great preacher and novelist. He is so convincing that no one could listen to him without feeling profoundly impressed by his teachings.
    The history of London, as evidenced in the hundred and one places I am taken to visit, appeals to me very strongly. I spent a morning at the Tower, and was much moved, thinking of our many glorious martyrs who there gave up their lives for the Faith.The weather is not too cold and I am very well. I am beginning to find my way about quite satisfactorily already. I have met a number of nice people, and everyone is kind to me; but I am longing to get settled at my musical studies in Germany. I hope - and pray - that I may do well, for the credit of dear old ''Australia.''
    Many well-wishers of this gifted young pianist will be pleased to note by the above that she has reached 'Home''; in good health and spirits, and also that her heart is true to her own land. She should, in due time, take a foremost place among our musical geniuses, for she has not only the God-given talent for music in its most beautiful form implanted within her, but has the rare power of concentration on difficult studies, and the mental assimilation of them which aid so greatly on the path to world-wide fame.53
  • 2 May 1914, Miss Rieke Parker's kind friend in London, Mrs. Scott, the daughter of the celebrated theosophist, Mrs. Annie Besant, is a convert to the Faith and a very practical Catholic. The last news from London tells of many intellectual women's receptiion into our Fold. May the 'Kindly Light;' that led them 'home' soon lead innumerable others into safe harbour. — Very faithfully yours, - MARION MILLER KNOWLES.54
  • 22 Oct 1914, Miss Reike Parker, daughter of Mr and Mrs Erskine Parker, David-street, who was pursuing her musical studies in Berlin when war was declared, reached London safely last week. The news, which reached her relatives by cable, has relieved the great anxiety felt by them as to her safety.55
  • 24 Oct 1914, The many friends of Miss Rieke Parker, the exceptionally talented Australian musician, will be glad to hear of her safe arrival in London from Germany, where she had been carrying on her studies with not only brilliant success, but most happily, having met with the greatest kindness from everyone she came in contact with at Berlin. Her last letter, written before war broke out between England and Germany, gives delightful pictures of her everyday life in a strange land, where, at the time, there seemed no cloud hovering over the bright fairyland whose every wind brought ravishing echoes of the grand strains of the old masters to the young Australian girl's ears. Surrounded by the affectionate thoughtfulness of her new friends, as she was when she wrote, Miss Parker must have felt overwhelmed with pain and distress when the storm cloud burst and all British ladies had, veritably, to make a stampede for the mother country. What a number of musicians from all parts of the world there must have been in Germany at the time, and how many arrangements and plans for long study must have been brought to an unwelcome close! It is fortunate for Miss Rieke Parker that she already had had the exceptional privilege of being received early as a pupil by the celebrated teacher, Schnabel, who usually, after first hearing a pianist, makes him or her go under tuition to someone less famous before he takes them in hand himself, but who, in Miss Parker's case, actually received her as a pupil only a fortnight after listening to her playing.
    In addition to genius, Miss Rieke Parker possesses the natural gifts which go so far towards social success and the winning and keeping of true friends. Fervently devoted to our Faith, she never yet has joined any early morning party of people seeking interesting diversion for the day without first making her way to the nearest Catholic church to attend the morning Mass. If, through this, she has had to forego what would have been pleasurable recreation, it has never caused her to omit this holy practice of the faithful.
    At present Miss Parker is the guest of Mrs. Besant Scott in London, a Catholic lady whose husband is Professor Scott, of the Melbourne University. Mrs. Scott some years ago spent a holiday in Australia, and made many friends out here. Miss Leila Doubleday, though, I believe, not yet in London, is also safely placed. It is a pleasant coincidence that two such attached 'old friends' should have arisen to such distinction in the musical world — pianist and violinist respectively.56
  • 1 May 1915, Miss Rieke Parker is due on her native shore on May 17th. That this frightful war should have so interrupted the musical studies of this exceptionally talented girl is a matter for much regret. She and others went to Europe with grateful, happy, and hopeful hearts, and under the most favourable auspices. There was then not oven the shadow of "a cloud as big as a man's hand." Now — well, it is hard to say when study can be resumed. A complete change of programme would have to be formed. Miss Leila Doubleday was last in London, but a few musical students went to Vienna, from whence, however, they are now likely to have departed. The war has caused a perfect upheaval of the musical world, and bewildered artists from all over the globe find it hard to accustom themselves to existing conditions.57
  • 7 May 1915, Miss Rieke Parker, of Melbourne, who is returning to Victoria after a two year's absence in Europe. Miss Parker, who is a young pianist of remarkable promise, went to Germany to study music and literature, and to travel. She settled in Berlin where she was when war broke out. It was only after much time and trouble that she managed to effect her return to England, where her physical health, never robust, broke down. On the advice of her medical advisers she is returning to Victoria, where she will be met with a hearty welcome. Miss Parker has friends in this city, and should opportunity allow it, will spend the time of the boat's stay in port with them in Perth.58
  • 27 May 1915, SOCIAL ITEMS. Miss Reike Parker returned to Victoria by the Osterley last week. Miss Parker, who went to Germany to continue her study of music, and had the distinction of being accepted as a pupil by Schnabel, was in Berlin when the war broke out. Some months afterwards she left for England with some ... students under the care of an American lady, and had some thrilling experiences on the way. She had the misfortune, too, to lose her luggage, but that has since been recovered through the efforts of a Dutch agency. Soon after arriving in England Miss Parker's health caused her friends such anxiety that it was deemed advisable by her medical attendants that she should return to Australia. The voyage out has proved most beneficial a wonderful improvement being noticed. The Osterley had the trying experience of being chased by the Germans on her way out.59
  • 8 Feb 1917, Miss Reike Parker and Miss M'Cormick, Melbourne, are spending a few weeks in Launeston, and are the guests of the former's parents, Mr and Mrs Erskine Parker, St. John-street.60
  • 20 Apr 1917, Melba Hall — Miss Rieke Parker.
    Miss Rieke Parker gave a patriotic concert in the Melba Hall last night. There was a large audience, and the evening was thoroughly enjoyajble. Since her last appearance in public Miss Rieke Parker has made very considerable progress in her profession. In the course of a long programme she gave evidence of notably good musical and pianistic qualities. Her touch was most sympathetic, her technique quite adequate, and her readings of a well-varied programme were all marked by intelligence.
    Some of her work in a lengthy Chopin group was admirable, and if her Cesar Franck (Prelude, Chorale and Fugue) fell short in the matter of climaxes, it was a round and poetical performance. Many parts of the fugue, especially calling for high praise. Altogether Miss Rieke Parker is to be congratulated warmly upon her playing at last night's concert. Miss Stella Power and Mr. John Fisher were the vocalists, and both singers did capital work earning well-deserved encores.61
  • 26 Apr 1917, There is no doubt (says a writer in 'The Argus') that Miss Reike Parker, who provided the greater part of the programme of a concert given "for our boys at the front" at the Melbourne Town Hall last night, has developed her powers very considerably since she was last heard publicly in Melbourne. She may not yet be fully equal to the highest things a pianist can achieve, but she is nevertheless already a player of more than common. She has an excellent technique, and a quick musical understanding. Moreover, she has a "way" of her own, which is another method of saying that she has what every artist must have to be interesting — personality. Unluckily, Miss Parker hides this attractive feature of her playing too much. She has not yet acquired that "glorious unashamedness," which, properly displayed, gives the chief value to interpretative art. She is too timid in expressing her feelings, and although this is a tribute to her modesty, it robs her work of an element she should make more of. Necessarily her best efforts were those in which no great amount of passionate expression was called for. Two Chopin studies, E. Major from Op. 10, and in F. Major, from Op. 25, came out charmingly. A group of seven preludes by the same composer were equally well suited to the pianists. In fact, she caught the atmosphere in a couple of them perfectly. And well nigh as good was her treatment of some short pieces by Brahms, the "Capriccio in B Minor" being particularly well done. Other items by the young artist included: Schubert's "Rosamunda" variations. Caesar Franck's prelude, choral, and fugue, and Chopin's great "F Minor Fantasie." As is well known, Reike Parker is a Launcestonian, daughter of Mr and Mrs Erskine Parker, St. John-street, therefore her success as a musician is a matter for the city to be proud of.62
  • 5 May 1917, Patriotic Work Helped.—As the result of a concert given by Miss Rieke Parker, £66 was raised for the Lady Mayoress's Patriotic League. Miss Parker, amid applause, handed a cheque for the above amount to Lady Hennessy, president, at the meeting of the League on Thursday afternoon. Miss Rieke Parker is a pupil of Mrs W. Nott (nee Miss Jessie Elliott), formerly of Kyneton.63
  • 7 Jun 1919, A pianoforte and vocal recital will be given by Misses Rieke Parker and Biddy English in the Assembly Hall, Collins-street, on Wednesday, June 11th, at 8 p.m., to augment the funds of the Societe Maternelle week's appeal for French war-orphaned children. The programme is of unusual excellence. Plan at Glen's.64
  • 12 Jul 1919, Miss Rieke Parker, the gifted pianist, and Miss Biddy English (mezzo-soprano) arranged the fine programme whose numbers were so greatly appreciated at the meeting of the Melbourne Music Club held last Thursday evening at the Victorian Artists' Society's Galleries, East Melbourne. It will be remembered that Miss Rieke Parker's studies on the Continent were interrupted by the outbreak of the great war, and that she was obliged to leave Germany hurriedly and proceed to London, from whence she returned to Australia.65
  • 15 Jan 1920, Mrs A. D. Du Boise, Sydney, and her sister. Miss Reike Parker. Melbourne, are on a visit to their mother and sisters, Mrs E. J. and the Misses Parker, St. John-street.66
  • 11 Mar 1920, Mrs A. Du Boise and Miss Reike Parker (Sydney), who have been visiting their mother, Mrs E. J. Parker, St. John-street, returned to the mainland last week.67
  • 2 Sep 1920, Invitations have been issued by Miss Rieke Parker, the gifted pianiste, for a reception to be given to Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Eisdell (Miss Kitty Parker, as we know her best) at the Lyceum Club on the evening of Wednesday, September 15th, after which they will start upon an Australian tour.68
  • 16 Sep 1920, Mrs. Eisdell (Miss Kitty Parker), in whose honour and her husband's a reception was given by her friends and well-wishers at the Lyceum Club on the 15th inst., has returned to Australia a more brilliant pianist than ever; and Mr. Eisdell's cultured voice is now at its best. Both artists should have a very successful touring season throughout Australia. High musical ability distinguishes all of the members of the Parker family, one of the younger daughters of which is Miss Rieke Parker. The Eisdell family is of French extraction.69
  • 10 Nov 1921, Miss Rieke Parker, the indefatigable musician, whose heart is wrapped up in her profession, is, in conjunction with Miss Mary Mack, the popular contralto, arranging a high-class pianoforte and vocal recital for the 14th inst., to be held at the Athenaeum Hall, Collins-street, City, about 8.15 o'clock on that evening. Consideration for students desiring to attend in a body of twelve or more has prompted a special arrangement in their interests which will enable them to obtain reserved seats for unreserved prices. Application therefor must be made at box office, Glen's, which was opened on 7th inst.
    Miss Parker's pianoforte selections include Schumann's "Papillons," Chopin's "Fantasia in F Minor," "Etude in F Major," and some preludes, also the great Liszt's "Liebestraum No. 3," and Paganini-Liszt's "La Campanella." Miss Mary Mack will sing Quilter's "Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal," Rachmaninoff's "The Island" and "Into My Open Window," Bridge's "Love Went a-Riding," Wolf's bracketed "The Friend," "Prayers," and "Tramping," and Schumann's "O Shining Sun" and "Lotus Flower," Rubenstein's "The Dream," Franz's "He Came," and Tschaikowsky's "Tears." The reserved seats are five shillings, obtainable at Glen's. The programme has a distinctive air about it, and a good house should reward the efforts of these gifted, enterprising, and hard-working musicians, who have won for themselves a deservedly high place in the best musical circles.70
  • 1 Mar 1922, A song Anzac composed by Miss Rieke Parker, was sung in the hall at Anzac House yesterday by Miss Biddy English, with a view to its being adopted as the standard anthem for Anzac commemorations. The words are by B. Meade Smith. The merits of the song will be considered by the Returned Sailors and Soldiers' League.71
  • 26 Apr 1923, Miss Rieke Parker, a very clever Melbourne pianist, who has been for some little time teaching in Sydney, announces a recital at .the Conservatorium Hall on next Thursday night. The only occasion on which this very talented soloist gave a concert here was on the evening we celebrated the false alarm of the signing of the Armistice. Though it was quite the worst evening in the history of Australia for any artist to have had the ill-luck to happen on, nevertheless there was a sufficiently balanced number of citizens who attended her irecital to remember the same with considerable pleasure, for she proved a very fine player. Miss Parker combines a strong forceful technique with much intelligence of interpretation, and our many pianoforte students will learn much by attending her concert on. Thursday night. She is a pupil of Tobias Matthay (London), and also studied on the continent. Her programme includes the Waldstein Sonata (Beethoven), the Bach-Buson 'Chaconne,' etudes by Chopin and pieces by Debussy, Scriabine and Godowsky.72
  • 21 Jun 1923, Miss Rieke Parker, who has now returned to Melbourne after having attained success in Sydney, will probably give the same programme in the Melbourne Town Hall as was given at her recital in the sister State. The most gratifying testimonies to her brilliant pianoforte girts wore received at the Sydney recital.73
  • 3 Jul 1923, PIANIST REAPPEARS. Miss Rieke Parker
    Musical people here are always interested in the work of Miss Rieke Parker. She is making a reappearance at the Athenreum Hall on July 11, with an interesting programme made up from the compositions of Bach, Busoni, Beethoven, Godowsky and Debussy.
    This young pianist had the misfortune to get her first opportunity for Continental training at the outbreak of war. When the declaration was proclaimed Miss Parker was one of the many British students in Berlin. She was taken in by a kindly family at Gottingen and made a member of the household as the children's governess. After three months of anxiety she got to England under the protection of the International Relief Society.
    For the last year she has been working in Sydney with Miss Doris Burnett, a teacher trained by Leopold Godowsky. Miss Parker is a Tasmanian, but has lived here since she was four, when she had a fall from a horse and her parents brought her to Melbourne for surgical treatment. The box plan for the concert opens tomorrow at Allan's.74
  • 15 Aug 1923, Our Violet Somerset has taken your Lady Colton Hall for September 11-15 for a song recital. She is not long back from England. Violet has one of those rare contralto voices that stir up all your emotions and send little shivers down your spine.
    You must go and hear her. She sings little French songs delightfully. There is a strain of French blood in her. Her family is also linked with the noted song writer, Sir Henry Somerset. Rieke Parker, the pianist who goes with her, is a Tasmanian and a clever little thing.
    Through a fall from a horse when she was about five she injured her back. Had it not been for this handicap to her musical studies there is not the slightest doubt that Rieke Parker would have ranked with the foremost artists of the day. Fate plays some scurvy tricks.75
  • 23 Dec 1923, Miss Florence Elsworthy, of Melbourne, has been staying with Miss Muriel Boldt, whose connection she will take over during 1927. Miss Boldt was in Melbourne for the week-end to be present at the big farewell party given by Miss Rieke Parker, at the Lyceum Club. The two musicians sail on January 18 for Italy.76
  • 7 Aug 1924, The DIRECTOR (Mrs. ANNE MACKY) of The New Conservatorium ; is prepared to organise INTERPRETATION CLASSES at the various Convents at a Reasonable Fee.
    The Piano Staff includes the following highly qualified musicians:—
    RIEKE PARKER, one of Australia's leading pianists, who has studied the method of Godowsky, also the method of the famous London teacher, Tobias Matthay.
    ADA FREEMAN, who has a Melbourne University degree of Bachelor of Music, a most successful pianist and teacher, her students gaining distinction in the various examinations ot the University and Royal Academy.
    WINIFRED LLOYD also has the degree of Bachelor of Music (whose student, Miss Violet Kenyon, won the Royal Academy London Exhibition for 1923.
    Any member of the above staff will give a detailed criticism of examination work regarding technique and interpretation, all of which will be strictly confidential.
    Apply—The Director. New Conservatorium of Music, 47 Victoria St., Melbourne. Cent. 8013.77
  • 31 Dec 1925, Miss Muriel Boldt went to Melbourne on Christmas Eve. After visiting her uncle, Mr Grieve, she will be the guest of Mrs Maurice Kaufmann, Armadale, and will also stay with Miss Rieke Parker, Abbotsford.78
  • 2 Nov 1926, Miss Rieke Parker, who is leaving by the Maloja early in the year, only intends having a short holiday trip.
    She cannot be absent very long on account of the number of students she has in training.79
  • 11 Nov 1926, Miss Rieke Parker, who is an Australian pianist of high repute in our musical world, and whose classical interpretations of the greater masters' work's have met with laudatory criticism from distinguished artists from overseas, will, with Miss Muriel Boldt, of Bendigo, leave for London by the Maloja in January to assist in furthering Miss Boldt's musical studies abroad, and to enjoy a well-earned holiday.
    Miss Parker's numerous students will look forward to her return.80
  • 9 Dec 1926, Miss Rieke Parker, the gifted pianist, will say "Au Revoir" to her numerous personal friends at the Lyceum Club, on the afternoon of 18th inst., at afternoon tea, before she departs for the goal of her dreams, Italy, music's most favoured clime. This will be the clever Australian's (she is Tasmanian-born) second voyage to Europe. May she sail under a propitious star!81
  • 23 Dec 1926, Miss Cecilia Belt, a pupil of Miss Rieke Parker, of "The Steyne," Abbotsford, has obtained her teacher's diploma (Licentiates of the Associated Board of the R.A.M. and R.C.M.) for the pianoforte; also Miss Alice M. Bisset (Sisters of Mercy, Lilydale).82
  • 25 Dec 1926, FAREWELL PARTY. It was a happy thought of Miss Ada Freeman and Miss Winifred Lloyd to give a party at the Lyceum Club on Wednesday afternoon, December 22, for Miss Rieke Parker, who is leaving for Europe on January 18, and many of whoso friends will be out of town on that date. The guests were received in the committee-room, which was decorated with great bowls of gladioli and pink snapdragons, and afterwards tea was served in the dining-room. Miss Freeman wore a shady navy blue crinoliue hat, bound with ribbon, with her navy blue georgette frock, which was patterned in a floral design in soft primrose colourings. A corbeau blue marocain frock, which opened in front to chow a panel patterned in rose and almond green tunings, was worn by Miss Lloyd, with her small blue crinoline hat, which was relieved with the same shades. Miss Parker was presented with a posy of pale pink carnations and delphiniums, which harmonised with her charming frock of soft wedgwood blue georgette, which was embroidered in blue and honey colour; her hat was of blue pandau straw, swathed with velvet ribbon in a deeper tone. Mrs. A. Freeman was in navy blue georgette, embroidered in a broderie Anglaise design, and showing touches of fuchsia colour, which also finished her small navy blue hat. The guests included:—
    Miss McCormick, Miss Russell, Mrs. Edward Michaelis, Mrs. T. J. McInerney and Miss Aileen McInerney, Mrs. George Caro, Mrs. Proctor Rogers, Mrs. Kenneth Hadley, Mrs. Ludbrook, Mrs. D. Mollison, Mrs. Lockyer, Mrs. Mattingly, Mrs. Mackey, Miss Violet Somerset, Miss Bacon, Miss Nancy Barber, Miss Alice Bell, Miss Jeanette Caro, Miss Kitty Gray, Mist Gladys McDowell, Miss Marjorie Bowern, Miss Eileen Byrne, Miss M. Doane, Miss Jessie Francis and Miss Wagan.83
  • 28 Nov 1930, Berlin's Poor Programmes. Coming Musical Star.
    According to Miss Rieke Parker, who disembarked from the Orient liner at Melbourne, after four years' musical study in Germany, very mediocre musical programmes are broadcast by the Berlin wireless stations. Miss Parker stated that she met Miss Nancy Weir, the Australian "prodigy," in Berlin. German musical critics predicted a great future for her. Miss Weir was now studying under Gruenberg, but would later receive tuition from the celebrated Schnabel, who charged as much as £5 for one lesson.84
  • 4 Dec 1930, "Depression and unemployment are widespread in Germany, despite the aspect of gaiety in its big cities frequented for the most part by American tourists," declares Miss Rieke Parker, the Melbourne pianist who returned last, week after four years' study in Berlin. She confesses to a strong admiration for German Catholics whom she considers much more devout than the French or Italians. Miss Parker has studied classical music with Artur Schnabel and Georg Gruenberg, specialising in Beethoven Sonatas, and she intends to teach classical interpretation. Among all the continental cities she has visited, Paris included, she professes to hold a special predilection for Vienna, where she was living when the famous Beethoven centenary was celebrated in 1927. Through the influence of Gruenberg, Miss Parker was granted the unique privilege of being allowed to hang out her plate in Berlin as a teacher, of music—a permission rarely allowed to foreigners. She also conducted classes in English language for Germans, and in German for Americans, and other foreigners to Berlin. "I am really delighted to be back," she declares, "and hope to give recitals in some of the capitals in the new year."85
  • 14 Dec 1930, THAT brilliant little pianist Rieke Parker has returned to Australia, after years of study in Berlin with Schnabel— one of the most famous of the world's living teachers — and is busy picking up threads again in her native city, Melbourne. Her mother (Mrs. Erskine Parker) has so many sisters and married daughters in Sydney — among the latter Mrs. Jack Mort and Mrs. Arthur du Boise — that she will probably remain here. She tells me of the wonderfully interesting international pension where her daughter and herself stayed in Berlin. No fewer than 14 languages were exchanged round bridge and dinner tables. Miss Rieke's German is so perfect that she was teaching it to the Germans themselves.86
  • 15 Jan 1931, RIEKE PARKER. "SEE deep enough and you see musically, the heart of nature being everywhere music, if you can only reach it."—Carlyle.
    Much the same belief as prompted Carlyle to write those lines must, I think, have been in Miss Parker's mind during the four years she has just spent in Europe. She went to Germany to study music; and she did study music, very intensely and very successfully.
    But she studied a great many other things as well. She approached her music with awe and reverence, and realised that talent and hard work alone will never make an artist; that every real artist possesses that indefinable inner illumination which springs from a wide knowledge and deep understanding of life, clear keen vision and the ultimate simplicity of real culture. Without these things he cannot expand to his full growth or accomplish all that he was created capable of accomplishing.
    With this conviction in her mind she spent many profitable hours in picture galleries, museums, concert halls, opera houses, and theatres; she read great books, made friends with people of countless nationalities, and steeped her mind and soul in the beauties of Italy, Austria, Germany, and France. "Vienna is the most beautiful city I have ever seen," she said. "People say it has changed since the war, but I don't believe its spirit could ever change. Whatever happened to Vienna, its romantic, old-world, aristocratic personality would still cling to it." Vienna's history is more tragically romantic than that of any other city in Europe, but it has never lost its sense of humour; it remains, in spite of everything, warm-hearted, gay, and enchanting; its tragedies have left deep lines upon its face, but they have added depth and colour to its character. "The people are perfectly charming," Miss Parker said. Everybody says that. There seems to be no other word that will describe them; in fact, one writer says they are the only people on earth to whom the adjective "charming" is entirely appropriate. The towns of Southern Germany Miss Parker loved, and the Rhine meant something to her that words cannot describe. Its wisdom and serenity and solemn loveliness moved her so that she will always remember it, and always want to return to it. "One can learn a great many things from the Rhine," she said. She spoke about Cologne, with its lovely Cathedral springing into the sky, and Bonn, where she visited the house in which Beethoven was born. "Bonn is a most exquisite little University town, the loveliest of them all I think. The best families in Germany send their sons to the Bonn University, and the whole atmosphere of the place seems somehow redolent of culture and refinement." But it was in Berlin she really made her home. Most of her four years were spent there, and she speaks with grateful enthusiasm of the courtesy and warm kindness of its people. She lived at Fraulein Fink's Pension, where she had been before the war, and took up her studies under her former master, Georg Gruenberg. She thinks he is one of the finest piano teachers in the world. "He is a man of extraordinarily wide knowledge and deep culture, and he possesses that rare gift of being able to draw out the best that is in his pupils. Most famous teachers seem always to brand their pupils' work with something of themselves, but Gruenberg has an almost uncanny facility for discovering whatever there is of personality and individuality in each student and directing it into his playing. . . . With his assistance she was able to obtain a permit to teach music in Berlin—a permit that is seldom given to a foreigner! Miss Parker intends giving some recitals in Melbourne and Sydney before she settles down to serious teaching. ...... I think it was Hugh Walpole said, "Had I children, my utmost endeavours would be to make them musicians." Had I the same ambition, I think I would like to have my children taught by somebody who felt about music the way Rieke Parker feels, somebody who had had opportunities and experience similar to hers, providing, of course, they had profited by them as certainly as she has.
    [Illustrated]87
  • 7 May 1931, Miss Rieke Parker, the young Australian pianist, who has been studying music in Europe for some years, is to play Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto with Mr. Fritz Hart's orchestra at the Melbourne Town Hall next Saturday evening (May 9).88
  • 14 May 1931, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. Rieke Parker in Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto"
    TO many in the Town Hall last Saturday evening, the most interesting part of the interesting programme submitted by Mr. Fritz Hart and the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra for their first concert of the year was Rieke Parker's performance of Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto."
    Miss Parker has recently returned from Europe, and her audience was anxious to discover just how much she had benefited by her studies there. They were probably surprised at the improvement she showed,
    and at her masterly grasp of the difficult concerto. Feeling her way intelligently through the earlier parts of the first movement, she quickly made her audience aware that the work was not beyond her artistic, technical or intellectual gifts. Logically, inevitably, the meaning of the music piled up and up until, with the last note, it really delivered itself—a perfect whole. The score contains many varied themes, and each of them was handled with effect—dramatic strength in the first movement; elfin lightness and deep sympathy in the plaintive, spiritual adagio; and understanding of the many moods in the Rondo.
    Study and hard work have developed Rieke Parker's personality and cultivated her historic sense. There is a certain originality in her interpretation, but she is definitely no radical.
    One feels that she is a classicist to the core. One feels, too, that she listens in the music for the composer's thoughts, and not for those of brilliant virtuosi.
    The Orchestra played conscientiously but a trifle perfunctorily. The concerto contains fascinating details of orchestration, but its performance was a little too colourless, a little too white. The orchestra showed to better advantage in the lovely Haffner symphony. Fritz Hart is a Mozart enthusiast and he seems to have instilled into his players a real love of that exquisite music. They exulted in the rich splendour of the "Haffner," in its purity and clear-cut delicacy. Genuine enthusiasm was accorded Mr. Fritz Hart's Orchestral fantasy, "Shenandoah," based on the old sea shanty. The composer took full advantage of the scope offered him for bright colour effects, and his free harmonies were cleverly interwoven with melodic variations on the original theme. The work was brilliantly performed and generously applauded. Of the rest of the programme, which contained a very early work of Mendelssohn, the overture to "Son and Stranger"; Bizet's "Arlesienne Suite"; and the ever popular Air for Strings from Bach's Suite in D, the latter was undoubtedly the most polished performance. The whole programme was up to Mr. Fritz Hart's usual excellent, standard. Melbourne music lovers dearly hope that these orchestral concerts will be continued throughout the winter. If the audiences continue as large as they were last Saturday night there should be no difficulty from the box-office side—even with the astonishingly low prices.89
  • 8 Sep 1931, The Rieke Parker Trio.
    Miss Gretchcn Schieblich, violinist (left), Miss Rieke Parker, pianist (centre), and Miss Joan Howley, cellist, who will appear as the Rieke Parker Trio at a recital in the Assembly Hall on September 19, at 8 p.m. This will be Miss Parker's first appearance since her return from Europe.90
  • 10 Sep 1931, RIEKE PARKER TRIO.
    ANOTHER interesting recital of chamber music is fixed for September 19, also at the Assembly Hall. This is Miss Rieke Parker's Trio. Miss Parker has been heard only once since she returned from Europe, and admirers of her work anxious ly awaiting her next appearance. She will play the piano part in the trio, and Miss Gretchen Schieblich, who has just returned from her studies in ... and Berlin, is to be the violinist; the cello will be played by Miss Joan Howley. an English artist. Daily rehearsal has brought the concerted work of these gifted musicians to a very high standard ..., and they have chosen three lovely trios by Beethoven, Schubert, and Tschaikowsky.
    [Illustrated]91
  • 15 Mar 1934, ABBOTSFORD CONVENT SUCCESSES. Music Pupils Win Exhibitions.
    Miss Marjorie Summers, aged 14 years, the brilliant little student of the Abbotsford Sisters, who won the £25 exhibition for highest marks in the L.A.B. examinations in Victoria for 1933, has now added to her laurels by securing the £100 scholarship at the University Conservatorium, where she is now studying under Miss Rieke Parker, for her Mus. Bac. degree. Miss Molly Nichols, also a pupil at Abbotsford, and daughter of Mr. G. Nichols, of Alans, won the exhibition (with another student) for highest marks in Grade IV., University, 1933.92
  • 10 Aug 1935, Composer Remembers Her Own Land
    THOUGH she lives in London, Katherine Parker, the Tasmanian composer, has her own way of bringing her homeland to mind. She was born at Park Nook, near Longford, Tasmania, and "Down Longford Way," well known as a piano solo, had its premiere as a symphony at a recent concert given by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra.
    Miss Parker is best known for her songs, in some of which she has set old Chinese poetry to music. Twenty two years have passed since she left Australia, but many music-lovers at the concert remembered that twelve years ago she and her husband, Hubert Eisdell, the famous tenor, made a concert tour of Australia.
    Katherine Parker is a sister of pianist Rieke Parker, who, since her return from Germany four years ago, has become one of the best-known teachers in Melbourne.93
  • 20 Dec 1951, MRS. HUBERT EISDEL is flying to Melbourne to-day for a three weeks' holiday on the mainland. After five days at the Windsor Hotel, she will motor to the Dandenongs to spend two weeks with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Clive Dunham.94

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  89. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), Thu 14 May 1931, p19
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article171679036
  90. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 8 Sep 1931, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article242958919
  91. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), Thu 10 Sep 1931, p28
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article171682353
  92. [S14] Newspaper - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), Thu 15 Mar 1934, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article171807174
  93. [S14] Newspaper - The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), Sat 10 Aug 1935, p21
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47480618
  94. [S14] Newspaper - Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954), Thu 20 Dec 1951, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52841584
Last Edited16 Sep 2019

Erskine James Rainey Parker

M, #22883, b. 10 Oct 1857, d. 29 Dec 1919
Birth*10 Oct 1857 Campbell Town, TAS, Australia. [par Charles Allan PARKER & Elizabeth Jemima RAINEY]1 
Marriage*7 Dec 1880 Spouse: Florence Agnes Leary. Campelltown, NSW, Australia, #M2956.2
 
Marriage-Notice*18 Dec 1880PARKER — LEARY. — December 7, by special license, at Campbelltown, by the Rev. Monsignor Lynch, Erkine James Ramy, eldest son of C. A. Parker, of Parkwood, Tasmania, to Florence Agnes, second daughter of Joseph Leary, solicitor, Sydney.3 
Death*29 Dec 1919 Launceston, TAS, Australia. 
Death-Notice30 Dec 1919PARKER.—On the 29th December, at his residence, 171 St. John-street, Erskine James Rainy, beloved husband of Florence, and eldest son of the late Charles Allan and Elizabeth Parker, of "Parknook," Lake River, aged 60 years. R.I.P.
Friends of the late Mr. Erskine Parker are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, Carr Villa Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to leave his late residence, 171 St. John-street, to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at 2 o'clock.4 
Death-Notice*5 Feb 1920PARKER.—On the 29th December, at his residence, 171 St. John street, Launceston, Tasmania, Erskine James Parker.5 

Grave

  • Launceston, TAS, Australia, Erskine James Rainy Parker

    Carr Villa Memorial Cemetery Launceston6

Family

Florence Agnes Leary b. 24 Jan 1859, d. 27 Jul 1949
Child 1.Florence Carmel Rieke Parker+ b. Jul 1893, d. May 1977

Newspaper-Articles

  • 2 Jan 1884, A very sad loss has occurred to Erskine Parker, Esq., of Parknook. The barn and ten bales wool have been destroyed by fire. The racehorse Quilp, which only came home last evening, is severely burnt, and not expected to recover. A telegram was sent to Launceston for a veterinary surgeon, but I have not heard whether one arrived, and now "your own" may be forgiven for any little offence he may have caused to the over sensitive, and he wishes you, and all who may feel interested enough to read the Cressy Notes, a very happy New Year.
    January 1.7
  • 2 Jan 1884, COUNTRY NEWS. CRESSY. (From our own Correspondent.)
    A report has just come to hand that Mr Erskine Parker's, of Parkwood, wool shed, 10 bales of wool, and a valuable horse — Quilp — have been destroyed by fire. The horse is not dead, but is very badly burnt, and a veterinary surgeon has been sent for.
    No further particulars have been received here.
    1 p.m. 1st January.8
  • 31 May 1890, Sporting Brevities.
    Mr Erskine Parker has bought Sir Wilfred's dam, and has mated her with Townley.9
  • 16 Aug 1890, Sudden Death. — Our Cressy correspondent reported on Thursday:— An old man who for many years had been in the employ of Mr Parker's family was found dead in a hut on a back part of the estate of Parknook. It was not considered necessary to hold an enquiry as to the cause of death, and his remains will be interred in the Cressy Cemetery to-morrow (Friday).10
  • 24 Dec 1890, Erskine James Rainy Parker, of Parknook, sheep dealer, to-day filed his petition in bankruptcy, the debtor estimating his liabilities at £8000.11
  • 17 Jan 1891, COMMERCIAL.
    A meeting of creditors in the estate of Erskine James R. Parker, sheep farmer, of Parknook, was held at the oflice of Messrs Douglas and Collins, solicitors, yesterday afternoon, Mr C. H. Smith in the chair. The debtor's statement showed the liabilities to be £25,255 14s 7d, and the assets £4804. It was resolved to wind up the estate in liquidation, and Mr J. J. Rumpff was appointed trustee. It was also resolved to grant the debtor a certificate of discharge.12
  • 22 Jan 1891, Legal. IN THE BANKRUPTCY COURT, LAUNCESTON.
    In the matter of a special resolution for liquidation by arrangement of the affairs of Erskine James Rainy Parker, of Parknook, in Tasmania. Sheep Farmer.
    Justus Jacob Rumpff, of Launceston, in Tasmania, Accountant, has been appointed Trustee under liquidation by arrangement.
    All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the said Erskine James Rainy Parker must deliver them to the Trustee, and all debts due to the said Erskine James Rainy Parker must be paid to the Trustee.
    Creditors who have not yet proved their debts must forward their proofs of debt to the Trustee.
    Dated this seventeenth day of January, 1891.
    Will. Hunt. Registrar.
    Douglas and Collins, Solicitors, Launceston.
    ---
    IN THE BANKRUPTCY COURT, LAUNCESTON.
    In the matter of a special resolution for liquidation by arrangement of the affairs of ERSKINE JAMES RAINY PARKER, of Parknook, in Tasmania, sheep Farmer.
    A Certificate of Discharge has been granted to Erskine James Rainy Parker, of Parknook, in Tasmania, Sheep farmer, who filed his petition under sections 112 and 113 of the Bankruptcy Act, 1870, on the twenty-third day of December, one thousand eight hundred and ninety.
    Dated this seventeenth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and ninety one.
    WILL. HUNT, Registrar Solicitors, Launceston13
  • 30 Jul 1892, Quilp (a son of the horse of the same name bred by Mr C. M. Lloyd, and afterwards owned by Mr Erskine Parker, and who with his death in a fire which took place at Parknook about three or four years ago) was somewhat of a lucky winner in the Maiden Hurdle, and paid a £79 dividend, the second highest that has been paid in Tasmania.14
  • 23 Jan 1893, WESTBURY. At the police-office yesterday the adjourned hearing of an information under the Rabbit Act against Erskine J. R. Parker was resumed before Messrs D. Burke (Warden) and C. W. Allen, J.P. From the evidence given it appears that in July last Mrs Hopkins and sons, the occupiers of Sillwood, or, as is locally known, Ashburner's Forest, sub-let the property to the defendant Parker subject to certain conditions. On August 26 the inspector served Parker with notice, and wrote him a few days later, requesting him to lay poison. Defendant replied promising that it should be done. In November the land was inspected, and an information followed, the inspector making a fairly strong case of non-compliance with the act. The defendant pleaded that he was not the legal occupier.
    Witnesses were summoned, the first being Joseph Hopkins, who had informed the plaintiff by letter that defendant took possession of the run in July. He afterwards in evidence qualified this by saying that it was in the early part of August that Parker took possession. Hon. Thomas Reibey, M.H.A., agent for the property, deposed that Hopkins and sons were still the tenants as far as he was concerned; that whatever arrangements may have been made to sub-let to defendant Hopkins and sons were responsible for the rent. Benjamin Smith, shepherd, said Hopkins paid his wages up to August 1; that defendant allowed him rations during the month of August to kill rabbits; that Hopkins's stock were cleared in August, though some remained until October; that defendant's stock were placed on the run in September. The bench held that Mrs Hopkins and her sons were the occupiers, and that Mr Parker was not therefore liable, and they dismissed the case, each party to pay his own costs. The defendant applied for costs, but the magistrates said they did not think they could award them.
    Jan. 21.15
  • 4 Feb 1893, SPORTING.
    The sporting world of Tasmania has just lost a splendid brood mare in Oars, belonging to Mr Erskine Parker. The mare died on Wednesday evening last before Mr Samuel Durham, M.R.C.V.S., who had been summoned, arrived, but on the following morning he made a post mortem examination, and found the cause of death to be enteritis (inflammation of the intestines), probably the result of eating briars. The post mortem also revealed the fact that she was in foal to Townley, Mr Parker's well known stud horse, and the loss will be a severe one. Oars, which was the dam of Mebeleck and Nepean, both good horses now racing, was by Gondolier from Obscurity.16
  • 21 Mar 1893, FRIDAY, MARCH 24. CLEARING SALE, W. T. BELL AND CO., LIMITED, are instructed by Mr Erskine Parker to sell at Coronea, Hadspen, on Friday, 24th March, at 12 o'clock,
    500 STUD SHEEP, BRED FROM BELLE VUE STOCK
    50 HORSES — THOROUGHBREDS, HACKS, AND HARNESS
    Farming implements.
    Further particulars future issue.17
  • 18 Aug 1893, WAGES Due.—Benjamin Smith, shepherd and manager of the Silwood Forest run, near Westbury, and owned by Mr. Erskine Parker, sued that gentleman for having on August 12 failed to pay to him the sum of £27 17s for wages due. Mr E. G. Miller appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr F. C. Hobkirk for the defendant. The defendant was engaged on August 1, 1892, at a salary of £40 per year with rations. This agreement was carried out for about six months, and then Mr Parker left off supplying rations and paying wages. Plaintiff had been coming into town for the past two months to Mr. Parker for the money owing to him, but could never get it. The bench ordered the defendant to pay Smith the sum of £21 12s, the actual amount due.18
  • 22 Mar 1894, FRIDAY, MARCH 24. Clearing-out Sale.
    W. T. BELL AND CO. LIMITED are instructed by Mr Erskin Parker to sell at Coronen, Hadspen, on Friday, 24th inst., at 12 o'clock,
    250 pure stud ewes, bred from Bellevue ewes 2, 4, 6, and full mouthed, due August, mostly to King John
    80 pure ewe lambs by King John, Steiger, and German ram
    1 stud ram, King John, 1st prize 2 tooth at Longford show, 1892, by son of The Owl (bred by David Taylor, Esq)
    20 pure ram lambs by King John, Steiger, and German
    20 pure 2-tooth rams by (son of The Owl) German and Ripper
    50 wether lambs
    60 mixed sheep
    HORSES.
    Imported blood stallion Townley, by Goldsbrough
    Blood stallion Blue Gown, by Astronomer, dam Bonnie Blue
    Bay colt The Glen, by Astronomer, dam Iris, by Townley, etc, engaged in V.R.C. Derby, 1893
    Bay mare Praimaydinna, by Astronomer, dam Ringtail
    Grey mare Corinna, by Quilp, dam Josephine, good jumper
    Bay mare, Astron, by Astronomer, dam Florence
    Chestnut mars Iris, by Astronomer, mad Emma (half-sister to Chandler)
    Chestnut gelding Tranby, by Astronomer, dam Selma (half-sister to Flashlight)
    Bay mare Solution, by Euclid (imp.), dam Florence
    Bay mare Fear, by Euclid (imp.); dam Cotherstone mare
    Black mare Natone, by Astronomer, dam Iris
    Brown colt by Astronomer, dam Mazurka
    Bay gelding by Townley, dam The Witch
    Bay filly, Madge, by Astronomer, dam Oars, in T.R.C. Derby, '93
    Black filly Runeka, by Townley, dam Iris
    Bay colt Aster, by Townley, dam Mizpah, 18 1, suitable for pony racing
    Bay mare Mizpah, by St. Albans, bred by John Field, Esq., dam Bay Middleton mare, etc, stinted to Townley
    Bay mare Selma, by Napoleon, dam Queen Anne, dam of Flashlight, foal at foot by Townley
    Brown mare Pinafore, good hack and harness mare, splendid jumper
    Grey horse by Quilp, good in saddle and harness
    Black cart mare, splendid worker and quiet
    Grey cart ditto, ditto ditto ditto, foal at foot
    8 good cows, good milkers, calve in good time
    3 quiet heifers, Hereford bull, 6 yearlings, 9 calves
    2 good wagons, dray, disc harrow, double and single ploughs, breaking down harrows, light ditto, Lion wool press, nearly new; mowing machine, several sets of cart harness, plough ditto, whipple trees, lot of light collars, wirenetting, droppers, tools, and sundries too numerous to mention,
    50 new hurdles, sheep crates, feeding racks.
    Luncheon provided.19
  • 21 Oct 1896, SHIPPING Inwards.
    Oct. 20.-Coogee, s., 1000 tons, Captain F. Carrington, from Melbourne. Saloon passengers--Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Parker and child;20
  • 17 Feb 1898, From reports to hand, it is learned that much damage was done to fencing and grass on the Connorville estate. It is stated that all the grass reserved for winter use was totally destroyed. On Tuesday night a more than usually large fire was observed, burning on the Tier, apparently at the back of Parknook, but no news has been received of any damage being done.21
  • 10 Sep 1898, Mr. Erskine J. Parker, the newly appointed handicapper to the Tasmanian Turf Club, has had a long experience with horses, and has been a keen sportsman the greater part of his life. He has owned some good animals, and is an excellent judge of form. Mr. Parker's experience should stand him in good steed in his new position. His father, the late Mr. Charles Parker, was in his day one of the most respected and most popular supporters of racing in Tasmania.22
  • 16 Mar 1899, WHEAT wanted. Erskine Parker, Agent Goldsbrough, Mort, and, Co., L'ton.23

Citations

  1. [S64] Archives Office of Tasmania. BDM Index Tasmania.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), Sat 18 Dec 1880, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133486751
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954), Tue 30 Dec 1919, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51067507
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thu 5 Feb 1920, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1676060
  6. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Nobes (Lauretta333).
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Wed 2 Jan 1884, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90551504
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Wed 2 Jan 1884, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149433107
  9. [S14] Newspaper - The Colonist (Launceston, Tas. : 1888 - 1891), Sat 31 May 1890, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200361702
  10. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Sat 16 Aug 1890, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150350606
  11. [S14] Newspaper - Tasmanian News (Hobart, Tas. : 1883 - 1911), Wed 24 Dec 1890, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163584225
  12. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Sat 17 Jan 1891, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39562199
  13. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Thu 22 Jan 1891, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150356604
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Sat 30 Jul 1892, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153229219
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Mon 23 Jan 1893, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90218623
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Sat 4 Feb 1893, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90216028
  17. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Tue 21 Mar 1893, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153374485
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Fri 18 Aug 1893, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39485836
  19. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Wed 22 Mar 1893, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90221262
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Wed 21 Oct 1896, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91153908
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thu 17 Feb 1898, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39658795
  22. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Sat 10 Sep 1898, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39777427
  23. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thu 16 Mar 1899, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39797671
Last Edited5 Sep 2019

Florence Agnes Leary

F, #22884, b. 24 Jan 1859, d. 27 Jul 1949
Father*Joseph Leary b. 7 Oct 1831, d. 20 Oct 1881
Mother*Catherine A Keighran b. 1832, d. 1 Aug 1915
Married NameParker. 
Birth*24 Jan 1859 Campbelltown, NSW, Australia, #B6408/1859.1 
Birth-Notice*26 Jan 1859On the 24th instant, at her residence, near Campbelltown, Mrs. Joseph Leary, of a daughter.2 
Marriage*7 Dec 1880 Spouse: Erskine James Rainey Parker. Campelltown, NSW, Australia, #M2956.1
 
Marriage-Notice*18 Dec 1880PARKER — LEARY. — December 7, by special license, at Campbelltown, by the Rev. Monsignor Lynch, Erkine James Ramy, eldest son of C. A. Parker, of Parkwood, Tasmania, to Florence Agnes, second daughter of Joseph Leary, solicitor, Sydney.3 
Widow29 Dec 1919Florence Agnes Leary became a widow upon the death of her husband Erskine James Rainey Parker
Death*27 Jul 1949 Woolahra, NSW, Australia. 
Death-Notice*28 Jul 1949PARKER, Florence Agnes.–July 27, 1949, at her residence, 294 Jersey Road, Woollahra, widow of Erskine James Rainey Parker, late of Launceston, Tas. R.I.P.4 

Family

Erskine James Rainey Parker b. 10 Oct 1857, d. 29 Dec 1919
Child 1.Florence Carmel Rieke Parker+ b. Jul 1893, d. May 1977

Newspaper-Articles

  • 12 Apr 1892, SERIOUS ACCIDENT.
    Yesterday morning a cab accident occurred which resulted in a lady sustaining serious injuries. Mrs. Leary, of Sydney, a sister-in-law of Mrs. Erskine Parker, with whom she had been staying at Parknook, Lake River, arrived by the 9.40 train, and had engaged a cab for the purpose of being conveyed to the ss. Corinna on her return. With her was her infant child, aged about six months. The cabman, J. Wenn always considered a very cautious driver, had left the vehicle for a moment for the purpose of conveying a portmanteau from the platform when something startled the horses, and they at once started out of the yard and bolted up Tamar-street. The animals turned the corner into Brisbane road continuing their rapid pace, the unfortunate lady with heartrending cries calling upon the people to save her and her child. When nearly opposite the mile post near Hawthorn (Mr. Frank Hart's) Mrs. Leary attempted to alight, in doing which she and the child fell. They were taken to Mr. O. G. Douglas' house, Dr. Holmes being quickly in attendance. While the child escaped unhurt, the doctor considers the case of Mrs. Leary a very serious one, and late last night was disinclined to give a decided opinion, preferring to wait until to-day. It is believed the skull is injured, but to what extent is not at present ascertained. The horses were not stopped till they parted from the cab, which took place opposite the Newstead Inn, where in rounding the corner the front wheels came away from the body.5
  • 7 Sep 1895, MRS ERSKINE PARKER will receive pupils at Messrs. A . W. Birchall and Sons' on Tuesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays6
  • 20 Nov 1895, MRS ERSKINE PARKER'S CONCERT.
    There was a good house at the Mechanics' Institute last evening on the occasion of Mrs Erskine Parker's concert, and the entertainment provided was most enjoyable throughout. It was commenced with the violin trio "Three merry fiddlers" (Fowler), by Misses S. Griffiths and J. Collins and Mr E. Parker, and the composition was heard with much pleasure. Mr R. A. M'Eachern pleased the audience with his rendering of Denza's song "Star of my heart," so well that he had to respond to an encore. He then sang Scott Gatty's "Over the hills and far away." "All the world" (Hope Temple) as rendered by Miss Leary was a pleasing item, and the audience persisted in her reappearance.
    Her second effort, "Rosette," was sung with much sweetness. In the second part Miss Leary sang Goring Thomas's "A summer night," and in response to an encore gave "The yeoman of the guard." Dr. Anderson sang "Qui Vive" with taste and finish, and also gave "Father O'Flynn" in such a pleasing manner as to create a desire for a replica, the request for which he acceded to Miss Wilmore was in excellent voice and her rendering of "O promise me" and "The Creole's love song" was admirable, the singer conveying expression and sweetness to her interpretation of each composition. Mr Charles Hammond sang "Tommy Atkins" and secured an encore. Mr W. H. Savigny sang Corney Grain's "Our daughters" and "Come along," for both of which he was encored, his replies being "Get along, Sambo," and a song that gave an enjoyable finish to the concert. Mrs Erskine Parker sang "Parted for aye" in such a manner as to gain the approval of the audience, and the applause was so loud and continuous that the singer was compelled to respond. She then gave a very sweet and sympathetic rendering of "Crossing the bar." Miss Cissie Griffiths, a violinist who has evidently devoted much time to the study of the most difficult of instruments, played an intermezzio with precision, delicacy, and sustained expression. Her performance was so greatly admired that the demand for an encore was unanimous. Mrs Erskine Parker, besides playing the accompaniments with Miss K. Richardson, played a pianoforte solo, "Rhapsodie," and an encore piece, and her performances contributed greatly to the pleasure of the evening. The concert was a musical treat, and the audience spent a very pleasant evening.7
  • 13 Oct 1898, MRS. ERSKINE PARKER RESUMES MUSICAL TUITION, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14.8
  • 20 Jul 1899, MRS. ERSKINE PARKER Resumes Musical Tuition TUESDAY, 25th JULY, At Messrs. A. W. Birchall and Sons.9

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wed 26 Jan 1859, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13010568
  3. [S14] Newspaper - Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), Sat 18 Dec 1880, p11
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133486751
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thu 28 Jul 1949, p12
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18123764
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Tue 12 Apr 1892, p3
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153229934
  6. [S14] Newspaper - Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Sat 7 Sep 1895, p8
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article153466295
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Wed 20 Nov 1895, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39620980
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thu 13 Oct 1898, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39780915
  9. [S14] Newspaper - Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thu 20 Jul 1899, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40097384
Last Edited3 Sep 2019
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.